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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V28 | by Thomas Meehan



The dotting style of planting trees is cold as well as meager; nevertheless it has its uses; it shows what individual plants can become under difficulties. It also brings individual specimens and species into the sharpest contrast. It has also enabled cultivators to grow the largest number of species and varieties within a given area. Useful as a school in which something may be learned about trees, it is worse than useless as a means of improving landscape effects; nay, more, the dotting plan mars every landscape on which it is practiced. What play of light, or shadow, or repose, could be obtained by a series of dots, even though they consisted of trees faultless in form and symmetry?

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V28
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1886
Copyright1886, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January. Number 325. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
A correspondent calls our attention to an article in the Garden of London, to some capital hints on planting trees and shrubs. They are so exactly in accord with our own teachings, and so timely, that...
-Communications. Crocking Or Draining Pots
Whenever a man sets out to instruct his fellows, in gardening or anything else, if he fail to practice as he preaches then he is certainly deserving of the sharpest criticism; so that your corresponde...
-Inequalities In Lawns
In the Gardeners' Monthly for November 1885, under the heading of Seasonable Hints, page 323, I noticed an item on filling in inequalities on lawns. I do not desire to be critical, so I trust you wi...
-My Experience With Southern Grown Roses
Having for the last eight years purchased from florists in Savannah, Ga from five to ten thousand Hybrid Perpetual roses every fall, would state that I have had as good results with them as wit...
-How To Grow Sweet Peas
Plant very early in the spring, or as soon as the frost will allow of spading the ground four inches deep, (the depth they should be planted) or deeper if the soil is light. Don't wait for fair weathe...
-A New Pitcher Plant, Sarracenia Courtii
In the old world, where people study to get as much pleasure out of their gardens as possible, they take special pains to suit the cultural conditions to the wants of the plant. If in our country we w...
-Bourbon Rose, Madame Pierre Oger
Bourbon roses, not having the odor so popular with cut-flower folk, are yet among the most desirable for out-door decoration. No one would want to be without the Hermosa, though it might not be as fra...
-Ivy On Trees
Ivy or any vine that runs perpendicularly up a tree does not injure it, unless branches from the vine extend along the branches, and by its mass of leaves smother the leaves of the tree. Vines like Wi...
-Linden Arches
H. L. Boston, Mass., writes: I have read several pieces in your Monthly about hedges with wire fences, and I want very much to know if you have ever made a pleached alley, and if so, whether you us...
-The Basket Or Bagworm
G. W. D., Baltimore, says: In your general remarks in November number of Gardeners' Monthly, you speak among other things of the 'bagworm' plague. Although I have them picked off every summer from ...
-The Elm Beetle
Mrs. M. C. B., Yonkers, N. Y., writes: I wish to ask you if there is any way to destroy the worm that eats the leaves of the elm, or if there is anything that could be put round the tree to prevent...
-January. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
A lady wants to know whether there is any use in watering plants in windows with warm water. She thinks there is, but a neighboring florist tells her that is all nonsense. He waters fresh from the ...
-Communications. Phajus Grandifolius
How often one meets this old but useful subject eking out an existence under conditions so unsuited to its needs, that it is never able to reward the owner with a single spike of its lovely blossoms. ...
-Ismene Amanccesisa
The Narcissus flowered Ismene, I. Amancoesisa, rare and very beautiful bulbous perennial plant, belonging to the natural order Amaryllidaceae. It has an egg shaped bulb from which some three or more b...
-Something Worth Seeing - Sturte-Vant's Water Plants
At the suggestion of one whose ripened experience in matters floricultural, seldom errs, I took a trip to Bordentown, N. J., on September 3rd, 1885, to see something worth seeing. Alighting from an ...
-Something Worth Seeing - Sturte-Vant's Water Plants. Continued
The next in order was to view the majestic Victoria regina, which mainly occupied another large tank, and of which it is truly said, this great Water Lily of the Amazon is the grandest of all aquatic...
-Steam Heating A Success
It appears to be a weakness with a good many florists to multiply the number of feet of glass they own, especially when bringing themselves before their brother florists. E. Hippard's greenhouses as d...
-Fire Heat And Plants
Although I write from a climate putting a severe test on fire heat in its relation to plants, owing to the long duration of its winters, some of my remarks may apply to those more favorably situated t...
-Insect On Smilax
A correspondent from Allegheny, Pa., sent us some insects a few months ago, which in a note in the Monthly we said might be the ordinary Black fly or Aphis of greenhouses. There were only a few, and f...
-Variety Of Farfugium
Mr. R. L. Blair, Des Moines, Iowa, writes: In the August Monthly, you say Farfugium grande is the only variety worthy of cultivation. I send you by mail to-day a box of leaves from a variety I have, ...
-A Rose That Will Not Flower
J. H., Ardmore, Pa., writes: I have had a Reina Maria Henrietta growing upon a rafter in my greenhouse for three years and it has not yet bloomed. I pruned it the first year, and the second year I ...
-January. Fruit And Vegetabie Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The people who garden simply to get something to eat, in most cases will do better by buying what they want from some pedlar, in market, or some other place; but most of cur readers have gardens and o...
-Communications. Western Pennsylvania Notes On Fruits
With the exception of peaches which were an entire failure, and some occasional apple orchards, the fruit season here has been a very favorable one both in respect to quantity and quality. In June and...
-Strawberries In Buckets
The New Haven News says: Portable strawberry beds are the latest in the long list of inventions of the nineteenth century, and in a few years every citizen who has a little patch of garden, or a s...
-Meech's Prolific Quince
It has become the fashion of late years for some one who knows to see nothing but old kinds of fruits in popular new varieties. Out of so many old forms disappearing, it would be remarkable if some of...
-Fruit Rooms
E. W. W. of Yantic, Conn., writes: I have been unable to find any published article on 'Fruit Rooms/and the generally accepted plan for preserving pears and grapes into the late fall or even winter...
-A Promising Seedling Peach
A Richmond, Va., correspondent says: Noticing your remarks on Mr. Shearer's 'Globe' peach, has inspired me to mention a seedling that I have, which might be judged by those capable of knowing, far su...
-Forestry. Communications. Tea Culture In The South
In one of last year's numbers of the Gardeners' Monthly, I gave an account of the success of our tea plants, which this autumn are profusely covered with bloom and buds. The bushes have much increased...
-The So-Called Hardy Catalpa
Under the above heading, the Monthly, in the number for December, at page 371, refers to a Bulletin (No. 7) of the Agricultural College of Michigan, which alleges that Catalpas, bignoni-oides and spec...
-Large Sassafras Trees
Some time since, Dr. G. L. Porter, of Bridgeport, informed me of a large tree of this species growing in the vicinity of that city. I have not seen this myself, but he visited and has kindly sent me t...
-The Hardy And The Tender Catalpas
Prof. Baily is catching it all round for his report on the hardiness of the two Catalpas, and it is even asserted that his plants are all of the one kind - C. speciosa. However, the trouble all arises...
-Amaryllis Treats
Who Has Amaryllis Treatae? In looking over the numbers of Harpers Monthly for 1877, I chanced upon what seemed to be Mrs. Treat's original description of the Amaryllis that bears her name. After de...
-Amaryllis (Zephyranthes) Atamasco Treatae, And Candida
Again and yet again the question of the difference of the above-named Amaryllis, comes under discussion. I have a genial adviser, who recently wrote me this sentence: Yes, write, but write what you k...
-Amaryllis Belladonna
This, one of the most beautiful of all the family, rarely blooms. We continually see plants without having seen a flower for years. A correspondent of the Garden tells how he treats it, and his experi...
-The Missouri Botanical Gardens
The eminently public spirited citizen of St. Louis, Mr. Henry Shaw, who proposes to give his celebrated Gardens to the city on his decease, for the enjoyment and instruction of the people for ever, ha...
-The Montreal Botanic Garden
A garden has been agitated since 1863. Since Prof. Pen-hallow has been Professor of Botany in the University, the project has taken shape, and seems now entirely successful. It embraces 77 acres; the ...
-"A. M.," Pittsburg, Pa
Away back in January, 1863, after participating in the battle of Fredericksburg and Burnside's 'Mud March,' the writer, along with the rest of the old Pennsylvania Reserves, went into camp at Belle P...
-Cattle Poisoning By Eupatorium Ageratoides
A travelling newspaper paragraph says that a horse disease known as trembles, was recently brought on in Ohio by colts eating this plant. As Eupatorium purpureum, the Joe Pye weed, is eaten by ...
-Fairy Rings
In the old world it is not uncommon to see circles of grass two or three feet in diameter, in pastures, with the grass wholly dead inside the circle. The children were taught as in old times they love...
-Fire Blight In The Pear
The December American Naturalist has a paper by Prof. J. C. Arthur, which is one of the most satisfactory we have read for a long time, and is well worthy of perusal by those interested in intelligent...
-Male And Female Flowers On The Gingko
The tree of Salisburia adiantifolia, the Maiden Hair or Gingko tree, which has fruited on the grounds of Charles Wister, in Germantown, the past few years, has been carefully watched this year, withou...
-Plant Life In The Arctics
During this short summer, the plant life of the Arctics grows very rapidly under the constant stimulus of an ever-shining sun; and before the snow is off the ground, flowers will be in bloom so near t...
-Hybridizing Indian Corn And Sorghum
A correspondent sends us the following as remarkable. It is from a communication by Dr. E. Bonavia, of Etawah, East Indies, to the London Gardeners' Chronicle, page 736 of last year: In the same y...
-Dryas Octopetela
H. Correvon, of Geneva, gives the Gardeners Chronicle the following in regard to this pretty alpine plant: This is one of the most graceful of the plants of the Alps. It is called ' Swiss Tea,' be...
-Grafting Hyacinth Bulbs
A correspondent from Lancaster, Pa., writes: A Philadelphia correspondent of your excellent Gardeners' Monthly desires to know whether he could take two crocus bulbs, yellow and purple, cut them in h...
-Twenty-Seventh Volume Of The Gardeners' Monthly
It is a great pleasure to feel, in closing our 27th and entering on our 28th volume, that in all these many years we are receiving the continued support of intelligent Horticulturists everywhere. Our ...
-The Seed Business In Philadelphia
The seed trade is said to be depressed, but there must be good life in it yet, judging by the magnificent building recently erected at 1711 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, for Wm. Henry Maule. It is 117...
-Ignorance Of Things Around Us
Mrs. Sarah K. Bolton says, in a very nice article on the Isle of Wight, in the Independent: We pass Steephill Castle, of which Joseph Paxton, who built the Crystal Palace, said: 'I have visited n...
-Seedling Chrysanthemums From Mr. Raw-Son
A very pretty bronzy yellow of the semi-double class, exhibited at the New York show, has been sent us by Mr. Rawson, of Elmira, N. Y. Mr. Rawson is a great lover of Chrysanthemums, and delights in ef...
-Punishment To Boys For Stealing Flowers
The London Gardeners' Magazine says : The stealing of a geranium, by a boy fourteen years of age, resulted in a sentence of ten days' imprisonment, pronounced by Mr. Barstow at the Clerkenwell Pol...
-Benedict Roezl
Few European botanical collectors have been better known in America than Mr. Roezl, who recently died in Austria in his 62d year. A large number of plants bear the name of Roezelii in his honor. The w...
-Moses Cole
The history of American gardening will some day be one of the interesting branches of general study, and it is well to place on record notes of the departure of those who have been instrumental in adv...
-Louis C. Lyte
Mr. Lyte was one of the oldest of Pennsylvania nurserymen, having been for many years the proprietor of the Smoketown nurseries, near the town of Bird-in-Hand, in Lancaster county. These were founded ...
-Report Of The Forestry Commission Of The State Of New York, Albany, 1885
In 1884, the New York Legislature appropriated $5,000 to be used by the State Controller in the employment of experts to report a system of Forestry. He selected Prof. Sargeant, D. Willis James, W. A....
-Transactions Of The Massachusetts Hor- Ticultural Society, 1885. Part 1
We must again congratulate this honorable Society on the excellence of its Transactions. As a general rule, the magazine and the newspaper have superseded society publication : and what is worth knowi...
-Pruning And Training Of The Vine
An address before the American Horticultural Society at New Orleans, by E. Williams, of Montclair, N. J. Our readers must not confound this with the American Pomological Society, though the titles ...
-Homes For Home Builders
By David W. King. New York: Orange Judd Company, 1886. This is a small octavo, 251 pages, furnishing designs and working plans for country people out of the reach of professional architects. Specif...
-Exhibitors And Premiums
Almost all our exhibitions suffer at times from the withdrawal of exhibitors whose presence is always welcome, who smart under a sense of injustice at the hands of the judges. On the other hand, it is...
-Exhibitors Of Chrysanthemums
A correspondent calls our attention to the exhibit of Chrysanthemums made by Mr. P. Conlin, gardener to P. Roberts, Jr., Esq., who took the first prize for the best 25, and second for the best 12, in ...
-The State Horticultural Association Of Pennsylvania
The annual meeting of this Society is always looked forward to by many, as one of great interest and pleasure. The endeavor has been, of late years, to embrace in its scope all lovers of gardening in ...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
A rose exhibition was held on the 8th of June, and an excellent display made. The first premium was awarded to H. A. Dreer, and the bronze medal to Mr. Hughes, gardener to George W. Childs, Esq. We...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Continued
Mr. W. H. Harris, first, for six Amaryllis. These were all of A. Johnsoni, in 8 inch pots, and had from two to four flowers on each scape. First for Lily of the Valley, Mr. A. Warne. These were in ...
-February. Number 326. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There can be no question about the great beauty to be derived from carpet bedding, when judiciously applied. The proviso is very essential, as misplaced beds, or wholly inappropriate designs are frequ...
-Communications. Trees And Hedges In Washington
In no city or town that I have visited are the street trees in as good condition as here. I do not exactly know who is responsible for this, but some one or other has something to be proud of. There a...
-A Beautiful Southern Native Vine, "Cocculus Carolinianus." By Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson
Extract from Peter Henderson's Hand-book of Plants : Cocculus Carolinus, derived from Kokkos, the systematic name of Cochineal, given to this genus because most of the species bear scarlet berri...
-Notes On The Parks And Gardens Of Chicago And St. Louis
Last summer (July, 1885) when I visited Chicago and St. Louis, I spent much time in looking through the parks and private plant-collections of these cities. The most attractive park of Chicago is Linc...
-February. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Look out for a good stock of bedding plants in time, by striking cuttings of such things as grow rapidly, and sowing seeds of such annuals as may be advanced to advantage. Fuchsias may now be readi...
-Ferns
Pteris argyrea, P.serrulata, Platycerium alcicorne, P. biforme, Polypodium aureum, Ne-phrolepis davallioides, N. exaltata, Onychium lucidium, Lomaria gibba, Microlepia hirta crista-ta, Gymnogramma chr...
-The Red Spider - So Called
At a meeting of the Society of Florists in Cincinnati one of the speakers is reported to have said, when the subject of plant enemies was under consideration, That it is customary to abuse and misus...
-Ranunculus And Their Culture Under Glass
Ranunculus comprises an extensive genus of herbaceous plants, giving name to the order Ranunculaceae, better known as the Buttercup - Crowfoot. In this order we have many other beautiful plants, such ...
-Variegata Ficus Repens
Last June, when visiting the Cambridge Botanic Gardens, Massachusetts, Mr. Manda, the Superintendent, showed me a sport of Ficus repens. It is beautifully variegated with white; not a dirty white as o...
-Notes From The White House At Washington
I was just in time a day or so ago at the White House conservatory to see President Cleveland. Not the President himself, but a beautiful chrysanthemum, pure white, raised by Hallock & Thorp, and name...
-Thunbergia Harrisii
Why do not more gardeners grow Thunbergia Harrisii? I think everyone will agree with me when I say it is the best stove climber there is. It always looks nice, even when not in flower; and at this tim...
-Fires And Steam Heating
Would it not be better, in giving number of feet heated, either by flue, hot water or steam, to have it always understood to be cubic feet? These can be readily ascertained, no matter what the shape...
-Notes On Orchids
Last spring some one wrote to the Gardeners' Monthly, concerning Cypripedium insigne having two flowers on one spike. This year we have two spikes of C. Spicereanum, and three spikes of C. Harrisianum...
-Lee, Mass. Bad Putty A Caution To Florists
During the month of September I built a carnation house 46x21 feet, and glazed it with 10x12 double-thick glass, put in the 12-inch way. The glass and putty I purchased in New York, of a firm who make...
-An Economical Plant House
I have increased my area of plant houses, and as economy was my very first consideration, I searched and read diligently every thing bearing upon that point. It is too soon to speak decidedly, but so ...
-Tea Roses, Paul Floret And Rosalie
For bedding purposes or as a pot plant I do not know of a more floriferous variety than Paul Floret. The flowers are large, full and very fragrant, produced generally singly on the end of every shoot;...
-Florists' Designs At State Fairs
At State Fairs the Fat Woman, Educated Hog, and similar monstrosities are the side issues that usually attract the multitude, and add to the totals of gate money. The London Gardeners' Chronicle...
-New Tea Roses Prom An English Stand Point
This is the view that a correspondent of the London Gardeners' Chronicle takes of new Tea Roses: During the last few years many new Tea roses have been introduced, but some of the best of the old v...
-Chrysanthemum, Mrs. J. B. Wilson
Mr. Walter Coles, Claymont, Del., writes: I have sent you to-day, per mail, one bloom of my new Chrysanthemum (Mrs. J. B. Wilson). Will you kindly give your opinion on it as to its merits in Gardener...
-New Tea Rose, "Moonlight"
We received recently a flower of a sport from Catharine Mermet. which was as large and perfect as the original, but of a soft subdued satiny tint that was neither white nor pink. There have been sever...
-Orchid Queries
J. R., New Bedford, Mass., writes : You will oblige me very much by letting me know through your journal if Cypri-pedium aucale has ever been crossed by any of the tropical varieties, if so, what a...
-February. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Nothing in gardening is so ill understood as pruning. Those who preach prune not at all. have no doubt seen some fearful illustrations of bad work. Those who advocate pruning whenever the knife is sha...
-Communications. Lime-Washing Fruit Trees
I have been a reader of the Gardeners' Monthly for many years and have often noted your advice to whitewash the stems of fruit trees. From other writers I have gathered the idea that whitewash close...
-February. Fruit And Floral Notes
I observe that you and your correspondents frequently have something to say about the peach curl. Allow me to contribute a little bit of my experience. Last year I bought of Ellwanger & Barry some ...
-Cleaning Scale From Fruit Trees
In our own practice we found nothing better than linseed oil for cleaning bark of scale, but some have complained that it killed their trees. Perhaps where there is this risk the following from the Ga...
-Pyrus Pollweriana
Every now and then we have references to this famous French pear, that is supposed to be not a pear, but a hybrid between the pear and some other genera; and the only reason for this supposition was t...
-The Bartlett Pear
The Editor has made a misstatement as to the Williams who introduced the Bartlett, or as it is in England, known as the Williams' Bonchretien. Mr. Hovey kindly corrects the error in the following note...
-Season Of Ripening Pears
An English grower of a hundred kinds, has been keeping careful record of exact ripenings, and of those well-known in our country, the Giffard was the earliest and Olivier des Sevres the latest. They r...
