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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V29 | by Thomas Meehan



Our column of Seasonable Hints differs from other portions of the magazine in this, that it deals only with that which is known and admitted as good practice, - while the whole of the other departments is devoted to progress. We endeavor to find out there that which is new. There we seek to prove all things and to hold fast to that which is good. There we desire to give to every reader something that will make him a more intelligent being, and the more intelligently to deal with that of which he already knows. Seasonable Hints is rather the friend at the elbow;

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V29
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1887
Copyright1887, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-1887. January. Number 337. Flower Garden And Treasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Our column of Seasonable Hints differs from other portions of the magazine in this, that it deals only with that which is known and admitted as good practice, - while the whole of the other department...
-Communications. Aristolochia Elegans
In the winter of 1882, my then employer, Prof. Richardson, handed me a paper of seed he had just received from a lady friend in Brazil, without name, but represented as the prettiest flower in that co...
-Lilies
I cannot understand how a man like C. M. Hovey can say, A layer of 6 inches of well-rotted cow manure, placed 5 or 6 inches below the bulbs, is the best fertilizer I have tried for lilies. The fact ...
-Mina Lobata
In a note Mr. John F. Clark says: Last spring I purchased a packet of the 'charming half-hardy Mexican Climbing Annual.' The packet contained six seeds. Five of them germinated, and grew up to be ni...
-Grafting Euonymus
The common Euony-mus is often used as a stock on which to graft the various evergreen Japanese kinds, and, strange as it may appear, the deciduous character of the stock does not seem to affect the sc...
-Acer Colchicum Rubrum
This Japan maple - more properly Acer laentum, - when young makes two growths a year, and the second growth is of a beautiful winy red. When the tree gets older, it rarely makes these red leaves. Ther...
-Of Leaves As Manure
A Philadelphia lady writes: Please give me your opinion of the usefulness or uselessness of dry leaves. I have observed people very diligent in gathering them, and I have wished my grandchildren and ...
-Preserving An Injured Tree
Miss E. J. D., Nicholasville, Ky., says: About six years ago a magnificent oak tree was struck by lightning and a groove some three or four inches deep was burnt in the tree about twenty feet from ...
-January. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
There is much hesitation as to when plants should be potted or repotted. The rule among gardeners is to repot just before the plant begins to grow, or while it is growing freely. It should never be re...
-Communications. Clerodendron Balfouri
This fine hot-house climber deserves more attention than it generally gets. It should have a place in every collection of plants, however small. To flower it perfectly, it requires a good season of re...
-Notes On Winter Decorative Plants
In private establishments, where space is often limited,it requires no little skill and forethought to keep up the needed supply of flowering plants, for house and conservatory decoration, during the ...
-Gesneras
This beautiful class of plants is not nearly so largely cultivated as their merits deserve. Not only do they have beautiful flowers, but a good many of them have very handsome foliage, making them wel...
-Lilacs In Pots
Few plants are better suited for forcing when properly prepared, than the above, and certainly as a rule, when well-grown are thoroughly appreciated, and yet how seldom do we meet with them even fairl...
-Oil And Sulphur For Mildew
J. S., Wilmington, Del., inquires: On Colonel Dupont's place is a large greenhouse full of flowers, with a large rose bed at the warmest end. The greenhouse is heated by a flue near the fire. The f...
-Flowering Of The Harris Lily
A correspondent, R. J. M., Chestnut Hill, Pa., under date of November 27,1886, writes: I have a Bermuda Lily bulb, but don't know how to plant it for the best, as I would like to have it flower ab...
-January. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
First, look after the nutrition of the trees. Some people say that land which will raise good corn will grow good fruit trees, which is all right; but they should add that, like corn, they require reg...
-Communications. The Japan Pear As A Stock
It must be confessed that the introduction of Japanese varieties has not added anything very desirable to the pear orchard, if adaptability to the table is sought. For culinary purposes several variet...
-Notes On Fruits, And Season In Western Pennsylvania
Six inches of snow on the 9th of November suggests that the harvest is over, and that a summary of its products will not be out of season. Somewhat drier than the average, the summer was, neverthel...
-Profit And Loss On Vegetable Raising In Florida
Mr. D. W. Adams tells the Florida Dispatch: Last spring I grew a field of squashes, and made a shipment which sold for $1 per crate, which I consider a very fair price. It is as large a price as t...
-Pithy Celery
Recently we took occasion to express our belief that pithy celery was due rather to some defect in culture than in seed or variety, without denying that there might be a greater tendency in some varie...
-Dandelion Salad
In early spring, as soon as the dandelion pushes its young leaves above the soil, women and children may be seen everywhere with knife and basket cutting them off just below the crown, for salat, as...
-Black Aphis And Tobacco
Max says: Doubtless one quart of tobacco juice to two gallons of water will kill a black aphis if you get it to him, but to apply it is the question. Our experience is that simply syringing will no...
-Apricot Plum
B.,Rome, Georgia, says: I notice a great deal in the agricultural papers lately about the apricot plum, and that it is especially profitable to planters in the south. What are its special merits? D...
-Forestry. Forestry And Its Advocates
Nobody need be reminded that the subject of forestry is not new, but those who take an interest in it, rather than a pecuniary one, have greatly increased and changed its aspect. The main question now...
-Forest Trees For Kansas
On page 337, Mr. Bennett, in speaking of the Adirondack wilderness, says or implies that these mountains would make a good nursery for forest trees, to be raised by the Government and planted on the p...
-The Useful Woods Of The United States, As Shown At The New Orleans Exposition
By Charles R. Dodge. Being part of a report of Mr. Wm. Saunders, representing the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Published by the Department of Agriculture. The wood-working and timber interests ...
-Louisiana's Big Cypress
The Pioneer of Assumption says, that among the seventy-nine specimens of native woods already procured by the committee chosen for the purpose, and now in the possession of custodian E. P. Helluin, to...
-Effect Of The Season On Flowering Plants In Belgium
The warm weather we had in the end of September and during October advanced the growth and flowering state of many out-of-door and greenhouse plants. Amongst the first, I noticed flowers of apples and...
-Blooming Of The Sweet Potato In Virginia
Relative to the bloom on sweet potato plants, on which several articles have appeared in your valuable magazine, would say that I have been cultivating sweet potatoes more or less for thirty years, an...
-January. Wild Flowers Of Dakota
In your Gardeners' Monthly for October, Mr. Thomas Bassler speaks of the pretty wild flowers of Kansas, and I fully endorse his opinion that many of them are well worthy of cultivation. Never having c...
-Wild Flowers In The Berkshire Hills
As the time for renewing my subscription to a valued paper comes at this Christmas time, I feel like sending thanks for pleasures received and many good wishes for a Happy Christmas and a prosperous ...
-Change Of Color In Flowers
The man of observation is frequently derided for his statements by the man who goes by common sense, - yet it must be conceded that once in a while the common sense man is beaten out. Now there is the...
-The Cause Of The Potato Rot
The Pharmacist, of Chicago, referring to the letter of our English correspondent on the cause of the potato rot, takes some exception to the exclusive use of the term practical men by the potato gro...
-The Coloring Of Autumn Leaves
There can be no doubt that climate has much to do with the coloring of autumn leaves, - but a habit, once acquired, is hereditary. The climate has, no doubt, been the main agent in giving American tre...
-The American Water-Weed
This is the name given to our small aquatic weed, Anacharis, or Elodea canadensis, which, on being introduced to Europe some years ago, found itself so much at home, that it actually choked up some st...
-Seeds Of Depauperite Plants
At a meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, a specimen of a grass, Setaria viride, was exhibited not over half an inch high, but which had a large number of perfect seeds nearly m...
-Acaena Microphylla
F. G. R., New Orleans, says: A writer in the last number of The Garden (No. 783, Article A Northern Garden) recommends in strongest terms Acaena microphylla as a foliage border plant for winter u...
-The Melon Pear
We had, some time since, an inquiry as to what was this new fruit which was being pushed, as they say, to an enormous extent. We have inquired of a friend who has some acquaintance with it, and have t...
-Rapid Traveling
What a change in favor of gardening work has come over the world by reason of improved means of transit, since the days when some enthusiast had to divide his short rations of water with his beloved c...
-Camellia
Now that the Chrysanthemums are on the wane we are beginning to look to another Chinese product, the Camellia. We hear occasionally people speak of Cameelia, but the real name was Camelli, with Camell...
-Cost Of English Roses
A London paper under the heading of good news for English Rose growers, remarks: There is a statement in an American exchange to the effect that English Roses can be sent to America, and that in...
-Col. M. P. Wilder
On the morning of December 16th this great and good man seemed in his usual health, breakfasting with his family. At half-past ten the same morning his life-work was done, and genuine horticulture in ...
-Auguste Van Geert
In one way or another this eminent Belgian florist was well known in America. A recent Gardener's Chronicle says: We greatly regret to have to announce the death of one of the famous horticulturis...
-George William Johnson
Johnson's Horticultural Works, and especially Johnson' Gardeners' Dictionary, are so well known, and have been so highly appreciated, that our readers will be, many of them, sorry to learn of the...
-Popular Gardening
Our vigorous and excellent young contemporary, continues to show the best evidence of good health, namely, an enormous appetite. It has already devoured a number of similar publications, and has just ...
-Some Additional Notes On Trees And Tree Planting In Massachusetts
By Prof. C. S. Sargent. This is one of the most useful contributions to American Forestry that has been issued for some time. He finds that so far as Massachusetts is concerned, his earlier recommenda...
-House Plants As Sanitary Agents
By Dr. J. M. Anders. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co. 1886. Dr. Anders is well-known, not only in America but in Europe, as the discoverer of the emission of ozone from flowers, and as the auth...
-History And Biology Of The Pear Blight
By Prof. J. C. Arthur. This is a thesis presented to the faculty of Cornell University on the creation of Professor Arthur to the degree of Doctor of Science. By Pear Blight, Dr. Arthur means what ...
-Proceedings Of The Seventh Annual Meeting Of The Society For The Promotion Of Agricultural Science - Buffalo Meeting
From the Secretary, Prof. Lazenby. The essays have, in many respects, as much, or even more interest for horticulturists as for agriculturists. H. E. Alvord shows that prevailing notions on the for...
-Proceedings Of The Second Convention Of American Florists
This is a very valuable document, and will certainly be of great service to the members of the Society for whom it is printed. So many persons expressed regret that we were not able to get Mr. Hendric...
-Penn. Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society the following officers were elected: President, J. E. Mitchell; Vice-Presidents, Caleb Cope, Isaac C. Price, Geo. W. Earl, Robert Craig;...
-State Horticultural Association Of Pennsylvania
The 29th Annual Meeting of this Society will be held at Lebanon, Pa., on Wednesday and Thursday, January 18th and 19th, 1888. Arrangements will be made for special rates at the hotels, and excursion t...
-New York Horticultural Society
The fall exhibition will take place on Nov. 8th. The articles on the schedule, for which competition is invited, include Chrysanthemums, Orchids, Ferns and foliage plants, cut flowers with Chrysant...
-Germantown (Pa.) Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting, Mr. B. H. Shoemaker was elected President, Messrs. Jonathan Jones, Charles J. Wister and James Barrows, Vice- Presidents; Joseph Meehan, Treasurer, and Thomas B. Meehan, Secreta...
-The American Exhibition In London
Seedsmen, Nurserymen and Horticulturists generally, should not forget the great exhibition that is to be held in London, commencing May the next, exclusively for the products of the United States. The...
-February. Number 338. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We are glad to find that our efforts to direct attention to the beautiful but much neglected art of landscape gardening, are meeting with considerable success. Much more attention is being given to ha...
-Communications. What I Would Do In Tree Planting
If trees, fruits and flowers were in any way a benefit or pleasure to my family and my friends - of any value to my property or my country - I would plant and cultivate them. If a knowledge of the ...
-Pyrus Spectabilis, Parkmani, And Chinese Weeping Lilac
It is a pleasure to talk with the readers of the Monthly - when you have something to say. Two new trees have come to us, which prove to be such valuable additions to our list of choice ornamentals, t...
-Freezing Of Tuberose Bulbs
In your October number I find an article headed, Tuberose bulbs flowering after hard freezing. I think this heading is misleading; so I give my experience. Some years since I had just such a state o...
-Hepatica
Some of our native plants are objects of enthusiastic culture in the Old World. A correspondent of the Gardeners' Chronicle, thus talks of the Hepatica: In his book on ' Alpine Flowers,' Mr. W. R...
-Wistarias
A correspondent inquires for a list of Wisterias. In the first place, they are Wistaria, not Wisteria, having been so named by Nuttall when he decided to separate the genus from Glycine, after Dr. C...
-Acaena Microphylla, P. 23
Mr. Falconer says: Perhaps George Woolson, of Passaic, N. J., has it in stock. If not, English firms, as Backhouse of York, Geo. Paul of Cheshunt, or Ware of Tottenham, no doubt can supply it. It is ...
-A Fine Cedar Of Lebanon
Chas. E. Par-nell, Queen's, L. I., N. Y., writes: I have noticed in the Monthly at variousintervals, notes on specimens of rare on remarkable trees, and especially on the Cedar of Lebanon. I do not r...
-Pruning A Transplanted Elm
J. N. J. writes: In the last week of last October, I transplanted to my place on the shore of Buzzard's Bay, Mass., an elm tree 25 feet high and 5 inches in the butt. It was carried on a man's back a...
-Her Majesty Rose
With what a sound of trumpets was this rose ushered upon the confiding florists. Its immense flowers, its vigorous growth and all its other good qualities were lauded to the very highest. We poor mort...
-Notes On Orchids, At The Botanic Gardens, Washington
It appears to me that some one or other in the neighborhood of the Botanic Gardens at Washington has about come to the conclusion that Orchids have some value and beauty. Some few years ago one could ...
-Remarks On The Chrysanthemum
The Chrysanthemum show lately held in New York was a grand affair, and visitors could not fail to be both instructed and delighted with the number and variety of plants and flowers there displayed. Ta...
-A Greenhouse Boiler
For the benefit of brother florists and those using hot water or steam, I submit the experience and workings of a new boiler I had made for my new place, covering 12,000 square feet of glass. The boil...
-Acineta Humboldtii By Charles E. Parnell
Mr. Humboldt's Acineta, Acineta Humboldti, is a very curious and interesting epiphytal Orchidaceous plant. It is a native of Laguayra, from whence it was introduced in 1837. It may be described as ...
-A Cure For Mildew
Our excellent French correspondent, Mr. Jean Sisley, says that it has been found in that country that about 6 pounds of salt to 100 quarts of water has been found a complete cure for mildew and other ...
-Failure Of "Her Majesty" Rose
Her Majesty, Queen Vic., may soon have a jubilee, but I think it will be a long, long time before the rose Her Majesty has a jubilee. A great many florists are wondering how it is that there are s...
-Floral Fashions
Within the last few years a great change has been wrought in the style of making up flowers for personal adornment. A few years back the idea of using Ivy leaves that had become discolored by exposure...
-Chrysanthemums
Those who desire to excel in growing these plants should look well after them at this season, when the young plants are well rooted. If they get stunted at first they are not easily recovered. They re...
-Please Send No Flowers
This is come to be a common notice under funeral advertisements, or marriage festivals - and it is no wonder, when we see the premium designs that often get honors at exhibitions and elsewhere. Even t...
-A Wonderful Bouquet
English papers enjoy themselves hugely, and not without some reason, at the wonderful things in cut flower work that seem popular just now. They poke a great deal of fun at the floral pulpits, floral ...
-Rose, Papa Gontier
This Rose, we believe, has not had much notice in our pages; but it seems to be working its way into public favor. A correspondent of the American Florist says of it: I went yesterday to Mr. John ...
-Culture Of Cypripediums And Poinsettas
A lady writes: It was very interesting to read that the blossoms of the Cypripedium insigne remained fresh for a long time in water, but I would be much more interested in hearing how to get the blos...
-Heating With Wood
J. S., Harrisburg, Pa., asks: Is heating a rose-house with wood instead of coal likely to have any injurious effects on the plants? If so, what is the cause? An answer through the columns of your mag...
-February. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
A friend asks, when is the time to prune fruit trees? just as he would ask when is the best time to dine? Numbers of trees need no pruning, and yet no implement is more valuable to the fruit grower th...
-The Blackman Plum
In answer to your Texas correspondent in the November number, I would say something about this worthless fruit, but am not able to give him the special information desired as to its actual fruitage. I...
-The Jessie Strawberry
This was raised by Mr. F. W. Loudon, of Janesville, and is represented as of great size, productiveness and general quality. Berries have been gathered 6 1/2 inches round. It is a seedling of the Shar...
-Bees Eating Grapes
The subject was again earnestly discussed at the meeting of the Columbus, O., Horticultural Society, October 26th. A number of growers furnished the actual experience that the bees eat the fruit. Ento...
-The Lovett Plum
We received the following from E. B. Good, Manchester, York County, Pa , on August 5th: I send to-day by mail a few specimens of a plum originating in York County, Pa., some twenty odd years, from a...
-Planting On The Site Of Old Orchards
F. M.,Ostego, New York: We have an old orchard of about 20 acres that is nearly done, and would like to set out five on the site, but are told by the late owner from whom we have recently purchase...
-Imperfect Fertilization
Mr. Green observes: Your say our correspondent wants the exact meaning of imperfect fertilization. The honest answer is, ' we don't know.' The truth is that with the experienced and learned 'what we ...
-The Largest Pears In The World
A Lover of Fruits, Worcester, Mass., writes: Being interested in pears, this item in December number of Gardeners' Monthly caught my eye, 'The Largest Pears in the World.' No doubt about that, tho...
-The Melon Pear, Or Pear Melon
A Philadelphia correspondent says: Looking over the Gardeners' Monthly - which came this morning - I was somewhat surprised at your remarks on the ' Melon Pear,' alias ' Pepino,' and ' Solan-um Guat...
-Cutting Back Peach Trees
A Maryland correspondent says: Some weeks since a very intelligent gardener insisted with me that cutting back budded peach trees was one source of weakened power that led to disease. The budded pe...
-Forests And Rainfall
Prof. Cleveland Abbe in a recent lecture before the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, attacked the popular error that forests had any influence on rainfall. He showed that in eastern Pennsylvania ...
-Catalpa Trees
Prof. Beal says of his experience at Ann Arbor: Four years ago I should have advised planting Catalpa speciosa where durable timber was desired, but further time shows that the trees are likely to be...
-Limestone Soil For The Chestnut
We were amazed to find the Editor of this magazine quoted by the Weekly Press as stating that the Chestnut needs limestone soil, as exactly the contrary is the Editor's experience. The Chestnut rat...
-Birchwood Timber
Referring to the Canadian forestry exhibit in London, an English paper says: Birchwood, particularly that of Betula alba, or the White Birch, is much used in this country for slate frames, bobbins...
-A New Hemlock Spruce
Under the name of Tsuga Caroliniana, Prof. Sargent sends a drawing to the London Gardeners' Chronicle, with the following description: It is certainly a remarkable fact that such a very distinct t...
-Flowers On The Sweet Potato In Florida
About a dozen years ago, while I was engaged in fruit growing and market gardening in Northern Indiana, a new variety of sweet potatoes was announced in the papers and heralded as a wonderful acquisit...
-The Pear Midge Or Pear Diplosis
(Diplosis nigra [?], Meigen.) Order Diptera; Family Cecidomyidse. We have for some time been interested in an insect which has appeared in a limited region near Meriden, Conn., confined almost enti...
-Life History And Habits
From a careful rearing and study of this insect in the office, and from correspondence with the Messrs. Coe, as well as from Mr. Smith's report, we may summarize the insect's history in America as fol...
-Remedy For The Poison Rhus
I notice in January issue that Dr. Frank Jones considers a strong solution of bi-carbonate of soda the most efficient application for the cure of Rhus poisoning. Nearly twenty years ago I was first...
-Blooming Of The Sweet Potato In New Jersey
Several years ago, a friend in Vineland told me that his brother often had flowers on his sweet potatoes, but I never saw one until the summer of 1885, when Mr. D. Colwell had some plants which bloome...
-Hardiness And Temperature
The Gardeners' Monthly has shown often that hygrometri-cal conditions, and not temperature, govern the hardiness of trees. This fact, however, is but slowly recognized. Prof. Beal recently noted a goo...
-Magnolia Cordata
Prof. Sargent has been over the route taken by Michaux in 1788-89, chiefly to try to find the original localities for Magnolia cordata, which Michaux is believed to have ardently searched for. But Pro...
-The Lifting Or Rising Of Heated Atmosphere
The practical man is often the true man of science, while he with the scientfic reputation is the one often to merit the contempt sometimes expressed for the merely practical. How this is exemplif...
-Dormant Bulbs
Mr. W. C. Steele, Switzerland, Florida, writes: In the spring of 1885 I planted a dozen bulbs of Milla biflora in the open ground. They all grew and bloomed finely. As most of such bulbs are hardy he...
