A genus of succulent herbs or shrubs, comprising about sixty species most of them natives of California, Mexico and Southern Africa. They are useful in formal bedding, and for rockwork where little or no artificial irrigation is given. A very interesting and effective rockwork is that planted with the different kinds of Cotyledons, Semper-vivums, Mesembryanthemums, Sedums, Crassulas, etc., and, as these all grow and bloom profusely without artificial watering, many waste spots, which otherwise might be left to weeds and Utter, can thus be made attractive.

Echeveria.

Echeveria.

The Cotyledons are very easily propagated by cuttings made from the stems in September. Strip them of leaves for about two inches, and, after cutting the ends with a sharp knife, insert them in sandy soil in a sunny situation, giving them very little water until they have formed roots which will be in two or three weeks. They may also be propagated by leaf cuttings, by simply parting the individual full-grown leaves from the stem, care being taken when parting them that the dormant bud at the axil of each leaf accompanies it. Insert them in sandy soil, about one-quarter of an inch deep, and give them a little water for two weeks or until they have formed roots. If the cuttings are put in in September or early in October, they will be ready for setting out the following Spring.