-Destruction Of Fruit By Bees
The San Bernandino (Cal.) Index says: The case of Randall and Noyes against Gus-tave Bohn, which was decided in Justice Knox's court yesterday, is probably without a parallel in the history of law...
-The Soulard Crab Apple
Vixen, Baltimore, seems mad, and wants to know : Can any one tell me whether in any single case, no matter how desperate, one solitary pleasure was ever derived from Soulard crab? The man that sta...
-February. Forestry. Editorial Notes
The Great Council Tree of the Senecas at Kanadesaga (Geneva), N. Y Nearly two miles northwesterly from the foot of Seneca lake. - On the Old Castle farm of Jerome Loomis, now owned and occupied...
-Scraps And Queries. Ginseng
H. H., Wilmington, Del., asks: Will you please inform me, if you can, in the next Gardeners' Monthly, where plants of Panax quinquefolium (or Ginseng), can be purchased. It is a hardy herbaceous pl...
-Plnus Ponderosa Of The Rocky Mountains
- S. B. H., Gordon, Sheridan Co., Neb. By mail to day I send you cone, seed, twig, sap wood from live tree, and heart wood from dead tree, of a variety of pine that is indigenous here. The tree gro...
-Value Of The Pecan Nut
Walnut Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, writes: I think the flavor of the pecan nut, far superior to that of our English walnut. The only defect is the small size, and extra trouble in getting the pecan mea...
-Rocky Mountain Echoes
Since coming to Colorado, I have had a little experience that is new to me, and that puzzles me not a little. When I came here I brought some onions of the common button variety, that had for a num...
-The Wild Plants Of Texas
In one of the last numbers of the Gardeners' Monthly appeared an article on the wild plants of South Carolina, by Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson, which the writer of this read with much interest, and at the sa...
-The Wild Plants Of Texas. Part 2
But we will return to our first place. Also along the foot of the mountain and among rocks we find during the summer months alow growing shrubby plant of the order Malvaceae. It has flowers from 1 to ...
-The Wild Plants Of Texas. Part 3
On our way homeward we notice a bulb, or rather its leaves, in many places. The leaves are bluish, flat, two-ranked and the bulb large, nearly as large as the bulb of an Amaryllis. In summer, after a ...
-The Wild Plants Of Texas. Part 4
Ascending one of the mountain ridges that line the canon on both sides, we find on the very top in dry black waxy soil, a beautiful herbaceous perennial with dark green leaves, scabrous or rough to th...
-Fire Blight In Pears
The December Monthly contains a statement that my work of the last two years has not been with the true, deadly fire blight, which fruit growers so much dread. It was, however, set right in the foll...
-Cause Of Astringency In The Pear
Just why some pears are astringent in some localities and not in others, has never been carefully developed, that we know of. Under the head of Glout Morceau, Downing says: sometimes astringent in he...
-Plnus Ponderosa, Var. Scopulorum
Mr. S. B. Higgins, of Gordon, Nebraska, sends us specimens for name, of a pine, native to that locality, which proves to be this species. We gave him the name, and he inquires, Is the Pinus ponderosa...
-Literature. Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. A Chapter In The Secret History Of The Gloxinia
The discovery of Gloxinia rubra, and its subsequent history, may possess some little interest to horticulturists, about which there has long hung a mystery. During the latter part of the year 1838,...
-Hardy Varieties
It is beginning to be well understood by fruit growers that hardiness as a character for a fruit, has a very uncertain meaning if taken in an absolute sense. A variety that is hardy enough when it f...
-The Florists' Smilax
This pretty plant, botanically Myrsiphyllum asparagoides, had too long a name for familiar use, so the florists took to calling it Smilax. The leaves do look a little like a Smilax, though of course i...
-Reverend Moses D. Curtis
To our readers Dr. Curtis is probably best known by his little book, The Woody Plants of North Carolina, which was first issued in 1860. Dr. Curtis died in 1872, but no extended account of his botan...
-Orchid Grower's Manual - Sixth Edition
By B. S. Williams, London. Published by the author. One of the best proofs that orchid growing has taken deep hold on the flower loving community, is the appearance of a sixth edition of a large an...
-The Vegetable Garden
By M. M. Vil-morin - Andrieux of Paris. Translated into English. Edited by Wm. Robinson, Editor of the Garden, London. Published by John Murray, 1885. Mr. Robinson in the preface to this superb boo...
-The Art Of Beautifying Suburban Home Grounds
By Frank J. Scott. John B. Alden, New York. If the wish is ever father to the thought, we must take credit for the appearance of this beautiful work, the suspension of the publication of which by t...
-Gray's Botanical Text-Book. Vol. II. Physiological Botany
By Dr. George Lincoln Goodale. New York: Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Co. 1885. When we read of Dr. Asa Gray, we think of him as we all know him, an active man, busily engaged in work, and accomplish...
-Horticultural Art Journal
Mensing & Stecher, Rochester, N. Y. This new candidate for popular favor proposes to disseminate by means of colored lithographic plates, correct representations of new productions of the nursery, see...
-Plum And Cherry Seasons
A correspondent sends us the following : In the southern counties of England there is a familiar proverb : 'A Cherry year a merry year; A plum year a dumb year.' Which is explained in the Journ...
-Mr. N. B. Stoever
Mr. F. W. Beach, of Richmond, Indiana, writes that he understands Ohioan as casting doubts on Mr. Stoever's truth and accuracy. He knows Mr. Stoever personally, and is sure he could not intentiona...
-Distributing Government Seeds
W. C. B., West Philadelphia, well remarks: We think Commissioner Colman makes a just complaint about the arrangement of the Department of Agriculture in its distribution of seeds. Two-thirds of the...
-Sunday Work Connected With Gardening
J. B., Fredericton, New Brunswick, calls attention to the large amount of wholly unnecessary work often desired by employers of gardeners on Sunday, in Canada and in the United States. It is undo...
-The Willow Oak
L.: Can you tell me why the Willow oak is called Quercus Phellos? My dictionary tells me 'phellos' signifies cork. In what way is this oak connected with cork? We hardly know why this name was...
-The Success Of Horticultural Societies
It ought to be clear that the success of all societies of this character depends on the informat on and instruction to be derived by the members and others who sustain it; and the failures to main...
-French Horticulture
We learn from Mr. Charles Joly, that there is to be a grand Horticultural Convention in Paris on the 4th to 9th of May next, in the Hall of the National Society of Horticulture, 84 Grevelle street. ...
-March. Number 327. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In preparing hints for the month, we have found more difficulty about March than about any other month in the year. We never forget that our readers extend from the St. Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico,...
-Communications. Ipomoea Rubro-Coerulea
The reddish-blue Ipomoea, I. rubro-coerulea, is a splendid half-hardy annual climbing plant, belonging to the natural order Convolvulaceae, and is a native of Mexico, where the seeds were collected by...
-Hesperaloe Engelmanni
I have just been the pleased recipient of the above plant, and, as I have never seen it written about nor ever heard of it, I will write and see if others have. This plant is a native of Texas - 200 m...
-Garden And Sanitary Notes From South Carolina
The unusual frosts which have visited our country in the early part of January have played havoc with our gardens. Plants always hitherto considered hardy in this latitude are either killed outright o...
-Giant Verbenas
Ten years ago while dining with a friend at Waverly, Maryland, one of his sons brought from the greenhouse a head of Verbena flowers, which in size exceeded anything that I had ever seen. Its color wa...
-Acclimatizing Plants In Texas
The acclimatization of exotic plants is an interesting undertaking, but it is rather an expensive indulgence, because the catalogues of plant and bulb dealers are so large that one's purse will be exh...
-Japan Ampelopsis
It is now nearly twenty years since this beautiful creeper was introduced to the notice of horticulturists by those famous cultivators, the Messrs. Veitch, of Chelsea, near London, who exhibited a spe...
-Tropical Bedding
The employment of such hot-country species as Dracaenas, Bananas, and similar plants, for the summer decoration of gardens, and which attracted such marked attention on the Centennial grounds at Phila...
-Grafting The Salisburia
A correspondent desires to know whether the Salisburia or Ginko tree will graft at this time of the year (Jan. 19). If the work is to be done on trees in the open air, grafting cannot be done succe...
-The Atamasco Lilies
Mr. J. H. S., New Haven, Conn., writes : Zephyranthus Treatae sold by florists has small, scant foliage, and blooms at different seasons of the year; I have it in bloom now. It seldom has but one o...
-March. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
This is the season when most plants will require re-potting previous to their making their new season's growth. The difficulty always is to find the increased room that re-potting requires. Usually ro...
-Primula Floribunda
This charming floral gem was first distributed to plant cultivators four years ago by the late John Sadler, of the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh. It was raised from seed sent by Mr. Lister - a forme...
-P. Obconica
We may safely predict, has also a great future before it. it is extremely susceptible to cross-fertilization and from what I have already seen of its tendencies to improvement from that cause, we may ...
-Notes On Winter-Flowering Begonias
Wherever flowers are grown during the winter season, either for the embellishment of the greenhouse, the dinner-table or the parlor, a few of the best of these should receive a place, their drooping f...
-Notes On Southern Grown Roses
My experience for the last thirty years in importing Hybrid Perpetual Roses on their own root?, which I have done considerably from France, England and Germany, has been a complete failure; no matter ...
-The Cannas As Pot Plants
Several years ago I related in the Gardeners' Magazine the history of the Canna. Since then it has been more cultivated in private gardens, but not, in my opinion, as much as it deserves. Several very...
-Japanese House Gardens
Some time since, you figured two specimens of these from a work brought home by Mr. Mosely. It so happens that I have a Japanese pupil attending my lectures, and who has been a frequent visitor at my ...
-The Lighting Of Conservatories
A small pamphlet on Petroleum Gas has been forwarded to us from Belgium, advocating the use of gas distilled from crude petroleum or from the tarry residues of mineral oils for lighting purposes, pa...
-Feet Of Glass
Mr. Hippard says : I have noticed the article published by you in January-number of Gardeners' Monthly as an editorial. You have made a grand mistake when you say the way in which the glass is used w...
-Diseased Roses
F. J. K., Ottawa, Ills., sends specimens of what is known here as the Black fungus or Black mildew. The leaves, especially the young ones with the tender shoots, turn black and die with a soft kind ...
-March. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In fruit growing, remember that fruits are like grain and vegetable crops, in this, that they must have manure to keep up the fertility. Unlike vegetables and grain, however, their feeding roots are m...
-Communications. Destruction Of Thrip In Grapery
A. H., in the January issue, page 18, wishes to know of some efficient remedy for the destruction of thrip in his grapery. If A. H. gets the water in his pipes to nearly boiling pitch and then pai...
-The Nevada Blackberry
A Kansas gentleman is still pushing this as something very new, for which he expects to get a large price, and with the announcement that it is a native of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and is wholly ...
-Lida Strawberry
Among the latest truly wonderful introductions is the Lida. Judging by a cut before us made by Blanc, and therefore not likely to be exaggerated, it appears to be a good one, notwithstanding the st...
-Improved Grapes
It is remarkable that to this day some of the best grapes we have are among those that started the earliest in the race for improvement. The Concord is to-day indispensable everywhere, and this is tru...
-The Burke Peach
Originated in Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana; average specimens measuring 12 inches in circumference, and selected specimens have measured up to 14 inches; and it is said to have reached to the enormous ...
-The Berckmans Grape
After another year, we feel that this grape will yet have a wild run in the North. It is as hardy and as free a grower as the Clinton, which was one of its parents; while the quality is very little be...
-Pears In The West
It is not uncommon to read that the pear is a very unreliable tree to plant in the West. It always seemed to us, that this representation was started by some uncomfortable Jeremiah, and, once started,...
-Apple Twig Blight
At a meeting of the Farmer's Club of Lancaster County, Nebraska, as reported by a correspondent of the Country Gentleman, Prof. Bessey exhibited the Bacteria obtained from a diseased apple shoot, and ...
-New Vegetables
Lettuce The Tomhan-nock is said to retain its usefulness without running to seed for an unusual length of time. It has been in use from June to September. Corn Cory. Raised in Rhode Island, w...
-Scraps And Queries. Pear, Josephine De Malines
J. H. P., Dayton, Ohio, Jan. 18, writes: I send you today by mail a specimen of an old pear, Josephine de Malines, which I hope will reach you in good order. I have had the tree many years, but nev...
-An Eminent Forester
We see by an English paper that Mr. Robb, the eminent American senator, and particularly versed in all subjects connected with American Forestry, has been received with distinguished honor by the Fre...
-Those Hardy Cocoanuts
By a casual expression we judge that the recent learned editorial in a Philadelphia newspaper on planting cocoanuts along the Jersey coast, was made up by an intelligent correspondent - that is to s...
-The Great Forestry Question
Often the Editor of a magazine like ours must be tempted to cry what is the use and put down his pen in despair; yet time tells often that his labors have not been without result. Years since w...
-Timber Culture In Minnesota
Mr. F. W. Woodward, of Eau Claire, Wis., well-known to our readers as an occasional correspondent and former proprietor of the N. Y. Horticulturist, has a farm in Minnesota, on which he has made some ...
-Hemlock Spruce Bark Extract
This substance, which is now much used for tanning, is obtained from the bark of the Hemlock Spruce (Tsuga Canadensis, Carriere = Abies Canadensis, Linnaeus), a tree 70 to 80 feet high, found over a v...
-Notes On The Flora Of The Sandwich Islands
In looking over a journal kept by me, during a visit to the Sandwich Islands, some forty-five years ago, I find several showy and otherwise interesting plants noted, which are to my mind well worthy o...
-Plantago Quelenianum (Gaud)
A shrub from 1 to 6 feet high, with woody stems and branches bearing broad seven-ribbed leaves in tufts, the long flower spikes arising from below the leaves. This plant is more singular than pretty. ...
-Acacia Koa (Gray)
This is one of the most common forest trees of these islands, rising to the height of 50 to 100 feet, with a trunk as much as 5 feet in diameter, affording excellent timber for cabinet work. The leave...
-The Upas Tree
Among all the deadly poisons of nature, that of the Upas stands pre-eminent for its terrible virulence. Much of fiction has gathered around this subject, and wonderful stories have been told concernin...
-Immediate Influence Of Pollen On Fertilization
Prof. Burrill took the Crescent strawberry, which is almost a pistillate. Along side were placed some Sharpless, and some of a wild variety with small dark-colored fruit and deep sunken seeds, as diff...
-Killing Pernicious Weeds
We have always contended that the alarm so often felt about the introduction of noxious weeds, and which often shows itself in the enactment of ridiculous laws by Legislatures against them, is wholly ...
-Accelerating Power Of Heat In The Appearance Of Insects
Professors Riley and Lester Ward have a difference of opinion, as to the appearance of a seventeen-year locust so late as October last. Dr. Ward did not see the insect, but believes he heard the song....
-Locality For The Ginseng
M. D.,says: Your correspondent, 'H. H.' will find Aralia (panax) quinquefolia under the forest trees on the well-known Goat Island at Niagara Falls. . I saw quite a number of specimens of the plant...
-The Yellow Zephyranthus
G. R., Beverly, N. J., says: Among some new Zephyranthus bulbs obtained from a friend abroad, I have one with a yellow flower, and would feel obliged if you would give me the botanical name of it i...
-The Sacred Lily Of The Chinese
Quite frequently I notice items in Eastern papers and magazines concerning The Sacred Lily of the Chinese, some of them making quite a mystery of it. One says it is something like a Narcissus, an...
-Early Wine Making In America
At the meeting of the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, July 19, 1768, it was resolved that the Society would be obliged to any gentleman that would communicate to them any method of ma...
-A Potato Centennial
Monsieur Eugene de Duren, in the Revue de l' Horticulture Beige, thinks that Europe ought to institute a potato centennial, as well as America have its centennial to commemorate the introduction of co...
-The Holly
The London Gardener's Chronicle has the following notes on the Holly, to which we add a few notes of the American species : The common name Holly, or Holme, is derived from the Anglo-Saxon Holign,...
-Plant Collecting In The Tropics
Mr. Joseph Woodford recently gave the Massachusetts Historical Society some account of his experience as a plant collector in Honduras. One of the difficulties was in getting native assistance. He say...
-Incidental Advantages
What one may do has often advantages never foreseen. A miner, for instance, goes into a dry and arid country, wholly unfit for horticulture, and what he needs to support him has to be brought hundreds...
-Bergamot Pears
The London Times says: Among fruit fanciers several incline to derive the name of this favorite species of pear from the Italian town of Bergamo, while a larger number prefer Pergamos, laying stress ...
-Correct Reports
Every one who has anything to do with public life, and is liable to have what he says or does reported in the public papers, must have but little confidence in the truths of history. He will be apt ...
-Swindlers
A very common dodge with swindlers of the horticultural persuasion is to open an account with some well-known firm, and pay promptly and well. Then they order of other firms, and refer to Messrs. So-...
-Covent Garden Market
This famous place of which all the world has heard, and so many seen, and which rules the price of vegetables, fruit and floral products over so large a part of Europe, was part of a monastery, the co...
-Origin Of The Heliotrope
Some very funny stories go the rounds of the papers sometimes, one of which is the following in relation to the Heliotrope. It reads as if it might have originated in the fertile brain of Brett Harte:...
-New York Experimental Station
Report of the Botanist to the New York Experimental Station, January, 1886. Nothing is more important to the horticulturist than the ascertaining of exact facts. Most of our horticultural reports a...
-"Little Amy" and the Sweet Peas. Floral Aid To Photographs
Our correspondent, Mr. Van Aken, of Elmira, has hit on a very pretty idea by which the language of flowers may be given effective value in connection with the photographs of our friends. They can be s...
-Richardson County, Nebraska
Prof. C. E. Bessey says: This county lies in the extreme southeast corner of the State. It has long been noted for its fine apples, which are annually shipped in large quantities. Pears are not much ...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. North, Central And South American Exposition, New Orleans
The Superintendent of Horticultural Hall, E. F. Nelson, is constant in his exertions to improve the already beautiful winter garden. Its beds of tropical and semi-tropical plants have made it the cent...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Association
This Association held a very successful meeting at Reading. Mr. Calvin Cooper was again reelected President, and Mr. E. B. Engle, Secretary. The next annual meeting is to be held at Bethlehem. Over...
-Pennsylvania State Horticultural Association
By favor of Mr. Cyrus T. Fox, the energetic secretary of the Berks County Agricultural Society, we have the full text of Mr. Shearer's essay on the history of fruit culture, which was regarded as one ...
-Des Moines Floral Association
Mrs. Kate E. Waltz, writes: The florists of Des Moines and vicinity, met on the 3d day of Dec, and organized what is now known as the Des Moines Floral Association. Peter Lambert, the oldest florist ...
-April. Number 328. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Our Southern correspondents seem very sad over the unusual touch of winter they have experienced this season. They have been so full of sympathy with those who are ruled by a boreal hand, that their s...
-Communications. Crooked Trees
I do not remember of ever hearing a word spoken in favor of crooked trees, yet there is something novel, striking and lovely in their peculiar growth and varied outlines, that attracts attention. T...
-Bulbs And Tubers For Out-Door Culture
Bulbs, tubers and corms, or hard bulbs, are storehouses of food for the embryo plant, and serve to nourish it until the roots start. In the Northern States we have many indigenous lilies, arums, but f...