-A Terrible Rose Fungus
W. H. T., Montgomery Co., Pa., writes: Will you please tell me, if possible, through the Monthly, what is the cause of, and how to prevent my rose bushes from dying? I send you two plants to show yo...
-Acclimatizing Plants
Mr. Green observes in regard to a note of the Editor: You consider it established that trees, etc., may become acclimatized, yet the able and practical president, T. T. Lyon, took the writer to task ...
-Trailing Arbutus
Virginia: We believe it is conceded that an ancient Roman would have pronounced the word with accent on the first syllable, but custom with the English speaking people has placed it upon the second,...
-Black Spot On Rose Leaves
Constant Reader, Hoosick Falls, N. Y., writes: I am very much troubled of late with the above mentioned attacking the leaves of my American Beauties and taking the vitality right out of them - ther...
-Note On The Gardens Of William M. Singerley
Having been invited several times during the past five years to pay a visit to a gardener friend who lives in Montgomery county, I found a chance recently, and was met at the station by my friend. Aft...
-Gardener S Accommodations
The gardener's cottage at this place is of a beautiful design and finish, consisting of eight rooms, all large and convenient. It has a hall-way six feet wide and stairs in centre. It is a frame cotta...
-U. S. Department Of Agriculture. Sub-Department Of Pomology
A new sub-division was made last year in the interests of fruit culture, to be known as the Division of Pomology. Mr. H. G. Van Deman, formerly of Geneva, Kansas, has been placed in charge of it, and ...
-The Violet, Napoleon's Flower
A pamphlet of the year 1815, which the Temps has recently discovered, gives an account of how the violet became the emblem of imperialism in France. Three days before the embarkation for Elba, Bonapar...
-Isolated England
A French writer in a Belgian publication, makes great fun of the weight and measures he finds among the florists and gardeners in Covent Garden market. He says you are told that the articles are so mu...
-David Douglas
Every plant-lover has heard of Douglas. His name has been given to numerous pretty flowers, and the Douglas Spruce has given him a great name among those with whom even a love of flowers is unknown. T...
-Professor William Saunders
This gentleman, Director of the Experimental Farms of the Dominion of Canada, has returned from his Western explorations in the interest of agriculture, having extended his observations to Vancouver I...
-General W. H. Noble
The Rural New Yorker gives a likeness and biography of this gentleman, whose excellent papers on landscape gardening and kindred topics have often interested our readers. He was born August 18th, 1813...
-Thomas Moore
This well known English horticulturist died suddenly on January 1st, in his 65th year. Possibly no man ever did so much for horticulture in the old world. When the writer of this knew him, he was a fo...
-Peach Culture
By John Willcox, Bridgeton, N. J. This is an essay of 80 pages, proposing to give a complete treatise on the subject. We can only say of this as of similar efforts professing to be drawn from practi...
-Apple Culture
By L. H. Bailey, Jr., New York, Orange Judd Co., 1886. This is a brief essay of 90 pages giving apparently the experience of the author and his father, and as the result of such experience has a value...
-Patenting Fruits
Mr. Charles A. Green says: You ask for suggestions relating to the protection of originators of new fruits. The Niagara Grape Co. has solved the question, having shown one way to secure protection wh...
-The Honor Of Nurserymen
Mr. Green in a note to the Editor, says: You uphold the integrity of many men in the trade whose statements you state can be relied upon, though they are pecuniarily interested. It is a direct insult...
-Horticulture In Schools
A Rochester correspondent remarks: Allow me to call the attention of your readers to the importance of teaching horticulture in the public schools. Denominations say, ' Let us have the children to di...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society For The Coming Season
The schedule of prizes of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, offered for the year 1887, has just been issued. Nearly $7,000 are offered, which is the largest amount appropriated for many years. ...
-A Chrysanthemum Club
Last Spring I interested our parish (of Trinity Church) in this city, in giving a Chrysanthemum show. Forty of us (they were mostly women) each bought ten plants (about one hundred varieties), and gre...
-Statement To The Chrysanthemum Club
Received from admittance...... $229 65 sale of plants........... 118 19 ...
-The Chrysanthemum Show
Chrysanthemums are so popular that a few remarks respecting them may not be out of place. The late Philadelphia show, at Horticultural Hall, is conceded by all to have been the largest and best ever h...
-The Massachusetts Horticultural Society And Col. M. P. Wilder
The Massachusetts Horticultural Society, at its meeting on the 1st of January, paid due honor to the memory of their esteemed associate, Col. Wilder. The leading members each paid a warm tribute. The ...
-March. Number 339. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Continuing our hints on shade in connection with landscape gardening, it may be remarked that not near as much advantage is taken of porches and piazzas in connection with house architecture as might ...
-Roses
Read before the Horticultural Society of Western New York. On the subject of roses I shall confine myself to the hardy varieties for garden culture. I regard this branch of the subject as of great ...
-Roses #2
If the writer were asked to what particular feature of culture more than any other he felt that his success with roses was due, he would reply, to the use of liquid manure. This is applied from the mi...
-The Manetti Rose Stock
Prairie Rose, Rochester, N. Y., writes: I note that you do not seem favorably disposed towards the Manetti stock. Roses seem to do very well on them, so far as I have seen. What is the objection t...
-Fruiting Of Cydonia Japonica
Mr. C. B. Paddock says: To while away hours of illness, I have recently read back volumes of the Monthly, and would like to call to the attention of Gen. W. H. Noble, first, his article on page 355, ...
-March. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
A very successful lady gardener tells us that any one can grow window flowers if he knows how to water them - that all your rules for this, that or the other, do not amount to a row of pins. Pins! w...
-An Inexpensive Greenhouse
There are undoubtedly many who would enjoy having a small greenhouse, but are prevented on account of the expense, the main item of which consists in a suitable apparatus for heating; and as six years...
-Pitcher Plants. Nepenthes Family
Amongst the recent additions to the Nepenthes family, Nepenthes bicalcarata is especially worthy of notice. It was discovered in Borneo and brought to England by Mr. Burbidge of the Trinity College Bo...
-A Carnation Worm
Carnation growers are troubled by something that eats the flower buds at night - they do not know what. Mr. Henry Woltemate, a florist of Germantown, watching his plants by night, has detected the ...
-Natural Gas
A Meadville, Pa., correspondent says: We have had a real old-fashioned winter here, with plenty of snow and nearly two months of good sleighing. Mercury occasionally from 14 to 16 below zero, which...
-Chrysanthemum Culture
Mrs. J. G. M., Buffalo, N. Y., writes: Some months ago, during the discussion about Latin and common names for plants in your magazine, you printed a paragraph telling how a German objected to an E...
-An Insect On Chrysanthemum Frutescens
A. New London correspondent says: I send by this mail to your address, a box containing leaves of Paris Daisy, which have been tunneled on the upper surface by an insect which you will find transfor...
-Greenhouse Heating
Mr. I. C. Wood, Fishkill, N. Y., says: The article in February number, by Mr. Hippard, on 'Greenhouse Boilers' has no doubt been read by many interested in heating greenhouses, etc., especially by st...
-The Montgomery County Rose Disease
In our last the receipt was noted of rose plants ftom Montgomery county, in which the leaves were all blighted as if by some fungus, while the roots were all granulated as in the case of grapevine...
-March. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
When preparing hints for the flower and pleasure grounds, something whispers to us to say everything possible in favor of the birds. Undoubtedly these lovely creatures give a double pleasure to that w...
-Blackman Plum As A Stock For The Peach
Instead of dropping the Blackman plum from nursery catalogues and burn the stock on hand, as suggested by H. E. Van Deman, Pomologist, Agricultural Department, why not use it for stocks for plum or pe...
-The Production Of Pears And Apples From Seed
About twenty-five years ago I commenced to plant the seed of a few of the best pears, in hopes of raising some good and acceptable varieties. Whether or not I have been successful, I shall not at pres...
-Position Of Garden
High and dry land being the best for the natural development of the pear, as well as of other fruit, I should prefer such a position not only for the growing of the seed to be planted, but of its frui...
-Preparation Of Seeds
Seeds openly planted in the autumn and left unprotected in this latitude, will perish. I have always planted in pots or boxes, and placed in the cellar on a shelf, where mice will not exhume them, and...
-Treatment Of Young Seedlings
After one year's growth in pots or boxes, I set them out in a row about 2 feet apart, protecting them in the autumn. After another year's growth I select those that are the most vigorous and promising...
-Prognostics
A small, round, thin leaf is unmistakable evidence of a pear not much removed from the wild type, and is rarely, if ever, produced from the common seeds of the garden. A long, soft leaf, as well as a ...
-Results Of Cross-Fertilization
What these are, of course no one can tell, as the influences of mixed pollen on the germen, together with constitutional or spontaneous forces and complications, are almost endlessly diversified. I ha...
-Seedling Apples
The apple seems to be governed by the same general physiological laws regarding reproduction, as the pear. From my own experience, the female parent gives size, shape and color to its progeny, - seaso...
-Glands On The Plum
When I saw the article I wrote in print in the last number of Gardeners' Monthly, regarding the Blackman plum, I noticed that I did not say just what I wanted to say. It was my intention to say that t...
-Chinese Quince
This fruit is doing remarkably well in tide-water Virginia. For three years past it has borne heavy crops, falling little short of the Orange and Angers varieties in quality, while in size and perfect...
-Canning Fruits And Vegetables
At a recent meeting of the Summit Co. (Ohio) Horticultural Society, Mrs. Claypole said she had used cotton and found that it had excluded the spores of the yeast fungus and consequently no fermentatio...
-Kieffer Pear
We had recently a pear of this variety sent to us, which was truly delicious. It reminded one of the luscious specimens Mr. Kieffer himself sends out. This was raised on a quince stock. This would ind...
-A Fine Mushroom
With a beautiful specimen, Mr. John Cullen, gardener to E. P. Wilbur, Esq., of South Bethlehem, writes: I have forwarded by mail to-day one mushroom, cut on Sunday morning, weighing when cut 13 ounce...
-Forestry. Practical Forestry
In Number 337, page 19, of the Gardeners' Monthly, Mr. Thomas Bassler, of Geuda Springs, Kansas, takes exception to the hint given in my sketch of the Adirondacks, in Number 335, as to the use and uti...
-Northern Range Of The Pecan Hickory
Mr. C. B. Paddock, Albany, 111., writes: On the northern limit of the Pecan, it may be of interest to note I have frequently seen the matter mentioned and have never noticed that any one had seen it ...
-The Hard Maple In Kansas
Mr. C. B. Paddock, Albany, Illinois, notes: On page 19, January number, 'Forest trees for Kansas,' the writer shows how hard maple grows in the West. A number of years ago I wrote you a note of exper...
-Wild Flowers Of Florida
According to promise please find enclosed seeds of the sweet potato (white Barbadoes); also an immature plume or tassel of the sugar cane. This will give you some idea of the beauty of the cane tassel...
-The "Pepino" Or Melon Shrub
Under the heading of The Melon Pear, I find in your January number a short account of this fruit. As I was the introducer of this fruit to this continent I may be allowed to say something in the mat...
-March. Wild Flowers Of Dakota
I found Mentzelia ornata growing on the bank of the American Creek, near Chamberlain, Brule co., Dakota. It was just at sunset and it had fully expanded its large white and fragrant blossoms, for it i...
-Beautiful Weeds - Circaea Alpina, And Euphorbia Peplus
Low smooth and weak, says Gray, when speaking in his Manual of Circaea alpina, and common northward. The little heart-leaved plant is said to be not over eight inches in height, and of the do...
-Hybrid Plums And Peaches
I read with much interest Prof. Van Deman's note in your last issue, in which he suggests that the Blackman plum is a hybrid between the plum and peach. The possibility of such a hybrid, the hope o...
-Lecanium Hemisphcericum, Or "Hemispherical Coccus," A New Enemy To Cucurbitaceous Plants
Coccus is a generic term - the typical genus of the great family, coccidae, which includes those insects usually designated bark-lice, scab lice, scale-insects, etc., with their various adjectiv...
-Cattle Eating Cactus
It may seem strange to those who are acquainted with the spiny nature of most species of cacti, that cattle should attempt to eat them. Yet, such is the case in this country, where many species of the...
-Currants And Grapes
It is well known to grape growers, especially those who grow grapes under glass, that often there are berries not halt the size of the normal berry, and seedless. Some varieties - as for instance, the...
-Spring-Time In Georgia
A correspondent at Savannah, under date of January 30th, says: Roses usually in bloom through the winter; from last of August to first of January, no rain here. Since the last of November, until wit...
-The Sweet Potato Flowering In Illinois
Mr. C. B. Paddock, Albany, Whiteside county, 111., says: I would add my mite concerning the blossoming of sweet potatoes, as I have not seen any account of their blooming so far north (nearly the 42n...
-Mistletoe Memoirs
As the pursuit of useful knowledge is at all times commendable, and not only does it elevate the individual who encourages it, but is one of the most certain and direct means by which nations are' exa...
-Mistletoe Memoirs. Continued
That this peculiar plant has been looked upon as no ordinary object from time immemorial, both by pagans and Christians, we have the strongest evidence; and however much our ancestors may have regarde...
-The Gardens Of Elisha P. Wilbur, Of Bethlehem, Pa
A hasty run through these grounds during the meeting of the American Horticultural Association on the 20th of January, afforded me much pleasure. It is in the city, and consequently the grounds are no...
-Cost Of Water
Circumstances alter cases. There is no more common expression than free as air and water, and yet in California any one who can secure a good water right, has property that is worth $1000 an hour. I...
-Cooked Potatoes
For three hundred years potatoes have been a cooking, and yet not one in in a hundred knows how to cook one properly. We never eat a sodden, tasteless tuber without wishing that there was a cooking sc...
-Hyacinth Bean
Physician inquires if any one knows what is the botanical name of a plant, said to be known as Hyacinth Bean. It is desirable to know on account of a case of poisoning. We do not know of the plant b...
-The City Councils Of Philadelphia
It may perhaps gratify many personal friends to know that the Editor of this magazine has again in the February elections been returned for a fourth term of two years to the City Councils - the govern...
-David Pooley
First-class landscape gardeners are not numerous, and among them Mr. Pooley's place will be missed by a large number of friends. He died on January 11th, in his 65th year. He came from England many ye...
-Donald Mcqueen
Some thirty or forty years ago, when large numbers of wealthy and enthusiastic amateurs had fine gardens within a dozen miles of the heart of the city, and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society was w...
-The Florida Times-Union
An agricultural and literary magazine, published at Jacksonville, Florida. We are continually receiving new agri-cultural ventures, but, useful as they are in their own special fields, we rarely find ...
-Gardening For Profit
By Peter Henderson. O. Judd Company, New York. Third Edition. The first edition was issued in 1866, the second in 1874, and now a third, just twenty years after the first one. No better tribute to ...
-Gigantic Seaweeds
Every one knows that the sea has larger animals than can be found on land; but, with the enormous sequoias of California in mind, many may be surprised to learn of vegetable growths in the ocean vastl...
-The Book Of Plans
By Geo. A. Solly & Son, of Springfield, Mass. This Book of Plans is something which will be welcomed by all lovers of flowers, and particularly by those who yearly are perplexed over suitable shapes a...
-Catalogues Received
Boyson, Jas. L., Roses, Caen, Calvados, France; Bull, Wm Select Flower and Vegetable Seeds, Chelsea, London, England; Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co., Farm Annual, Philadelphia; Bush, Son & Meissner, P...
-Transactions Of American Horticultural Society
This Society announces that $2 is the membership fee in this body, for which the members receive a copy of the Transactions. As an additional favor to the subscribers for 1887, they will not only get ...
-April. Number 340. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The great difference between an artist in landscape gardening, and a mere loon, would probably be in the ability of the one to give an intelligent reason for what he does, while the other could do lit...
-Shepherdia Canadensis
By the side of a road leading from near the top of the elevator of the Genesee Falls Hotel down to the river's edge, I saw for the first time, a year ago, the shrubby, deciduous-leaved Shepherdia Cana...
-Culture Of Sweet Peas
In regard to sweet peas, the essayist thought all present would agree with him that the sweet pea is the most desirable annual in cultivation. Its delicate fragrance, beautiful form and variety of col...
-White Variety Of American Wistaria
Mr. Geo. G. Atwood, Geneva, N. Y., writes: The article, p. 38, Feb. No. of the Monthly, reminds me that we had a Wistaria frutescens alba in bloom here last season. The cluster was about the size of...
-A Small Yard
Ignoramus, Philadelphia, says: I am in search of information in your line, and do not hesitate to lay my wants before you. I have moved to a house that has got a good yard to it, something that I ...
-Rare Evergreens At Mr. John Wanamaker's
A correspondent says: While on a recent visit to 'Lindenwood,' the residence of Mr. John Wanamaker, at Jenkintown, near Philadelphia, I was pleased to notice a few very fine specimens of rare evergre...
-April. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Very much more attention is being given to the culture of Amaryllis as pot plants, than formerly. We know a friend who has a fair collection, and he is rarely without some one in flower the whole year...
-The Nameless Beauty Rose
You had a short article about the Rose, Nameless Beauty, or Namenlose Schone, in your magazine last year. Let us proceed to give our experience. To try the winter-blooming quality of this rose, we imp...
-Pancratium Ovatum
This fine Amaryllid has to be seen in full bloom to be appreciated. It bears several spikes, each of which is surmounted by a large umbel of pure white funnel-shaped flowers. These, when backed up wit...
-Notes Of A Visit To John Wana-Maker's Greenhouses
At the residence of Mr. John Wanamaker, at Jenkintown, Pa., there is quite an extensive range of greenhouses. The whole place is under the management of Mr. Alexander Young, a gardener well known abou...
-Stigmaphyllum Ciliatum
The ciliated-leaved Stigmaphyllum, (S. cilia-turn,) is a very handsome, free-flowering stove or warm greenhouse plant, belonging to the Natural Order Melpighiaceae, and may be described as being a twi...
-Over Heated Wood
People are not generally aware of the danger of fire connected with the exposure of wood for long periods to a comparatively moderate temperature. Mr. Braid-wood, superintendent of the London fire-eng...
-Begonia Semperflorens Gigantea Rosea
Under this name we have from C. H. Murphy flowers of a very beautiful Begonia. They are in dense forked cymes, and of a bright vermilion rose color. It is remarkable that in the nine stalks of flowers...
-Senecio Cineraroides
This is the name of the plant referred to in the following from Mrs. Mary Ann F., West Phila.: Will you kindly state the class, also its English name, to which the enclosed specimen belongs? The stal...
-Yellow Fuchsias
A Subscriber, Beverly, N. J., writes: In the February number of the American Garden, there is a letter signed by Mr. Peter Henderson, of Jersey City Heights, in reply to a query, ' Is there such a...
-An Aphis Injurious To Rose Leaves
Mr. John White, of Pittsfield, Mass., sends us specimens of an aphid, which seems, he says, to attach itself to a leaf, and to seem almost inseparable from it, doing much damage to the foliage. Prof. ...
-April. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In no class of vegetables has there been so much improvement of late years as in celery. The chief effort of improvers has been in the direction of getting plants with an abundance of short and thick ...
-Kieffer Pear, Double Worked
In reply to your inquiry in regard to double working the Kieffer Pear (in March number) I would state I have two trees which were originally Duchess. When the Kieffer craze struck us here these tre...
-Notes On Mushroom Culture
I am glad to find the mushroom is getting to be appreciated in this country. Not many years ago, it was little known or valued, except by a few. Now its price is regularly reported with other vegetabl...
-Market Apples For The Vicinity Of Lansing, Michigan
Until the last few years the Baldwin has held the first place among market apples. The increased severity of the winters, resulting from the destruction of timber, has caused the Baldwin to suffer abo...
-A Tennessee Fruit Region
I thought a description of this section would be of some interest to your readers. I have visited several localities in search of a good fruit-growing section, where lands could be had at a reasonable...
-Essentials Of A Perfect Grape
What would we consider a perfect grape? What are the essential requisites? These: 1. A large amount and the proper proportions of sugar and acid. 2. A good flavor. 3. A tender, melting flesh....
-The Codlin Moth
Though most of our readers know about the Codlin moth, and how to decrease the number by cleaning off the loose bark, wrapping hay bands around the trunk, and by other watchful maneuvers, the annexed ...
-Black Rot In Grapes
The following abstract of Mr. Scribner's excellent paper on the grape rot is from the New York Independent: The disease known as the black rot in grapes, has been determined to be the resul...
-Scraps And Queries. Hardy Black Cap Raspberry
H. H. C. B., Eureka, Wis., asks: Is the Nemaha any hardier than the Gregg raspberry? I lose very much in the latter and I think this winter will not prove an exceptional one. The mercury on this ri...
-Forestry. The Cost Of Fencing Timber In Pennsylvania
From the reports made to the State Board, I arrive at the following conclusions: That the cost of broad chestnut rails varies from eighteen dollars per hundred in Philadelphia county to three dolla...
-The Cembran Pine
Though never likely to be popular as a timber tree in America, because of its slow growth, it has a good reputation in the land of its birth for many useful purposes. The largest specimen we have seen...
