This beautiful succulent from Table Mountain is one of the best plants for planting on rocky hillsides or ledges as it grows freely without care or watering if given a handful of soil in which to start. Plant the young plants early in February and give them a little water to settle the soil about the roots; they afterwards will take care of themselves. When planted on a sunny slope (preferably facing the East) in loose, well-drained soil, with a background of low-growing, dark foliage, such as dwarf Pine, Cypress or Juniper, it is very effective as it also is in the rockery among other succulents, such as the large-leaved Echeverias and Sedums or the smaller Mesembryanthemum.

Crassula coccinea.

Crassula coccinea.

There are many species of this interesting genus, including Crassula arborescens which grows to the height of three feet and has rose-colored flowers, and Crassula coccinea, the best known of the species, bearing scarlet flowers of a most dazzling hue which entirely cover the plant. Others bearing white flowers are also very pretty.

Propagate by cuttings, placed in sandy loam in a cold frame, in September; give them just enough water to keep the leaves from wilting.