-Diseases Of The Rose
The first of the diseases of which M. de Thumen speaks is the most common and well known of the three; it is a mould which is caused by the rapid development of a a mildew similar to that which affect...
-The Winter At Charleston
A lady writes : We have had a sharp experience of your familiar Northern rigors this winter, and as our houses in this semi-tropic clime are built to woo the ocean breezes and to keep their occupants...
-Improvements In Roses
A California correspondent says : There is no flower with which so many experiments are being made as the rose, both by grafting and by seed. By these means no less than fifty new roses have been dis...
-April. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The question often is what to do with pot plants in the summer? The great majority of plants do much better in the open air than under glass. It is found by experience that many do much better when ta...
-Perpetual Carnations - Dianthus Caryophyllus Semperflorens
In the last number of the Revue Horticole, February 1st, a very remarkable article was published on the Perpetual Carnations in their present state. But the writer says: Where and how was the culture...
-Lycaste Deppei
Mr. Deppe's Lycaste, L. Deppei, is a very desirable epiphytal orchideous plant, having oblong lanceolate bright green leaves, from 18 to 20 inches in length, and which arise from the summit of the pse...
-Rose, Reine Marie Henriette
In the Jan. number of Gardeners' Monthly, page 15, I. H., Ardmore, Pa., asks how to treat the rose, Reine Marie Henriette, to get it to bloom. This rose requires a rest. If planted in a cold grapery...
-Chinese Narcissus
In an article in the March number headed The Sacred Lily of the Chinese, I notice the Chinese Narcissus is spoken of. A Chinaman brought to New York last winter some of these bulbs and presented one...
-April. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The apple is our standard fruit, and may always be relied on with reasonable care. The first care is good food. Some talk about too rich soil. We never saw the soil too rich for the apple. Where any t...
-Communications. Peaches In Florida
Our section is peculiar as regards fruit. The peach, apple, etc., from the North either do not grow, or become demoralized in some way. Northern peaches do not bloom till May, then drop their fruit. T...
-Pickling Corn
I notice editorial remark below notice of M. M. Vilmorin's work, The Vegetable Garden, about the American treatment of Indian corn : Possibly they are so treated, but I have not so seen, and it mus...
-Astringency Of Pears
My soil, or rather subsoil, is a very compact yellow clay and of course the surface soil has much of the clay in it. Some years before the war I had the Glout Morceau pear on quince to come into beari...
-Coal Dust As Manure
In the February number of the Monthly Mr. J. A. Price, Scranton, Pa., says he believes that coal dust will make an excellent fertilizer. And so do I. General as the belief has previously been that c...
-Thrip And Other Grapevine Insects
Cultivator (page 78) recommends the Mead-ville correspondent to use sulphur fumes in doses strong enough to kill thrip. If he does he will surely come to grief, as others have done before him. This ...
-Forced Fruits And Vegetables
On the 1st of February a reporter of a Philadelphia paper found strawberries, of the Sharpless variety, grown in a Wilmington, Delaware, hot-house, bring $7 per quart. They are also received from New ...
-Frost And Peach Trees
Juvenal writes: I have recently become a subscriber to the Gardeners' Monthly, and am much pleased with the intelligent manner in which all questions are discussed, sometimes in a light wholly diff...
-Forestry. Communications. Some Tree Measurements
I have been much interested in the occasional notes on tree growth, which you give in the monthly. And I send the following measurements to show the growth of trees planted in rich soil and in private...
-Abies Pungens
In the early explorations of the western part of our continent, a pretty spruce was discovered and named Abies Menziesii. Subsequently a species was found in the Rocky Mountains, supposed to be the sa...
-Quercus Pannonica
The Garden says of this oak : This is truly a noble oak, with handsome incised leaves, and one of the quickest growing oaks in cultivation. The wood is said to be very endurable and valuable. The ...
-Scraps And Queries. The Long Leaved Pine Of Nebraska
Mr. S. B. Higgins, Gordon, Nebraska, writes: Since writing you at the time specimens were sent, I have been investigating this more fully. I have seen seeds, cones, twigs (with leaves thereon) and wo...
-Vegetable Milk
Every one is acquainted with certain plants that secrete a milky fluid in peculiar ducts known as milk ducts. The lettuce, silk-weed and sumach may be mentioned as well-known illustrations. In tropi...
-Hawks And Owls
The Pennsylvania legislature, which a few years ago enacted that forestry should be encouraged by allowing a man not to pay for the repairs to the highways, provided he would plant a few trees along t...
-Origin Of Varieties
We recently came across the following piece of manuscript written many years ago by the Editor and misplaced. It is true enough to appear yet; and it also shows that one may live and learn; for if w...
-Geographical Range Of American Grapes
Mr. T. V. Munson tells the Wine Grower that: A number of the Faculty of the Geological Survey of Canada have very kindly aided me in determining the Northward distribution of Vitis in America, and...
-Burning Fungus Spores
Referring to the potato disease, an admirable treatise before us says: From what has been said it follows that the parasite may often live over winter in the tops or decaying tubers left in the fi...
-Gesneraceous Beauty
The philosophic Bacon remarks: God Almighty first planted a garden, and indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man, without which buildings and p...
-Gesneraceous Beauty. Continued
Speaking of the satisfactory results, in a floricultural sense, I can well imagine how the unique offspring of two such renowned beauties, as the pretty cousins' Donkelaari so successfully joined toge...
-Tree Agents
If, instead of saying I should smile, I merely say I smiled when I read Rose Terry Cooke's article in February No. of Gardeners' Monthly. I trust I shall not be accused of using slang. And if I s...
-Proposed Increase Of Postage On Seeds And Plants
Before this reaches the eye of the reader it may be that the question will have been decided. It will be useful, however, as showing that leading members of the Philadelphia delegation did not favor t...
-The Brotherhood Of St. Dorothy
Inquirer says : In your very interesting note on the history of the potato you refer to the potato having had its first great impetus in cultivation given to it by a body of gardeners known in Germ...
-A New Journal Of Forestry
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society the Reverend J. B. Harrison said : We need a periodical which shall be devoted to the persistent education of the people; not by elabora...
-Professor Edouard Morren
Few men distinguished as botanists have become better known to horticulturists than Edouard Morren, Professor in the Botanic Garden at Liege, Belgium; and his death at the early age of 53, and in the ...
-Robert J. Donnelly
Among those who worked so ably to make Rochester eminently the Flower city of this continent, the name of Robert J. Donnelly stands prominent, and his death in that city on the 27th instant, will be...
-American Pomological Society
Session of 1885. From Charles N. Garfield, Secretary, Grand Rapids, Michigan. This comes to us with a singularly fresh odor. In former times, essays written especially for it have been given to the...
-Gray's Synoptical Flora Of North America
Gratifying as it is always to botanists to have any publication prepared by Prof. Asa Gray, the reception of Supplements and Indexes to the two parts already issued will not be without some regret. ...
-Annual Report Of The Arnold Arboretum
By Director C. S. Sargent. It is pleasant to note that the prospects of this becoming one of the most valuable institutions of the kind in the world, are drawing nearer. People who see nothing but ...
-Catalogues Of Seedsmen, Florists And Nurserymen
We have a large number of these before us, showing remarkable enterprise and care, and mostly furnished with beautiful illustrations. We doubt whether any country in the world can show so much accurac...
-Heliotrope, Vanilla
*** remarks: The common name of the Heliotrope with the Peruvians is 'Vanilla;' whether borrowed from the orchid bean of that name, or whether the Vanilla bean is so called from the resemblance of th...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. Des Moines Floral Association
At a meeting of the Des Moines Floral Association, March 4th, 1886, Mr. W. L. Morris read an essay on ventilation, wherein he set forth some of the errors in ventilating greenhouses. And one or two po...
-May. Number 329. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Mosaic beds, so much derided when the style was introduced, seem to have touched a popular chord, and instead of being laughed down are more in vogue than ever. We have from time to time given some sk...
-The Caladium As A Bedding Plant
Why these plants are not more generally grown for bedding purposes I cannot understand. Nothing can be more beautiful than these plants with their gorgeous foliage. They certainly would be a great con...
-Experience With Bulbs In South Carolina
P. H. Obberwetter suggests we report upon our successes and failures in acclimatizing exotic plants, bulbs, etc., which suggestion I meet with report of my failures this fall. Alas ! how many successe...
-Chimonanthus Fragrans
This deliciously scented shrub has proved very disappointing this year, and instead of the large examples with which a portion of our walls are clothed being now sheeted with the soft yellow flowers,...
-Lawn Grasses
People laugh at the one who buys a pig in a bag. and yet they do just the same thing themselves in a variety of ways, and love to do it. If they are sick and require a few cents worth of ipecac or s...
-Cemetery Gardening
In an admirable essay before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. J. G. Barker gave his views as to the proper ideas to rule in cemetery gardening, which may be briefly summed up as follows: ...
-Hardiness Of The Gladiolus In Northeastern Texas
Mr. D. H. Watson, Brenham, writes: I have just read the interesting letter of Mr. Obbenvetter in the March number of the Monthly, and I beg to differ with him in regard to the hardiness of the Gladio...
-Bad Putty
Your correspondent, Hudson, N. Y., in the February number of your valued magazine, relates his experience, and asks, Will some one explain how this putty is adulterated? I know nothing of the part...
-Dendrobium Fimbriatum
The fringed Dendrobium, D. fimbriatum, is a rare and singularly beautiful epiphytal orchideous plant. It is a native of Nepal, where it was discovered by Dr. Wallich and by him introduced into England...
-Streptosolen Jamesonii
Streptosolen Jamesonii, a rather new appearance in the floral kingdom, is receiving a welcome from all lovers of flowers, on account of its peculiar color and form. Well cultivated specimens of it in ...
-The Dandelion As An Early Window Plant
Admiring a pretty collection of pot plants in a lady's window recently the question was asked which she admired the most. It was a surprise to learn that it was the Dandelion. She had one potted in th...
-Dwarf Amaryllis
Those friends who are calling attention to the merits of this exquisite tribe of flowers, are doing good service to flower lovers.' Recently we saw a very pretty kind in the window of a lady, that had...
-Ceratozamia Mexicana
The whole family of Cycads, of which the Sago-palm is a well known illustration, is very much appreciated by those who love ornamental foliage plants around their homes in summer, and as they are of v...
-Poinsetta Culture
A lady desires to know how best to grow Poinsettas. If very large bracts are desired, the plants may be cut down in early spring. As soon as they have pushed a little, shake out of the old pots, and...
-May. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Whoever grows wheat or any other farm crop, knows that the soil will not maintain its fertility without manure. He knows that however rich a virgin soil may be, it cannot long remain rich without his ...
-Communications. Thrip In Graperies
I thank the contributors at pages 78 and 109 of the Gardeners' Monthly, for suggestions on the subject of thrip, in reply to my article on page 18. As my grapery is a cold one, where fire is not us...
-Management Of Grapevines
I am in charge of some twenty acres of vineyard, therefore am asked a great many times what is my experience with bagging grapes as a preventive of grape rot. I say bagging is a perfect nuisance, so f...
-Florida Oranges
With the exception of 100 oranges sold in the store, those two boxes were all I got from my grove, out of about 3000 which the trees bore. My neighbors in Tangerine have a feeling that whatever grows ...
-Vitis Floridana, Or Peltata (Raf.), Florida Grape
Petioles short and smooth; leaves drooping, ovate-cordate, acute (in outline); base sub-peltate, split acutely, lobes approximated; teeth all round large, acute incised, straight-sided. Surface smooth...
-Remedies For Peach Tree Borer
To my item Tobacco Stems and Ashes, page 323, November Gardeners' Monthly, 1885, which I chanced across in reviewing some of the back numbers of the Horticulturist - as is my practice to occasionall...
-Forcing Strawberries
In the June number of 1885 appeared my query of growing strawberries under glass, which brought forth many responses, and many have been induced to try the experiment by reason of this correspondence....
-Sulphur, An Antidote For Thrip
Mr. Rhind, page 109, takes exception to my answer to A. H'.'s inquiry for an effectual remedy for the destruction of thrip. Probably Mr. Rhind took my remarks, under the sense which the Editor point...
-The Evergreen Blackberry
Botanistsknow well that there is no native blackberry in the Sierra Nevadas fit to eat, and others who are not botanists know well that this so called Evergreen Nevada blackberry is only a varie...
-Scraps And Queries. Preserving Hot-House Grapes For Winter Use
A correspondent from western Pennsylvania says: My crop of grapes from under glass turned out better than I expected, and we have the last of our Black Hamburghs and Muscat of Alexandria grapes on o...
-Forestry. Communications. Forest Conifers Of The Rocky Mountains
Referring to specimens of Pinus ponderosa, page 113, April number, P. ponderosa, sent me by Mr. S. B. Higginson, Gordon, Nebraska, are in no way different from the species as found in the foot hills f...
-Size Of Ancient Trees
How one may be deceived in evolving a chain of facts is evident from much that we read in scientific journals. Here is an illustration. At Kinnened in Sweden a boat was recently dug out of a bog. I...
-The Distance Between Forest Trees
In Europe, where one might suppose such a question would long ago have been settled, the proper distance to set forest trees is still a matter of dispute. If set very close they starve each other as t...
-Telegraph Poles
In England the Norway spruce is employed, known we believe in the English lumber market as deal. Larches, of English growth, formerly employed, were found sadly wanting in durability. In America ced...
-Birch-Wood For Doors
It is stated that Birch is a good material for doors. A gentleman recently had black Birch used for the foldingdoors of his new house against the architect's protest. The result has so far been satisf...
-The American White Oak In England
The Garden says that in England the American White oak grows faster than the English oak. This is remarkable, as in America, it grows slower than most oaks, and the reputation the oak has of being a s...
-The Bag-Worm And The Elm-Leaf Beetle
I notice on page 7 in the January number of the Gardener's Monthly, that some of your correspondents still indulge in chronic complaints about the two noxious insects I have named above, and of course...
-The Bag-Worm And The Elm-Leaf Beetle. Continued
It is rather to be regretted that this insect has been endowed with such a long scientific name, Thyridopteryx ephemaeriformis, but that cannot now be helped. I devoted three or four seasons to its sp...
-Geographical Range Of Wild Grapes
I was pleased to note your request in April number for your readers in Oregon and Washington, and even in British Columbia, to report for your columns any wild grapes found in those regions. Please...
-History Of The Potato Disease
It would be a valuable fact could we locate the exact spot where the potato disease first appeared. In England it certainly appeared first in its most southern point, the southern shores of the Isle o...
-Graft-Hybrids In Potatoes
Gardening Illustrated says, that at a recent meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society, Mr. W. G. Smith forwarded specimens of hybrid potatoes obtained by the method of introducing plugs with eyes of...
-Blue Grass
Under this head, with the initials S. D. V., in Encyclopedia Americana it is said : The most valuable of American grasses is known as the Blue Grass (Poa compressa) which springs up spontaneously o...
-Crows Eating The Fruit Of The Poison Vine
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, the question being on the food of birds during the recent severe snow storm, the chairman, Mr. Thomas Meehan, stated that crows ...
-The Maiden-Hair Tree
Of all coniferous trees this (Salisburia adiantifolia) is undoubtedly the one which, from its general appearance, has the least resemblance to any other member of the tribe. Yet, although totally devo...
-Movement Of Stamens In The Flowers Of The Night-Blooming Cereus
We did not know that there was any movement in the stamens of the night-blooming cereus, though it has been noticed in the common Opuntia, Portulaca, Purs-slane, and allied plants. The following note ...
-Travels Of The Coffee Plant
The Rev. Henry Ellacomb furnishes a graphic account of the narrow escapes the coffee plant has had in its travels round the world. We have to premise, for the benefit of the younger portions of the hu...
-Common Names Of Plants
A correspondent sends us the following extract from the letter of an English gentleman - indeed we have the whole letter before us, - asking if we can identify the plants named. We regret our inabilit...
-Pomiculture And Olericulture
Dr. E. Lewis Sturtevant, of Geneva, proposes that we drop the words fruit culture and vegetable culture, and adopt in their stead pomiculture and olericulture. Following the manufacture of agriculture...
-Liability Of Transportation Companies
Judge Rumsey, of the New York State courts, has decided in favor of Messrs. Spaulding for $993.25 and W. S. Little for $942.45, with near two years' interest since the suits were begun, against the Me...
-Horticulture And Agriculture
Professor Reagan, of Depauw University at Greencastle, Indiana, recently gave a pleasant paper before the Illinois Horticultural Society, on the methods pursued by him in teaching, as Professor of Hor...
-John Gerard
Our readers may know that the most ancient English work on gardening that has come down to our day is Gerard's Herbal. The copy on the Editor's table is a large octavo of 1630 pages, printed in 1636, ...
-Modern Palestine
One of the finest tracts of land in western Palestine is to be found in the northwestern slopes of the range commonly known as the hills of Samaria. The more I travel over this country and examine its...
-Andromeda
Most of our readers versed in horticultural botany, know that Linnaeus gave the name, Andromeda, to a plant he saw in his northern tour, because some circumstances connected with the situation in whic...
-Philip R. Freas, Editor "Germantown Telegraph"
Few men have made themselves better known in connection with agriculture and horticulture in America than Philip R. Freas, until the past two or three years Proprietor and Editor of the Germantown Tel...
-Samuel W. Noble
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Association has met with a double loss in the death of this gentleman on the 22d of March, the day before that of his co-laborer, Thos. M. Harvey. He had been for many y...
-Mr. Harry Ingersoll
Readers of Down-ing's charming works, and other treatises on landscape gardening, will be familiar with the name of Medary, the country-seat of Mr. and Mrs. Hairy Ingersoll, near Green Lane Station,...
-Thomas M. Harvey
Intelligent horticulture has suffered a severe loss in this gentleman, whose death occurred on the 23d of March, suddenly, at his residence at West Grove. He was well versed in those sciences that had...
-Hon. John Welsh
As President of the Board of Commissioners of Fairmount Park, the decease of this estimable gentleman demands a note in our columns. This event occurred on the 10th of April, he being in his eighty-fi...
-Transactions Of The Worcester Co. Mass. Horticultural Society
The love of horticulture and the money in the garden, are two very distinct ideas, each of great value in their way, but which should never be confounded. Yet there is often danger from such confus...
-How To Grow Strawberries
By George Knapp. Published by H. D. Watson & Co. Greenfield, Mass. Books on strawberries and other small fruits, are common in every library, but they are usually half filled with description of va...
-Fertilizers
By J. J. H. Gregory. Mr. Gregory is one of those members of the seed trade of whom the profession may be proud. He is not only a gentleman who has been eminently successful as a business man, but is w...
-Secretary Harrison Of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
The Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the election of Mr. Apollus Walcott Harrison, to the position of Secretary of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, was made memorable by a pleasant little gathering ...
-The Holland Premium Hyacinths
The following were the chief varieties in the fifty of D. Fergusson Sons, which obtained the Gold Medal at the March meeting of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society : S.White.. ...
-Maryland Horticultural Society
At the March meeting Mr. Cook exhibited a number of new seedling roses, which were regarded as highly meritorious. Mr. Donald Grant, gardener to T. H. Garrett, made an admirable exhibit of flowering p...