-Ladies' Silk Culture Association
It is remarkable that so many enterprises started for the public good, result in a limited amount of usefulness. But the Women's Silk Culture Association is a notable exception. This body of ladies ha...
-On The Early Growth Of The Spider-Worts - Tradescantia
Rattan, in his Flora of California, mentions the fact that Big-root, Megarrhiza Marah, has its dicotyledonous leaf-stems united so that they form a long tube, at the base of which and within, is fou...
-A Rocky Mountain Oak
There is found growing in this country a species of oak that, from its abundance, if nothing else, will attract attention. It is found growing in dense patches and thickets, in moist places in gulches...
-Further Notes On The Pepino
In your February number I find several comments upon the Melon shrub or Pepino. As I have already answered most of the remarks, I will confine myself now to only a few points. I enclose the circular o...
-Notes On The Wild Flowers Of Florida
There are but two climbing plants with unequally pinnate leaves given by Chapman in his order Leguminosae of the Southern States, namely, Apios tuberosa and Wistaria frutescens. Both of these are foun...
-Indian Corn And Phylloxera
It is reported, and the report fast traveling through American agricultural papers, that if Indian corn be planted near grape-vines infested with Phylloxera, the insects in their fondness for maize, w...
-Cause Of The Fire Blight In The Pear
In an article on Pear Blight, in the Report of the Botanist to the New York Experimental Station, Prof. Arthur sensitively says: There is something remarkable in the slowness with which the ess...
-Proof That Specific Bacteria Cause Pear Blight
(a) Bacteria are found in great abundance in actively blighting tissues, so as to be easily demonstrable to the naked eye, and occur in less abundance in proportion as the disease is less active, (b) ...
-Public Gardens In Washington
Preparations to have everything in good shape at President Cleveland's private place are in progress, but, Oh! Downing, some one has laid out a left-handed approach to the house! Army officers in gene...
-Lovers Of Roses
A distinguished English clergyman writes to a local paper to regret that just in proportion to the spread of a love for roses among his congregation, he notices a corresponding emptiness of pews in hi...
-The Probasco Fountain At Clifton, Near Cincinnati
Every one has seen or read of the magnificent Davidson fountain,given by Mr. Henry Probasco to the people of Cincinnati. One of the neighboring boroughs, Clifton, of which Mr. Probasco is Mayor, is no...
-The Botanical Gardens At Washington
A correspondent of the London Gardening World who has been traveling through the United States, pays the following compliment to the United States Botanical Garden: The Botanical Garden is close ...
-Charles Downing
Mr. B. Gott, of Arkona, Ontario, has recently published a biographical notice of the venerable Pomologist who has so recently passed away. He notes his birth on the 9th of July, 1802, and that of the ...
-Henry Ward Beecher
When the death of one for whom the whole nation mourns is familiar to every reader through the daily press, it seems superfluous to dilate on an event about which the reader already well knows. It is ...
-William Carvill
Some of the specimens of landscape gardening in the vicinity of Philadelphia, among the older places, will rank as among the best illustrations of beauty and taste in the art, anywhere in the world. M...
-History Of The Pear Blight
Under this title, Dr. J. C. Arthur gives in the Report of the Botanist to the New York experimental station, a list of all the leading references to pear blight he has been able to find. The first not...
-Carnation Culture
By Leroy L. Lamborn. Published by the author, Alliance, Ohio. The immense importance of the carnation in a commercial aspect, aside from the general love which people have for its cultivation, make...
-Drugs And Medicines Of North America
Cincinnati, J. N. & C. G. Lloyd. The September number gives an exhaustive account of the Magnolia in the United States. There is a map showing the geographical distribution of the genus. The histories...
-Pennsylvania State Horticultural Association, For 1886
From E. B. Engle, Waynesboro, Pa., Secretary. We doubt whether any more truly valuable report comes to our table than this; as most of those who give the addresses and take part in the discussions ...
-Germantown (Philada.) Horticultural Society
The March meeting of this local Society was particularly interesting from the numerous orchids and rare plants on exhibition, one of which Ruellia macrantha, shown by Mr. James Barrows, was particular...
-May. Number 341. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
One of the prettiest pieces of true art in landscape gardening near Philadelphia is Hunting Park, designed about a quarter of a century ago by Mr. William Saunders, now of Washington. Having a wholly ...
-Summer Annuals
There seems to be a growing interest in this deserving and really beautiful class of plants. The fact that annuals, as the name signifies, grow, bloom, and die the first year, is against them in the e...
-A Look With Paul Over His New-Roses
I note what you say in April number about two new English roses. I saw these on the grounds of the originators, Wm. Paul & Son, Waltham Cross, near London, last August, and am confident they are varie...
-Gardening In Delaware Co., Pa
Gardening does not attract popular attention in America as it would do if people would only report on the good things they see. The author of this, happening in the neighborhood of Media, with the aid...
-A Pretty Weed - Chelidonium Majus
Greater Celandine loves well the fence-side. Of course it will flourish elsewhere - indeed one may suppose almost anywhere - and never is it averse to showing its deeply sinuate and always nicely kept...
-Changes In Rural Taste
In riding through the suburbs of our northern cities and larger towns, the man of sixty years or so cannot fail to notice the remarkable change that has taken place within a few years in rural ornamen...
-Planting Large Or Small Trees
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. Francis H. Appleton said: In regard to the size of trees to be planted, the experience of the essayist has resulted in the beli...
-The Japan Witch Hazel
The Japan Witch Hazel has been now blooming several years in America, and seems scarcely different from the American species, Hamamelis Virginiana. It is one of the wonderful facts of nature that so m...
-Southern Gardening
One can scarcely appreciate the great difference between the plants that do the best service in Southern gardening, as against those that are common in the north, until they have read carefully the ca...
-Virginia Creeper And English Ivy
Mr. J. G. Barker tells the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that the ampelopsis should not be planted with the idea of covering a brick building; for the brick is too smooth for it to cling closely...
-Companion Plants
Symbiosis is a new term applied by vegetable physiologists to a condition in which plants live together, and aid each other, in contradistinction to parasitism in which one lives upon one and on anoth...
-May. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The great variety which gives so great a charm to landscape gardening, is always in the eye of the flower cultivator, for it is the infinite variety in the form, color, and character of flowers that g...
-Steam Heating
In answer to Mr. I. C. Wood, of Fishkill, N. Y., I will endeavor to throw as much light upon the subject as possible, in regard to amount and cost of fuel used during the season thus far, and for the ...
-Imantophyllum Miniatum
Imantophyllum miniatum is a remarkably robust growing, free flowering greenhouse plant, belonging to the natural order Amaryllidaceae; and is a native of Natal, whence it was introduced in 1854. It...
-Glazing Greenhouses
Some time since, we noted that no one now thought of glazing with putty, and this has brought us an inquiry, what is the substitute? For the outside of sashes we do not need any substitute. No putt...
-American Methods Of Growing Flowers For Cutting
We have before noted that the European method of growing everything for cut flowers in pots, seems odd to American flower growers. They, on their part, seem surprised at the ease with which we grow th...
-Orchid Seeds
It is a well-known fact among our wild orchids, such as Cypripediums and the like, that they do not seem to spread, though apparently seeding freely. If there are a thousand plants in one spot to-day,...
-May. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The paramount question with the fruit gardener is the destruction of insects. We have to confess to a belief that all schemes for their wholesale destruction have proved failures, and that our best ho...
-The Yellows And Plum Stocks
In the March issue of the Monthly is a suggestion from Mr. C. Hiller that it might be profitable to utilize the non-producing Blackman Plum as a stock upon which to bud peaches. Mr. H. thinks this wou...
-Protection To Fruit Industry
England and her Colonies in sympathy with her policy profess to be opposed to protection and favor free trade as a general principle - yet once in a while tax the community, to help some struggling ...
-Skill In Ripening Pears
While writing on the proper ripening of pears recently, we took occasion to say that there was a great art in handling as well as in growing them, and that no doubt the uncertain reputation some varie...
-Pears
The Fire-Blight Fungus In The Pear Prof. Arthur proves very clearly that only the one Bacterium, Micrococcus amylovorus, has to do with the pear blight. He inoculated the fruit - a pear - with many...
-The Ribstone Pippin Apple
This is the great favorite with the mass of English apple eaters. Our Newtown Pippin is also popular. As a general rule the Ribstone Pippin does not do well in our country. No doubt there are special ...
-Cold Graperies
Houses for the culture of foreign grapes, were once among the most popular of adjuncts to an amateur's garden; but the ease with which they can be had from out-door culture in California, and from oth...
-Beauty In A Kitchen Garden
At the December meeting of the Summit County (Ohio) Horticultural Society, Prof. Claypole stated that in England peaches, apricots and the finest plums are trained only in the way described by the ...
-Vegetables In Japan
The Japanese are almost vegetarians - not so much from choice perhaps as from necessity, though the eating of flesh is in a great degree forbidden to those who are religiously faithful. Fish is not am...
-Close Cutting Of Asparagus
There has been a discussion in English magazines, extending over a year, as to the proper treatment of asparagus. It is well known that unless plants have the benefit of some foliage during the year, ...
-A Money Lesson From Rhubarb
Faith is said to be the evidence of things unseen, and it is this faith that sees money where ordinary eyes cannot, that makes the fortune of many a nurseryman and market gardener. Everybody has heard...
-Forestry. Profits Of Timber Culture
Reading Secretary Edge's article on the Cost of Fencing Timber in Pennsylvania, in the last number of the Monthly, has suggested some notes of a recent sale of locust posts at the place of Isaac G. ...
-Paulonia Imperialis
This tree has not received the attention that its fast growing and value as timber deserves. Its growth exceeds any other tree in this locality, - has been grown of a circumference of 72 inches in twe...
-Umbrella Pine - Sciadopitys Verticillata
This is the Umbrella Pine, so-called by the Japanese, and which is the literal meaning of its botanical Greek name. It may be said to be a forest tree, though it is no longer found in Japan forests; a...
-Laws For The Encouragement Of Forestry
The Legislatures of the several States, and the United States Congress, are continually enacting laws which do little more good than to pay useless Commissioners, who waste more money on ignorant repo...
-The Yellow Locust
It is botanically, Robi-nia, so named from Jean Robin, botanist to Henry the Fourth, of France, who raised it from American seeds, towards the end of the seventeenth century. It is possibly the hardes...
-Yellow Pine In England
The Garden says that what we know as white pine, Pinus Strobus, is always called yellow pine in England; and it adds: Fir timber of coniferous trees coming from America is distinguished in the mar...
-Tree Planting On Farms
At the meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, held on January 8th, Levi W. Russell gave an excellent essay on tree planting. He justly says that every farmer should have his nursery of fo...
-The Mount Enos Fir
This is the common name of Abies Cephalonica, which has proved to be one of the hardiest of the rarer firs in America. The following account of its history is from the Garden: In that interesting...
-Plum Stocks, And Plum And Peach Hybrids
Though harnessed down to over-much heavy work, I have a chance to slip a few words edgewise into the Hybrid Plum and Plum stock discussion, so interesting to me, and made still more so by the remarks ...
-Wisconsin Orchids
Allow me to say a few words to your readers on the subject of cultivating our native orchidaceae, which can be so easily procured and transplanted into the garden, and when once planted they give a ha...
-The English Sparrow - Passer Domesticus
Whatever this subject of the feathered kingdom may be, or may not be, in its relations to the insect world; or whatever insects, insects'eggs, or insect larvae it may destroy, or may not destroy, ther...
-The Cotyledons Of The Peach
Young peach seedlings are quite common on the rubbishy margins of the streets of Jacksonville, Florida. One of these, several inches in height, was pulled up not long since and its pale stem's base wa...
-Celery Fungus
In the Eastern States the larva of the celery fly is a great foe to the culture of this vegetable. Under its attacks the edges of the leaflets are browned as it burned. The plants only grow weakly whe...
-Water In Vegetables
Few people have an adequate idea of the enormous amount of water that is in the various solids we eat. Dr. C. A. Goesman recently prepared the following figures for the Massachusetts Horticultural Soc...
-Pruning To Promote Vigor
The English gardening periodicals are going over a question, long ago settled we think by their American brethren, whether or not pruning promotes vigor. One of the best affirmative writers puts his a...
-Sweet Scented Persian Cyclamens
Mr. Herbert Harris, Halifax, Nova Scotia, writes: I post to you a few flowers of a very fragrant 'Cyclamen Persicum.' I know of Cyclamens (some) being sweet scented, but never saw so fine a variety s...
-Notes On A Trip From Florida To Massachusetts
You will remember that last year I gave a brief account of experiments with the foreign grape at Belleview, Fla. In a recent visit, March 25th, I again examined the vines of Mr. Penfield, and found th...
-Philadelphia Prices In April
It may serve as a guide to those at a distance, who wish to grow for the Philadelphia market, to note the prices which fruits and vegetables brought at retail the first week in April: cucumbers, 15 to...
-Christmas Trees And Greens
Of the thousands of trees that are sold in Philadelphia, most are Black Spruce from the mountains of north-east Pennsylvania. There are a few Pinus rigida, or Pitch Pine, with an occasional Red Cedar ...
-Decline Of Gardening Taste In The Old World
The English papers complain that by reason of the more even distribution of wealth, the number of first-class places capable and willing to employ the highly educated gardeners of older times, are rap...
-Golden Bell
Common names are very nice when expressive, and Golden Bell, first suggested by A. J. Downing for the Forsythia, is a very good name. Botanically, there is but one species, Forsythia viridissima; F. s...
-Mum Is The Word For Chrysanthemum
The Journal of Horticulture says: An American writer wishes that 'the name Chrysanthemum could be shortened, as it causes some trouble to those who are not familiar with botanical names. We hear t...
-Culture Of The Bacterian Fire-Blight
In his experiments with the culture of the Micrococcus amylovorus, which Prof. Arthur believes to cause the fire-blight in the pear, he found it required a large supply of water for its best developme...
-Classical Notes On The Violet
Lady Wilkinson, in her book on flowers, gives many interesting particulars concerning the violet. It must have been greatly in favor with the Romans, she tells us, as they called their days set apart ...
-Pomology In Germany Three Hundred Years Ago
When we look at the numerous new varieties of strawberries, raspberries and other fruits which can be raised from seeds and fruited within a year or two, and contrast them with varieties known to us h...
-The Princess Of The Sandwich Islands
Mrs. Claghorn - Princess Like-Like - who recently sacrificed herself in order to appease the devil who is supposed to have caused the volcanic eruption at Mauna-Loa, was a great lover of flowers, and ...
-James Powell
Mr. James Powell, of the old-time florists of Philadelphia, died at New Centre-ville, near Philadelphia, on the 17th of April, in his 73rd year. Mr. P. was a highly educated gardener, a native of Engl...
-Grasses Of North America. Vol. I
By Prof. Beal, Professor of Botany and Forestry in Michigan Agricultural College. Published by the author, at Lansing, Mich. There may have been a work on grasses equal to this in value, in the Old...
-Botanical Contributions, 1887
By Asa Gray. The Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, issued March 4th, gives us notes on a number of North American plants. The pretty Californian genus Eschscholtzia is revised ...
-Florida Notes
A correspondent sends us the following notes: Near Ormond, Florida, one of the points of interest is the Indian burial ground at Bosarve. The road to it lies through orange groves and bananas, and is ...
-Horticulture At The Industrial Hall At Paris
Mr. Chas. Joly sends us a review of the exhibition of the Horticultural Department, recently, in which he notes that the plants and flowers were arranged with much more taste than usually seen in Pari...
-International Horticultural Company Of Belgium
The Societe L'Horticulture Internationale of Ghent, Belgium, has succeeded the famous Compagnie Continentale d'Horticulture, and propose to continue to send out to foreign countries collectors for new...
-Royal Society Of Literature (England)
At the meeting on the 22d of March, Mr. W. Paul, the celebrated rose grower, gave an address on the literature of gardening. After the passage of the dark ages, horticulture took a wonderful leap, in ...
-June. Number 342. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
A city paper recently noted that a great change was coming over the community in regard to having pleasant country homes. Just before the war for the Union, there was a growing love for the home in th...
-Pinus Pun Gens - The Table Mountain Pine
As the planting season comes around again I feel like saying a good word for our Table Mountain pine - Pinus pungens. Aside from their evergreen character, and beauty of form and color, there are two ...
-Trees Grown As Bushes
I do not know but that the Monthly has often emough showed the value of dwarfing our standard trees to use them as shrubs; but there is nothing finer for a small lawn or for groups on a large lawn. Am...
-Classifying Roses
D., of Deal, a well-known contributor to the London Journal of Horticulture, says the judges of roses at exhibitions are badly puzzled over the classes in which some of the roses should be ranked. H...
-Rosa Brunonis
Those who require a rose that will cover the greatest possible space in a short time should procure R. Brunonis, the Ne-paulese Brier; when once established in fair soil it will make shoots 20 feet or...
-Garden Pentstemons
In an essay on herbaceous plants read before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. W. A. Manda noted the various families which gave us the most beauty in our gardens. He said: There are a ...
-Box Laying
The laying of Box and all other live edging should be pushed forward in mild weather; the levels should be determined from each end, and the intermediate pegs set by the use of the rods. This is only ...
-Garden Phloxes
Mr. W. A. Manda of the Cambridge Botanic Garden said at a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that of the hardy herbaceous and perennial plants, the phlox is one of the best, the...
-Public Roads
An exchange, in an admirable article on road making, says: The plan adopted by Telford, the greatest road engineer probably since the time of the Romans, was first to level and drain the site of t...
-The Siberian Salt Tree (Halimodendron Argenteum)
We do not know that this plant has flowered in American gardens, but we know of some plants that have endured our hardest winters. The following from the Garden indicates it to have some merit. Th...
-Trichopilia Tortilis
The twisted petaled Trichopilia tortilis is a very pretty free flowering dwarf evergreen orchid. It is a native of Mexico, from whence it was introduced in 1835. The leaves which are of a dark-green c...
-Nameless Beauty Rose
[Translated by E. M. from the Deutsche Rosen-Zeitung]. Mr. Max Deegan of Kostritz has had a large tea rose in his possession which few people know of. He has long preserved it and it has always pro...
-Culture Of The Chrysanthemum
An Essay read before the Mass. Hort. Society, Jan. 15,1887. The cultivation of the chrysanthemum should begin as soon as the plant is through flowering, for it is in a great measure upon the health...
-Culture Of The Chrysanthemum. Continued
A light, rich loam is the best soil; if possible it should be quite sandy, so as not to adhere to the roots in hard lumps, but to fall away without taking the roots with it. With a proper soil and a h...
-Autumn Leaves For Home Decoration
Looking through Mr. August Rolker's catalogue of *' Florists' Supplies, one is reminded of how great and varied are the means afforded of cheap and yet beautiful home decorations to what was possible...
-A Refractory Mareschal Niel Rose
W. M., Govanstown, Md., writes: I am in charge of a greenhouse on a gentleman's country place, size, 75x18 feet - glass area about 1,500 square feet - heated by one flue, running under front bench;...
-June. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
For those who have large tracts of land to cultivate, the plough is of course the turner up of the soil. Hundreds have but small plots which must be tilled by hand. It is strange as one travels here a...
-The Genuine Yellows
The Yellows referred to in the May number as attacking peach budded on plum, was the genuine Yellows - not a starvation or badly drained soil Yellows, but the simon-pure article. My observation teache...
-Treatment Of The Downy Mildew And Black-Rot Of The Grape
Last year a circular was sent out by this Department recommending for trial certain remedies for mildew and rot of the grape. The results of experiments in 1886 have fully demonstrated the value of...
-Degeneration Of Fruits
Mr. O. B. Had-wen, gave an admirable address on this topic before a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, which he summarized as follows: First Each fruit-bearing tree and p...
-Alpine Strawberries
A few years ago the Mexican Everbearing strawberry, as it was called, had a great run. It did remarkably well in cool boggy ground near Detroit, but did not do so well in the dryer soil of other loc...
-A New Vegetable - "Chorogi"
We are indebted to the courtesy of Messrs. Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co., of Paris, for the following particulars respecting the new vegetable, Choro-Gi, extracted from M. Paillieux's work, Le Potager d'...
-Fruit Or Vegetable
A New York correspondent says: Will you kindly inform me whether a tomato is classed as a fruit or a vegetable? The horticultural answer is, that it is a vegetable. If the question were put to a bot...
-Mice Eating Osage Orange Hedge Plants
A correspondent who suffered much last winter, writes to know what will destroy ground mice or moles that ate off his Osage orange plants. It is believed that where there is no grass or weeds for t...
-Heating A Pit
E. D. W., Independence, Iowa, asks: Can you give me any information in regard to the most economical plan of heating and watering a forcing-house, 12x24, built mostly under ground? [For so sm...
-Forestry. Thoughts On Practical Forestry
Personal interest will ever be the leading factor in progress. Public spirit induces the general movement - but what good is public spirit to me? is the prevailing thought with the masses. The Forestr...
-"Woodman, Spare That Tree"
After an absence of twenty years from my native State and county, nothing on my return strikes me so painfully, as the rapid and wholesale destruction of the native forests, once the pride and glory o...
