A race of hardy ornamental perennials, biennials or annuals with tall branching flower-stems and beautiful palmated leaves. They are very easily grown, but, if fine flowers are wanted, they must be given special attention, while the soil should be deep and enriched with old manure well incorporated with the soil. They should be planted about three feet apart, and, as soon as the shoots attain a height of one foot, a stake must be placed at each shoot for its support, as they are easily broken by the winds. After flowering, the stalks should be cut down, when the young growth will sprout from the base to form flowering shoots for the following year.

Propagate by division of the roots, or by seeds which may be sown at any time, when the ground is in order, from October to February, the seeds being covered to the depth of a quarter of an inch. Division of the roots is much the simplest plan for increasing them, and early Spring the best season for dividing the roots. The annual species (such as the common Larkspur) are propagated only by seeds sown in the open where wanted to bloom; when the seedlings are three or four inches high, thin them to one foot apart and mulch with old manure.