-Germantown (Philadelphia) Horticultural Society
At the April meeting there was exhibited by Mr. Jamieson, gardener to R. S. Mason, Esq., a beautiful specimen of Cymbidium eburneum, in a 12-inch pot, with about a couple of dozen of its large ivory-w...
-The Spring Show Of The New York Horticultural Society
We have not received from any friend notes of the New York Exhibition, but the following from a correspondent of the Philadelphia Ledger may give some idea of what occurred : The flower show was o...
-June. Number 330. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Among the many interesting ornaments to the flower garden is a class of plants which may be termed sand plants. They are plants with myriads of hair-like fibres, which require a large amount of moist ...
-Communications. Notes Suggested By A Visit To The Gardens Of P. Lorillard, Esq., At Jobstown, N. J
A celebrated wit, (Sidney Smith, I think it was,) who evidently knew what was good, once facetiously remarked, that God might have made a better fruit than a strawberry, but for some reason, did not....
-Lawn Mixtures
BY -----------. Your article on Lawn Grass Mixtures is a little obscure as to intent. But taking it for granted, from the tone of your article, that you desire to warn your readers against purchasi...
-Expenses Of American Public Gardens
A debt of $135,000 encumbers the Cincinnati Zoological gardens, and they will probably have to be sold out. Philadelphia was in somewhat the same fix, but subscriptions have been made sufficient to ti...
-Improvement Of Grounds
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Dr. Bowen proceeded to make some suggestions for the improvement of country homes. The first is, that the expenditure of money does not ...
-American Buttonwood, Or American Plane Tree
The true character of American trees is rarely known, because in early life they have been crowded by others, and it is only when by the help of man a specimen here and there finds itself for a number...
-Red Spider
Red spider, (Acarus telarius) is a minute mite of microscopic size, and is first seen with the naked eye as a red moving speck. The genus to which it belongs (Acarus) contains an enormous number of sp...
-Hardy Roses For Toronto
The following query reached the Editor on the 15th of last month. It is only in rare cases that any inquiry can get reply in the succeeding number that reaches the Editor after the 5th of the month : ...
-A Proliferous Or Fasciated Lily
Mr. C. J. Power, of South Framingham, Mass., writes : I send this day by express (paid), a box containing a spike of Lilium candidum, with twenty-two open flowers, thirteen buds and one undeveloped b...
-A New Rose Pest
It may be that what I allude to and shall attempt to describe is known to some of the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly, who represent such a wide and varied experience. However, I use the adjective ...
-Mimosas - Sensitive Plants
The sensitive plants - Mimosa pudica and sen-sitiva are interesting and beautiful children of nature. As decorative plants, either for the conservatory, stage or dinner table, they can hardly be surpa...
-Dendrobium Moschatum
The musk scented Dendrobium, D. moschatum, is a very beautiful epiphytal orchidaceous plant, and is a native of Pegu, where it was discovered by Dr. Wallich and introduced in 1828. It is a strong grow...
-Diseases Of Plants And Their Remedies
In undertaking a subject of such wide scope and vital importance, I realize fully my unfitness to instruct such a body of older and more experi enced men, but as every one's experience is of some valu...
-Diseases Of Plants And Their Remedies. Continued
Mealy Bug We have tried various emulsions of kerosene oil for this pest but with indifferent results. Alcohol, which is the basis of most insecticides for mealy bug, will do the work, but it is too...
-Flowering Of Agave Americana At Auburn, New York
This is the century plant. In old English greenhouses it took a century for a plant to .flower. In its native country it flowers in about ten years, and, under culture, generally between this and a hu...
-A Basket Of Pansies
Among arrangements of flowers for the sitting-room table, none have truer charms than may be gained from a handful of some simple flower placed loosely and easily in a. receptacle of quiet form and co...
-Scraps And Queries. Thunbergia Harrisi
A remarkable specimen - Mr. Edward Norman, Lee, Mass., writes; When I wrote to you about Thunbergia Harrisii, I promised to send you the large spike when it got through flowering, so I have sent it w...
-June. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Watch newly planted fruit trees. If they have but a few weak leaves only, it shows the roots have been injured; then prune them severely, which will make them grow freely. It should be a main object t...
-Communications. The Scuppernong Grape - A Correction
Mr. T. V. Munson, in his recent article in May number of Gardeners' Monthly, after describing a supposed new species of grape in Florida, uses the following language : Just at this point, let me m...
-Cold Storage Of Fruits
Your letter of the 2d duly received, and will endeavor to give you the information you desire. I have been successfully running the fruit house on the banks of the Delaware river above Bristol for man...
-Thrips - Leaf-Hoppers
I forward Prof. Riley's reply to specimens of insects sent to him, and you will please observe he recommends the use of hellebore : U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Entomology, Washington, ...
-Florida Fruit Culture
While visiting at Belleview, Florida, in February last, I saw in the garden of Mr. James Pen-field half a dozen grape-vines of the exotic varieties that were alive to the tips of the shoots, and this ...
-Training Raspberries
We are so accustomed to see our small fruits grown in the profitand-loss style of market gardens that only the few are privileged to see how tastefully they are often trained and cared for in the gard...
-Fruiting Strawberries In Frames
Few private growers are able or willing to devote frame or pit room to the cultivation of early strawberries, and not many market gardeners have as yet adopted this plan of securing profitable early c...
-Solid Celery
It is still an open question whether pithy celery is to be attributed to culture, or circumstances of growth; or whether it comes from some defect in the plant from which the seed was obtained. We hav...
-Lichens Injurious To Fruit Trees
A New Jersey correspondent says; Will you please give me the name of the inclosed moss, which I find growing in company with unlimited quantities of lichen on a lot of old cedars on the river bank in...
-Tree Growth On The Plains
From a recent paper on Tree Planting on the Plains, by Robert W. Furnas, we extract the following statistics of the growth of trees, as shown by actual measurement of trees of known ages. The measur...
-The Drying Up Of Rivers
Though the belief that forests increase the rainfall has been given up everywhere, except in Forestry Conventions, there is still a clinging to the belief that they regulate the flow of springs. It wo...
-Spruce Fir Timber
I have been talking today with a wood agent, who has had considerable experience in dealing with the different kinds of home-grown fir, and his opinion quite bears out what has been said about the use...
-The Western Arbor Vit,E
They are still worrying in the Old World about the identity of various trees which they have growing under the names of Thuja Lobbii, T. Menziesii, T. plicata, T. Standishii, T. Craigiana, and T. giga...
-Tree Planting In Arizona
Messrs. Douglas have made an experimental plantation near Trinidad in the Texan Pan Handle. They believe that the absence of trees from these places is as much from the tramping of buffaloes, and from...
-Water In Timber
The amount of water present in freshly-cut wood is very different, as is shown by the following table by Scheubler and Hartig: Hornbeam contains 18.6 per cent. of water; Willow, 26 per cent.; Ash, 287...
-The Garden Web-Worm-Eurycreon Rantalis, Guen. Order Lepidoptera; Family Pyralidae
Perhaps the most marked insect outbreak of the year has been the appearance of Eurycreon ran-talis over a large area in the five States of Texas, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Arkansas, and also in ...
-Food-Plants
There is no question but that the preferred food of this species is the foliage of plants of the genus Amarantus, called in different parts of the country Amaranth, Pig-weed and Careless weed (corrupt...
-Number Of Annual Generations
From our own observations and from what we have been able to learn from our correspondents, the first brood of moths is noticed from May 1st to May 7th in Texas, from May 20th to May 25th in Missouri,...
-The Botany Of India
To the botanist, India yields, as the reward of plant-collecting toil, specimens varying from such as flourish near the equator to those which thrive near the line of everlasting snow, illustrating th...
-Frogs In Rocks
In the recently issued Proceedings of the Berwickshire (England) Naturalists' Club, Commander Francis Martin Norman, the president of the body, goes over the ground often investigated, as to whether f...
-Host Plants Of The Mistletoe
As noted last year, it is evident that the mistletoe, while preferring to grow on some plants in one locality or in one age, seems to shun them in other places or other times. Hence, it is of great se...
-Bud Variations
E. L. E., Omaha. Nebraska, writes: Will you please give some information in next issue of Gardeners' Monthly, in regard to sports? Do they proceed from stem or radicle, or both? Do fruit trees eve...
-Travelling In Australia - The Fate Of Dr. Leichardt
Please see page 157, Vol. xxiii, 1881, of the Gardeners' Monthly, in which an account is given of at last discovering the (supposed) remains of Dr. Leichardt, the distinguished explorer and botanist, ...
-Ladies As Members Of Learned Societies
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. Wilder said that we are very much indebted to ladies for the improvement in the cultivation of flowers. He spoke of the time, very e...
-Latin Names For Garden Varieties
We have from time to time entered our protest against the ridiculous habit of giving latin names to garden varieties. But our English friends would not fall in line. They even refused to receive ours ...
-John Brooks
Mr. John Brooks, of whose death at Pittsburgh on the 6th of March, we have but just heard, was well known about Philadelphia a quarter of a century ago for his remarkable skill in growing the hot-hous...
-Small Fruits
By Wm. H. Hills. Boston: Cup-pies, Upham & Co., Agricultural publishers. 1886. This is a large octavo of 137 pages, and, though we have seemingly enough works on this subject, this is really one of...
-Horticulture And Landscape Gardening In The West
Bulletin No. 12 of this Department of the Michigan Agricultural College contains a paper by Prot. L. H. Bailey, Jr., in which a list of evergreen trees and shrubs that have been found to do well at La...
-Thrips Or Thrip
A friend says : Please excuse me for the liberty I take, of suggesting a small matter connected with correct grammar in horticulture, for some of the correspondents of the Gardeners' Monthly. It see...
-Heart-Leaf Asarum Arifolium
Under the above common name, a Southern lady sends a leaf which proves to be the Asarum arifolium. She gives the following interesting notes of local history concerning it. The corn-beads referred to,...
-Special Prizes For Hybrid Perpetual Roses By The Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The following special prizes are offered for Hybrid Perpetual roses at the coming Rose Show of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, on Tuesday and Wednesday, June 22d and 23d, 1886: Prize A. Be...
-The Pansies From Washington
It appears that the pansies from Washington, D. C, were from Washington Street, Wilmington, Delaware, as the following note reveals : You in report in Monthly, made a mistake in addressing the pan...
-National Grape And Wine Growers' Association
The following letter is printed just as received: Office of National Grape and Wine Growers Associa-tion, No. 24 Park Place, New York, April 24th, 1886. Editor Gardeners' Monthly : Dear ...
-July. Number 331. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Every now and then a perfect craze possesses people in behalf of some new thing. In our country half a century ago, there was a craze for a particular kind of mulberry; and later a craze on new kinds ...
-Communications. Notes At The Grounds Of The Department Of Agriculture, Washington, D. C
People who stay at home have the satisfaction of knowing that they often see things in better shape than they would after making a long journey. The full force of this was impressed on me, and noted f...
-The Amaryllis In The South
Another year's trial of the Amaryllis confirms what I wrote about a year ago, that this family of plants deserves a greater amount of attention in the Southern States than it has hitherto received. Bu...
-Amaryllis Atamasco
The Pink Atamasco Lily referred to in my article in January number is not merely pink tinged, but a very bright pink. I have known this plant for twenty years; have received it from Pennsylvania, ...
-The Flowering Ash
If you or any of your readers have flowering plants of the genuine Fraxinus floribunda, will you kindly tell me something about it? We have several specimens 10 to 16 feet high of F. Ornus, the common...
-Manettia Cordifolia
Last September I wrote you in regard to Man-ettia cordifolia, published in your October number, page 290, wherein the hardiness of this beautiful plant was pretty thoroughly tested. I had not then sat...
-Chionanthus Virginica (Fringe Tree) By Cultivator
This, though found chiefly in our swamps, is equally at home upon the lawn, and is a gem among deciduous flowering shrubs. Its long racemes of pure white flowers seem to have a charm about them which ...
-Hardiness Of The Gladiolus
The hardiness of the Gladiolus is referred to in the May number. They will survive most winters here without any protection. I have them now 8 inches high from roots left last fall; but it is seldom t...
-Actinida Polygama
This rather new and and still scarce climbing plant, has flowered freely in several places this year, and promises to be a valuable addition to our already large list of climbing plants. The foliag...
-A New Lilac : Syringa Japonica
Prof. Sargent tells the Gardeners' Chronicle : Mr. W. S. Clark, at that time president of the Agricultural College at Sapporo, in Japan, sent to the Arboretum, in the autumn of 1876, seeds of an ...
-Propagation Of Anthurium
I have read in the February number of your esteemed magazine under the heading Orchid Queries, J. R., New Bedford, Mass., asking : Would like to know most easy way to get a stock of Anthurium Wa...
-Culture Of Perpetual Carnations
When the cuttings rooted in a hot-house during winter have been hardened in a pit or a greenhouse, they can in May stand a long journey without or with very little earth at the roots and packed in dam...
-A Dozen Narcissi
The Narcissus has received much and well-deserved attention of late years, and has now become almost indispensable for spring decoration. Its wealth of color, richness of perfume, and beauty of form c...
-Germantown, Philadelphia. Hints On Selaginellas And Their Uses
The few hints which I am about to offer upon these, are such as we have practiced with such satisfactory and beneficial results, that I heartily commend them to all in possession of an ordinary greenh...
-Russelia Juncea
The rushy branched Russelia, R. juncea, is a twiggy, drooping, rush like plant with greenish branches which spring apparently from the base of the plant, and which are covered with a great profusion o...
-Culture Of The Cyclamen
Much has been written about this plant, but we do not see it in collections as it deserves. When we do, seldom is it with that strength and vigor that it would have under proper cultivation. It will a...
-Flowers At The President's Marriage
Though every endeavor was made to have the President's marriage private, and hence one has scarcely a right to make public any of the arrangements, some of the persevering reporters have violated the ...
-Chrysanthemums For Exhibition
About the middle or end of May they are ready for their final shift. I find 9-inch pots the most suitable; a few of the strongest I put into 10-inch and the weakest into 8-inch, the latter being potte...
-July. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
It is well to remember that the great bulk of garden fruits are natives of temperate climes, or of altitudes that have cool soil and climate. Hence, it is the long summers, dry atmosphere and overheat...
-Communications. Mildew And Rot In Grapes
1. Dissolve in 10 gallons of water five pounds of sulphate of copper. Soak the stakes and whatever may be used to tie up the vines, in this solution, and, as soon as the leaves are fully formed, thoro...
-Grape Mildew And Grape Rot
Col. Col-man is desirous of getting all the information possible about these diseases, and has issued a circular of questions which he desires answered. Grape growers have a vital interest in these qu...
-Apple, Dr. Jules' Gaudy
As a general rule apples raised in our own country are better than those of foreign origin. But not always. Some of our most popular kinds are European; and then the varieties are so numerous we seem ...
-The Bark Scales
Prof. A. J. Cook says of these insects that are so troublesome to the fruit grower: Parasites, mites and lady beetles all prey upon these fell destroyers, but though efficient aids, they are not ...
-The Strawberry Season In Philadelphia
Strawberries in considerable abundance appeared from the South about the first of April. They were chiefly Albany seedling, and only average samples of this old kind. On the 1st of June the fruit grow...
-Consumption Of Wine
Notwithstanding the efforts of people on the one hand to decrease the consumption of alcoholic liquors, efforts on the other hand, seem to increase. A speaker at a recent convention detailed his effor...
-Peculiar Fertilizers
An exchange says: A peculiar fertilizer for potato fields has been introduced on a Pomeranian model farm. Hitherto herrings and potatoes have been known as a palatable dish in family households. The ...
-Tomato Soup For The Sick
Dr. Horatio Wood, who stands among the leading physicians of Philadelphia, and well known as the discoverer of the active cause of diphtheria, gives the following formula for a tomato soup suited to s...
-Uses Of Onions
A lover of the tearful bulb has been giving the Gardeners' Chronicle some notes of his favorite, from which we give the following specimen : Big onions stew and bake well, and if served up with co...
-The Codling Moth
This is the insect that gives us wormy apples. It is the greatest foe of the apple grower. Professor Cook, of Lansing, says the method of placing bandages round the stems to allure the worms to ta...
-Curing Tobacco
Very few of the thousands who use tobacco have any idea how much care and skill is required to bring even a weed like this to the proper standard of excellence. The Gardeners' Chronicle tells how it...
-The Nevada Evergreen Blackberry
Mrs. Fanny E. Briggs, writing from Washington Territory, remarks : I have been observing the Evergreen blackberry quite closely for the past two winters. The leaves on the old wood - that which has b...
-Growth Of The White Pine
A Canadian correspondent sends us the following from a local paper, and asks if we can supply the information desired: Within our own Dominion many varieties of useful lumber are nearly extinct, a...
-Ages Of Trees
The Philadelphia Public Ledger says: As the great ages attributed to men have been doubted, and with good reason in many cases, it is not surprising to find the Prussian chief forester denying tha...
-Forest Planting
Now that people are really planting forests, it becomes the more important that the system that will bring the timber into profit with the least amount of labor in the shortest time, should be clearly...
-Scraps And Queries. Arbor Vitae For Hop Poles
L. J. C, Wolcott, N. Y., writes: Would you advise me to plant cedar for hop poles? The nurserymen here tell me that cedar trees will grow in seven years up to about 2 inches in diameter at the but...
-Friendly Lady-Bugs
The inclosed slip was sent to me by some person unknown, mailed at Virginia City, Nevada, March, 1886, without note or comment. I have known the insect referred to for forty years at least in this c...
-A Yellow Zephyranthes
You have published many interesting paragraphs, during the past year, upon the genus Zephyranthes; and one of the points debated has been the existence of a yellow species. I have now in blossom a spe...
-The Onion Cut-Worm
The dark-sided cut-worm, (Agrotis messoria, Harr.), order Lepidoptera, family Noctuidae, has formed a new habit. This insect was treated of in our last annual report (p. 290) under the general head...
-July. Habits And Natural History
It will be seen from what we stated of this insect in our last annual report (p. 290) that it is a very wide-spread species, occurring from the Pacific to the Atlantic, as far north as Quebec and as f...
-The Mistletoe : Viscum Album
From time to time I read notices of this plant in the Gardeners' Monthly. I do not understand why this miserable parasite should be so much made of. In Central Europe it is a great curse to the arbori...
-Montbretias
Coming to the front as rivals of the Gladiolus, Montbretias hold a prominent place. They are Cape plants, and some of them have been regarded as gladiolus in times past. Ixia, Tritonia, Freesia, Waitz...
-Rainy Seasons
Some people do not reflect that the water which comes down as rain must first go up as vapor, and that, forests or no forests, nothing can come down but what first goes up. The central part of the Uni...
-Transpiration And Evaporation
When a clod of earth dries it is said to be through evaporation; when moisture passes away from the surface of the leaf in the regular operation of growth it is called transpiration. In relation to th...
-Muddy Water
As everybody knows, mud is heavier than water, and when time has been given to muddy water, the mud sinks to the bottom. But why should mud ever be able to float? The following from the Independent...
-Crinum Amabile In Florida
E. K. T., Providence, Bradford Co., Fla., under date of June 3rd, writes: I send you to-day, by mail, the blooms, stalk, and leaf of a lily which I do not find in florists' catalogues, and suppose...
-Lit-Chi
F. J. H., Jacksonville, Ills., writes: I send by this mail samples of a fruit highly prized as a dessert by the Chinese. It is imported by the barrelful, and is eaten just as it is, which I belie...