-Unscientific Forestry
Scribners Magazine is giving a series of extremely interesting papers on forestry from the pen of Prof. Shaler. It is to be regretted that so eminent a teacher, and original observer as Prof. S. shoul...
-Measuring Trees
There is a great amount ingenuity exercised to invent instruments that will readily measure the heights of trees or other objects of similar character. But the traveler need take nothing along with hi...
-The Great Enemy To American Forestry
One of the most common-sense papers on forestry that we have read for some time is in the tiny little Forest Leaves, from an anonymous author, J. H., from which we take the following: The loss i...
-A Use For The Wild Oranges Of Florida
A friend sent me two months ago several specimens of native wild oranges, from Orange County, Central Florida. They were of medium size and of the rich color of the Mandarin. Some used instead of lemo...
-The Hybrid Plums
Mr. Munson kindly sends us from Denison, Texas, flowering branches of the Blackman and other varieties supposed to be hybrids. To our mind they are all simply sports - the Blackman indeed may be terme...
-Hybrids And Cross-Breds
The term hybrid has been carefully reserved for mixtures between what botanists would regard as species - and the mixtures between garden varieties are regarded as crosses. Though botanists have ...
-Roots Of The Shepherdia: A Scientific Puzzle
Recently we received for examination a mass of roots of Shepherdia argentea, in which the smaller roots were completely necklaced with the numerous beads about the size and appearance of grains of...
-United States Department Of Agriculture. Division Of Entomology
Thos. Meehan, Esq., Germantown, Phila., Pa. Dear Sir - In the absence of Prof. Riley I beg to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 5th inst. The roots of Shepherdia which you sent show no trac...
-History Of Palafoxia
Among the pleasant readings in the American Agriculturist are always the notes of Prof. Thurber who when a younger man was one of the explorers of the unknown portions of our Continent. Every now and ...
-Peach Yellows
Discussions continue on this subject, and even in well informed channels the arguments go on as if nothing had been learned. Surely it is a gain to know as we do from the work of Prof. Penhallow, that...
-Vitality Of Seeds
In the Monthly for June is some interesting talk about the vitality of seeds. We know that under certain circumstances seeds will retain their vitality much longer than others. What the most perfec...
-Rapid Changes In Climate
Travelers in Alaska find local changes of climate evidently very rapid in comparison with such changes in more temperate regions. Parts of the country that a hundred years ago were covered by ice shee...
-United States Department Of Agriculture
The question, What good can result from this Department? is often asked by those who regard it as in some measure in competition with State or National Agricultural Societies. But it is only when it p...
-Traveling With The Driver
Young men on starting out to travel on stage lines used to get the advice to get a seat by the driver. It is not however always a success, for some drivers won't talk while others talk more than they ...
-St. Dunstan And The Apple Tree
In Southeast Devon and the neighborhood, a curious legend is current among the farmers respecting St. Dunstan and the apple trees. It is said that he bought up a quantity of barley and therewith made ...
-American Florist Company's Directory
Directories for nurserymen, seedmen and florists, are getting to be numerous; all are useful, and this one specially so. It pays special attention to those engaged in the business as florists. We gath...
-Japan Work On Botany
Inouma Yokoussai appears to have been a famous author on botany in Japan. This particular work, we are told by Tanaka Yosiwo - who gives us here a second edition, issued in 1867 - was for a long time ...
-Horticultural Building Construction
By Josephus Plenty, New York and Philadelphia. This is perhaps rather a catalogue for free distribution, than a book for review, and scarcely comes under the literary rule that demands notice in this ...
-Public Parks Of Boston
The annual report of the Park Commissioners for 1886, shows that $123,981.88 were expended on construction and maintenance during that year. In order, however, to extend the Park system, the legislatu...
-The New South
By M. B. Hillyard. Balti- more: published by the Manufactuiers' Record Co. 1887. This is a description of the Southern States, noting each State separately, and giving their distinctive features and m...
-Insects Injurious To The Trees Of Washington
By C. V. Riley. Bulletin No. 10 of the Entomological Division of the United States Department of Agriculture. In Washington, as elsewhere, Prof. Riley finds there are four serious pests to the shad...
-Flower Markets And The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
One of the first objects of interest to the traveler, in Paris, is the Flower Market, which is held in different quarters of Paris. Some days in front of the Church of the Madeline, and on other days ...
-An Ordinance - Appointing A Stand For The Sale Of Plants And Flowers. Section 1
S Be it ordained and enacted by the Citizens of Philadelphia in Select and Common Councils assembled: That the Committee on City Property be, and they are hereby authorized to grant permission to pers...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society - Spring Exhibition
Those who have been of late lamenting, that flowering plants have been banished from exhibitions, and nothing but ferns and leaf plants are to be seen in their places, dried their eyes and looked happ...
-Maryland Horticultural Society
While friends in Boston, New York and elsewhere, kindly keep us posted, if only by local newspaper slips, of the work of their horticultural societies, we rarely get such favors from Baltimore, and ar...
-Germantown, Philadelphia, Horticultural Society
The May Meeting generally makes a specialty of wild flowers. On this occasion Mr. Edward Gellet exhibited 120 species all collected by him in the vicinity of Germantown. These were all named, and it s...
-A Californian Floral Fete
California must indeed be a land of flowers, judging by the festival that, extending over two weeks, has excited the famous old town of Los Angeles. Hundreds of contributors of cut flowers, poured the...
-The Gardens At The American Exhibition In London
Recently I paid a visit to the works in progress at Earl's Court, upon which over a thousand men are employed, when a glance at the main exhibition building now in progress, and the surrounding ground...
-July. Number 343. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Continuing our hints on tasteful landscape gardening, we give this month some views of Glenview, the residence of John B. Trevor, Esq., of Yonkers, in order to illustrate a point made last month, that...
-Abelia Rupestris, P. 323, 1886
Although this pretty little Chinese evergreen shrub is hardy in Texas, it is not hardy around New York, but it survives our winters very well in a cold frame. With me it blooms from late summer on thr...
-Stapelia Hardy In Texas, P. 328
As outdoor plants in summer, and in the full sunshine, Sta-pelias grow and spread with a luxuriance they never attain as pot grown plants. For a good many years I have grown them in this way, that is,...
-Zinnia Elegans Robusta Grandiflora Plenissima (Lorenz)
My continued endeavors in improving the most popular flowers have enabled me, in course of time, to introduce flowers of greatest merit, such as Pansy Emperor William, Diadem Pink, Gam-phrena globosa ...
-Sweet Scented Roses
Having ascertained that I had sixteen varieties of scentless roses in my garden I made out a list of these, and at the same time, another list of the most popular kinds grown which did really possess ...
-The Best Hybrid Perpetual Roses Raised During The Years Named
The following, I think, will be generally admitted to be the cream of the large number sent out during the period referred to, viz: 1879. Raisers' names. Charles Da...
-Aristolochias
These remarkably curious and always interesting plants, of which the Dutchman's pipe vine is a familiar example, have two new illustrations in Mr. Bull's catalogue now before us. One, Aristolochia ele...
-Japanese Hop
The new Japanese hop which was introduced last season, proved with me, a capital thing for covering summer-houses, poles, and lattice-work screens with foliage. Planted in good soil, it makes an excee...
-Mowing Heavy Slopes
J. W. L., says: In cutting grass with a lawn mower on a slope of considerable inclination, the method customarily followed, at least by the gardeners for the railroad companies, is, to attach a ro...
-Kalmia Latifolia
Miss S. E. P., St. Joseph, Michigan, makes the following inquiry respecting the beautiful wood laurel: Is Kalmia latifolia perfectly hardy, if not, would it flourish in a greenhouse? Is Aristolochi...
-Milk In The Norway Maple
F. W., Newark, Wayne Co., New York, writes: On examining Acer plantanoides growing here as a street tree, I am surprised to find the young growth abounding in milky juice of the same appearance and...
-The American Beauty Rose
I enclose you herewith an article translated from the French, as published in the Journal des Roses for May, just at hand, in which the writer, a German florist, claims that our celebrated American Be...
-"American Beauty" Or How The Old Beauties Become Young Again
The desire of an 'impressario' that his prima donna may appear young and beautiful as long as possible to her adorers, is very easy to explain. That one be able to put back old age, or rather to rend...
-The Clivia
The Clivia or Imantophyllum is an old plant of the family of Amaryllideae. Since a long time, we possess two very distinct species - the Clivia miniata and the Clivia nobilis. The flower of the former...
-Note On Bougainvillea Spectabilis
It is no doubt a gratification to most people to see their names in public print, and after seeing mine in the present month's issue of the Gardeners' Monthly, in connection with the Bougain-villea sp...
-Cut Roses From America
The most remarkable exhibit at the last meeting of the Floral Committee on the 12th inst. consisted in some cut blooms of Tea Rose Puritan, which left New York on the 2d inst, and arrived in the docks...
-Coleonema Alba
Those interested in cut flowers may profit by the following hints regarding a pretty plant from the Cape of Good Hope, which we find in the London Gardening World: A very pretty evergreen shrub, t...
-The Holy Ghost Plant, Or Dove Orchid
A correspondent of the Garden says the flowers make admirable button-hole bouquets and are in great request by those who like to have something out of the common line, and still have that which is han...
-Watering Fine Seeds
Mr. J. T. Saltau, Little Efford, Plymouth, has forwarded us an ingenious, inexpensive, and useful contrivance which he employs for lessening the stream of water flowing from a watering-pot, as is ofte...
-Plants As Sanitary Agents
The Therapeutic Gazette, does not seem to admire Dr. Anders' suggestions that plants in dwelling rooms may often be productive of good sanitary results. It has more faith in calomel and jalap, or sulp...
-Progressive Horticulture - Notes On The Garden Of Pierre Loril-Lard, Esq
Presuming a few remarks about snowballs - especially while the weather is excessively hot - may not have a tendency to give any one the chills, I feel encouraged herewith to give a few facts about the...
-Wood Ashes And Pear-Blight
As to the value of wood ashes in not only preventing but curing blight in the pear, there can be but little doubt. Coal ashes have been also advocated and tried, but they have not the same value; and ...
-Manure For Strawberries
I have read that stable manure is not good for strawberries. They say - I do not know who, but I suppose people who are looked up to - that it makes the plants run to leaf when we want fruit and not f...
-Retail Prices In Philadelphia
Distant readers often get the wholesale prices of fruits and vegetables, but it may be of use to have the retail prices at different dates. On the last day of May peas raised near Philadelphia brought...
-Paris Green For Apple Worms
Beware ! Prof. A. J. Cook, of Agricultural College, Lansing, Mich., announces: In Bulletin No. 26, issued last week from our Department of Zoology and Entomology, on page 6 a typographical error make...
-Preserving Apples From Worms
At a meeting of the Michigan Horticultural Society, W. A. Brown of Benton Harbor said growers in that vicinity had for three years practiced spraying apple trees with Paris Green with great success. S...
-A New Enemy To The Peach Grower
We never knew the rose bug, macrorhyncus sub-vestititus, to be of any serious account to the peach grower, but it seems it gives trouble sometimes. Every Evening of Wilmington, Del., prints thirty-fou...
-The Foreign Grape In America
The numerous efforts to succeed with the foreign grape on the eastern slope of the American Continent, have always proved failures - of late years all attempts have been abandoned. It is, however, ple...
-Celery Growing In Small Gardens
The market grower has to do things in a very different manner from the amateur. With the former, profit is the first consideration. The latter aims chiefly at excellence. From an amateur's stand-point...
-New Fruits
Nearly every catalogue that comes to hand, or serial of any kind published, has a sketch or description of some new fruit or other, until the whole science of pomology approaches unutterable confusion...
-Stachys Affinis
At one of the recent meetings of the National Horticultural Society of France, M. Chappellier exhibited tubers of this new esculent from Japan, which is of the easiest possible cultivation, and which ...
-Pistillate Strawberries
Homer: There are strawberries without stamens; of which the Crescent is a modern example. They will not bear strawberries, unless pollen from other kinds that have stamens reach them. This is probab...
-Forestry. Trees, Their Use And Beauty
Of the divine origin of trees, no reasonable doubt can possibly exist in the minds of all capable of understanding the records of Sacred Writ. In it, we are informed that out of the ground made the L...
-Forestry. Trees, Their Use And Beauty. Part 2
Then again, there is an indescribable grandeur about massive, stately old trees, which God seems to have given them to excite our admiration for His goodness to us poor erring sons of men. No monument...
-Forestry. Trees, Their Use And Beauty. Part 3
Besides improving and adding so much to the beauty of the otherwise dreary sameness of landscape, they furnish the most effectual means possible of giving comfort to man and beast, and through which, ...
-A Practical Glance At Botany
Many there are who set a very small estimate upon the practical value of botany. Not only is this true of many whose education is entirely practical; but of others and not a few who can boast of more ...
-A New Apple Pest - The Apple-Leaf Flea-Beetle (Haltica Punctipennis Leconte)
As long ago as 1872 I found the larva of a little flea-beetle known as Haltica punctipennis in Missouri, feeding upon Hawthorn. In 1877 I found it again in Colorado, but the species has never been con...
-Cortical Peculiarities In The Plum
Some specimens of supposed hybrids between the peach and the plum were sent to the Academy for examination. The chief reasons for the belief that they were hybrids were that they were sterile, and see...
-Bees Slitting The Flowers Of Petunias
F. This is now well known. It was the subject of a paper printed in the proceedings of the Troy Meeting of the American Association many years ago - and the fact that humble bees always do this to a...
-The Lily Of The Valley
Flowers large and flowers showy, Brighten up the umbrageous dale, But modest sweetness marks the snowy, Bell-like, Lily of the Vale. Fragrance, in its fairy lightness, Every nook and corne...
-The Pleasures Of A Garden
A New York correspondent writes: Just now I am having an interesting time with roses and strawberries. Have several acres of the latter and am testing some twenty varieties, and may send you somethin...
-Over-Statements
The following from Vick's Magazine deserves wide spread consideration. It is not only in connection with flowers; the whole range of gardening suffers from these exaggerations: When the writer in ...
-Insuring Greenhouses
C. H. S., Philadelphia, Pa., writes: Can you inform us where we can find an association that will insure florists' hot-houses By giving us immediate information you will greatly oblige. There i...
-General Samuel Alexievitch Grieg
This gentleman, after whom the very beautiful species of Tulip, Tulipa Griegii was named, died recently. He was a famous amateur horticulturist and President of the Imperial Horticultural Society of R...
-Dr. W. H. Schmcele
The death of this gentleman, the founder of Egg Harbor City, is announced. He died in Philadelphia in his seventy-sixth year. He was a native of Westphalia, and had a great fondness for establishing G...
-Dr. Kellogg
Dr. Albert Kellogg may be said to be the first resident botanist of the Pacific slope to make much of a mark in the study of the flora of that region. A very large number were first described and name...
-The Latest Studies On Indian Reservations
By J. B. Harrison, Philadelphia. Published by the Indian Rights Association. This is one of the most common sense treatises on the Indian question we have ever read. The trouble with the Indian began ...
-The Propagation Of Plants
By A. S. Fuller. New York: Orange Judd Company. 1887. We look on this as one of the most original and in many respects the best of Mr. Fuller's very useful works. It is dedicated to Mr. Trumpy, who...
-American Seed Trade Association
The fifth annual meeting was held in Philadelphia, on the 14th and 15th of June, and was called to order by President Fotler of Boston. James J. H. Gregory, of Marblehead, Mass., delivered an address ...
-The Annual Meeting Of The American Nurserymen's Association
The twelfth meeting of this body was held in Chicago on the 15th and 16th of June. Many of the older members were absent, but a large proportion of new ones swelled the attendance to probably 300. The...
-American Pomological Society
This was organized 1848, and is now about to hold its twenty-first session. Mr. P. Barry, First Vice-President, announces that at the last session of the American Pomological Society, held in the city...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
At the meeting on the 30th of July, the chief interest was the competition for sweet peas adjusted to a scale of points, as good horticultural judging should be. The name of the successful competitor ...
-Germantown (Phila.) Horticultural Society
The last of the spring meetings was held on the 9th of June. The hall was crowded by visitors among whom were many of the leading citizens of Germantown. One of the most notable of the plants exhib...
-The Michigan Horticultural Society
The Grand Rapids Daily Democrat says that seventeen years ago was organized the Michigan State Horticultural Society, an association which has grown to be one of the most vigorous and useful of all th...
-August. Number 344. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Some good poet essays to thank the Lord for flowers; but many a poor person of our large cities may thank the Lord for cemeteries, for without them hundreds would never own a flower. It has become ...
-The Ampelopsis
How beautifully the Ampelopsis Veitchii colors under the autumn frosts. Three vines, growing to a silver maple in front of our door, have now (Nov. 2d, 1886,) leaves of dull crimson, rose, yellow, dar...
-Improvement Of Flowers
Many of the old songs are the dearest to my ear and heart. Many of the new are not without their charms. But in these old time melodies there is often a strange sweetness, richness and rapturou...
-Garden Notes From Summerville, S. C
The earthquakes which have desolated our country, followed by extraordinary drouths, emptying our wells, drying up ponds and streams, and parching our fields and gardens to powder, have, we trust, fin...
-A New Weeping Tree, Teas' Weeping Russian Mulberry
In the year 1885, Mr. John C. Teas discovered among some Russian mulberry trees, one having a tendency of growth similar to a vine, running on the ground like a pumpkin vine, which attracted his atten...
-The Effect Of Colored Walks In Landscape Gardening
There are some kinds of gravel that recommend themselves to our notice on account of certain inherent qualities which they possess, among which we reckon that of strength to stand the wear of traffic;...
-A New Race Of Gladiolus
Kelway & Son, Florists, of England, have started wholly anew to raise a class of gladiolus from the original species. He has followed the selection rather than the hybrid system. His breed is characte...
-A New Late Lilac
The Syringa ligustrina proves to be a much later lilac than any now grown, and prolongs the favorite lilac season admirably. The Siberian lilac, Syringa Josikae, comes in about a week or two after the...
-Scraps And Queries. The English Bind-Weed, Convolvulus Arvensis
L., Harrisburg, Pa., writes: The enclosed is a fearful weed. What is its name, and how can I destroy it? It came into our garden, I believe, from some New York fruit trees in the first place. T...
-Alocasia Macrorhiza
What a superb and graceful plant is the Aloca-sia Macrorhiza variegata ! If not one of the best, it is certainly entitled to claim a position as being one of the most striking and effective ornamental...
-Fertilization Of Orchids
May 19th of this year Cattaleya Mossiae commenced opening its flowers. A few days afterwards in the morning I was observing a very fine solitary flower. I also noticed a very large humble bee that had...
-"The American Beauty"
The articles of Mr. F. Harms and Dr. Ludwig Fritsch seem to indicate that they consider some of our American florists a bad lot of men indeed - when they, our Yankee Garden Barnums, deliberately wit...
-Tea Roses In Pits
Plant your roses in frames six by three. Pitch rather flat, as I find when the pitch is steep it forces them too much in the spring. The earth at the back of the frame eighteen inches from the glass. ...
-Hebeclinum Ianthinum
The violet-colored Conoclinum, or, as it is often called, Hebeclinum ianthinum, is a very showy stove or warm greenhouse plant belonging to the Natural Order Compositae. It is a native of St. Catha...
-Tree Tubs
Everybody knows that after getting our tubs for large plants made of the most enduring woods, we are often worried over the rotting away of the bottoms through contact with the earth. Clement & Dun...
-Pacific Cut Flowers In Eastern Markets
In our last we gave an extract from an English source in regard to the successful sending of cut flowers of the Puritan Rose three thousand miles across the ocean. There is no doubt if it can be done ...
-Niphetos
Judging by the following, a correspondent of the Gardeners' Chronicle does not think anything will beat Niphetos as a White Tea. But then it is such a delicate grower in American rose houses. A Te...
-The Meteor Rose
Of this Mr. Evans says: This is a remarkably rich dark velvety crimson Hybrid Tea rose, without the least tint suggestive of purple. It is a constant and good bloomer, very vigorous and healthy in gr...
-Cut Flower Arrangements For A Dinner Table
The Journal of Horticulture thus describes the floral arrangements at a very aristocratic dinner table recently: The table was laid for thirty, and light was supplied by five candelabra arranged d...
-Rose, The Puritan
In regard to the manner in which these were shipped from America: Two dozen cut blooms were staged, all of which had been received from America in the Etruria, which left New York on the 2d inst., a...
-Sowing Seeds Of Amaryllis
A correspondent of the Gardeners' Chronicle says: Sow about fifty seeds in a 5 inch pot, place in a good bottom-heat, and they will vegetate in two or three weeks. In a month or so from the time ...
-Pot Mignonette
In the Old World an enormous number of pot plants are grown and sold for window or small conservatory culture, of some popular flowers; there are sometimes florists who grow only the one kind. One who...
-Color In Plants
No variation of plants is more common than those of color, and the color of plants is one of the readiest marks of distinction. We find it scattered through all the classes of nature animate and inani...
-August. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
A very suggestive article in our last was that on strawberries. But it was written by an amateur for amateurs, and would scarcely be payable for market growers. They prefer as a general thing to pla...
-Fruit Growing And Change Of Climate
If I read the Gardeners' Monthly aright, I believe its estimable Editor does not believe in a change of climate, and consequently that fruitgrowing will vary in its successes according as climates cha...
-Pears And Their History
I have been asked to give some account of what I know about pears. There is, of course, much to be said about a fruit which more than any other attracts the attention of the cultivated pomologist from...
-Forcing Strawberries
For all the talk of having fruit from the southern parts of our country, there are several months when strawberries are not to be had; and those who are forcing them find great encouragement. We have ...
-American Apples In English Orchards
No less than 15,000 barrels of apples were received in Covent Garden market, London, during the week ending December 9th, 1886, and these were considered but the balance of a much larger quantity rece...
-Sorghum Sugar
Miss Helen Abbott, the eminent authority on plant chemistry, in a lecture given before the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, contends that the failure so far to produce sugar profitably from sorghum...
-Protecting Potato From Colorado Beetle
It is surprising how slow profitable information travels. It is now many years since the Gardeners' Monthly first proposed to destroy the beetle with Paris Green. This has been taken up so generally b...
-Fire Blight In The Pear In Tennessee
A Jackson, Tennessee, correspondent writes: I would like to ask you if you can tell me what ails my pear trees. They die back. A small limb will die. and when I cut the dead limb off another dies, an...
-Pears On The Quince Stock
A Pittsburg correspondent wants to know why, as pears on the quince stock are so much cheaper, he should not plant them in preference to the more costly standard. We cannot answer the question to our ...
-Couch Grass
C. J. T., Flora Dale, Pa., says: Enclosed please find a specimen of grass I have growing upon my farm; it started here several years ago, and has been spreading very rapidly despite my efforts to ...
-Cultivating Ginseng
C. B. R., Albany, Whiteside co., 111., referring to the note of Mrs. E. J. D., Nicholasville, Ky., desires to know whether an effort to cultivate it in Western North Carolina, might ...
-Forestry. Succession Of Forests
I don't wonder you get out of patience with this old *' chestnut, of oaks coming up in pine forests. I have never seen a pine forest in a climate where oaks can be made to grow that did not have oaks...
-The Forestry Question
As I do not believe that you publish your opinions with a conviction that they cannot be changed, I venture to offer some comment on your position in regard to forestry matters in your last issue. ...
-The Growth Of Timber Trees
The proper distance to plant timber trees apart is the most troublesome question in forest culture. A number of antagonistic economies have to be consulted. For instance, we want a long, clean, straig...
-Best Kinds For Forest Planting
A discussion of some length is going on in our exchanges between Mr. Fernow, Mr. Douglas and the Agricultural Editor of the Press, as to the best kinds of trees to plant in American forestry. The ques...
-Cypress Lumber
The Lockland Lumber Company are endeavoring to introduce this for greenhouse sash and rafters, and give the following note on the general value of the timber: It grows in groups called ' Brakes,'...
-Some Wild Flowers Of Florida
Until recently Middle Florida in my mind was either that portion of the peninsula included between lines projected westward to the Gulf coast from Saint Augustine and Cape Canaverel, or the somewhat l...
-Hybrid Peaches And Plums
Enclosed I send you a problem in botany, only leaves of common and well known species of Prunus and Amygdalus. Each is numbered. Will you tell in the Gardeners' Monthly to which genus each belongs, wi...
-Behria
A new genus of the lily family has been named by Professor Greene in honor of the well known and enthusiastic California botanist, Dr. Herman Behr, of San Francisco. It has some relationship to Brodia...
-Wild Flowers Of Nevada
A lady writing from Franktown says: I have found our wild flowers do not grow in cultivation, with a few ex ceptions. I have lifted them, earth and plant, and planted in flower beds not far distant, ...
-Red And White Roses
Roses the lover gives to his love; Roses we lay on the breast of death That nevermore fondest whisper can move - Which is the sweeter, answer and prove. Passionate love, or sleep without breath?...
-Flowers Of Literature
Literary expressions are often ridiculous when measured by common sense. In a work on architecture, now before us, from the pen of a distinguished Boston gentleman, we read that in the seventeenth ce...
-The Arbutus
Our Trailing Arbutus is not the Arbutus of the ancients - nor indeed by modern botanists would it be regarded as an Arbutus at all - but its relationship to the famous Arbutus of the ancients gives an...
-Names Of Chrysanthemums
A correspondent of the Gardeners' Magazine, referring to the superior culture of American growers, adds: Before leaving the American growers, there is an interesting subject worthy of mention. The...
-American Beauty Rose
Mr. Fr. Harms, of Hamburg, repeats in the May issue of the Journal des Roses that he is satisfied that Madame Ferdinand Jamain ne plaisit pas ici (no good here), and that the penstroke of an Americ...
-Wilson, The Ornithologist
In the School Monthly, a meritorious publication, edited by the grammar school boys of Germantown, in aid of a fund to establish a public school library, we find the following anecdote of Wilson, the ...
-Caleb Cope
Those who look back over the literature of horticulture thirty or forty years ago, will find this estimable gentleman among the leading amateurs in American horticulture. He was long President of the ...
-The Establishment Of Louis Menand & Sons, Albany, N. Y
Some of the most enterprising florists in the United States are in Albany, though their good work seldom gets into the pages of horticultural literature. Among the oldest of these excellent establishm...
-The Cemetery Branch
In 1870 Mr. Menand purchased thirty-one acres of land near the entrance to the Rural cemetery, on which are now the residence of his son Louis, and a half dozen hot-houses. These houses are devoted mo...
-Nichols & Lorton
Davenport, Iowa. These well known nurseries were started in 1858 by Mr. Nichols. Mr. Lorton entered in 1865. The beginning was two and one-half acres, which has extended to three hundred now. Fruit tr...
-Jean Baptiste Boussingault
We recently noted the telegraphic news of the death of this distinguished agricultural chemist. Our exchanges give a fuller account of his life and services which we annex: This eminent and vetera...
-Die Erziehung Der Pflanzen Aus Samen (The Raising Of Plants From Seed)
By H. Jager. Published by Ernst Benary, Erfurt, Germany. 1887. This is a large octavo, 422 pages, gotten up with that completeness which has made German literature famous all over the world. The gr...
-Florists In Suburban Villages
The American Florist takes especial pains to inform Mr. Meehan that in the vicinity of New York there are villages in which reside florists who raise flowers for the New York market. The informatio...
-What Is A Vine
G. A. L., Bryn Mawr, Pa., says: I take the liberty of asking a botanical question, as I have been kindly referred to you as authority. I desire to obtain the technical and scientific botanical mean...
-Mass. Horticultural Society
The income of the society last year was $53,930.96. Almost the whole of this is from investments, only $1,078 being from members, and $2,329.16 admission charges, less expenses. $600 came from the Sta...
-The Georgia State Horticultural Society
We learn from President Berckmans that a meeting will be held at Dalton, on the 4th, 5th, and 6th of August; on the 9th and 10th the State Agricultural Society will have its annual fair at Canton. The...
-Observation On The Monthly Increase In Girth Of Trees At The Royal Botanic Garden
Dr. David Christison, at the April 14th meeting of the Edinburgh Botanical Society, gave the results of monthly measurements of different species of deciduous and evergreen trees in the Edinburgh Bota...
-September. Number 345. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
One does not need to own a twenty thousand dollar picture, painted by a master in the art, in order to enjoy it. In the picture gallery, or in the hall of the connoisseur, he is as free to criticise i...
-Cannas
In August last, during a visit to a floral establishment, my attention was called to a group of Cannas, lately imported from Europe by scientific florists, who produced this admirable collection by cr...
-New Zinnias
The improvement in double Zinnias within a few years has been quite marked, both in greater variety and more brilliant colors, and also in the habit of the plants. Two valuable strains are added this ...
-The Japan Hop
The Japan Hop - is a very fine, rapid-growing annual climbing plant, as hardy, healthy and vigorous in growth as the common Morning Glory. The leaves and vine resemble the common hop, but it differs i...
-Amateur Rose Culture
For the past four or five years I have been much interested in the culture of roses. My comparative success in their cultivation, together with the great pleasure derived by myself and others in Watch...
-The Larch
It is worth remembering that in most parts of our country the Larch, of all other trees, should be planted in the fall of the year, and as early in the fall as practicable - the best time perhaps, jus...
-The Oriental Plane Tree
In our country the Plane tree was once a popular tree - but when the disease, still continued, deformed the Button-wood or American Plane, the European fell into disgrace with it. Experience however s...
-Parks Of Boston
Boston has 3,356 acres of public park, of which about four square miles are in open spaces of about four acres each. It is an excellent example to other cities. Philadelphia made a start in 1883, and ...
-New Hardy Hibiscus
An American florist advertises the following in the London papers. We have heard nothing of them in this country, and should like to know if any of our readers can explain. The description reads like ...
-A New Balsam - Impatiens Roylei
The Gardeners' Chronicle says: It may interest apiarians to know something of a plant, easily obtained and easily cultivated, that will supply their bees with a large quantity of honey at a season...
-Well Planted Trees
B. Baltimore, Md., says: I have a puzzle which I would be obliged if you can unravel for me. I bought a quantity of deciduous trees this spring, which were temporarily covered with earth on their ...
-The Double Tiger Lily
Mary writes: Father says the Editor of the Gardeners' Monthly might like to know that this lily does not do as other double flowers do - come double by changing stamens into petals. The flower is ...
-Sobralia Macrantha
One is always certain to find something of interest in the Botanic Gardens here. Looking in the Mexican house a week or so ago, I came across a splendid specimen of Sobralia macrantha, with nine fl...
-Stephanotis Floribunda
For many years, when I was doing a retail plant business, I grew a small number of Ste-phanotis floribunda, and occasionally succeeded in selling a plant, and that only to persons who had used the per...
-Flowers At Public Festivals
Amidst all the changes in social and political life, and in religious and public institutions, and no matter how diverse these may be, no one thinks of doing without them. The soldiers of the American...
-A Double Greenhouse Rhododendron
In these days when a plant is popular not only for its beauty, but as it may serve the interests of the cut flower grower, the Asiatic Rhododendron we now present to our readers will be heartily welco...
-Lifting Chrysanthemums
The custom of growing the bulk of plants we require for winter flowering, in the open ground during summer, is getting to be very common. It saves a great deal of summer labor in watering and caring f...
-A Beautiful Cycas Revoluta
One of the most beautiful Sago Palms west of the Mississippi is said to be in possession of Mr. M. J. Nagel, a noted landscape gardener of Jefferson City, Missouri. It is only 18 inches from the tub t...
-Notes On Wholesale Fruits And Vegetables In Philadelphia Markets
As a general rule mere quotations a week or two after date are of little use; but there are often points to be learned from the doings of a huge market that afford hints for cultivators everywhere. ...
-Good Old Fruits - Madeleine Pear
While the rage for novelties keeps fresh and warm, it is not well to leave to cold neglect the good old stand-bys that have given us pleasure in the past, and show no disposition whatever to runout ...
-American Fruits And Vegetables
The Garden having stated that the American cranberry, when cooked, is said to be very palatable, and DeCondolle, in his Origin of Cultivated Plants, that the United States, in spite of their vas...
-Orange Scale Insects
Prof. C. V. Riley has just returned from California, where he has been studying the orange scale insects. He found the injury reported to be by no means underrated, and some orange orchards were being...
-How To Make A Caterpillar Torch
To burn out tent caterpillars a torch has to be used which Prof. Riley thus describes: Take a piece of soft brick known as salmon brick, and trim it to an egg shape; then take two flexible wires, cros...
-The Wilder Pear
Mr. Charles A. Green, Rochester, says: I shall be glad of your opinion on the Wilder pear. Presuming that it ripened at Rochester, we think so well of it for an early pear, that we have sent it to t...
-Killing Couch Grass
C. J. T., Flora Dale, Pa., writes: I am very much obliged for the information concerning the Couch grass I sent you. Will follow your directions where we can do so. There is a large amount of it in...
-Bees Eating Raspberries
Apis writes: I do not know whether bees eat grapes or not; but this year I am nearly wild about my raspberries. I have a neighbor who keeps a large lot, with hardly anything for them to live on. T...
-Rotting Plums
ALenox.Mass., correspondent says: Will the Gardeners' Monthly kindly inform *No. 4' what is the matter with his plums, a great many of which are dropping off his trees? These have had an egg deposit...
-The Sand Pear And Hybrids On Quince
G. F. H., Flat Rock, O., writes: I saw a few days ago, an article from ' Lawrence of the Ohio Farmer' Cleveland, O., in which he claims that Kieffer's Hybrid, LeConte, etc, pears, and in fact all s...
-Forestry. Profits Of Forest Planting
In the April uumber of the Monthly, I gave some figures of locust timber on the farm of Isaac G. Smock, near Holmdel, in Monmouth county, New Jersey, and I promised to give some additional facts of th...
-The Tap Roots Of Trees
Many questions were brought up at the American Nurserymen's Convention, in Chicago, last week, which were passed over for lack of time to discuss them. A member claimed that the Black Walnut, being...
-American Forestry
We have frequently pointed out that common opinion that looks to centuries to replace our forests is founded on a misapprehension of American character. When the time comes that a good profit can be d...
-Young's Flora Of Texas
Dr. Gray's Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States, gives all the flowers wild to the northern part of Virginia and east of the Mississippi River. Chapman's Flora of the Southern United St...
-Clethra Alnifolia
Scientific men of late years have speculated much on the behaviour of the plant for its own good; and, indeed, some of those who are striving to solve the riddle that involves the origin of species lo...
-Vigor And Fertility
It is important to distinguish in plants the difference between what may be termed the vegetative and reproductive stages in plants. It is within the every-day experience of the cultivator that so lon...
-Planting Beans And Cucumbers
Some people are continually asking, what is the use of knowledge? Cannot we raise beans and potatoes as well by doing as we have seen others do, as by stuffing our brains by knowing this thing and lea...
-Pollen From Rye Fields
A Belvidere, N. J., correspondent says: I desire to note a singular thing which occurred when I was out driving early in June. We were passing a field of rye; there was a gentle wind blowing. The pol...
-The Snake Gourd
A correspondent says: Few people have any idea of the rapid growth of the fruit of the Snake Cucumber, Trichosanthes anguina. A plant growing on the premises of the writer, is bearing, at this time, ...
-Smilax Lanceolata
We are obliged to our Summerville, S. C, correspondent, for expressing a doubt as to the correctness of the editorial note at page 228, that the beautiful vine she described as such a lovely ornament ...
-How Wood Is Made
A correspondent sends us the following editorial from the London Garden, with the note that it might be of some interest to republish it for the benefit of American readers. It so happens that it has ...
-Paper Mulberry
Morris, Pittsburgh, Pa., writes: I mail you leaves of small shade tree under separate cover. The variation is so great that you will confer a favor upon me by naming it. [Some of the leaves a...
-Red Spider On Arbor Vitae
Thuja, Pittsburgh, Pa., writes: The eastern sides of the Sib. Arbor Vitae in one of our cemeteries are discolored to such an extent as to be noticeable as far as you can see them. I enclose sample...
-Second Flowering Of Orange Trees
The Florida Farmer and Fruit Grower kindly says: If this should come to the notice of Mr. Meehan we hope he will give his opinion on these points through his Gardeners' Monthly. In questions invol...
-The Peach In America
In the course of some historical researches recently undertaken, I have come upon the following paragraph in Kalm's Travels in North America:* I have been told by all those who have made journ...
-A Fruit Growing Settlement In Washington Territory
A colony in which fruit-growing has been made a prominent feature has located on the shores of Puget's Sound, with promise of complete success. Mrs. Gallup, of Denver, and J. M. Grant, of Tacoma, name...
-Quality In Fruit
A correspondent asks why, when speaking of quality in fruit, writers have come to confine the term to nice flavor. We do not know that they do, though it is often used to express a very eatable fruit....
-Useful Herbarium Plants
Mr. M. Buys-man, of Middleburg, Holland, has started a very useful enterprise in preparing sets of dried plants to suit various objects. The farmer may, if he chooses, buy an herbarium of weeds; the d...
-Drought In The Northwestern Portion Of The Atlantic States
Only think of but eight-hundredths of an inch of rain over 75,000 square miles in ten weeks, and a torrid sun at that! That is the record up to this 8th of August. Horticulture and forestry everywhere...
-Introduction Of Chromo Lithography Into The United States
By the kindness of Mr. W. R. Smith, of the United States Botanic Garden, and of Miss Mumford, of Washington, the Editor some time since came into possession of a set of magazines very much in the styl...
-Prof. C. V. Riley
The Pacific Rural Press of July 23d gives a portrait of Professor Riley, which is an excellent likeness and a good picture every way. It winds up an account of his life and services with the following...
-Spencer Fullerton Baird
When men like Agassiz, Darwin and Baird pass away there is little left for a monthly magazine to note; for in these days of newspapers and telegraphs the world's loss by their deaths is heralded at on...
-Charles L. Watrous
This well known nurseryman of Des Moines, Iowa, and president of the American Nurserymen's Association, was born at Cortland, N. Y., in 1837. He entered in the war for the Union as Captain of the 7th ...
-Edgar Sanders
This well known and highly esteemed florist of Chicago, has been elected by the City of Lake View, in which suburb of Chicago he resides, one of the Board of Commissioners of Public Works. Lake View h...
-Mr. Wm. Meggat
This gentleman, president of the American Seed Trade Association, was born near Drumlanrig Castle in Scotland - a place famous as a centre of horticultural learning. He came to America in 1859, eventu...
-Mrs. Louis Gloeckner
Among the successful florists of Albany, New York, this lady is prominent. In 1873 the late Louis Gloeckner bought out Mr. Ferguson, whose greenhouses were directly in front of the cemetery station. A...
-Rohrer Brothers Of Lancaster, Pa
The praise of one's neighbors is often more grateful than honors from abroad. The Lancaster papers speak in high praise of the florist enterprise of the Rohrer Bros., of whose fine set of plant houses...
-Halliday Jackson
Another of that remarkable band of Chester County botanists, which gave such an impetus to the study of the amiable science, under the lead of Dr. William Darlington in the last generation, has passed...
-Dr. William Henry Ravenel
Botanists and horticulturists generally will regret to hear of the death of this gentleman which occurred at his home in Aiken, S. C, on the 17th of July, after a protracted illness. He was born in th...
-Ezra Whitman, Editor And Publisher Of The "Maryland Farmer"
The death of this well known gentleman occurred in Baltimore on the 13th of July. He was in his 75th year, having been born at Bridgewater, Mass., on the 7th of June, 1812. He removed to Baltimore in ...
-Practical Floriculture
By Peter Henderson. Orange, Judd Co., 1887. This is a new and enlarged edition, and it is a pleasure to say that this is not to be taken in the sense in which such booksellers' announce-ments are...
-The Ravishing Snow Flower
A Florida correspondent sends us the following paragraph, and asks, is there any foundation for it? The great botanist, Anthoskoff, found in Siberia, in 1870, the ravishing snow flower, the se...
-Storage Houses
H. H., of Halifax, Nova Scotia, writes: I cannot find in any book on horticultural buildings, how to construct nursery tree store-houses and instructions how to manage them. I would be obliged if...
-The Holland Bulb Trade
The Royal General Union for the cultivation of flower roots at Haarlem has held an extraordinary general meeting on June 20th, which was attended by a large number of its members, among whom the princ...
-Individual Horticultural Exhibitions
We have repeatedly shown that with a few worthy exceptions, horticultural and agricultural societies have not progressed as the world has moved. The best people among amateurs neglect them, while exhi...
-The American Forestry Congress
The Sixth Annual Meeting will be held at Springfield, 111., on the 14th, 15th and 16th of September, on the invitation of the State Senate and the House of Representatives. The local committee are end...
-Society Of American Florists
The Florists' Convention at Chicago, commencing August 16th, will, besides the address of so intelligent a gentleman as President Craig, a paper on hybridization by John ,Thorp, on Fungoid diseases...
-A Flower Show For Public School Children
The following account of a novel idea is reported by the Isle of Wright (England) Ob-server: On Wednesday a very pretty little wild flower show, in aid of the Congregational Village Station Chape...
-A Country Celery Show In England
A correspondent of the Garden says: In a Lancashire town, which shall be nameless, I recently saw the advertisement of a Celery show, and a unique advertisement it was. Projecting from the upper w...
-October. Number 346. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In our last we gave some hints in regard to the laying out of grounds, looking to the effect planting might ultimately have on giving glimpses of different distant views, or of furnishing different as...
-Garden Notes From California
The Southern California Floral and Perfume Company has inaugurated a novel way of advertising; every day one thousand choice rose buds are distributed on the numerous trains passing through their farm...
-Hyacinths
The Honorary Secretary of the Horticultural Club has invited me to say a few words upon bulbs and bulb-growing in Holland, and feeling anxious to oblige the members I will endeavor to meet your wishes...