-Seedless Oranges
I recently examined an orange, the seeds of which had all failed to develop. The core was solid, forming no carpels. I have seen oranges in which some of the seeds had not developed, but have never se...
-Selling The Wrong Trees
A suit has been commenced in one of the State courts against a prominent nurseryman, for $2000 damages. Plaintiff alleges that in 1879 he purchased 300 cherry trees from defendant, which were warrante...
-Pansies
Ophelia told us that pansies are for thoughts. The lovely flowers have served for thoughts in many ways. Very pretty thoughts are expressed in the following lines, sent with a basket of these flower...
-The Philadelphia Park Commission
The choice of members to the Philadelphia Park Commission is not made elective, because mere politicians and not those acquainted with the business desired might be elected. So the Judges of the court...
-Poison Honey
Some correspondents of the Weekly Press are worrying its readers about the honey from bees that collect from Kalmia flowers, being poisonous. Mr. Williams, of Central Park, is very earnest in cautioni...
-The Onion In Literature
At the November meeting of the Summit County (Ohio) Horticultural Society, Mrs. Claypole gave an interesting address on the Onion, from which we make the following extract: It is plain by this ti...
-The Introduction Of The Potato To Europe
There has been an outburst of literature in England on the subject of the introduction of the potato. A number of writers contend that none of the names connected with the histories had anything to do...
-Curator Of Kew Gardens
In 1864, Mr. John Smith who had for so many years ably filled the position of curator in these famous gardens, resigned from age and infirmity. Another John Smith, who was gardener to the Duke of Nort...
-Useful Nurseries
Mr. J. Wragg, in the Iowa Homestead, make the good point that numberless supposed new things under new names, but which are really old and common things at very novel and astounding prices, might be r...
-Ambroise Verschaffelt
Through the still popular Coleus Verschaffeltii, as well as by many other plants named in his honor, Mr. Verschaffelt was well-known to American flower lovers, who will be sorry to read the following ...
-Agricultural Reports
Prof. Bessey says: Agriculture has been cursed by a greater amount of very poor work under the name of experiment, ation than any other of the great industries. Dealing as it does with the soil, t...
-Proceedings Of The Michigan Horticultural Society
From Charles W. Garfield, Secretary. This is the volume for 1885, and makes a large book of 513 pages. This society has had the wisdom to establish auxiliary societies in different counties of the Sta...
-Tommy's First Speaker
W. H. Harrison, Jr., publisher, Chicago, 1886. Not long ago our baby was desired by his teacher to choose some small piece and recite. The whole library was ransacked, but little suitable to a l...
-Through The Yellowstone Park On Horseback
By Geo. W. Wingate. New York: Orange Judd Co. 1886. The wonders of the Yellowstone is now an old story, and yet it is one or those rare instances where it is not difficult to lend fresh interest to a ...
-The Law Concerning Farms, Farmers And Farm Laborers, Together With The Game Laws Of All The States
By Henry Austin, of the Boston Bar. Published by Charles C. Soule, Boston. 1886. One of the last things for any sane person to do is to go to law. But people need not buy this book in order to lear...
-Dock - Not Burdock
Mr. T. S. Gold, West Cornwall, Conn., kindly corrects as follows : Did you copy an error or was it a slip of the pen when you speak of the ' common Burdock' as 'Rumex?' The Burdock is Lappa and wide...
-The Eglantine
A correspondent inquires whether she is not correct insisting that the Eglantine of English poetry is the Sweet-brier? This has been so often gone over in these pages, that only for the inquiry it wou...
-New Or Rare Plants
A correspondent says : Last fall I saw an 'Encyclopaedia of Gardening,' published in London, in 1825, and was surprised to see mention of things that have been offered as new' within the last ten yea...
-Thrips
Vis-a-vis writes: I feel like joining you in your half-hearted protest against using thrips for the singular as well as for the plural, for there is no real reason why we should adopt the whole gra...
-Germantown, Pa., Horticultural Society
At the June meeting of the Germantown, (Pa.) Horticultural Society, there were exhibits of cut roses, the best ever seen at any of the meetings. As showing what sorts are considered the best, the anne...
-The Nurserymen's Convention
The meeting at Washington was a great success. Some three hundred members were in attendance. Col. Colman's address of welcome was warmly applauded. The officers for next year are C. L. Watrous of Iow...
-Horticultural Society Of New Mexico
Even this far-away part of our territory has grown in wealth and intelligence to the degree that impels it to take so great an interest in horticulture as to start a horticultural society. Mr. Arthur ...
-The Holland Premiums At The Pennsylvania Show
Mr. C. Eisele, Philadelphia, says: Allow me to call your attention to an error in the May number of the Gardeners' Monthly, in reference to the Holland Medals awarded at the Spring Exhibition of the...
-August. Number 332. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The gaiety given to gardens by the massing of colored leaved plants would be sadly missed if the fashion were abolished. Indeed, where mere general effect in gardening is desired this system of beddin...
-Communications. Encouraging Flower. Love In The Young
The wider diffusion of a taste for agriculture, or floriculture, than now exists, would have the effect to elevate the moral and intellectual calibre of the rising generation. In this connection, I wo...
-Flowering Of The Hovenia Dulcis
On the grounds of the Misses Drexel, at Torres-dale, Pa., there flowered for the first time the above-named tree, in the month of June last. I do not remember reading any account of its flowering else...
-West Laurel Hill Cemetery
We do not read every day about the horticultural features of a cemetery. But there is often more to admire than marble, slate and monuments. Particularly is this the case with West Laurel Hill Cemeter...
-Good Pansies
Passing a friend's garden recently there they were in all their original loveliness, the wild English pansies! Small they were, to be sure, but still lovely. The single blooms were no larger than ordi...
-Flowers For Graveyards
The New York correspondent of the Philadelphia Ledger, referring to the Decoration Day ceremonies in New York, says: Apropos of the day itself the Hour makes a timely suggestion, namely, as a grea...
-The Japan Climbing Hydrangea
This has not been found a good nurseryman's plant, as it takes too long to get started on a rapid run, and the American mind takes more stock in something like the gourd of Jonah that will cover a hou...
-Roses And The Rose Beetle
As a general rule, the rose, mock-orange, many spiraeas, magnolia glauca, and many other things, have their flowers utterly ruined by the rose beetle, entomologi-cally known as Macrodactylus sub-spino...
-Gardening In Brazil
Every part of the world has its special fancy, and in Brazil the cala-dium is the chief delight of the 'gardener, and forms no mean feature in ornamental gardening. In the vicinity of Rio de Janeiro t...
-Japan Gardening
Park's Floral Magazine says: Many of the plants cultivated in Japan to-day have been introduced from Europe and America. The Rose, Azalea, Lotus, Wistaria and others are grown for ornament, and in a...
-Japan Umbrella Pine
One of the largest specimens of the Sciadopitys in Europe is, according to the Garten Zeitung, a fine specimen growing in the garden of Max Daniel Wolterbeck, at Valkenburg, near Arnheim, in Holland. ...
-Large Pleasure Grounds
Some of our public parks are of great extent, but the best of these will not compare with some of the private grounds of the Old World. Longleat, the seat of the Marquis of Bath, is enclosed by a fenc...
-The Kamtschatca Rose
This beautiful red rose, which has been under culture near Philadelphia for nearly a hundred years, and which proves to be not materially distinct in a botanical sense from Rosa rugosa, recently intro...
-Indigofera Dosua
In gardens there is a dearth of good ornamental shrubs to flower about midsummer. Those which flower from old wood are about over, while the fall flowerers, or those which bloom at the end of spring g...
-Varying Leaves In Ivy
A correspondent from Dunreith, Ind., asks : Does the common English ivy often bloom freely? The form I have in mind is largely planted in the forests in England and Scotland, and the commonest seen i...
-Aerides Virens
The dark, green-leaved air plant, AErides vi-rens, is a very beautiful epiphytal orchidaceous plant. It is a native of Java, from whence it was introduced by Messrs. Loddiges of the Hackney nurseries ...
-Heating Small Greenhouses
Many lovers of flowers would like to have a small conservatory or greenhouse but are deterred by the expense and trouble of heating. The following method of heating was related to me by a gentleman wh...
-North Bridgewater, Mass. The Oil And Sulphur Remedy For Mildew
Ever since it became known that oil and sulphur combined is a safe and unfailing remedy for rose-mildew in greenhouses, several writers have treated the subject as unworthy of serious consideration. F...
-Destroying Cockroaches
Usually strewing powdered borax in the runs of cockroaches either destroys or drives them away. There may be situations where this may not be convenient to apply, when the following from the Gardeners...
-A Novelty In Window-Plant Culture
A few days ago I had a special request to go and call upon two lady friends of mine who reside a short distance off. Their principal object was to show me a very neat and handsome tuft of horse chestn...
-Chrysanthemum Stakes
Some day when the millenium of Chrysanthemum culture shall have been reached there will be no necessity for stakes; yet awhile they are desirable, and the following from Gardening Illustrated will be ...
-Double Bouvardias
The first double Bou-vardia (Alfred Neuner) sent out in the spring of 1881, created some amount of surprise, many being inclined to think that the description of it was exaggerated, but when it flower...
-Orchids For Cut Flowers
The London Journal of Horticulture says : Many Orchids continue in flower for a great time, either from the duration of the individual flowers or their production in succession over an extended p...
-Orange And Lemon Trees
A correspondent who has some seedling oranges, desires to know if they will bear without being grafted; or if they bear, whether the fruit will be good for anything. A seedling orange or lemon will...
-New Tea-Noisette Rose, "Namenlose Schone"
France and England have so far divided between them the honor of introducing new roses that have become popular with the florists. Here we have a competitor from Germany, introduced by the well and re...
-August. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
It is often a subject of comment how long it takes the world to profit by a good idea, and the potting of young strawberry plants, preparatory to setting out in autumn, is a case in point. It is getti...
-Communications. A Tree Planting Machine
I have a working model which plants matches, as trees, in a box of sand, with a success that demonstrates the answer to that most natural question, Will it work? It will work, not only as a tree pla...
-Some Notes From Richmond, Va
Notwithstanding almost daily rains from May 8th to the end of the season, strawberries did very well in this section, yielding fairly and commanding moderately good prices. Subjoined are notes of a fe...
-The Early Richmond Cherry
In the vicinity of Philadelphia it would be hard to find a more popular cherry than the Early Richmond. There are two reasons for this. One is, that owing to the immense number of robins - which, by t...
-California Apricots
The crop in California is very large this year, and numbers have been successfully sent to the East. They were quite abundant on the fruit stands in Philadelphia during the first week in June, and exc...
-Cleaning Oranges
The black smut which discolors oranges grown in many orchards has until lately been removed by washing the oranges before boxing them for shipment. Until a few weeks ago one shipper in Orange employed...
-A Remarkable New Vegetable - A Tuberous Mustard
The natural order, Cruciferae, has given us a number of our most esteemed vegetables. The radish, turnip and cabbage all belong to this order, and all have varieties with tuberous roots. Now the musta...
-Murdochs' Biggareau And Rostraver Big-Gareau Cherries
We have the following note with fruit from Messrs. Murdoch: This accompanies prepaid samples of two new cherries that we expect to put upon the market in the Fall of 1887 - Murdochs' Biggareau and Ro...
-Woolly Aphis On Apples. Black Aphis On Cherries
We have before us two letters - one from New York, talking of having to give up cherry growing because of the Black Aphis, and one from Virginia, similarly disheartened because of the aphis on the app...
-A Fine Pig-Nut Hickory
As we read in the books, the Pig-nut Hickory is a native of the forests of the United States and Canada, usually growing about 60 feet high, but occasionally reaching 100. On the grounds of Geo. W. ...
-The Best Forest Trees For American Planters
It must not be forgotten that America is a large place; when we talk of American forestry, we may have in mind any thing from a palm to a pine tree. There are doubtless spots in this large place where...
-Alder Wood
The Alder on the northwest coast grows large enough to make canoes, and in the north of Europe the species indigenous grow to a large size. In our efforts at timber culture in the near future there wi...
-Gopher-Root
There is a very curious tree quite common in this vicinity which I have never seen noticed, or if I have seen it, it was so obscured by unintelligible name and description that I did not recognize it....
-A Rare Monstrosity
Recently while admiring an unusually large spike of the Yucca filamentosa and courting the acquaintance of the little dusty-millers which haunt and seem to operate these fairy flower-mills, I came a...
-Cause Of The Potato Disease
I see by your June number that in America as in England a belief exists that the potato disease is caused by Peronospora infestans and not that the fungus is the effect of disease. This, the first cau...
-The Strawberry. Fungus
The strawberry fungus, Ramularia fragaria, which causes the misnamed sun-scald on strawberry leaves, and eventually causes varieties to run out, is not nearly as bad in the vicinity of Philadelph...
-A Fly-Catcher
A daily paper says : A mosquito-catcher (Drosera dichotoma) is among the rare insectivorous plants in the Botanical Gardens at Washington. Nature lost a big opportunity to supply a long felt want whe...
-Non-Bearing Strawberry Plants
The English gardening periodicals are still arguing whether there really are bearing and non-bearing strawberry plants; some contending that their strawberry beds occasionally become barren. The Engli...
-Seedless Fruits
Fruits of all kinds may be grown without seed by reversing the cion - rooting the top end of the cion. To do this, you can bend the cion to sprout down, and cover it with dirt, and after rooting cut...
-Apples On A Grape-Vine
A Philadelphia correspondent says: The imperfect specimen of an abnormal growth on a grape-vine I beg to hand you, and am sorry that I could not hand it to you in a better state of preservation. The ...
-Wild Sweet William
Mrs. S. F., Washington, D. C, notes : Please tell me the name of the beautiful wild flower I send. Unfortunately it has faded, but I suppose enough is left to answer the purpose. I am from Centra...
-Brief And Expressive Names For Fruits And Flowers
Agricultural exchanges are still discussing the propriety of short and expressive names for fruits and flowers. It seems strange that there should be any dispute about it. The parent of a Spanish Prin...
-The Rose Of Sharon
Following Miller, the Althaea is generally regarded in America as the Rose of Sharon. We give the following, from Gardening Illustrated, as showing that no one yet seems certain what plant was referre...
-Notes On The History Of Fruit Culture In Georgia
The Augusta Chronicle, celebrating its one hundredth year, gives a history of the industries of Georgia. In relation to fruit culture, we learn that on the income of De Leon, De Soto and others in the...
-Introduction Of The Moss Rose
We have referred to many old authorities, and the results of our search are that Parkinson in his Paradisus, published in 1629, Rea in his Flora, published in 1665, and Banhin in his Pinax, publ...
-Varieties Of Perfume In The Rose
In roses there is a national interest; their scents are especially interesting, and, I am sure, to none more so than to our lady gardeners, whose delicacy of discrimination in matters of perfume will ...
-The Honest And The Rascally Tree Pedlar
Mr. C. E. Barnes, in an admirable address recently given before the Summitt County (Ohio) Horticultural Society, draws a proper distinction between the cheat and the fair dealer among tree pedlars. In...
-The Bo-Tree At Anuradhapura
If the stories about the original Bo-tree at Buddha Gaya can be believed, it is said to have been planted by Brahma himself. The Buddhists attribute it to Dutugemunu, King of Ceylon. One account of th...
-Horrible Names For Innocent Flowers
At a meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. Manning, the secretary said, that the agitation of this subject was begun nearly forty years ago, when rules of pomology were adopted by ...
-Historical Jottings On The Mushroom
Our English word mushroom certainly comes from the French, mousseron, and that again from an old word of doubtful derivation, yet which is possibly traceable to mucus in the Greek and Latin, allud...
-James Y. Murkland
James Y. Murkland died suddenly at his residence at Hackensack, N. J., on the 16th inst. He had been ailing for the past five or six years with disease of the lungs, and there was no hope that he woul...
-John Nisbet
Among the earlier of the most valuable contributors and friends of the Gardeners' Monthly Mr. Nisbet held a prominent place. He was one of the most intelligent of the highly educated race of gardeners...
-Contribution To The History Of Certain Species Of Conifers
By Dr. Maxwell T. Masters. London : reprinted from the Linnaean Society's Journal. The links that have marked the evolution of the different forms of coniferae have, in many cases, not dropped out,...
-Catalogue Of Books And Papers Relating To The Fertilization Of Flowers
Compiled by D'Arcy W. Thompson, of the University of Cambridge. Published by McMillan & Co., London. The interest manifested in the subject of the cross-fertilization of flowers may be illustrated by ...
-The Bridle Bits
A treatise on horsemanship. By Colonel Battersby. New York : Orange Judd Company. 1886. Col. Battersby is famous as a rider. As a member of Sheridan's corps in the army of Virginia, his feats of ho...
-Russian Olive
B. F., Lincoln, Neb., says. Will you please inform an appreciative reader, what is the Russian Olive advertised by some of our nurserymen, as well adapted to our northern climate? I am interested i...
-August. Horticultural Societies. Editorial Notes
The meeting of Florists to be held in Philadelphia this summer, will, I believe, be an event long remembered by the commercial plant growers of the country. The occasion being the second annual conven...
-The American Nurserymen's Association
In the debate on the place of next meeting the urgent demand of Texas was overruled, on the ground that in summer it is too hot. When a member leaves home and gets caught in a warm wave, he generall...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The new President, Dr. Henry P. Walcott, gave his inaugural address on the 2d of January. It was very well received by the members, and his presidency promises to be a very successful one. Horticul...
-September. Number 333. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Whoever has travelled in the South at midsummer must have been struck with the great beauty of the old neglected fence-rows, covered with Trumpet Creeper, and all ablaze with their fiery red blossoms,...
-Communications. Color And Form In Trees
Some time ago a paper was read before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, in which variations in form and color of trees were treated with contempt. It did not seem worth while to answer it at th...
-Color And Form In Trees. Part 2
He also writes : Nor can much be said of that class of horticultural productions known as weeping trees. I differ with him in this opinion, for I think much can be said. The broad cathedral form...
-Color And Form In Trees. Part 3
Where are our October forests, of which all the world, both artists and artisans, recognize the beauty, when purple and gold, silver and scarlet, wave their banners to show what monstrosities they...
-September. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Eggs and larvae of small insects get protection in the wood work of greenhouses and conservatories, and the best gardeners give all a thorough cleansing once a year. Where neatness is a feature of a p...
-Communications. Pitcher Plants - Nepenthes
The Pitcher Plants (Nepenthes) form the only known genus or family of the botanical order Nepenthaceae. They are wonderful and beautiful children of Nature, and richly reward examination. There are ab...
-Cost Of Small Boilers
The communication of Loring W. Puffer in the August Monthly, relating to heating small greenhouses, is full of sound sense, and a good article in every particular with the exception of the last senten...
-Iron Or Steel Greenhouses
A circular of the Manly & Cooper Manufacturing Company, respecting iron greenhouses, leads us to inquire of our readers what has been the experience of any of them of late years. They are in favorable...
-Colored Flowers At Funerals
The following is taken from the advertisement of a Philadelphia florist in a city paper. It has ever been a puzzle with intelligent people that black should be a mourning color for dresses and funeral...
-Glazing Without Putty
In our May number we made the remark that the quality of putty was of no consequence to greenhouse builders as it is no longer used on the best work. This assertion of ours has evoked a good deal of c...