-Hyacinths. Continued
In this run after large bulbs among Hyacinths many sorts with very inferior flowers were brought out in quantity but although these large bulbs did increase the general trade, and so far gratified the...
-Milk In Maple Leaves
A contributor in the last number referred to the milky juice present in the leaves of the Norway maple. He will find the lacteal fluid present, and more copiously, in the Colchicum maple. As to this s...
-Bronson Park, Kalamazoo, Michigan
This city has been wise in selecting for one of the special features of a public park one of the monuments of the past in an Indian mound. One by one these will disappear all over the land, except whe...
-The Drop Worm, Or Basket Worm
This pest, which makes for itself a nest out of the leaves of the tree it feeds on, and has these nests hanging on the branches like brown curl-papers over a lady's head, is so easily kept down by han...
-The Norway Spruce
The Rural New Yorker has a number of correspondents discussing whether it is worth while to plant the Norway Spruce as an ornamental tree. In this part of the world, the vicinity of Philadelphia, it u...
-Combining The Red With The Sugar Maple
Mr. Levi W. Russell tells the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that the red maple,also known as the swamp, and improperly as the white, maple is too little esteemed for ornament and ...
-Crotons As Bedding Plants
Among the novel features worthy of note in Fairmount Park are two beds of crotons and a bed of the bronzy acalypha. The crotons make a remarkably fine effect, as the warm orange-brown tints in so many...
-Parsons' Weeping Hemlock
The Hemlock Spruce has naturally a weeping character - that is to say, its branches droop by reason of the weight of foliage. In the variety noted above, the main branches turn over and droop as in th...
-New Roses In England
A correspondent of the Gardeners' Chronicle says: Comparisons are out of place, but there are few orchids that would be chosen before a well grown forced rose bush in the spring months. The Englis...
-Keeping Bulbs Over Winter
Mrs. L. J. C, Parnassus, Pa., writes: As you so kindly answered my previous questions, I now make another request. Will you please, as soon as you conveniently can, give some instructions as to the...
-Improved Flower Pots
Mr. Geo. A. Burroughs, of Providence, R. I., brings to our attention a newly invented flower-pot that has some excellent points. Every reader of the Gardeners' Monthly knows by this time that it is...
-Passiflora Kermesina
The crimson passion flower, Passiflora kerme-sina, is a beautiful slender growing stove or warm greenhouse climbing vine belonging to the Natural Order Passifloraceae. With the exception of P. race...
-Hot Water For Killing Insects
We believe the Gardeners' Monthly was the first to show that one of the cheapest and best modes of destroying insects on pot plants was to invert the pot and dip the plant for a few seconds in water w...
-Niphetos Rose
The Journal des Roses says that the German name, Niphetos - snow - expressively indicates the soft, tender white of this rose. Wherever white roses are desired, it says, this variety always has the pr...
-Greenhouse Rhododendrons
All who know the hardy Rhododendrons admire; but, beautiful as these are, they do not begin to compare in gorgeous splendor with the more tender Asiatic species, of which the comparatively well known ...
-Reviving Wilted Cuttings
A lady writes: Do you ever put your wilted, dried up specimens into water as hot as you can bear your hand in and leave them for twenty-four hours? When quite a child I accidentally revived a lot of ...
-Mealy Bug On Stephanotis
Mr. Albert Momme, gardener to R. W. Downing, Esq., of Wallingford, Pa., writes: I should like to ask a question in regard to Mr. Wm. Lyne's article on 'stephanotis floribunda. Mr. Lyne says by exposi...
-Peach And Plum Hybrids
The Cortical Layer Theory Nailed, and the fact that Peach and Wild Goose Plums do Hybridize Demonstrated. In the Gardeners'Monthly for July 1887, p. 217, under the head of Cortical Peculiaritie...
-Botanical Analysis In Part Of The Species
1. Amygdalus, Persica; and 2, Prunus Chicasa, including Wild Goose Plum; and 3, Seedlings of Wild Goose Plum, supposed to be hybrids. (1) Amygdalus, Persica The peach; cortical layer not deciduo...
-Burning Over Strawberry Beds
I am told that some market gardeners in this vicinity, have been very successful, in renewing and invigorating their strawberry beds, by burning them' over. I understand that they sprinkle straw over ...
-Old Seeds Versus New Seeds
An item in the September number recalls an experience I had some years since, when a large grower of pear seedlings. Some French pear seed being left over, they were packed in water, and air tight tin...
-Clean Culture For Fruit Trees
They are having the same discussion over clean culture or grass culture for orange trees that we in the North once had over our orchards. They will see, as we have had to learn, that it is a broad que...
-The Best Way To Produce Varieties
Much stress is laid on the practice of hybridizing or crossing in the production of new varieties, but as a general rule our fruit growers have had more success from selection than from crossing. Mr. ...
-Retail Prices Of Fruits And Vegetables The First Week In September In Philadelphia
Lima beans, shelled, 35 cts. a quart; string beans, 15 cts. half peck; egg plants, 5 cts. each; cabbage, 10 cts. ahead; celery, 40 cts. a bunch; sweet potatoes, 15 cts. half peck; white potatoes, 15 c...
-Preventing Rot In Grapes
A letter in a daily paper says: The experiment of bagging grapes previous to their blooming, is being tried quite extensively this year on C. H. Smith's vineyard at Vineland, New Jersey, and there...
-Kelsey's Japan Plum
This plum, introduced from Japan without any special name, has been given the name of Kelsey, just as William's Bon Chretien, of the Old World came to be called the Bartlett pear in the New. The Japan...
-American Apricot Peach
Mere size is not sought for in a good dessert fruit. One of the smallest of grapes - the Delaware - is one of the most profitable. Among pears, the small Seckel heads the list for popularity, and the ...
-Curculio In California
A correspondent of the Gardeners' Monthly inquires why the curculio has not been introduced into California as well as the colding moth, to which the Editor answers that there is something there unfav...
-A Destructive Insect On Apple Trees
G. P. Norwich, Conn., says: I inclose a leaf or two from a crab-apple tree; you see the edge of the leaf is rotted, and cemented down; I find eggs of some kind enclosed; I find no worms on the tree...
-Forestry. The Uses Of Our Imported Timber
There is no imported wood more popular than Mahogany, Swietenia Mahogani. Its rich rose color, with its light and dark shades, when polished, produces a beautiful effect; and its even grain makes it e...
-Cerasus Serotina
Few trees are better known than the wild cherry. As a timber tree, it ought to have a preeminent place, for it is of great value in furniture, and is not far behind mahogany in the beauty of its appea...
-Effect Of Seed From Different Portions Of The Plant
A lady well known for her writings in connection with popular science, inquires: For the sake of reaching general principles of wide interest in the study of natural history, I would like to ascertai...
-Some Important Discoveries In The Life-History Of The Hop Plant-Louse Phorodon Humuli, Schrank)
The author has been for several years carrying on investigations with a view of ascertaining the full annual life-history of Phorodon humuli, and especially with a view of settling the hitherto mooted...
-Fertility Of Hybrids
In August, 1884, The Independent had an exhaustive article showing that hybrids were as generally fertile as species or varieties that may have originated in what some people would call a more natural...
-The Agency Of Insects In The Introduction Of New Species Of Plants
The belief that plants of one species or genus become new species or genera in order to accommodate themselves to certain insects for which they may be said to have special preferences, seems to have ...
-The Frost Line
Speaking of the probable success of pine-apple culture in Florida, the Dispatch says: There is no such thing as the 'frost line,' or the line of 'hurtful frosts; ' all frosts are hurtful, but the ...
-The World's Rainfall
In a recent paper to the Royal Society of Edinburgh John Murray sought to give the world's rainfall in figures. The areas of country having an inland drainage - equal to 11,486,350 square miles - rece...
-Vital Powers Of Old And New Seeds
A correspondent from Belvidere, N. J., says: You are always so exasperatingly correct in all you say or write that it does one good to be able, if only for the short time that elapses before you sit ...
-Potatoes On Beans
F. N. says: I clip the following from a Florida paper. Can you tell me if it can be done? I have always understood a plant must be of the same family to insure a successful graft: 'A potato ...
-Echinocystis Lobata
T. B. S. says: I take the liberty to send you some flowers of a Cucurbitaceous plant for name, if you please. I have tried Loudon's edition of 1855, with his two supplements, having no higher autho...
-Service Berries
What are Service berries? asked the young lady. The sergeant replied: They are berries we get in the service; but we called them bullets then. The horticulturist could scarce give a better answer,...
-Importation Of Plants Into Germany
The Commissioner of Agriculture recently received official notification through the Department of State of a reversal of Section 2 of the German Imperial decree of July 4, 1883, which prohibited not o...
-A June Morning In The West Indies
Up from the Caribbean The wind conies like a paean, As on my fragant orange-bough 1 swing, Dreaming and wondering, And piping Sapphic fragments o'er and o'er. Along the shore The surf foams m...
-The Mud-Gardens And Fields Of The Nile
In a little time, then, a Nile farm becomes a rare beauty-spot, instead of a waste of mud; tor now the crops are grown. The lentils bend with their heavy load, and the fields of grain turn their well-...
-The Home Of Sappho
Lord Byron wrote: The Isles of Greece ! The Isles of Greece ! Where burning Sappho loved and sung, Where grew the arts of war and peace; Wlipre Delos rose, and Phoebus sprung! Eternal summer gi...
-Gardeners From The Old World
The following advice from a letter in regard to gardeners going to Australia is good for those who come to America: I would advise any one coming out here not to go into business at once, had he ...
-Introduction Of The Potato Into France
At a meeting to celebrate the introduction of the potato into Europe M. Henri L. de Vilmorin, of Paris, read a paper on The Introduction of the Potato into France. M. Vilmorin said that the potato w...
-Analytical Herbariums
Herbariums, or collections of dried plants, usually serve little more purpose than to identify a species, and even then one can often not be sure, because the specimens are imperfect in some respect. ...
-Wafer Ash
One of the worst features of common names is one that has not been hitherto noted, namely, that people are no more satisfied with them than botanical names, and new ones come up every year or two. The...
-The Wonderful Growth Of Florida
Hon. Wm. D. Kelley, the father as he is called, of the United States House of Representatives, by reason of his long term of service there, has written a letter on the future of Florida, that is excit...
-Agriculture And Horticulture Of Italy
Mr. Charles Joly ex-President of the National Horticultural Society of France, describes his visit to the great exhibition at Florence, which he styles the Ghent of Italy in its floral features. He sa...
-Charles Dimmick
Mr. Dimmick, of Ryde, Isle of Wight, England, an occasional correspondent of the Gardeners' Monthly from that faraway portion of our horticultural domain, died on the 1st of September in his 70th year...
-Garret R. Garretson
This famous seedsman died at his home in Flushing, Long Island, New York, on the 28th of August, in his 74th year. He may be said to be one of the great fathers of the modern seed trade. Possibly t...
-Catalogues
Aspinwall & Treadwell, Bee Keepers' Supplies, Barrytown, N. Y.; Boomer & Boschert Press Co., Cider and Wine Machinery, Syracuse, N. Y.; Braun & Satterthwaite, Greenhouse and Nursery Stock, Denver, Col...
-State Board Of Forestry Of California
At a recent meeting it was Resolved, That the State Board of Forestry, through its representative at the next National Forestry Congress, will impress upon that body the importance of urging upon the ...
-November. Number 347. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There is no time in the whole year but thought on the proper laying out of grounds is timely. The Seasonable Hints we have recently been giving seem so thoroughly appreciated that we are disposed to c...
-What Is Good Planting? By D. O. Munson
B., of Baltimore, Md., in September number of your valuable magazine writes: I have a puzzle which I would be glad if you would unravel for me. I will try to unravel it. The trouble with most tre...
-The Weeping Mulberry
In the August number are some notes on our new Weeping Mulberry, in which it is stated that the fruit is above the average size of Russian Mulberries. This is an error. The trees have not yet borne en...
-Rose, Etoile De Lyon, From The Open Air
I send you by mail to-day a few buds of the Tea Rose, Etoile de Lyon, cut from a lot of plants in open ground. The very heavy rains of the past few days have injured them a little. The plants from whi...
-Transplanting Trees
B. in Baltimore, would like to have the puzzle unraveled about tree planting. That many times in spring well planted trees are dying is the natural consequence from the effect that trees taken up in...
-Bedding Plants
The Gardeners' Chronicle notes that the great fancy for bedding plants, which in England ran wild about a quarter of a century ago, is dying out, chiefly on account of its expensiveness; and left chie...
-Hybrid Streptocarpus
Old gardeners will remember a plant of the gesneraceous order called Streptocarpus Rhexi, which never had but one large leaf, the flowers from the base of this leaf ending in a curiously twisted long ...
-Jonesia Asoca
Among some of the genera allied to the Cassia section of Leguminosae, Amherstia nobilis, and Poinciana, are amongst the most rare and beautiful. But Revue Horticole says that Jonesia Asoca rivals thes...
-Fall Grass
Subscriber, Baltimore, Md., writes: I enclose sample of grass which comes up on all very sunny and exposed places on the lawn from July till killed by frost in the fall. Please answer in the Monthl...
-Good Dahlias
Bryn Mawr asks, May an old subscriber ask the favor of Mr. Editor to give him, either in the November or December number of the Monthly, in the order of merit, the names of twelve of the best large...
-New French Roses
Our correspondent, Mr. Jean Sisley, writes that a large number of new roses have been raised at Lyons last year, some of which may prove of permanent value. Of these he believes to be among the best t...
-Sulphur On Vegetation
H. M. H., Watertown, N. Y., writes: I would be pleased to have your opinion of the probable effect of the gas from burning sulphur, considerable in amount, on the foliage of apple trees. We have a...
-Spiraea Venusta
Mr. V. Burgevin writes: I regret your editorial comment on the Spiraea venusta. Although the great extent of your botanical knowledge is sufficiently and generally recognized an error is not impossib...
-November. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Flowers are pretty, and plants are pretty, and there is considerable pleasure to be derived from growing them - but it is well to stop and think awhile on how much of pleasure we owe to taste in arran...
-Watering Plants
No operation in the greenhouse requires more care and good judgment than watering, especially where there is a general collection of plants, some of which require an abundance of moisture at all times...
-Calanthe Vestita
The clothed Calanthe, Calanthe vestita, is in my opinion one of the most handsome species of Calanthe in cultivation. It is a fine terrestrial orchid, and was discovered growing near Moulmein in 1846 ...
-Orchids In September At The United States Botanic Gardens
This is not a time of the year when one would expect many orchids in bloom; still I found a good many very interesting and beautiful to look at in a walk through the plants at the Botanic Gardens last...
-Rose, American Beauty
In order to correct some misconceptions on the part of the author of the following, Canon Girdlestone, we give it entire from the Garden: There has been a good deal of discussion lately as to the ...
-Hot Water Circulation
Mr. James Duncan Raynolds, of Riverside, Illinois, makes a very intelligent criticism in the American Florist on all that has been written about hot-water pipes flowing up or down hill, and thus sums ...
-New Or Rare Plants. Philodendron Andreanum
The Aroids now so generally under culture are everywhere appreciated for their singular foliage, which often has the added interest of striking tints and markings. A lovely bronzy tinted one has recen...
-Poor Seeds
F., Cincinnati, O., writes: I am glad that you give a hit now and then at poor seeds. It is quite common to hear that old seeds are as good as new, and this is the excuse given for selling them. I...
-Kelsey Plum
By the October number of your magazine, I see that the Editor states that this fruit is only a variety of Prunus domestica, and that the Japanese have no native plum that is fit to eat. Now this se...
-Irregular Russet In Fruit
I have a remarkable statement which I wish to present to you and your readers, and for the literal truth of which I hold myself responsible. I present it solely in the interest of science. A friend...
-Notes On Grapes
This has been an unusually good year for grapes, and a small vineyard of 150 vines comprising 34 varieties, planted in the spring of 1885, largely for experimental purposes, has given so much interest...
-Native
Agawam, Brighton, Empire State, Niagara, Herbert, Lindley, Martha, Lady, Barry, Wilder, Duchess, Worden, and Salem. All the varieties had been carefully grown, under the most favorable conditions, ...
-Fruit-Growing At Jerusalem
Mr. H. C. Hart says in the Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy: One of the most showy of all the flowers is Anemone coronaria, which Canon Tristram thinks is the real ' Lily of the Field.' Ano...
-Poetical Allusions To Pears
In Mr. Rivers' paper on Pears, published recently the lecturer notes that Shakespeare only mentions this fruit once ( Merry Wives of Windsor, n. 5), but in ' Winter's Tale,' n. 2, the poet mentions ...
-Pear Blight
When noticing Prof. Arthur's treatise on blight in the pear, we noted that much of the hesitation that we had in accepting conclusions of those who had heretofore experimented came from an uncertainty...
-The Phylloxera In Germany
Phylloxera has lately been gaining so much ground in the wine-growing district of the Rheinland that the German Chancellor has at last summoned a conference of the competent authorities to consider wh...
-The Black-Rot In Grapes
This disease has been more virulent in New Jersey than ever before - even the famous Concord, supposed to be proof against all kinds of Cryptogamic pests, succumbing to the enemy. Kinds of the Clinton...
-A Huge Grape-Vine
There is a grape-vine in Carpinteria, the property of Jacob Wilson, that exceeds the famous Montecito vine that was forwarded in 1876 to the Centennial. At the butt it measures five feet ten inches, a...
-The Fallawater Apple
The sketch we recently gave of the Madeleine pear, as in the line of making the reader well acquainted with kinds that have worked their way into favor all over the country, seems to have met with gre...
-The Delaware Winter And Lawver Apples
We find the following in the Delaware Farm and Home: The question has, on several occasions, been raised whether the Delaware Winter apple is not a variety known by some other name, and recently i...
-Stunted Pear Trees
Subscriber, Baltimore, Md., writes: We have a great many pear trees in the garden from fifteen to thirty years of age. The bark is tight and scaly; when they do bear fruit, it is hard and full of ...
-Curculio Proof Plums
There is no such thing as a plum that a curculio will not puncture if it has a mind to. At times a tree may be neglected because the insect has found enough fruit elsewhere in which to deposit its egg...
-Idaho Pear
The Idaho Pear Company, Lewistown, Idaho, sends us a nice pear. On first glance we exclaim, A nice Glout Morceau! but remembering it is October and not late winter, we look more closely and note ...
-The Wood Of Paulownia
Paulownia imper-ialis is used to a considerable extent as an ornamental tree, but attention has been drawn to the value of its timber. The extreme lightness of the wood has, no doubt, caused it to be ...
-Fertile Hybrids
It is perfectly amazing how much work is needed to drive the great error out of the world that hybrids are generally sterile, simply because that much abused beast, the mule, happens to be commonly (t...
-The Lotus Lily
A correspondent at Minneapolis says that Prof. Lewis of St. Paul furnishes the following account of the Nelumbium as growing in western waters: The aquatic plant now being sold about the streets ...
-Destruction Of The Robin
When the Legislature at Albany last winter passed the bill making it a misdemeanor to intentionally give food or shelter to the English or European house sparrow, there was a clause added making it la...
-Hybrids Between Peach And Plum
The Gardeners' Monthly just to hand, containing my remarks on Peach and Plum Hybrids. You have been more kind and courteous to me than I deserved. I should have modified my paper some. You wrote a ...
-When Sumac Glimmers Red
Across the sky cold clouds are driven, From tree and shrub bright leaves are riven And at my feet are spread; Around me gaudy flowers gleam yellow, Fair Nature's still most royal color, When sum...
-Liberality Of Philadelphia Florists
The generous liberality of Philadelphia is becoming proverbial. Without a dollar from the taxpayers the citizens subscribed over a million dollars towards making the centennial anniversary a success. ...
-How Peddlers Sell
A western lady, stopping in the office of the Gardeners' Monthly to subscribe for the magazine, relates a singular experience in being cheated by peddlers: A man with a bag full of small bulbs on ...
-Our Annual Frontispiece
As most of our readers know, we give in our December number, as a frontispiece to the whole volume, a portrait of some one of our distinguished living horticultural authors. We shall have in the Decem...
-Love Of Flowers In The Arctics
Lieut. Schwatka tells the Independent that: Those Eskimo brought in contact with white men not only showed more appreciation for flowers, but the greater floral display in their land gave them bet...
-An Early Philadelphia Nursery
John McArann was probably a Scotchman. About 1804 he became gardener for William Hamilton, of the Woodlands, and was in his employ until about 1811. In the meantime he had laid out and improved Lemo...
-The Birthplace Of Linnaeus
When we look on the lives of great men it is remarkable to note how few are born great. Indeed, those who have achieved the greatest fame are often those who possessed few early advantages. Linnaeu...
-Professor And Mrs. Lemmon
It has become general to associate these two famous botanist explorers. Professor Gray states that he named the genus Lemmonia in honor of both of them. A California paper says: Prof. Lemmon is w...
-Charles Darwin
Charles Robert Darwin, the naturalist, was the second son of Robert Darwin by Susannah Wedgwood, eldest daughter of the celebrated potter, to whom she was married at Marylebone Church in the year 1796...
-J. Eastburn Mitchell
It is not so long since we had to record the death of Mr. W. L. Schaffer the well known President of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, whose magnificent gift through his sister and nephew, Dr. S...
-Sarah Hoopes
A famous amateur horticulturist, in this lady, passed away at West Chester, Pa., on the 10th of October, in her ninetieth year. It may not be too much to say that to her in a great measure we owe the ...
-Dr. George Thomas
Amateur horticulture, loses a rare lover of gardening in Dr. George Thomas of Whitford, Chester County, Pa., whose death occurred recently in his eightieth year. He was especially fond of rare trees a...
-Lindenia
This magnificent work, devoted wholly to illustrating and describing orchids, has just completed its second volume. The first part of the third volume will soon be issued, and the publishers announce ...
-Annual Report Of The Forestry Congress
Annual Report of the Division of Forestry of the Department of Agriculture, for 1886. By B. E. Fernow. These two pamphlets show that there is yet a wide spread interest in the subject of forestry, ...
-Report Of The United States Department Of Agriculture For 1886
It is pleasant to note with each recurrent year, an improvement in this government publication. For, good as they have been of late years, we regard this as the most valuable ever issued. There is a m...
-Mr. Halliday Jackson
The following reminiscences are by Mr. J. F. Clark: In the last issue of the Gardeners' Monthly I notice with regret the death of Mr. Halliday Jackson, of Chester county, Pa. In 1874, while then ...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
The Fifty-eighth Annual Exhibition will be held on the 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th of September. The premium list amounts to $700. The chrysanthemum show will follow on the 8th, 9th, 10th and nth of Nov...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Continued
Marquis Vivens, and Madame Cuisin, by the same growers, found admirers for their pretty mixtures of rose and white, but we suppose will not reach the popularity achieved by some of their sisters. The ...
-December. Number 348. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
One of the greatest objects of art is to add to the pleasures at our command. In the language of trade, we desire to work a thing for all it is worth. In gastronomic art, we may pronounce a potato v...
-The Pepino Or Melon Pear
Accompanying this you will receive, by mail, two specimens of the fruit of the Pepino or Melon Pear, grown on my place at Point Pleasant, N. J., from plants received last spring from Dr. Gustave Eisen...
-Roses In The Open Ground
Your remarks on page 264 of the September number of the Gardeners' Monthly, that roses are killed in winter by the drying out of moisture, which cold often causes, is quite valuable to me. I have here...
-How To Free Roses From Slugs
While visiting the garden of my friend, Mrs. R---------, this September (1887), my admiration was called forth by her remarkably fine roses, many of which were blooming vigorously. I asked her how she...
-Three Good Hardy Border Plants
Anemone Japonica comes first in order of merit, and a finer thing can scarcely be imagined than this most beautiful of herbaceous plants. They have tall branching flower stems, 2 1/2 to 3 feet high, a...
-Prunus Pissardi
It appears that this has rosy flowers as well as rosy leaves, which will give it an additional interest. It is a pity it was given a Latin name as if it were a distinct species, as it is only a purple...
-The Japan Umbrella Pine
A correspondent of the Garten Zietung communicates some particulars of a specimen of this singular and distinct conifer that is growing in the garden of Max Daniel Wolterbeek, Valkenburg, near Arnheim...
-Bergamot Flowers
For those who want to have at the same time beautiful border flowers that will easily take care of themselves, and flowers that are very attractive to the bees, there is nothing better than the differ...
-Sophora Japonica
This tree, better known in America under its pendulous form, makes a very noble tree when fully developed. The whitish yellow flowers are in racemes like those of the locust. We have seen flowering tr...
-The Tuberose In South Africa
A correspondent from Natal tells the Gardeners' Chronicle: For several years Tuberose bulbs, in number a few hundred, were simply cultivated, not propagated, their possibilities unthought of. Abo...
-Ornamental Birches
The birches deserve more attention than they have received. The black birch, in open ground, forms a stately, round-headed tree and its numerous slender, finely divided branches, sometimes drooping, l...
-Triumph Aster, Deep Scarlet
This novelty is undoubtedly the most beautiful and most perfect of all dwarf-Asters, not only concerning the habit of the plants, but also relative to the form and beauty of the flowers. It forms an e...
-Landscape Lawn Cemeteries
Dr. L. C. Diedrickson, Aarhus, Denmark, writes: I have noticed with great interest what has occasionally come to my knowledge about the landscape lawn system for cemeteries in America. Wishing for mo...
-Tuberous Rooted Begonias As Fall Decorative Plants
Few things will reward the cultivator with better results for the labor bestowed upon them, than the above. Their usefulness as fall decorative subjects for the conservatory is unsurpassed. From a pac...
-A Monster Double White Camellia
In the gardens of G. F. Lyndon, Esq., The Henburys, Mosely, Birmingham, there is a very fine double white Camellia, 17 ft. high and 17 ft. through, in the best of health, and a well-furnished symmetri...
-Wreath Making
The Journal of Horticulture says: The first step after having decided the required size of the wreath when completed will be to form a circle, which is most frequently used, and for which I have ...
-Arrangement Of Flowers In Wreaths
The Journal of Horticulture gives the following hints to beginners: It may not be out of place for a moment to refer to the arrangement of a wreath, though, as I before remarked, much will depend...
-A New Kidney Scaled Fern
Among the easiest ferns to grow are the various forms of Kidney Scaled Ferns or Nephrolepis, and some few of them are common in window and room gardening. We give herewith an illustration of a new ...
-Celery At Kalamazoo
I saw a note in Editorial Notes about Kalamazoo Celery, saying it would be interesting to know the cost of land per acre, etc. I thought I would give you a few notes which you can publish or not, as y...
-Care Of Plants On Arrival
Customers on receiving Strawberry plants should care for them immediately. If the ground on which they are to be set is not in condition to receive them, they should be heeled into the ground at once ...
-More Japan Plums
Mr. Burbank, of Sacramento, has fruited forty-three varieties, and has selected two of these as being remarkably fine; one six weeks earlier in ripening than the Kelsey. Of these, the editor of the Pa...
-Slag As A Fertilizer
We give below a paragraph from the Scientific American because it is important to the cultivator of the soil to know what is going on in these things. We give it rather as in the nature of a warning, ...
-Under-Draining
This has not made much headway in our country, because land is cheap. The cost of draining is often more than the market price of the ground. It pays better to have half a crop than a whole crop at s...
-Wearing Out Of Varieties
It is amazing how old questions, long since settled, continually come up for discussion. It would pay speakers to examine files of standard publications before wasting public time in giving thoughts d...
-New Fruits By Hybridization
The leading scientific minds of England, instead of teaching that hybrids are generally sterile, mostly believe that many of the leading kinds of fruits and flow-ers in cultivation, the history of whi...
-Fruits Of Japan
H. H. Berger says: The principal fruits of Japan are the persimmon, chestnut, orange, different plums, loquat, Prunus tomentosa, some very poor sorts of peaches, apricots, a small and sour apple, ...
-The Chinese Quince
There seems to be a growing popularity for the Chinese quince in the South, - not because it is better than the ordinary quince, - but because it does well where that one will not. A Florida correspon...
-Vegetables In Utah
Few people have any good idea of the enormous productiveness of desert soil when a little water starts it into life. Dry soil, as is well known to those who have had experience with earth-closets, is ...
-Earthing Up Celery
We were surprised to read recently the statement from one whom we are accustomed to look up to as a leader in vegetable growing, that it was a waste of time to be continually earthing up celery. Bette...
-Forestry. Tree Planting In Kansas
Kansas is comparatively a new State, and when we take into consideration that the first settlers in our prairie States always settle near the timber, we see by the immense number of trees her citizens...
-Transplanting Evergreens From The Forest
Transplanting conifers may be done at any time when there is no frost in the air, except while they are making their first young growth in May or June. Perhaps the best time is during the spring and s...
-Roadside Trees
One of the misfortunes of our country is that over the most part of it we cannot have roadside trees and live hedges at the same time, as they do in the British Isles. If we have trees along the hedge...
-Forestry In America
Robert Douglas, the Nestor of American Forestry, told the American Association of Nurserymen last year that when forestry in this country is conducted in a plain business manner, and it is shown to ca...
-Some Large Trees Of Long Island
The Brooklyn Eagle says: It is not probable that any tree on Long Island is more than 500 years old, and very few in New York or New England are of greater age. Formerly there stood at Flushing, n...
-The House Sparrow
I wish to institute a crusade against the House Sparrow, erroneously named English Sparrow. I would like to see the warfare waged throughout the United States. It is what I should term, in a certain s...
-Reason In Insects
I see in current number of Popular Science some proceedings of a hornet in the management of a dead locust, as related by Professor Thomas Meehan, and am thus reminded of a similar incident I observed...
-The Horse Nettle As A Weed
The Horse Nettle. Solanum Caroliniense of Linnaeus, is one of the worst weeds in American agriculture. From Pennsylvania south to Florida and Texas it is regarded by cultivators as pernicious as the C...
-Fertilization Of Flowers In Compositae
Every flower lover knows that asters, daisies, sunflowers and the like belong to that class which botanists call Composite; and every one knows that scientific people have had a great deal of interest...
-A New Race Of Verbenas
There was a time when it was believed that the proof of a plant being a true species was, that it would reproduce itself from seed - a variety would not. If like would produce like it was in a true bo...
-The First Living Tea Plant In Europe
Osbeck's voyage to China in the Swedish ship Gothic Lion, which sailed in 1750, says: After a stay of four months and ten days in China, our ship and the other Swedish ship began their voyage home....
-Japan Plums
So much has been said lately about native Japan Plums, that we have, since our last issue, referred to Franchet and Savatier's enumeration of the plants growing spontaneously in Japan, issued in 1875....
-Garden Plants And Wild Flowers Of Mt. Sinai
A traveler says: On Mt. Sinai itself is a convent at about 5000 feet above sea level, and in the gardens here were cypresses, oranges, figs, olives, date palms, and grape-vines in cultivation. Near ...
-Age Of The Big Trees Of California
A Boston correspondent refers to some articles that have recently appeared in scientific magazines, denying that the age of a tree can be told by its circles of wood, - insisting that trees often make...
-The Hemlock Spruce Of The Himalayas
It is interesting to note that there is a species of hemlock spruce in North Carolina, different from that which prevails through other portions of the East, though very closely resembling it. On the ...
-On The Stipules Of Magnolia Frazeri
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Mr. Thomas Meehan exhibited some fresh flowers of Magnolia Frazeri, Walter (M. auriculata, Lamark), and said that when he contri...
-Sugar In China
At a recent meeting of the Botanical Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Mr. Thomas Meehan read the following extract from a letter of Miss Adele M. Fielde, a missionary in China. The letter i...
-The Bed Bug
They have charged us with introducing the Phylloxera to the grape-vines of Europe, and now they are insisting that the bed bug also traveled eastwardly with American lumber after the great fire of Lon...
-The Golden Rod
Open the bars and make me room. Let me wade. waist-d-ep. in the yellow bloom. Let me revel at will, let me gather my fill, Let me touch their plumes with revereur hands. Let me tread wher...
-S. B. Parsons
In our annual chapters on the work of authors in American Horticulture, the name of Samuel B. Parsons will find an honored place. It must be going on forty years since the writer had placed in his ...
-The Next Volume Of The Gardeners' Monthly
The publisher believes there is no other magazine in the world which gives more for the low subscription price than the Gardeners' Monthly. He has been glad to do this because it gives him some claim ...
-Horticulture In America
M. Charles Joly, ex-Vice-President of the Horticultural Society of France, in a note on the School of Arboriculture and Viticulture of Geisenheim, pays a high tribute to America. He shows that with al...
-Indian Corn
We saw an intelligent man recently astounded that he could not answer his child's question, what was hoe-cake, - some one had just been singing to him that Poor Uncle Ned Had no teeth for to ...
-Only A Thistle
In popular opinion only Scotchmen and donkeys are fond of Thistles, but if so we must say they show very good taste. Among our hardy plants there are few finer subjects in point of foliage or flowe...
-Poisonous Honey
Though the following extract from the Journal of Horticulture is rather long, we give it place from the importance of the subject: In several localities I am acquainted with (one atGreenock, anoth...
-Francois Lacharme
Mr. Jean Sisley furnishes us with the following memorandum concerning this distinguished rosarian: Francois Lacharme was born the 28th of Janu-uary, 1817, at St. Didiersur Charonne-Ain, France; di...
-Miss Susan Poissonie
This young lady was getting to be quite famous in Europe as a flower painter, and was particularly well known by the beautiful Roses painted for the Journal des Roses, She died in Paris on the 8th of ...
-Chrysanthemum Show Of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
It is not easy to note such matters in a local exhibition that will interest the readers of a magazine scattered over a whole continent. Still we think we can make a few points that will come within t...
-January, 1888. Number 349. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Walking out with a bright child, once on a time, the writer came to a very beautiful stable built by a wealthy gentleman who prided himself on having everything of the most costly description. There w...
-Fruiting Of A Camphor Tree At New Orleans
Camphora officinalis, the tree which produces camphor, was referred by Linnaeus to the genus Laurus; but it has subsequently been removed into a new genus of Lauracas, on account of some botanic...
-The Cineraria - Its Culture And Management
The Cineraria may be classed among the most useful flowering plants we possess, and can be raised in any quantities desired from seed. If wanted to bloom about the holidays, the seed should be sown ab...
-Growing And Exhibiting Auriculas In My Youthful Days
As recollections of floriculture of other days, fitfully gleam upon memory, and carry us back to the happy spring-time of life, it makes us feel young again. Blessed are they who can joyfully recall a...
-Growing And Exhibiting Auriculas In My Youthful Days. Continued
Immediately after the judges had awarded the premiums, the vicar of the parish delivered an excellent oration, in which he most eloquently dwelt upon the sublimity and harmony of nature; and of the lo...
-Abies Fortuni
M. Carriere regarded this singular Fir as belonging to a distinct genus, and named it years ago in honor of John Baptist Kete-leer, of Brussels, under the name of Keteleeria For-tunei. M. Carriere has...
-Scillas And Leucojums
A colored plate in Gartenflora, suggests that these beautiful bulbs deserve more attention than they receive. Leuco-jum aestivum, the Summer Snowdrop, is well-known and appreciated. In this picture, q...
-London Purple In The Destruction Of Insects
Referring in the Country Gentleman to Elm-leaf beetle, and the directions apply to all leaf-eating insects, Dr. Leitner recommends spraying with London Purple and says: The London Purple mixture r...
-New Or Rare Plants. Statice Superba
The genus Statice is a very curious one, having some relationship to the Plumbago of our gardens, which gives the name to the whole natural order, Plumbaginacea. The sea-thrift or sea-lavender is also...
-January, 1888. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
One of the prettiest features of modern household life is the attention paid to ornamentation. Not only in pictures and works of art, but in floral decorations, both fresh and dried, has there been a ...
-Gardening Notes From West Philadelphia
Sheffield, England, for cutlery, Darby Road, West Philadelphia, say I, for flowers. Happening to be in the latter neighborhood recently, I called on Mr. Wm. Colflesh, 57th and Darby Road. This gentl...
-Note On Azalea Forcing
Azalea generally flowers in April, or even in May, nevertheless by forcing, and through good selection of sorts, one can get them much earlier, and even in the commencement of December several varieti...
-Coal Tar As An Insecticide
Many and various are the uses to which coal tar may be applied in the destruction of insect pests. Certainly much damage has been done by an indiscriminate use of the article, but if used properly and...
-Justicia Coccinnea
The scarlet flowering Justicia, J. coccinnea, is a very beautiful warm greenhouse plant, belonging to the Natural Order Acanthaceae. It is a shrubby, soft-wooded plant, of vigorous rapid growth, attai...
-Common Names To Plants
There are few people, even among those who are very scientific, who do not love common names to flowers. Pansy, buttercup, daisy, carnation, rose, - who would want to know them by botanical names only...
-Date Palm
The date palm is usually dioecious, that is, having the male and female flowers on separate plants and hence single specimens seldom bear fruit in our gardens. But by the following from the Gardeners'...
-Camellias
The time of blooming in Camellias is best regulated during the growing season when, by prolonging the warm treatment that the plants receive whilst making their growth and setting their flowers, the b...
-Rose, Souvenir For Wootton
We have specimens of flowers from Mr. John Cook, of Baltimore, which we regard as one of the most promising new varieties of the day, and which it is proposed to name as above. As seen by a casual obs...
-Black Aphis On Chrysanthemums
Mrs. J. D. C, Upper Sandusky, O., writes: I see nothing in your valuable monthly of which I have been for many years a careful reader, in relation to a very troublesome pest, seen this season for ...
-Brownea Grandiceps
Mr. Charles H. Miller, Landscape Gardener, Fairmount Park, writes: I think you told me that you had never seen the flower of Brownea grandiceps. Presuming that to be so, I have the pleasure to send ...
-New Or Rare Plants. Phrynium Variegatum
This has been introduced to the notice of cultivators by Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, of Chelsea, London. It is an elegant stove plant allied to Maranta and Calathea. The leaves have erect foot-stalks...
-Fruit Eating
Knowing how beneficial good ripe fruit is in assisting the process of digestion, and recognizing the fact that the human stomach is very apt to feel a craving for some food of a more or less acid char...
-Celery Culture
Earthing up Celery - from Gardening Illustrated - you extract for your readers, page 368, and ask them to tell what they know about it. Well, I am in a small way in quantity, compared with your ci...
-Russet In Fruit
I have read the article by Mr. W. B. Carr, (page 335, November Number) with much interest, and write to tell you of a little experience I had with this russeting of fruits. In 1884 we had a severe fro...
-Paralysis In Fruit Trees
We do not know whether the Fire Blight, as it is called, in the pear, exists in California, but the following by the Rev. M. Ongerth, of Alameda, looks much like it, and has a much more expressive nam...
-The Hampton Court Vine
It is a well known fact, proved by the history of the one huge vine in the grapery at Hampton Court, in England, that a single grape-vine is much more successfully trained over a whole grape-house tha...
-Grapes In California
Californians do not seem to have any dread of Phylloxera, and seem inclined to compete with France and Germany for the mastery of the world in grape culture. The California Land and Wine Co., of Fr...
-Service Berry
In the west they have taken to calling the dwarf form of the Indian cherry - Amelanchier canadensis - Service berry. As already noted, it is often advertised as huckleberry. It is a misfortune that th...
-Asparagus Chicory
This is a vegetable new to English gardens, but which is common in South Italy and on the Adriatic shore from Apalia to Taranto. It is supposed to have come from Catalonia, having been brought by emig...
-Chestnut, Paragon
The American chestnut, as is well-known, has a much more agreeable flavor than the European, or, as it is better known, the Spanish chestnut. This, though of the Spanish race, is an American seedling,...
-Pear From Wm. H. Moon
Mr. Moon writes: We forward you by mail to-day, a new pear, a seedling variety that originated in this state. We have been acquainted with it for three seasons, and have watched its habits and tested...
-The Barnes Apple
Mr. W. C. Strong, Brighton, Mass., writes: I send by this mail a sample apple which is said to have originated in Worcester County, Mass., and is called the Barnes. It has just been exhibited at o...
-Sea Kale
This vegetable is rarely grown, chiefly, as we believe, because few people know how to cook it properly. It is one of the meanest of dishes when meanly cooked - while one of the most enjoyable when it...
-The Preservation Of The Old Forests
Speaking of a recent Government Report, the Washington Star says: The other side of the subject - the accidental damage wrought by the roads, as opposed to the deliberate havoc - is touched upon by...
-Formation Of The Rings Of Wood In Trees
The many differences of opinion that even eminent men are presumed to hold in regard to the character of the so-called annual rings of trees, would be readily reconciled if a little thought were given...
-Red-Wood Lumber
Here in the East, there is a growing demand for redwood lumber. It is to be regretted from the following which we find in the Pacific Rural Express, that the supply is about exhausted. The foreign...
-Re-Forestation In France
It is a common thought with us, that in the Old World, governments do everything, - and what these governments do for forestry is a common theme with our forest associations. But individuals and socie...
-Annual Growth Of Trees
A correspondent says: I suppose you have seen the statement of Mr. Charnay in ' The Ancient Cities of the New World' (page 260), denying the truth of the commonly received doctrine as to the annual ...
-A Large Fossil Tree
In the grounds of the Natural History Museum, South Kensington, a magnificent tree fossil of the carboniferous era has just been pieced together. It was taken from the Craigleith Quarries, near Edinbu...
-The Crimean Linden
Under this name the Garden has a chapter on the Silver Linden, Tilia argentea, or T. petiolaris of some authors. As much is not known of it, and it does remarkably well in America, we give what the Ga...
-Influence Of The Stock In Grafting
That the grafted stock exerts an influence over the scion or graft, for strength or weakness, is now pretty generally admitted by all fruit growers. This is well illustrated by grafting the pear upon ...