-Culture Of Asparagus Tenuissimus
Mrs, H. L. D., Ketchum, Idaho, writes: Will you please give me information in next issue of Gardeners' Monthly in regard to soil, temperature, etc., of Asparagus tenuissimus? I have had one two ye...
-September. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
We were telling an old amateur gardener recently, whose back seemed almost breaking with the heavy work of earthing up celery, that there was little need of such hard labor in these days. There were t...
-Communications. Blanching Celery
I have for two seasons practiced the following plan for handling celery preparatory for winter keeping : I take a ball of strong cotton wick, and gathering up the stalks of the end plant of a row, tie...
-Downing's Everbearing Mulberry
There are but few persons who know what a good thing this mulberry is. Owing to the efforts made to introduce the Morus alba for silk-worm culture, many more of this sort are met with than of any othe...
-Bees Injuring Grapes
It is still contended that bees do not injure grapes or other fruits. It is not denied that they eat the fruit, but *' something else must puncture the skin to enable them to do so. If the puncture...
-Firming The Soil
Considering that the best farmers so long knew the advantage of rolling their fields after seed-sowing, it was always a matter of surprise that the practice had never become part of good gardening, an...
-Transplanting Wild Blackberries
F. B., Cannelton, Pa., has a very fine blackberry wild; also, a white variety with it, that he desires to remove to his garden in fall. It will be very important to separate them carefully, to prev...
-Fruiting Of English Hazel And Filbert Trees
C, Villa Nova, Pa., says: Can you give me information in regard to an English hazelnut tree or trees. The owner complains of their never having borne, but this year they have quite a quantity on....
-Seedling Cherry Specimens From J. G. Burrow, Fishkill, N. Y
It is not possible in these days, when varieties are so abundant, to give the value of a new one from specimens alone. Merits must be comparative; and only the competitors, growing side by side, will ...
-English Gooseberries
A correspondent from Taunton, Bristol Co., Mass., writes: I take the liberty to send you, by today's mail, some sample gooseberries, for your opinion. From the original bush, which was on my place w...
-Grafting Quince On The Thorn
In our last there was an inquiry about grafting the Quince on the Crataegus or Hawthorn. Mr. Thos. J. Edge, Secretary of the Pennsylvania State Board of Agriculture, kindly furnishes the following ...
-Kelsey's Japan Plum
W. F. B., says: If any disinterested person has fruited Kelsey's Japan Plum, I would like a full report of it. If it will bear freely when the curculio destroys the European varieties and the quali...
-Raspberries For Massachusetts
W. H. F., Wood's Holl, Mass., writes: You would oblige 'W. H. F.' very much if you would let me know in your next number of the Gardeners' Monthly, which are the best raspberries for an exposed pla...
-American Trees For American Planting
A correspondent says : Note in N. Y. Tribune of last Monday, July 9, a criticism of Sargent's notes on trees, and the writer's own opinion of the worth-lessness of foreign ornamental trees. The last ...
-Douglas' Railroad Plantings At Farling-Ton, Kansas
The Prairie Farmer gives an in. teresting account of a visit to these forests, which occupy 520 acres. Five miles from this is the forest planted by Douglas for Mr. Hunnewell, of Boston, who wa...
-The Rosewood
The leading tree that yields rosewood has been supposed to be Jacaranda mimosaefolia. The proceedings of the Botanical Society of Edinburg give the following as the latest information in regard to it:...
-Native Locality For Robinia Viscosa
In August number of Gardeners' Monthly, p. 228, in speaking of the Clammy Locust, (Robinia viscosa) you say, It is remarkable that this species, discovered by Michaux in the Caro-linas, has never...
-Leucophyllum Texanum
It is a wonder to me, why some horticulturist has not preceded me in introducing this very desirable shrub to the general public. My attention was first drawn to it, in its native haunts on the Neuces...
-"Desirable Native Shrubs Of South Carolina" By Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson
I have thought that an article upon some few of our most desirable native shrubs might prove interesting to some readers of Gardeners' Monthly. Our whole State has, according to Mr. H. W. Ravenel, ...
-Duration Of Individual Plants
A very serious question has been agitated since a great many years: that of the extinction of varieties by time. About twenty years ago, it was discussed in our horticultural papers, and then the grea...
-Migrations Of Plants
Plants, like human beings, are continually extending the area of settlements, and forms new to old localities are continually appearing. Thus the local botanist never feels that he has found all that ...
-Botanical Names And Common Names
A correspondent sends us a plant which he says is the Gopher root, and asks for its botanical name. We wrote that Michaux had named it Chryso-balanus oblongifolius. In return, the following bomb has e...
-Freaks Of Taste
It is interesting to watch the fluctuations in tastes and diversity of opinions as they go and come in connection with flowers. So changeable are we that at one time we are found admiring a plant, and...
-Telegraph Plant: Desmodium Gyrans
The sensitiveness to touch of the well-known Sensitive Plant (Mimosa pudica) and Dionaea is singular enough, but the movements of the leaves of this Desmodium seem still more curious, and up to the pr...
-The Health Of Gardeners
At a recent conference held at the Health Exhibition, it appeared from some statistics collected by Dr. Ord, that gardeners had a better chance of life than any other class, out of some eighty specifi...
-Ladies As Members In Scientific Bodies
Noticing the refusal of an eminent scientific body to receive a lady to membership, and the action of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences in receiving them to full membership, a Cincinnati co...
-Vitality Of Sago Palms
It does not do to throw these away when they appear to be dead. The writer has known Encephalartos from South Africa remain without showing any signs of life for several years. Similar instances are o...
-The American Florist
In our note on the American Beauty Rose in our last, we referred to the Florist. The American Florist was of course referred to, as there is no other magazine of the name now - the English Florist and...
-The Mulberry Silk-Worm, With Instructions
By C. V. Riley. Printed by the United States Department of Agriculture. With the newly awakened interest in silk culture this work is timely and useful. What is said of raising plants from cuttings...
-Transactions Of The Massachusetts Horticultural Society For 1885
From Robert Manning, Secretary. Progressive horticulture owes a great deal to its Massachusetts votaries, and especially those resident in the vicinity of Boston. The interest they show in their Ho...
-Transactions Of The Massachusetts Horticultural Society For 1885. Part 2
There are spaces left open for undetermined varieties, but the garden now contains 690 species and 250 varieties, with the possibility that from four to six hundred new species or varieties will be a...
-Transactions Of The Massachusetts Horticultural Society For 1885. Part 3
The following extract from the Bulletin of the Bussey Institution will be of interest to all, even if the facts are known to some: 'In the spring of 1872, the President and Fellows of Harvard College...
-Books on Horses
How To Handle And Educate Vicious Horses By Oscar R. Gleason. The Percheron Horse In America By M. C. Weld; In France By Charles Du Hays. New York: Orange Judd Co., 1886. These two works b...
-Hard And Easy Names
A florist who is a German does not think the English names of plants any easier than Latin ones, and even the English names used in florists' work worry him considerably. He thinks Dutch names might b...
-Roses In Egypt
B. writes: I enclose a slip that I have just enjoyed from a very readable ladies' article on roses: ' Cleopatra, at one of her receptions to Marc Antony, caused roses to be massed on the floor o...
-Management Of American Horticultural Societies
Much is found commendable, by English journals, in the management of American Horticultural Societies. The Gardeners' Chronicle says: The fifteenth annual report of the Michigan Horticultural Soci...
-Georgia State Horticultural Society
The annual meeting was held at Fort Valley, in the last week of July. Mr. J. H. Parnell, the Peach King of the South, Dr. Hape, Dr. Brown, Dr. Cary, Col. Geo. W. Waring, the Bishop of Florida, Messrs....
-New York Horticultural Society
The building known as Horticultural Hall, costing $110,000, was not found light and airy enough, and has recently been sold for $75,000 - a loss of $35,000, which has been borne by the bondholders pro...
-California Nurserymen's Association
The leading nurserymen of the State have formed an association, the objects of which shall be to promote the general interests of the members: First - In the cultivation of acquaintance. Second - In a...
-Missouri State Horticultural Society
The summer meeting will be held at Louisiana, Missouri, on the 8th and 9th of June. Mr. L. A. I Goodman, of Westport, Missouri, tells us that the free entertainment for all the members will be offered...
-The Society Of American Florists
This institution has reason to be proud of the commemoration in Philadelphia of its second birthday. The number of intelligent men and women who attended, representing the trade, all the way from the ...
-October. Number 334. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The dear old-fashioned flower garden, which consisted of little more than a two or three feet border through or around a vegetable garden, is still one of the best places to pass a pleasant hour among...
-Communications. Some Notes On The China Tree
The China tree, Melia azedarach, is one of our quickest growing and most valued shade trees. Shall I venture to tell you more about it than Gray does? I say venture, because you, perhaps, know the tre...
-The Climbing Hydrangea
I first saw this in bloom in Col. Marshall P. Wilder's garden at Dorchester, Mass., some years ago. The plant was running up the stem of a living pear tree ivy-fashion. Since then I have seen it in bl...
-Grays Lily (Lilium Grayi)
You mention, p. 230: Lilium Grayi among a very large collection in Philadelphia, seems the earliest of any to flower. It was open on the 12th of June. So far as the earliest to bloom is concerned, I...
-Single Dahlias And Other Flowers
Single as well as double-flowered dahlias are beautiful and desirable and our hearts and gardens have room enough for both. Speaking of single asters and dogwood. By whom are single Annual asters ...
-Tuberose Bulbs Flowering After Hard Freezing
I much fear that I intrude myself too often upon the attention of readers of Gardeners' Monthly, but this time I hope I have something of an experience to relate that will prove interesting. This i...
-Mexican Poppies
The Argemons, or as they are popularly called, Prickly Poppies, are a group of exceedingly showy, free-flowering, hardy annual plants belonging to the natural order Papaveraceae. They are plants of...
-Red Aphis On Roses
W. H. G., Erie, Pa., writes: I notice this year, on my rose plants, a number of insects identical with the green aphis, so far as appearances are concerned, except that it is of a reddish color. ...
-October. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The quantity of the so-called Dutch bulbs in pots, for house decoration, has been surprisingly small during the few past years, in comparison with what is grown in other parts of the world, though it ...
-The Amaryllis
Genus Hippeastrum. I always read with much pleasure the various contributions on Amaryllis in your interesting and entertaining paper, especially Mr. Oberwetter's in the July number. I am an enthusias...
-The Amaryllis. Continued
I have the following hybrids in my collection : 1. Hippeastrum (Amaryllis) Johnsonii, Herb Across between Hippeastrum vittatum and Hippeastrum Reginae. Raised by Johnson in Lancashire, England, ...
-Namenlose Schone Rose
Every year brings its novelties of Roses, few of which are what they are represented to be. Through this fact one cannot complain that there is not much confidence shown in a novelty. Namenlose Schome...
-Aeschynanthus Pulcher
The pretty flowered AEschynanthus, AE. pulcher, is an epiphytal evergreen stove or warm greenhouse plant, belonging to the natural order Gesneraceae. It is a native of Java, and was discovered and int...
-Potting Hyacinths
As the season for potting Hyacinths, etc., is near at hand, and never having seen the method I practice, in print, although others may practice it, I deem it of some importance in the way of cleanline...
-October. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In preparing our Seasonable Hints it is interesting to note how much practical fruit culture advances. Practical men thought they knew something a quarter of a century ago, but no one would give the s...
-Bacteria And Pear Blight
A. N., Chicago, Ill., writes: In this State, pear blight has always been very destructive. There are some old trees, but millions have been swept away, where these have grown. Perhaps after we...
-Water Apple
It is over twenty years ago since we called the attention of our readers to this wonderful Pennsylvania apple, and yet little is known of it to-day. One of its class, the Smith's Cider, has managed to...
-The Strawberry Kings
People who enjoy everywhere delicious fruit at very moderate prices, scarcely stop to think of how much they are indebted to a few persevering men, who have settled in various districts, and by studyi...
-The Catawissa Raspberry
When we read here and there that this or that variety of fruit is no good, we must remember that this is usually from the market-growers' standpoint. The Catawissa Raspberry would not earn its salt...
-A New Raspberry, Rubus Phoenicolasius
This is a very handsome Bramble, striking at first sight from the shaggy crimson glandular hairs with which it is so plentifully beset, and from which it derives its name (phoenix, red, lasios, shaggy...
-Peculiar Ripening Of Pears
J. H. P., Dayton, Ohio, writes : A few words on the proper ripening of pears in your last number suggests that information from yourself, Pres. Wilder, or other competent authority on that subject...
-Soot
A Louisville, Ky., correspondent says : When you Eastern people talk of soot do you mean soot from the burning of wood, anthracite coal or bituminous coal? [Any one of them. In this part of...
-Improvement Of The Grape In Texas
The following letter was not intended for publication, but to keep the Editor posted on the work of grape improvement in Texas. But it contains so much of interest to everyone interested in the succes...
-Variation In The Lindley Grape
With samples, we have the two following notes from Mr. Lorin Blodgett, of Broad street, Philadelphia : I bring a sample of the growth of my Lindley this year - hoping to meet you here. I leave it ...
-The Bertrand Grape
We have received a bunch of this grape which we thought so delicious, especially in its juicy freedom from pulp, that we are prompted to introduce it by name to our readers. We have been very chary in...
-Forestry. Communications. The Uses Of Our Native Timber
The Live Oak is in great demand for ship building, but is becoming very scarce. Our matchless White Oak is used for wagons, railway cars, furniture and general framework. Rails and shingles are made o...
-Slow Or Fast Growing Oaks
It is surprising that the Oak has had the reputation of being a slow-growing tree. This reputation probably comes from the Old World, where the growth of the English Oak is acknowledged to be slow. In...
-Forestry
Magazines of forestry seem unfortunate. Forestry, an excellent magazine published in Edinburgh and London, has ceased publication. There is a wide spread sentiment that something should be done to pr...
-Additional Facts About The Mistletoe
Mr. Eisele speaks of this miserable parasite, as if it were to be dreaded here as in the apple orchards of the old world. It has been on a hackberry tree on my grounds, for more than twenty-five ye...
-Wild Plants In New Jersey
I noticed in a recent number of the Monthly some notes on the number of different species of plants that were found in going a mile in New York in comparison with California, and being curious to see ...
-Wild Flowers And Fruits Of Connecticut
We have spent our summer holiday of seven weeks among the Berkshire Hills where I have been amazed at the immense quantity of fruit in the vicinity of Great Barrington, Hillside, Winstead and Sheffiel...
-Zephyranthes Atamasco - The Su-Wanee Lily
When I traveled in Florida last April, I learned that the people of the Suwanee region call this fine Amaryllis the Suwanee Lily. It grows most luxuriantly on the banks of that far-famed river, and ...
-Pretty Wild Flowers Of Kansas
Those of your readers that have been through Kansas, know that we have a good country and a varied flora; but probably not many are aware of how many of our floral beauties are well worth a place in c...
-The Charleston Earthquake
Among the curiosities of the phenomena, was the sinking of a piece of land about 8 feet square, on which was a large peach tree growing, which was about 16 feet high. It went down perfectly perpendicu...
-Four-Leaved Clover
A New Jersey correspondent writes: What has gotten over the clovers this season? My daughter found this morning in about three-quarters of an hour 25 four-leaf clovers and 10 with five leaves. Is not...
-Silk Culture
Under the auspices of the Women's Silk Culture Association, of Philadelphia, the culture of the mulberry and silk raising generally, is becoming one of the great successful industries of the United St...
-The Gardeners' Monthly
As the season for renewing subscriptions is approaching the publisher expresses a hope that the friends of the work will kindly endeavor to send another subscription with their own. The lovers of inte...
-Travelers At Hotels
Horticulturists are great travelers. It may interest them to know that an American put up at the Adelphi Hotel at Liverpool, leaving $2500 in a valise in his room. It seems strange that an American wo...
-The Missouri Botanic Gardens
By one of the visitors to the Florists' Convention it was a pleasure to learn that, notwithstanding advancing years, the generous proprietor, Mr. Henry Shaw, was still enjoying robust health. He ha...
-Apollos Walcott Harrison
Following close on the death of the admirable Secretary of the New York Horticultural Society, Pennsylvania meets with a similar loss in the death of Secretary Harrison. He departed but a few weeks be...
-John Stevenson
Only recently did we hear of the death of this excellent landscape gardener, to whom so many of the pretty gardens about Philadelphia are indebted for their landscape beauty. He will be remembered by ...
-Abies Amabilis
A beautiful specimen of this tree, some eight feet high, is on the grounds of Mr. Caleb Cope, at Chestnut Hill, near Philadelphia. It is of the variety known as Abies lasiocarpa. Of the Conifers ...
-First Annual Report Of The Ohio Forestry Bureau
From Adolph Leue, Secretary, Columbus, Ohio. One cannot but admire the disinterested zeal with which so many good people follow the forestry question, though candor compels one to say little see...
-The Exhibition
The sudden death of Secretary Harrison but a few weeks before the exhibition threatened to throw everything into confusion; but the horticulturists of Philadelphia seemed so impressed by his loss as t...
-Cut-Flower Work
These seem to be the great attractions with the multitude. We hardly know how it is possible for the judges to give satisfaction. The premiums are for the best design, and just what this means is i...
-Cut Garden Flowers
A great improvement on the old style of Petunias, are the new double-fringed edge kinds. Mr. H. A. Dreer had a first premium for a fine lot of these. He had also a special premium for Verbenas, which ...
-Aquatics
There were hosts of admirers around the water tanks of E. D. Sturtevant, of Bordentown, New Jersey. His flowers drew hundreds to see the exhibition. He has succeeded in naturalizing the famous Egyptia...
-Pot Plants
These were fully up to the cultural attainments of last year, and the species of plants exhibited had little that was novel. Mr. Dreer's gloxinias were very attractive. He had several hundred in 3 and...
-Hydrangeas
These are almost indispensable to the florist for work that is to keep some time without fading readily, and they make excellent pot and tub flowers. Mr. Warne, gardener to Clarence H. Clark, had some...
-Lilacs In August
It was a great treat to see White Lilacs in bloom in August, but it was still surprising to note that they were from small stocky plants in 5 and 6-inch pots. Just how this was all done Ernest Asmus, ...
-The Reception At Mr. Childs'
One thousand one hundred of the florists and their friends, were entertained by Mr. Childs, at his beautiful grounds at Wootton. When the party had assembled in the woods near the house, Mr. Childs wa...
-New York Chrysanthemum Show
This will be held on the 2d of November and following days, at Cosmopolitain Hall, 41st and Broadway. Mr. John Thorpe is Secretary for the time being, in place of James Y. Murkland, deceased suffer fi...
-Communications. Abelia Rupertris
In Henderson's Hand Book of Plants he describes Abelia as a small genus of greenhouse plants bearing rose-colored or dark crimson flowers, and that Abelia rupertris flowers profusely in autumn and w...
-Floral Taste. Ry Valentin Burgevin
It is gratifying to note how the taste for floriculture has developed and is increasing from year to year and becoming universal. Therefore a few words of encouragement and advice will not be out of p...
-Queen Of The West Geranium
Considering all the qualities that unite to constitute a good geranium, one of the best, as well as most popular of this portion of the country is the Queen of the West. It is an old variety, but time...
-The Best New Roses To Be Sent Out In France, November 1st, 1886
Tea, Viviand Morel (Bernaix) Flowers large, dark cherry red, slightly yellowish, lighter in the centre when expanded. New shade. Very free bloomer, fine trusses. Tea, Madame Scipion Cochet (Bern...
-Exacum Affine And Begonia Socotrana - Two Socrotan Gems
If the individual plants of this recently introduced annual would grow to the same size and flower at the same time, it would be a decided acquisition to the list of bedding stuff; but it has a most e...
-Shade Trees
Dr. L. W. Puffer tells the people of Brockton, N. Y., that it is absurd to select a tree that will have a span of head 40 feet, and then plant them but 10 feet apart. About three times as many trees a...
-The Golden Yew
There is not much en- couragement for silver leaved variegations in our ornamental trees, - the white portions dying under hot suns. But golden tints prove fast colors, as the ladies say, - and the mo...
-The American Mist Tree
According to Mr. Falconer, in the Country Gentleman, this grows much faster than the European Rhus Cotinus. It is one of the rarest of American plants, for though long ago discovered and described ...
-The Smoke Tree
Bless the dear old Smoke tree, says the Rural New Yorker, a sentiment every lover of good hardy shrubs will echo, who has knowledge of it. It should, however, be borne in mind, that the plant belon...
-Noisette, William Allen Richardson
Journal des Roses gives a colored plate and a full account of this rose. It was raised in 1875 by Madame Ducher, of Lyons, and sent out in 1887. It was named for the well-known rose-lover of Kentucky....
-Choiseya Ternata
This very sweet-flowered evergreen is regarded as hardy in England. A very healthy plant left out last winter to test was entirely destroyed, though the circumstances were rather favorable than otherw...
-Sanitary Influence Of Trees
P. H. F., Babylon, N. Y., says : On the subject of the sanitary effect of our best native hardy forest trees, as to planting in cities, etc., I have made inquiries from different sources and can f...
-Southern Buckthorn
A correspondent from near Jefferson City sends us a specimen for name, which proves to be this plant, Bumelia lycoides of botanists. It has not been found by collectors north of this line we believe. ...
-Moles
J. N. B., Red House Farm, New London, Conn., writes: I, in common with my neighbors, have been greatly troubled by ground moles. They tear up our lawns and tennis grounds, upset our plants in the ...
-Stapelia Hardy In Texas
Mrs. Dr. H., Palestine, Texas, writes: I enclose a rough sketch of a cactus, not native to this part of the State, though perfectly hardy, and survived last winter out in the yard. There were only...
-Plants And Trees At Pencoyd, Montgomery County, Pa
A correspondent says: In a hurried call on your correspondent, Mr. Wooding, gardener to Mrs. Roberts, at Pencoyd, I was much interested in a fine specimen of the Pinsapo fir, Abies Pinsapo, as it is ...
-November. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In managing house plants, one of the difficulties is the struggle with insects. There are now many kinds of oils and washes sold by florists, that are found very effective; but, when applied in the us...
-Communications. Drying Flowers For Parlor Ornaments
The Marsh Rosemary, or Sea Lavender, Statice Limonium, is at its brightest on the salt marshes now, reminding us that it is time to cut it for winter bouquets. I have dried it by wrapping old newspape...
-Floral Emblems
At page 266 of the September number of the Monthly you touch on the signification of flowers, quoting from an advertisement from your city paper in reference to colored flowers at funerals. While I be...
-Aristolochia Elegans. By. G. W. O
This new Brazilian flowered with us for the first time a few weeks ago, and what a pleasing surprise ! With leaves quite as small as those of A. ciliata, the flowers in size come near those of A. giga...
-A New Method Of Glazing Sash
It is well known that all glass now (both in portable sashes and in fixed greenhouses), is simply imbedded in putty, and kept in place by glazier's points, no putty being now used on top, as was forme...
-Funeral Wreaths
I am glad to be able to agree heartily with Veronica on the subject of floral wreaths and crosses at funerals. A custom overdone often brings its own condemnation. A few flowers or even sprigs of fo...
-Button-Hole Roses For Autumn And Winter
Tea-scented roses are the most suitable for producing blooms for button-holes during autumn and winter, but it is essential that the best varieties be chosen. A good selection would be, De-voniensis (...
-Cape Plants
The Revue Horticole gives a colored plate of the Burchellia capensis, or rather a large variety of this very old plant, of which even a colored plate will delight the heart of those old-fashioned gard...
-A New Maiden-Hair Fern, Adiantum Fra-Grantissima
Maiden-hair ferns, or Adiantums, are very numerous; but few can compete with it in special beauty. But another unique one has appeared, which seems to have some merit equal to that of the Farley's Mai...
-Narcissus Growing
In the Channel Islands, between England and France, there has come a windfall in the recent fashionable turn for Narcissuses - they are grown by the hundreds of thousands as tuberoses are here. But wi...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Profitable Plums
The practical results growing out of orchard culture of the plum seem to be demonstrated in this market; more plums being brought to market than could be sold at any price, and large quantities remain...
-The Tuberous Rooted Grapes
Everything new in relation to grape culture has an especial interest to Americans, and hence we called attention a couple of years ago, to the discovery of some herbaceous species with tuberous roots,...
-Vitis Martinii
The Superintendent in the report of the Botanical and Afforestation Department of Hong Kong, 1885, states that this 'new tuberous rooted vine from Cochin China, fruited this year in Hong Kong for the ...
-Classes Of Pears
We quote the following from the Gardeners Magazine, accounting for the names various classes of pears have received : Bergamot is a collective name for a distinct class of pears. A Bergamot pear t...
-Figs
From a paper by Dr. Eisen, on fig culture in California, we learn that in the best fig-growing countries there are three crops a year. When the leaves die in the fall, a fig comes from the axil, on th...
-Horse-Radish Culture
Mr. A. Hamman, writing to the Florida Dispatch, says : In the State of New Jersey, my former home, I planted on moist soil, in banks 3 feet apart, 18 inches apart in the row. The average weight i...
-Potash As A Protection Against Peach Yellows
F. M., Vineland, N. J., writes: Is it clearly demonstrated that potash is a protection against yellows? I want to set out a large orchard, and would gladly invest in a supply of potash when plantin...
-Grape Mildew
A French correspondent says: You most likely know, that after having been invaded by the Oidium and by the Phylloxera, our vineyards are now subject to the mildew. The Oidium is beaten by sulphur. Th...
-Productiveness Of The Lindley Grape
Mr. Lorin Blodget, Broad street, Philadelphia, says: I am greatly obliged by your generous notice of my grapes. They are abundant yet, and if I could send conveniently I would put up a box in fine c...
-Blackman Plum
Mr. W. W. Stell, Paris, Texas, says: This plum is offered for sale in almost every fruit catalogue I receive; I wish to know if any one has ever fruited it and what of the quality of fruit, and at wh...
-Quality Of The Kieffer Pear
B. F.: We do not know that there is any good to be gained by inviting the opinions of eminent men on the quality of this fruit, for, as we have recently noted, their opinions must necessarily va...
-Forestry. Communications. Forestry - The Adirondack Wilderness
Having spent part of three years in the great Adirondack wilderness, N. Y., allow me to say a few words in favor of these grand old woods. I am inclined to speak very highly of this place, but d...
-Forests And Climate
-An exchange, inspired by the last year's report of the New York Forestry Commission on its table, says: In Kansas, the plantings of the new settlers have already carried the rainy belt farther we...
-Cercidiphyllum Japonicum
At the Centennial, the Japanese had specimens of wood of a forest tree that seemed hitherto unknown, and yet bore evidence of great value. The tree has since been imported, and besides its probable va...
-The Largest Douglas Spruce In England
It has been supposed that this noble Spruce would not grow as tall in its own country as on the western coasts of the New World. But the following from the Gardeners' Chronicle, alluding to the pinetu...
-The Cherry Or Mahogany Birch
This tree, native of the Eastern United States and Canada, seems to be growing in popularity for its timber in the old world, and it may be of interest to American forest planters to examine how far i...
-Improved Method Of Preserving Wood
The improved French method of preserving wood by the application of lime is found to work well. The plan is to pile the planks in a tank, and to-put over all a layer of quicklime, which is gradually s...
-A Gigantic Oak
One of the sights of Paris at this moment consists in the trunk of a gigantic oak placed in an iron boat especially constructed for the purpose, and moored in the Seine near the Pont de la Concorde. A...
-Forest Fires
A daily paper remarks: Great forest fires are reported from various parts of the country, and in every case it is stated that nothing can save the woods except soaking rain storms. New York is try...
-Hard And Soft Maples
Dasycarpum says: While crossing the Alleghenies en route to the Florists' Convention in August, the conversation turned upon shade trees, and among them maples; and as there appeared to be some amb...
-Blooming Of The Sweet-Potato
A correspondent says : Did you ever see a sweet potato bloom? As largely as we plant them in the South I have never seen but one; I made a picture of it. We had a friend who on one acre of ground ma...
-Wild Flowers Of The Adirondacks, By Thomas Bennett
After a sojourn of nearly three months in the great Adirondack wilderness, N. Y. State, I find myself at home again, much improved in health, and on looking over my notes I have thought a few remarks ...
-The Mangrove
The Mangrove (Botanical Order, Rhizophora-ceae) is one of nature's most interesting and wonderful products. There are about twenty species of the Mangrove, all of which are natives of the tropics. It ...
-Bacteria, In Their Relation To Disease
Prof. Burrill in a recent lecture at Chautauqua, contends that it is fully demonstrated that Bacteria cause disease and are not the product thereof. We hardly know in what way this has been demonstrat...
-Humble Bees And Clover
The American Horticulturist says that Prof. Shelton, of the Kansas Agricultural College, remarked some time since, that in ' Kansas bumble bees are almost unknown. It is safe to say that not one clov...
-Disappearance Of The Mistletoe
A few years ago, says Mr. Hillenmeyer of Lexington, hardly a walnut tree in Fayette Co., Ky., but was full of Mistletoe. Today a cluster of this plant is quite rare. A careful examination last winter ...
-Purslane
The Germans, in olden time, were fond of this as a vegetable, and tradition says that its presence as a weed in our country is due to its escape from German-Pennsylvania gardens. We fancy it would hav...
-Fertilizing Flowers By Insects
Those who have written of this curious subject, the agency of insects in the cross-fertilization of flowers, love to -tell of the mutual interests involved. The insects want honey - flowers want forei...
-The Ladies' Bee
There is not much doubt that many people would engage in bee-keeping but for one thing - viz.: the little bee's weapon of defence - its sting. Some people do not much care whether they are stung or no...
-Floating Islands
The Editor of the Gardeners' Monthly in his younger days when an active plant collector, was surprised once, on returning the way he came through a piece of woods, to find a sheet of water across his ...
-The English Sparrow
This terrible nuisance to the fruit raiser and seed-grower is, like Satan, not without an occasional good quality. Prof. Ward thus tells of a slight advance in its moral character : One small piec...
-The Rose Rust
A subscriber to the Gardeners' Monthly writes: The foliage of my Hybrid Perpetual roses has been very much injured by a rust, which you will see on the underside of the leaf enclosed. They have blo...
-Acclimating Trees And Fruits
A correspondent from Switzerland, St. John's County, Florida, sends us clippings from the Florida Dispatch and other papers, and says: Can you give me any facts, going to show that any plant, native ...
-Getting Additional Subscribers For The Gardeners' Monthly
As stated in our last, the extraordinary circulation the Gardeners' Monthly has achieved in the past, has been almost wholly due to the good will of its friends, who love to hunt up one or two subscri...
-Destroying A Neighbor's Trade
A funny paper has the following : What's the price of sausages? Dwenty cents a bound. You asked twenty-five this morning. Yes; dot vas ven I had some. Now I aint got none I sells for dwent...
-Selling Rare Seeds
It has long been charged that when some seedsmen have but a limited supply of expensive seeds, they get cheap kinds that resemble them, roast them to prevent germination, and consequent detection, and...
-Weeds
How to define a weed continues to be a subject of discussion in magazines and newspapers. It seems to us a very simple matter. It is a term having a relation to cultivation and nothing more. The prett...
-Those Apples In Paradise
It is now contended by those versed in ancient languages that the apple of the poets in their visions of paradise need not have been our modern apple, nor need the serpent be one of those drea...
-The Forget-Me-Not
The Gardeners' Magazine tells us that - The flower which we now call the 'Forget-me-not ' (a name which originally appertained to the Speedwell) has become inseparably connected with the flower, born...
-The Acacia At Masonic Funerals
I regret the neglect in not acceding to your request earlier, to give the particulars I promised upon this interesting subject. I may say that I had prepared an article on the subject, which proved to...
-Origin Of Moss Roses
It is now nearly three hundred years ago since the old Provence or Cabbage rose was introduced; and that it, or its more recently raised representatives, should still find a place in our gardens is no...
-The White Moss
The first production of the white Moss Rose, which took place in the year 1788, was from a sucker or underground shoot. Mr. Shailer states: My father, Henry Shailer, nurseryman, of Little Chelsea, an...
-Col. Wilder's Eighty-Eighth Year
The adage that a prophet is not without honor, save in his own country, would seem not to apply to Col. Wilder, for he is honored at home as well as abroad. A dinner was given to him on the 22nd of Se...
-Prof. C. V. Riley
It has been a marvel to most reflecting people how Prof. Riley gets through with so much original and very useful work. But we are sorry to learn that it has its severe price in broken-health, while t...
-Louis Ott
This estimable gentleman is well-known in connection with the great success which has attended the culture of the grape in Virginia, in which he may be said to have been one of the pioneers, for there...
-Origin Of Cultivated Plants (Origine Des Plantes Cultivees)
By Alphonse Decandolle. This work has proved so popular that this third edition has been issued to meet the demand. The author adds to this, six pages of additions and corrections to the former editio...
-Celery And Its Cultivation
By W. W. Ramson. 1886. This is a small pamphet of 15 pages, evidently intended to present the merits of a new variety, Ramson's Early Arlington, for which it is claimed that it is '* three weeks earli...
-Catalogues
Anderson, H. S., Imported Stocks, Seeds, etc., Union Springs, N. Y. - Be-nand, E., Roses and Nursery Stocks, Orleans, France. - Berckmans, P. J., Fruits, Evergreens and Roses. Augusta, Ga. - Curwen, J...
-Common Names
Dudley W. Adams remarks : The Editor of the Gardeners' Monthly says: 'And now we rise to remark that no one appreciates the desire of our correspondent more than these same botanists and scientists. ...
-December. Number 336. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In making lawns it is more and more evident that discrimination should be used as to the kind of grass to be employed. Under the shade of trees, where it is not very shady, but is yet rather dry in su...
-Communications. Double Flowers
Is a flower any more beautiful for being double? Of course tastes differ, but I think not. True beauty in anything is dependent mainly on form; form being aided often by color. The common Chinese Wist...
-An Imaginative Garden
D'Israeli, in his novel of Lothair, thus sketches the garden of Lady Corisande: It was formed upon a gentle southern slope, with turfen terraces, walled in on three sides, the fourth consisting o...
-Koelreuteria Paniculata
Old as this tree is in the gardens of New York, Philadelphia and Boston, it seems only yet becoming popular, as its merits make it well deserved to be. Its panicled spikes of yellow blossoms give it a...
-Degeneration Through Culture
It is a well-known fact that grape culture in America got a fearful set back on account of degeneracy produced by long continued soft-wood propagation, and florists are now pursuing the same fatal cou...
-Taxus Adpressa
This often goes under the name of Japan yew in our collections; but a correspondent of the London Garden says it was a chance seedling of the common English yew, found in the nursery of Messrs. Dickso...
-Rose, Her Majesty
It is contended that this is the largest rose ever raised. It is one of Mr. Bennett's; the whole stock being purchased by Charles F. Evans, of Philadelphia. It is a cross between the hybrid perpetual,...
-Lilies
Many pleasing associations are connected with the Lily; and it has long since been adopted as an emblem of purity. The Rose has been called the queen of flowers; but the Lily, since the introduction o...
-Sawdust For Rhododendrons
When I was at Mentone, some six weeks since, Dr. Bennet showed me some Rhododendrons, as a curiosity, growing in his garden in the Maritime Alps. He informed me that the peat in which they were growin...
-Layering Roses With Notched Shoots
This method of layering has been applied with great success to climbing Roses, whose annual shoots are from 3 ft. to 10 ft. in length. When grown on a commercial scale the parent plants are set in bed...
-December. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
A lady of the writer's acquaintance, who has fine window flowers, and a nice conservatory or rather greenhouse attached to the dwelling-house, finds no little pleasure in raising seedlings with the vi...
-Communications. Two Handsome Begonias
On visiting the greenhouses of R. J. Halliday, Baltimore, the other day, I found there a very interesting collection of palms, ferns and leaf-plants. Amongthe latter were two very handsome begonias. O...
-Oncidium Divaricatum
The cushion-lipped Oncidium, Oncidium divari-catum, is a very pretty small but abundant-flowering species, and when well grown a useful plant. Its leaves are nearly oval shape, and of a yellowish gree...
-Asparagus Plumosus
A correspondent recently inquired for the best method of cultivating this pretty plant. A contributor to Gardening World thus responds : This elegant South African evergreen climber may been seen ...
-Japanese Chrysanthemums
The following are well deserving of cultivation: Elaine, white; Dr. Masters', bright yellow and red, very fine; Fair Maid of Guernsey, pure white, and very distinct; Hero of Magdala, blood red and ora...
-A Shipping Box For Cut Flowers
Mr. Long, of Buffalo, has applied for a patent for a new style of box for shipping cut flowers, of which we give herewith an illustration. It will be seen that the arrangements are made for receivi...
-Rose, Namenlose Schone
This grand rose for the florists, recently figured in our columns, has been sold by M. Deegen, the introducer, for 1,000 marks, or about $400 - a large figure in Europe. With the purchase, however, it...
-The Culture Of Tree Mignonette
It is very easy of culture, and by exercising a little judgment in the sowing of a few seeds at different seasons of the year, and care in cutting away the dead flowers as they appear, it may be had i...
-Desirable Improvement In Carnations
When the Carnation was known as a florist's flower especially grown for summer blooming, it was cut up into numerous classes, such as Picotee, Bizarres, Flakes, and so on. The fringed-edged class, whi...
-Perpetual Double White Stock, Princess Alice
In American cut-flower work, the White Stock holds a place little inferior to the Carnation, and a good everblooming kind would be nearly as valuable. In some respects it would be more valuable, as it...
-Proprietary Interest In New Fruits
This matter still continues to be a subject of discussion in the magazines. Why cannot the inventor of a new fruit get the same protection from law as the inventor of any other novelty? The only answe...
-Preserving Fruits
Col. Wilder gave recently an address before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and concludes that the conditions of success may be briefly stated as follows : The perfect control of temperature,...
-Trade Views
A correspondent of the Michigan Horticulturist says that : Pomological Societies are largely made up of nurserymen, who may or may not have some pet scheme, in which they are pecuniarily intereste...
-Lucy Duke Pear
In an essay read before a Western Pomological Society complaint was made that Eastern horticultural papers gave so little encouragement to the introducers of new fruits to write up their novelties, th...