-Lupinus Albo-Coccineus Nanus
In our last we noted the interesting discovery of recent times, that varieties perpetuate themselves just as exactly as recognized species; and, in view of the numerous experiences of florists in this...
-Rabbit Pest In Australia
The Australian government, it is said, offers to pay some Yankee - or other (or that matter - a good round sum for a method of destroying the English rabbit, which, introduced to that part of the worl...
-Woody Violets
Few people who only know the natural order of violets, - Violaceae, could imagine that in Borne parts of the world some of the genera take on the character of woody shrubs. The following account of on...
-Schinus Molle (Pepper Tree)
With most things commercially, as soon as demand is known, supply is forthcoming. It is the demand for berried plants for indoor work which has, no doubt, brought this into the market. In Covent Garde...
-The Relation Between Color And Flower In Fruits
Just what is the relation is not known, but that there is some relation is patent to all. A correspondent of the Garden well observes of hothouse grapes that Mrs. Pince and Black Morocco are two vari...
-Reclaiming Desert Wastes
The devotee of science seems to his fellows as engaged in but trifling pursuits, yet we owe most of the great progress of the age to the silent labors of these investigating minds. To discover an enti...
-Animal Parasites
There is nothing more interesting to the Horticulturist than the subject of vegetable parasites, especially those of low organization known as mildew and moulds, or under the later or more polished na...
-Cactuses As Fodder Plants
Some attention is being given to the value of opuntias or prickly pears as fodder plants to be raised on those dry parts of our continent where little else will grow. This attention comes from some re...
-Earthquakes
M. Mandin, a distinguished naturalist, and especially noted as a botanist, tells the French Academy of Sciences that severe earthquake phenomena only occur in districts destitute of forest growth, whi...
-The China Aster
Callistephus hortensis, or China Aster, was introduced toward the end of the last century, and was raised in the Jardin des Plantes of Paris from seeds sent from China. Of annual duration, numerous va...
-Wild Flowers In The Arctics
Lieutenant Swatka says in the Independent: Along most of the Arctic coast the ice does not disappear from the ocean channels during the whole summer, and it would be nothing unusual, of course, t...
-Floral Calendars
In regard to the times of flowering of plants, Mr. Meehan exhibited at a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, blooms of the Winter Aconite, Eranthus hyemalis, and the Sno...
-The Smallest Plant In The World
The smallest flowering plant in existence is Wolffia microscopica, a native of India. It belongs to the natural order Lemnaceae, or the Duckweed Family. It is almost microscopic in size, destitute of ...
-Rhododendron Punctatum
Your paragraph upon Rhododendron punctatum, in the Gardeners' Chronicle for June 9, in which the species is mentioned as a compact grower, of dwarf habit, producing an abundance of pink, funnel-shap...
-Pronunciation Of Gladiolus
The Pittsburg National Stockman says: The word gladi-o-lus, accented on the antepenultimate (the i in the present instance) according to rule, is not easily pronounced by many until after consider...
-How Horticulture Aids The Public Peace
A Vienna newspaper supports a suggestion for the permanent closing of Trafalgar Square to mob meetings by laying it out as a public garden. The propensity to convert any large flagged place into a f...
-Prof. Riley And The German Phylloxera Decree
A very annoying blunder occurs in our October number which has only just received our attention. The article at page 314, headed Importation of plants into Germany, is stated to be by Prof. C. V. Ri...
-History Of The Chinese Azalea
More than a century ago Kaempfer and Thunberg made known to botanists the existence in Japan and China of the beautiful Azalea indica, which had been cultivated there in gardens for many years and was...
-The Wood Anemone
After patient waiting we are so glad to see the Wood Anemone once more that we are hardly inclined to discuss the origin of the name, Wind-flower, sometimes applied to the plant. Our artist evidently ...
-The Meaning Of Anemone
Referring to the note on p. 543, asking why the Anemone was called Wind-flower, it may be remarked that when we inquire why any flower was called by its name we should be sure of two things - first,...
-A Caspian Lily
A still more pleasant afternoon I spent in visiting the haunts of the far-famed Nymph of the Caspian. Neither rock nor whirlpool besets the approach of this coy beauty, but as the siren can be seen on...
-Cozad's La Cygne Nurseries, Kansas
La Cygne is on the line of the Kansas City, Fort Scott and Gulf Railroad, a town of about 2000 inhabitants. Cozad's nurseries form one of its chief industries, and are about one mile from the town. Da...
-Charles H. Marot
The Editor is pained to announce at the moment of going to press, the death of the proprietor and publisher of the Gardeners' Monthly, Mr. Charles H. Marot, which occurred on the 21st inst., after a f...
-Professor Asa Gray
No one can surpass Dr. Sandys in the felicity with which he presents the distinguished men whom Cambridge University honors with its highest degrees. Among those who received the degree of Doctor of L...
-History Of Horticulture In Michigan
Mr. T. T. Lyon, President of the State Horticultural Society. From Charles Garfield. In the East, when there are any centennials or similar festivals, horticulture usually takes a back seat. It is a p...
-Man's Heredity From God
By Rev. G. P. Powell. New York, Messrs. Appleton & Co. This deserves notice in this place, because the author is a well-known lover of horticulture, and because a large amount of material he has gathe...
-Justice To An Exhibitor
We give the following, though it is wholly anonymous, presuming that the fact is as represented. At the same time it is but justice to our reporter to say that he saw no such name attached to the exhi...
-A Fine Herbarium
One of the best private herbariums in America is owned by Mr. P. V. LeRoy of Peekskill, West Chester Co., N. Y. It has about 25,000 to 30,000 species, though this includes many of the lower orders of ...
-American Horticultural Society
Mr. Parker Earle, Cobden, 111., says: It is now definitely decided to hold the eighth meeting of A. H. S. in Riverside, Cal., commencing on Tuesday, February 14, 1888. Full particulars, giving railr...
-Honeysuckle Trellises - A Good Violet
Honeysuckle Trellises Honeysuckles are usually grown on trellises, - but some very pretty effects in gardening can be obtained by training some of the more bushy kind, like Hall's Japan or the Ever...
-Ampelopsis Japonica - Insecticides
Ampelopsis Japonica Some of the English nurserymen are selling our common poison vine, Rhus radicans, under this name, and are being badly punished for their deceit or ignorance. The newspapers rep...
-Thanatophore - Grafting The Persimmon
Thanatophore This is the French name of a machine for the vaporization of nicotine to be used in insect destruction. Beautiful Chrysanthemums A box of very fine Chrysanthemums reached us on t...
-Corsican Pine Timber - Commissioners Of Fairmount Park
Corsican Pine Timber As recently noted, it is as often the fault of the planter as the tree, that timber proves poor. The Corsican pine, - Pinus Laricio - has recently been condemned as a timber tr...
-Large Begonia - A Forestry Journal
Large Begonia In Germany they have produced Begonias with male flowers 5 inches across. This is certainly enormous and they give it an enormous name, - nothing less than Begonia hybrida maxima flor...
-Our Portrait Of Mr. Hovey - Cultureofcallas
Our Portrait Of Mr. Hovey Col. Wilder, in a letter brim full of enthusiasm, received but a few days before the news of his death says he was delighted to see our portrait and sketch of Mr. Hovey in...
-The Globe Peach - Bidwell Peach
The Globe Peach This does appear not to be an original Pennsylvania seedling, but one the name of which was lost by the owner, and then re-named Globe. Peach, Madame Pynaert Though American s...
-Mushroom Culture - The Mistletoe In California
Mushroom Culture Cincinnatus: We do not know of any one who is now growing mushrooms as a specialty. We think we can answer your question, that there is money in it. But the hap-hazard method ...
-Host Plants Of The Mistletoe In England - Sheppard Knapp
Host Plants Of The Mistletoe In England Mr. James M. Pulley, Boston, Mass., writes: Seeing you are interested in the host of the mistletoe, I beg to add my mite. I have seen the parasite in Englan...
-Prof. Alphonse De Candolle - The Newer Roses
Prof. Alphonse De Candolle Looking at the MSS. from which the note in our last was made, it seems to be 87, but a correspondent who is certainly well informed on the age of Prof. De Candolle, says ...
-Border Flowers - Fine Crops Of Sweet Potatoes
Border Flowers C. B., Hartford, Conn., says: Nowadays we are getting ready to start seeds for the ' border,' a little early perhaps, but we can at least lay out, on paper, some kind of a workin...
-Editorial Notes. The Arnold Arboretum - Dr. Wigand
Editorial Notes. The Arnold Arboretum Director Sargent reports that about 70,000 trees and shrubs have been planted the past year. Pits ten and twenty-five feet square, filled with good soil, have ...
-Mahlon Moon - Culture Of Herbaceous Plants
Mahlon Moon This well known nurseryman of Morrisville, Bucks county, Pa., died on the 24th of January, in his 73rd year. He was a genuine lover of flowers, and out of this love grew the nursery bus...
-Japan Lilies - Standard Geraniums
Japan Lilies Do not forget that these and all other Lilies like a rich and cool soil. Some of the most successful we ever saw were planted in among a lot of Rhododendrons, where they were kept very...
-The Popular Roses - Destroying Thrips
The Popular Roses For cut flowers with florists, Bennett, American Beauty and Mermet continue very popular this season. Iron Greenhouses Mr. Falconer, in a note to American Florist, tells tha...
-Heating By Steam - The Stanton Plum
Heating By Steam It is generally believed that steam heating is not economical, as compared with hot water, in very small plant houses. A Philadelphia amateur informs us that he had a comparatively...
-Progress Grape - Abies Or Picea
Progress Grape This is an early red variety, originated, it is said, in Norfolk county, Massachusetts, but brought into notice chiefly in Georgia, where it seems to have a good reputation. Plant...
-New Trees Of North America - State Agricultural Officers In Pennsylvania
New Trees Of North America Professor Sargent finds three new trees in Florida, but they are of a sub-tropical character, and are no doubt immigrants from a more Northern clime. They are, Myginda in...
-An Orange Hardy For The North - Deutzia Gracilis
An Orange Hardy For The North It is said that Citrus trifoliata either has, or is likely to stand hardy in any ordinary winter south of New York. The fruit is not very good, but improvements may co...
-Fan Bouquets - W. F. Bennett Rose
Fan Bouquets The fan style of bouquets that once was popular, is now again competing with the mushroom style that now almost universally prevails. It commends itself to some florists as costing les...
-Culture Of Cyclamens - Weight Of Grapes
Culture Of Cyclamens A correspondent of Vick's Magazine writes that Cyclamens planted out into very rich ground in June and repotted in September, give much more satisfactory results than when kept...
-Peach Trees In New England - Empire State Grape
Peach Trees In New England Mr. Edmund Hersey, of Hingham, Mass., says that fifty years ago good crops of peaches could be had every year in Southern and Middle New England. Today the crop is uncert...
-York Imperial Apple - The Early Flowering Chrysanthemums
York Imperial Apple Unless an apple gets into the hands of some large wholesale dealer, a first-class variety remains for a long time unknown. There is probably no more profitable apple than the...
-Cause Of Summer Thunder Showers - Senator Mitchell, Of Wisconsin
Cause Of Summer Thunder Showers Sohneke states that the electricity which is discharged during a thunderstorm is produced by the friction of water and ice; that is, that the ice is electrified by f...
-The American Naturalist - Evergreen Cypresses
The American Naturalist The American Naturalist, one of the leading exponents of American scientific progress, which has already proved its necessity by a twenty years of existence, has changed pub...
-Lawn Grass For Louisiana - Corbularia
Lawn Grass For Louisiana Mr. William Saunders of the Agricultural Department tells Popular Gardening that he is sure Blue grass-Poa pratensis, will make a good lawn grass for Louisiana. Pogogyne...
-Sweet Briars - New Greenhouses
Sweet Briars Roses with scented leaves are still largely planted, though we do not find many novelties pressing for popular applause among them. The Garden says that one of the best of this class i...
-A Troublesome Insect Pest To The Pear - The Spring Of 1887
A Troublesome Insect Pest To The Pear The English pear-growers report that the maggot of a small fly, Cecidomyia nigra, is proving troublesome. They lurk in the core and throw out tunnels to the su...
-Seedless Oranges - The India-Rubber Plant
Seedless Oranges The Gardeners' Chronicle says, that the usual forms of orange planted for fruit, are not adapted for growing for cut flowers. The plants suffering from the constant cutting. The Sa...
-Boussingault - Moles, P. 327
Boussingault The telegraph announces the death on the nth of May of this celebrated student in vegetable chemistry, at an advanced age. The Illustrated Strawberry Culturist By A. S. Fuller. N...
-Cercidiphyllum Japonicum, P. 338 - Mahonias
Cercidiphyllum Japonicum, P. 338 As an ornamental tree it is distinct and pretty and worthy of cultivation. It is hardy, a ready grower, and easily transplanted. It does not assume, with us at any ...
-Late Season In France - Long Clusters Of Wistaria
Late Season In France As in this part of the world, the season was late in France. In Paris, where the lilacs are wholly in bloom on the 15th of April, they were wholly dormant at that date. Dis...
-The Texas Blue Grass - Iron-Stemmed Tree Carnations
The Texas Blue Grass This is Poa arach-nifera, and is very highly spoken of as a good grass for the South. A Fine Hermosa Rose In a postscript - always the best part of a lady's letter - we r...
-The Strawberry Season In Philadelphia - The Ives Grape In Georgia
The Strawberry Season In Philadelphia This fairly opened on the 28th of May, when no less than thirty-five car-loads came into the city from Maryland and Delaware. The largest berries wholesaled at...
-Hybrid Blackberries - Ellwanger & Barry
Hybrid Blackberries The Editor of the Rural New Yorker has succeeded in raising seedling plants of raspberries crossed with the blackberry. They will fruit in a couple of years. The Rudbeckia Or...
-Lonsdale & Burton - Decandolle
Lonsdale & Burton This famous firm of rose growers, located at Wyndmoor, near Philadelphia, will be dissolved on July 1st. Mr. John Burton will retain the old establishment. On the new grounds of M...
-Personal Exhibitions - New Kinds Of Mignonette
Personal Exhibitions The leading florists are making personal exhibitions that are equalling in beauty and interest those given by associations. Siebrecht's Orchid Exhibition in New York in the spr...
-A New Rose Sporting From Souvenir De La Malmaison - Asparagus
A New Rose Sporting From Souvenir De La Malmaison The Deutsche GartnerZeitung, of Erfurt, says that a beautiful sport has been secured from this famous old variety. It appeared on a plant in a gard...
-Colored Plates Of Fruits - Latin Names For Garden Varieties
Colored Plates Of Fruits The June Horticultural Art Journal has plates of the Arkansas apple - a very pretty dark red of large size, said to be a first class variety for the South. The Shannon is a...
-Ladies In The American Philosophical Society - Dr. Ezra Michener
Ladies In The American Philosophical Society This learned society has at length followed in the wake of similar institutions, and has elected a lady to full membership in the society. On the 20th o...
-Charles Alden - Public Sales Of Floral Produce
Charles Alden Possibly one of the greatest of all benefits to American fruit growers, came in with the invention of the Alden Fruit Driers. Alden made some $60,000 by his invention. He subsequently...
-Perle Des Jardins - The Gold Strawberry
Perle Des Jardins Mr. James Taplin of May-wood, N. J., reports that this beautiful yellow rose was a partial failure in that section of the country last winter. Cold Water For Flowers Mary E...
-The Belmont Strawberry - Host Plants Of The Mistletoe
The Belmont Strawberry The Massachusetts Horticultural Society thinks very highly of the behavior of this strawberry this season. It is an excellent amateur berry, as the fruit does not ripen all i...
-Indian Clover - Engelman's Flora Of Missouri
Indian Clover A plant from Japan, Lespe-deza striata, has been welcomed to naturalization in the South, where it goes as Japan Clover. Another relative, equally welcome, has made its appearance. Th...
-Professor J. G. Lemmon - Miller & Hunt
Professor J. G. Lemmon Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon, the arduous botanical collectors of the Pacific Slope, are summering in the rich but dry region of San Luis, Obispo county, California. They will return ...
-Geo. P. Lamb - Banana Fruiting In The Open Air
Geo. P. Lamb Landscape gardening and floriculture generally, in Wilmington, North Carolina, loses a good friend in Mr. Geo. P. Lamb, who, for so many years, was looked up to as an authority in thes...
-Water Lilies - Horse-Tails For The Florists
Water Lilies The efforts of Mr. Sturtevant to make water plants popular show some good effect in the aquarium at Fairmount Park, where a number of species have been blooming beautifully the past su...
-Bricks Of Cork - Friendly Birds
Bricks Of Cork The waste cuttings of cork are now being employed in England for making bricks, which can be used for walls, impervious alike to heat or damp. The cork cuttings are reduced to powder...
-A Large Watermelon - The Thurber Peach
A Large Watermelon We do not know the weight of the largest water melon, but one raised in Delaware this year weighed 51 lbs. Consumption Of Cantaloupes In Philadelphia The number of melons c...
-Storing Oranges - The Noble Strawberry
Storing Oranges The efforts to keep oranges beyond their usual season, in order to avoid market gluts, are meeting with success in Florida. They have been kept successfully for 120 days after gathe...
-Madeleine Pear - A Luscious Wild Plum, Prunus Occident-Alis
Madeleine Pear Rev. E. P. Powell, Clinton, N. Y., writes: I was compelled to discard Madeleine as being incomparably the worst fire-blight subject among my pears. Onondaga is bad enough but I can ...
-The American Garden Plot At The London Exhibition - Bourne's Essay On Roses
The American Garden Plot At The London Exhibition The London papers speak in high praise of the exhibition of American plants in the recent exhibit. One bed was wholly devoted to California annuals...
-Florida Horticultural Society - Irruption Of New Roses
Florida Horticultural Society The Florida Nurserymen's Association has merged into a new body with the above title. A. I. Bidwell is president, and S. L. Taber secretary. The next meeting will be h...
-The Single Dahlia - Variegated American Elder - Sambucus Canadensis
The Single Dahlia Beautiful as this is, it has not succeeded in dethroning the old double kind, which seems to be more popular than ever. Gladiolus Gandavensis There has been no certainty to ...
-Ornamenting A Grape Dish - Collar Grafting Apple Trees
Ornamenting A Grape Dish The Philadelphia Public Ledger advises to set purple and gold flowers around the black and white grapes in the dish. The Large Vanda Sanderiana At a recent sale of or...
-Duchess Of Oldenberg Apple - Forced Rhubarb
Duchess Of Oldenberg Apple This large and beautiful apple seems finer than usual this season. Specimens, seven ounces, are not uncommon. It is not of the finest flavor - none of the Russian apples ...
-Twig Blight In The Pear - A White Gerardia
Twig Blight In The Pear Mr. G. L. B. Leighton, President of the Horticultural and Pomological Society of Norfolk, Va., writes that for several years he has been able to tell nine days ahead, when t...
-American Weather In England - Premiums For Horticultural Products
American Weather In England The mother country is getting a taste of it. 8o one day and 350 a few days after, is getting near the thing. The next experience may be 90, and then zero. We s...
-The Bedding System - Noxious Properties Of The Laburnum
The Bedding System Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer, in the Independent, has a vigorous article against the bedding system, which for the last quarter of a century has been a rage. Empty flower beds in...
-Improvement In The China Aster - Geraniums At The Massachusetts Horticultural Society
Improvement In The China Aster The Germans, who have done so much to improve these flowers, that they have come to be better known as German Asters than under their own name, continue their useful ...
-Beauty Of Glazewood Rose - Local Peaches
Beauty Of Glazewood Rose This rose, being a sport, does not always retain its true character, but when it is in its own dress is handsome enough. Arthur Robinson in Revue de 1' Horticulture Beige f...
-Stocks For Peach And Plum - Microscopic Fungi
Stocks For Peach And Plum It is said the peach and plum do not do well on stocks of the Chickasaw breed, in Florida. Apricots In California According to the Rural Press, the Breda is not popu...
-Orris Root - H. H. Berger
Orris Root The roots of Iris Florentina, I. Germanica, and I. pallida, are the species of Flag used in Italy to use in perfumery as Orris powder. These are commonly grown in our gardens; but a lady...
-John Laing - The Dwarf Catalpa
John Laing This.is one of those intelligent British gardeners of whom the Old World is proud. In his early years he became eminent in botanical as well as horticultural pursuits; he has since been ...
-A Park For Trenton, New Jersey - Rain In Salt Lake City
A Park For Trenton, New Jersey Cham-bersburg, the borough which adjoins Trenton, voted at the late election in favor of a public park. but the project threatens to fall through, because only seven ...
-Strawberries With Five Leaves - How To Remove Stains From The Hands
Strawberries With Five Leaves As is well known the strawberry has trifoliate leaves. Occasionally in the Old World, varieties have appeared with five leaves. Some Potentillas and other Rosaceous ge...
-Plant Culture - Classes Of Chrysanthemums
Plant Culture George H.: Please accept thanks for the suggestion, which, as far as practicable, shall be acted on. The West Grove (Pa.) Experimental Farm The State Experimental Farm at West G...









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