-Pears
Weights Of Some Well-Known Pears At the Chiswick Pear Congress of last autumn, Mr. Le Cornu, of Jersey, exhibited samples of Uvedales St. Germain at 1 lb. 10 oz., and of Catillac, the same. Other g...
-Cherry, Saunders' Everbearing
A market grower wants a fruit that will bear all at once, so that without making two bites at a cherry he may get the whole into his baskets at one or two-pickings. But the most useful amateur fru...
-The Currant
Most persons know that the currant of the grocer, is a grape that produces no seeds; and, because it produces no seeds, the berries are only half the size of an ordinary grape. It is supposed that the...
-Worden Grape
At the recent meeting of the American Horticultural Society, the Worden, Mr. Hubbard said, was a larger, handsomer, and more attractive berry than the Concord, and ripened from a week to ten days earl...
-Muscat Of Alexandria Grape
Hot-house grapes are getting to be quite a luxury in America; as the ease with which California fills the market with open-air fruits gives people little desire to raise them artificially. Still, out-...
-The Uses Of Oranges
Owing to some untoward circumstances in the European orange gardens, there is occasionally a glut of fruit in the English markets, and then the fruit will not keep well. The glut will soon be past, an...
-Orange Jelly
Having many times eaten this delicious jelly, I was curious about the exact mode of preparing it, but could neither obtain by honestly asking for it the information I desired, nor discover by my own e...
-Orange Sauce
It is a great pity that the English do not, as a rule, permit sweets to accompany meats, for when the combination is judiciously managed, the result is delightful, and adds not only to the variety, bu...
-Japan Vegetables
A remarkably interesting paper was read by Mr. Kizo Tamari, Japan Commissioner, before the American Horticultural Society. He said that burdock roots were highly esteemed as a vegetable in Japan, as w...
-Horticultural Information
L. A. B., Wisconsin, writes : I subscribe for a number of papers, and have not found the right one yet. I want to get hold of a paper devoting space to vegetable gardening. Send me the Gardeners' ...
-Forestry. Editorial Notes. A Remarkable Linden Tree
This is to be seen in the grounds of the New Bath Hotel at Matlock Bath; and it is reported to be at least 300 years old, and the local records say, probably with much truth, that it is one of the lar...
-Oregon Forests And Rainfall
Mrs. Fanny E. Briggs, La Centre, Washington Territory, writes: This region is covered with a heavy growth of timber, mostly giant firs, with a dense undergrowth, save here and there a small natural o...
-The Russian Mulberry
An Illinois correspondent writes : In the Kansas Forestry Report, page 32, 1885, I. Horner, Emporia, Kansas, says: The hardy Mulberry, commonly styled Russian Mulberry, is a cross of several var...
-Native Lilies Of Oregon
How many White Lilies are native of the Pacific Coast? Some four years since, I received some bulbs from the Sierras described as white, very fragrant; also one dug in the woods near Oregon City, d...
-Flowering Of The Sweet Potato
The inquiry of your correspondent of the South, about the flowering of the sweet potato, reminds me of a field I saw in full bloom in the summer of 1884, on the farm of Job Haines in Gloucester County...
-The Mistletoe Parasite
In your Gardeners' Monthly for October, Mr. Eisele speaks of the miserable parasite, the mistletoe. It deserves no such appellation, for it is a very pretty plant and quite interesting. The true mist...
-Blooming Of The Sweet Potato. F. J. Vogel
In another article, I see the question asked, Did you ever see the Sweet Potato bloom? Here you can see them to perfection in bloom, as many as ten or more on the ends of the vines, and they mature th...
-Pretty Kansas Wild Flowers
To-day I add the names of a few more plants, worthy of cultivation, to my list of pretty Kansas wild flowers - to wit: Dicentra cucullaria, well-known to most botanists and not needing description. Sc...
-Northern Lady-Bird - Epilachna Borealis
This is the largest species of the true Lady-birds (Coccinellidae) that occurs in Pennsylvania, and it seems to have elicited very little attention as a destructive insect, for the reason, perhaps, th...
-The Mistletoe In Florida
Have noticed several articles in the Monthly, as to the habits of mistletoe, and upon what trees this parasite delights to grow in different sections of the country. My observations so far have only f...
-Zinnias
Gottingen, in Hanover, seems to have seen the first cultivated Zinnia over one hundred years ago. The seeds came from Peru. The Professor of Botany in the newly-established University (John Godfrey Zi...
-Charles M. Hovey
In our annual presentations of a portrait of some eminent living author in American Horticulture as a frontispiece to our annual volume, few will be more welcome to the readers of the Gardeners' Month...
-The Gardeners' Monthly From An English Point Of View
The many friends of the magazine will, we are sure, be pleased to know how their favorite is viewed in the old world. The following from the Gardeners' Magazine, of London, will, we are sure, interest...
-Shortia Galacifolia
Our readers will remember how much interest has been felt in this curious plant, which was found by Michaux in North Carolina, and never again till a few plants were seen in another place by Mr. Hyams...
-Cyclamen
This name is derived from the Greek cyclaminos, meaning roundish, and was suggested to Lobel from the form of its tuberous root. There are six European species - C. Euro-pasum, native of Austria, Nort...
-Desiccating Garbage
** A company in New York City is endeavoring to perfect a process for ! the desiccation of garbage, says a writer in Science, with a view to utilizing the vast quantity of city refuse now dumped into ...
-The Bouvardia
Botany loves to honor other branches of science as well as its own. Bouvard, after whom, Salisbury, in 1806, made Bouvardia, was an astronomer. It belongs to the Cinchona-ceous division of Rubiaceae. ...
-History Of Tobacco
Sir Wm. Robinson, Governor of Trinidad, has written a treatise on the culture of tobacco in the West Indies, from which the following is an extract: The history of tobacco in England is both inter...
-Modern Rose Culture
It seems that the first impulse given to Rose culture in France was at the commencement of the present century, under the auspices of the Empress Josephine. At that time it appears that Rose seeds, ob...
-Arboris Multum In Parvo
The Chico (Cali-fornia) Enterprise says that there has been a man around Chico for several days past selling, or endeavoring to sell, cuttings of a peculiar tree. It bears every month in the year, so...
-Rumph's Willow Lake Nursery At Mar-Shallville, Georgia
This fine Southern nursery was only started in 1870, by Samuel H. Rumph, then only in his sixteenth year, when he planted some Peach trees. His first budded trees were sold to the neighbors, with such...
-Horticultural Hall, Miss Schaffer's Magnificent Gift
At the regular stated monthly meeting of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, on the 16th inst., a notable event in its history took place. It was a red-letter day. On that occasion the property wa...
-Penna. Horticultural Society
The Annual Exhibition was held on the 24th, 25th and 26th of September, and was, in many respects, one of the most successful held for many years. Particular interest attached to it, on account of its...
-Burning Of Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia
A church adjoining Horticultural Hall, took fire on February 1st, and burnt out some $170,000. The roof of Horticultural Hall took fire, and the whole upper floor was destroyed. Some $50,000 of damage...
-Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia
This beautiful building, destroyed through proximity to a burning church, a year ago, has been rebuilt by W. L. Schaffer, President of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, and was re-opened on the ...
-The Chrysanthemum Shows
The annual exhibits of these beautiful flowers are now held in all the large cities. The grand ones in Boston, New York and Philadelphia, have been particularly attractive, judging by the space given ...
-Successful Exhibitions
One of the most re-markable incidents of the times is the stupidity of the managers of exhibitions in regard to the under-lying principles of success. They are failing everywhere, and each failing exh...
-Illinois State Horticultural Society
The winter meeting will be held at Jacksonville, Illinois, on December 14-16. The city is one of the most beautiful in the west, and is well worth seeing, outside of the regular inducements which the ...
-Summitt County (Ohio) Horticultural Society
This society united exhibitions and premiums with intellectual improvement, and the autumn meeting held at the residence and grounds of Hon. Frank M. Green, was a great success. The ladies took most o...
-Snowflake Tree - Japan Fringe Tree
Snowflake Tree The Canadian Horticulturist says this is the garden name in Germany of our White Fringe. This is near the Snowdrop tree, which is Halesia tetraptera. Combining Fences Since t...
-Souvenir De Victor Hugo Rose - The Industry Gooseberry
Souvenir De Victor Hugo Rose A colored plate appears in the October number of Journal des Roses. Unlike most tea roses, it seems to bloom in clusters. It is a yellow rose, but with such deep rosy e...
-The Florence Cherry - Forest Destruction
The Florence Cherry The Gardening World figures this old European variety, and wonders that it is not more known. It is given as forming a bunch of fruit over five inches wide, and with 21 cherries...
-Timber Of Austrian Pine - The Discharge Of Rivers
Timber Of Austrian Pine The Garden says that the timber of Austrian Pine is preferred to Scotch Pine, by Austrian woodmen. It is a rapid grower, and thrives at lower elevations than the Scotch. ...
-Double Flowered Calla - State Horticultural Meetings
Double Flowered Calla Mr. J. H. Slo-combe, New Haven, sends a pretty specimen of a double calla. The plant, after starting to turn the green leaf into a white spathe, as in the ordinary case, chang...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's Chrysanthemum Show - Reine Marie Henriette Rose
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's Chrysanthemum Show Mr. J. E. Mitchell, President of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, has issued a card of thanks to the press, the public, the exhibitors...
-Raspberry, Hilborn - Coe's Golden Drop Plum
Raspberry, Hilborn This is a new Black cap raised in Canada, and said to be of very superior flavor, and as large as any now known. Pears In The Old World At the recent Pear convention in L...
-The English Gooseberry At Home - Floral Barometers
The English Gooseberry At Home Few of our readers can have any idea of the enthusiasm with which a resident of Great Britain views a gooseberry bush. At Cawdor Castle the plants are ten feet high, ...
-Rainfall Per Acre - An Early American Mowing Machine
Rainfall Per Acre People scarcely understand by rainfall in inches, what this really means, but an inch of rain means a gallon for every two square feet, or 100 tons per acre. Locusts In Mexico ...
-Vriesia Hieroglyphica - Dana's Hovey Pear
Vriesia Hieroglyphica This is one of the most remarkable of variegated or foliage plants. It belongs to Bromeliaceae or pine-apple family of plants. The leaves are in shape like short and blunt pin...
-American Forestry In Europe - Comfort For Florida
American Forestry In Europe The work of Robert Douglas and others in setting out trees, and taking the whole contract to care for them for two or three years, is attracting great attention in Europ...
-Cocculus Carolinianus - The Botanical Gazette
Cocculus Carolinianus A botanical friend kindly calls our attention to a slip of the pen in the editoral note under Mrs. Thomson's article on page 36. The word should of course have been dioecious,...
-Western New York Horticulttural Society - Tea Rose
Western New York Horticulttural Society This excellent Society has held its usual successful meeting, some account of which we have received as we go to press, and from which we expect to draw to t...
-Remedy For Vine Mildew - Ginseng
Remedy For Vine Mildew The Proceedings of the Agricultural Society of Bouches on the Rhine says that in cases of vine disease - mildew we suppose - where sulphur was ineffectual the following was q...
-Potato Rot - Portfolio Of Rare And Beautiful Flowers
Potato Rot Prof. Erwin F. Smith, Ann Arbor, Mich., desires to know Whether the potato rot was present in Pennsylvania last year, and if so, to what extent - part of the State in which present? and...
-The Grand River Valley, Mich., Horticultural Society - Propagating Acacias
The Grand River Valley, Mich., Horticultural Society This society will henceforth have meetings twice a month. At a recent meeting it was resolved that nothing is known of the cause of the Peach ye...
-A New Species Of Grape, And The Scuppernong - Immediate Results In Cross-Fertilization
A New Species Of Grape, And The Scuppernong Recently I have identified a distinct species of grape, first discovered in Florida by a Mr. Halsey, about 1830, and sent to Rafinesque who described as ...
-Is The Snowberry Poisonous? - Early Nursery In Maine
Is The Snowberry Poisonous? It is now the white Snowberry's turn to get a bad character. The British Medical Journal says, four children suffered considerably from eating them. We have known some...
-Algireta - American Grapes
Algireta Under this Mexican name, G. W. H., sends us from Albany, Texas, a specimen which he says, bears a red berry, tart and very nice eating - like a currant, - and with a lovely wreath of go...
-Directories - Bismarckia Nobilis - A New Genus Of Palms
Directories The various sections of the garden have developed into so many distinct interests that special directories for each seems a necessity. Mr. Tillinghast, of La Plume, Pa., proposes to mee...
-Chrysanthemum, Boule De Neige - The Seckel Pear In England
Chrysanthemum, Boule De Neige Pure white chrysanthemums are common, but the English growers think they have a good thing for all in Snowball. The flower is perfectly round, about 3 1/2 inches over,...
-Winter Nelis Pear In Massachusetts - The Grape In America
Winter Nelis Pear In Massachusetts Fine specimens were exhibited at the meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, on January 23d, for which a premium was awarded to Andrew McDermott, the ...
-History Of The Potato Rot - Newtown Pippin Apples
History Of The Potato Rot Prof. Spalding of Ann Arbor says that the potato rot appeared in this country as well as in Western Europe in 1842, and 1845. He adopts the name of Phy-tophttiona infestan...
-Glout Morceau Pear - Mertensia Virginica
Glout Morceau Pear How much climate or locality has to do with success with different varieties is evidenced by the fact that though it does well hardly anywhere in America, it is the leading and p...
-An Early American Botanic Garden - Profits In Poultry
An Early American Botanic Garden The minutes of the American Philosophical Society, June 19th, 1784, record that a botanic garden should be at once established; that 200 feet of the Arch Street lo...
-How To Make Money Without Work - Destruction Of Ants In Gardens
How To Make Money Without Work This is the title of an unannounced book which many are looking for as soon to appear. We have not heard the name of the author. A sale of at least 100,000 in a few w...
-Azalea Amoena - Roses In Beds Or Benches
Azalea Amoena This Chinese and very beautiful dwarf azalea is well known from the peculiarity of having its calyx developed so as to look as if the plant had two corollas, one set like a cup inside...
-Winter Flowering Carnations - Sowing Turnips
Winter Flowering Carnations In the old world Souvenir de Malmaison is still the most popular with florists. They do not generally practice the bench system as we do, but grow in pots. As fast as th...
-Pine Apple In Florida - The Sweet Locust
Pine Apple In Florida A correspondent, who spent last winter in Florida, believes that the Pine apple will escape freezing seven years in ten as far north as Eustis, and can be raised with less tro...
-The Japan Varnish Tree - Rosen-Zeitung
The Japan Varnish Tree Some years ago Northern nurserymen used this name for the Kol-reuteria paniculata, but the late W. R. Prince protested so strongly against it, that the name was dropped. He t...
-Rhododendron And Azalea - Gas-Tar On Hot-Water Pipes
Rhododendron And Azalea Querist wants to know : Why is it that some nurserymen send out azaleas and label them rhododendrons, as occurred with me in an order this spring? I wanted rhododendron...
-Whortleberries - Fay's Prolific Currant
Whortleberries Some time since we warned our readers that the engraving attached to circulars of some Western nurseries, regarding whortleberries, was not a whortleberry, but the dwarf June-berry. ...
-Golden Queen Raspberry - A Century Plant In Philadelphia
Golden Queen Raspberry This was found on the grounds of Ezra Stokes, of Camden county, New Jersey, among a 12-acre block of Cuthbert. It resembles that variety in all but its bright color. Like all...
-Italian Name For Tomato - William Gray, Jr
Italian Name For Tomato The Italians call the tomato, Pomodoro. Long, pear-shaped varieties seem to tickle their fancy most. Introduction Of Dahlia And Camellia The dahlia was introduced to...
-Mr. William Nisbett - Fruit Synonyms
Mr. William Nisbett To the Editor of the Gardeners' Monthly: In the August number you have a notice of my father's death, etc. My father's name was William; you print it John. Please to notice the...
-Good Varieties Of Fruit To Travel - Winter Parsley
Good Varieties Of Fruit To Travel Mr. Holsinger told the late meeting of the Kansas Horticultural Society, that, whether a variety would travel well, often depended as much on the packer as on the ...
-Large Tomatoes - Injury To Rice By Birds
Large Tomatoes We do not know that there has been placed on record, figures regarding the largest Tomatoes ever raised. Mr. Jacob Prin-cing, gardener to Fairmount Park Commissioner Fitler, raised o...
-Antarctic Explorations - Edward Pynaert
Antarctic Explorations Attention is again turned towards Antarctic! explorations, through an address by Baron Von Muller on the 18th of January last, who points out that by establishing an outpost ...
-Dr. Hance - Old Patriarchs Present
Dr. Hance This gentleman, who was English Consul at Amoy, in China, did more perhaps than any one in recent times to make the world acquainted with Chinese plants, and many flowers have been named ...
-Cocoanuts In Florida - Flower And Tree Pedlars
Cocoanuts In Florida G.T. Field, of Monmouth county, New Jersey, speaks in glowing terms of the prospects for success of cocoanut culture along the coast of Florida. All reports favor Mr. Field's e...
-An Old Florist - Old-Time Florists
An Old Florist Peter Henderson was employed by the late Robert Buist in 1844. He says there are eight hundred florists now in America. Women Florists There were many women among the successfu...
-Tuberous Begonias - The Chrysanthemum Show Of The Pennsylvania Society
Tuberous Begonias Mr. Dreer exhibited a fine collection of these very good bedding plants. They are still confined to red and carmine colors. The City Of Homes Mayor Smith, in welcoming the f...
-The Expenses Of London Parks And Gardens - New Hardy Rhododendrons
The Expenses Of London Parks And Gardens The amount recommended for the care and maintenance of the numerous parks and gardens of London this year was $558,000, but only $202,000 were voted for the...
-New Gazanias - The Wragg Cherry
New Gazanias The Gazania Pavonia has always been a favorite garden plant, and recently has had more than usual attention, through being found to do well in the open ground of an American summer. Th...
-Florida Orange Crop - Garden Cats
Florida Orange Crop Notwithstanding the losses by the freeze, - such a freeze as may not occur again in a century, - the orange crop of Florida this season is estimated to be fully two-thirds as ...
-A New Race Of Tomato - Sugar In Oak Trees
A New Race Of Tomato Revue Horticole says that a new and very valuable race of tomato has been produced by Mons. Hippolyte Des-champs, chief gardener to the Count of Boisgelin, which is fully equal...
-The Spider Lily - Blue Gum Tree In Florida
The Spider Lily Mr. Berckmans says that the Guernsey Lily, and the American crinum, C. Americanum, are known by this name in some parts of the South. The Standing Of Nurserymen American nurse...
-Wild Roses - Improvement In The Chrysanthemum
Wild Roses These are growing favorites, not only for the delicate fragrance which most possess, but also because of the great show which the mostly red fruit makes in the autumn. One of the largest...
-The Peach Tree Borer In The Cherry - Grapes To The Acre
The Peach Tree Borer In The Cherry Our attention was called to a young five-year-old cherry that had been nearly bored to death near the ground. Not knowing what particular borer attacked the cherr...
-Remarkable Watermelons - Improved Pansies
Remarkable Watermelons Messrs. J. M. Thorburn & Co. say that the OEmler's Triumph Watermelon has seeds so small that fifty-five will go into a number 6 thimble; and that the Volga Watermelon, while...









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