Herbaceous perennials include those hardy plants, the stems of which die down at the approach of winter, or earlier if they have completed their growth; the roots being hardy, they remain in the same place for several years in succession. Plants of this class were formerly more popular than they have been of late years, the taste for brilliant bedding effects having caused these former favorites to be neglected. Recently the taste for perennials has revived, and while they cannot serve as substitutes for what are known as bedding plants, they are exceedingly useful for those who wish to have flowers with but little trouble, as most of them can remain for three or four years without requiring any other care than to keep them clear of weeds. When the clumps become too large they require to be lifted, divided, and re-set in fresh soil. For the best results it is advisable to re-set most of them every third year, while some may remain in place indefinitely, taking care to give them a yearly manuring, as the vigorous growing ones soon exhaust the soil immediately around them. In setting out these plants, the taller growing kinds should be placed at the rear of the border, or in the center if the bed is to be seen from both sides, while those of the lowest growth are to be placed at the edge, and those of intermediate size are to be placed between. A proper selection of these plants will give a succession from early spring until frost stops all bloom. Many of these perennials are unchanged from their natural state, but bloom in our borders just as they appeared in their native woods and hills in different parts of the world, and seem to show no disposition to "break" or deviate from their normal form, notwithstanding they have been in cultivation for a century or two. On the other hand many have, by sporting, or by hybridizing, and crossing, as in the case of paeonies, phloxes, irises, and others, produced many florists varieties, which show forms and colors not found in the native state of the plants, and the frequent occurrence of double flowers among them shows that cultivation has not been without its influence.

With such a number to select from, it is difficult to make a list of 25, or even 50, and not leave out many desirable kinds. Those in the following list are all of generally admitted excellence, and are usually to be obtained from florists and nurserymen.

It may be added here that there is no part of the country which does not afford wild flowers of sufficient beauty to merit a place in the garden, and most of them, except perhaps those which naturally grow in a deep shade, will grow larger and bloom finer in a rich border than in their native localities.

Perennials are propagated by division of the clumps, by cuttings of the stems, and sometimes of the roots, and by seeds. In many cases the seeds are very slow of germination unless sown as soon as ripe. As most of them do not bloom until the seedlings have made one year's growth, the seeds should be sown in a reserve bed, from which at the end of the first summer, or in the following spring, they may be transplanted to the place where they are to flower. It is well to give the seedlings some protection the first winter, not because they are not hardy, but to prevent them from being thrown out of the soil by frequent freezing and thawing. A covering of evergreen boughs is most suitable, but if these are not at hand, use coarse hay or other litter, first laying down some brush, to keep the covering from matting down upon them.

Aconitum Napellus..........Monkshood.

" variegatum.........Variegated Monkshood.

Anemone Japonica...........Japan Windflower.

" var. Honorine Jobert.....White Japan "

" Pulsatilla..........Pasque Flower.

Aquilegia alpina............Alpine Columbine.

" ccerulea...........Rocky Mt. "

" chrysantha.........Golden-spurred Columbine.

" vulgaris...........Garden "

AstilbeJaponka............(Incorrectly Spiraea.)

Asperula odorata...........Woodruff.

Baptisia australis...........False Indigo.

Campanula Carpathica.........Carpathian Harebell.

" persicifolic..........Peach-leaved "

" grandiflora..........Great-flowered " and others.

Cassia Marilandica..........Wild Senna.

Clematis erecta.............Upright Clematis.

" integrifolia..........Entire-leaved "

Colchicum autumnale.........Meadow Saffron.

Convallaria majalis..........Lily of the Valley.

Delphinium datum...........Bee Larkspur.

" nudicaule..........Scarlet " and others.

Dianthus ptumarius..........Garden Pink.

" superbus...........Fringed "

Dicentra eximia............Plumy Dicentra.

" spectabilis...........Bleeding Heart.

Dirtamnus Fraxinella.........Fraxinella.

Dodecatheon Meadia......... .Am. Cowslip.

Eranthis hiemalis...........Winter Aconite.

Mica carnea.............Winter Heath.

Funkia ovata.............Blue Day Lily.

" Japonica...........Japan" "

Gypsophila paniculata.........Panicled Gypsophila.

Helleborus niger............Christmas Rose.

Hepatica triloba............Liver-leaf.

" "fl .pl..........Double do.

Iberis Gibraltarica..........Gibraltar Candytuft.

" sempervirens..........Perennial "

Iris Germanica............German Flower de Luce.

" Iberica..............Iberian " " "

" pumila..............Dwarf " " " and many others of a great range of colors.

Liatris spicata.............Blazing Star.

" squarrosa........... " " and others.

Lilium auratum............Gold-banded Lily, this, with many other Japanese species in the catalogues, is perfectly hardy, and there should be a good collection of them in every garden.

Linum perenne............Perennial Flax.

Lobelia cardinalis...........Cardinal Flower.

This native, (also its hybrids), does perfectly well in the drier soil of the garden.

Lupinus polyphyllus..........Many-leaved Lupine.

Lychnis Chalcedonica.........Scarlet Lychnis, and several others.

Lysimachia nummularia........Moneywort.

Mertensia Virginica..........Virginia Lungwort.

Myosotis palustrie...........Forget-me-not.

" Azorica.......,....Azorian Forget-me-not.

" dissitflora..........Early " " "

Narcissu biflorus...........Primrose Peerless.

" poeticus...........Poet's Narcissus.

" Jonquilla..........Jonquil.

" Paeudo-narcissns.......Daffodil, in double and single varieties.

CEnothera Missouriensis.........Missouri Evening Primrose.

Pceonia officinalis...........Common Paeony, and the various hydrids of this and other species, of which there are many fine named sorts.

Pceonia tenuifolia...........Fennel-leaved Paeony.

" Moutan.... ........Tree " of which there are many named varieties.

Papaver orientate...........Oriental Poppy.

Pentstemon grandiflorus........Large-flowered Pentstemon.

" barbatus var. Torreyi....Torrey's "

" Palmeri...........Palmer's " and several other hardy species.

Phlox, herbaceous..........French Lilac

Under this head a great number of florists named varieties may be had. New ones are offered every year, and a good selection of colore makes a grand show.

Phlox subutata............Moss Pink.

Also the white variety.

Polemonium reptans..........Jacob's Ladder.

" cceruleum.........Greek Valerian.

Primula veris.............Eng. Cowslip.

This and the Polyanthus varieties need a moist and shady place. P cortusoides is hardy, and P. Japonica probably so.

Pyrethrum carneum..........Rosy Pyrethrum, the new double varieties.

Saxifraga crassifolia..........Thick-leaved Saxifrage,

" cordifolia..........Heart-leaved "

Hardy Herbaceous Perennials. ILL

Sedum acre..............Stone crop.

" Sieboldii (and var.).......Siebold's Stone crop.

" pulchellum...........Beautiful " "

" spectabile............Showy " " and a large number of others, presenting a great variety in foliage and flowers.

Sempervtoum arachnoidewn.......Cobweb Houseleek.

" calcaratum........Purple-tipped "

" tectorum......... Common "

Of these curious plants there are more than 50 species in cultivation, and all perfectly hardy; useful on rock-work.

Spiraea filipendula, (and double)....Dropwort.

" palmata.,...........Palmate Spiraea.

" Ulmaria...........Queen of the Meadow.

" venusta............Queen of the Prairie.

Symphytum officinale var........Variegated Comfrey.

Thalictrum minus...........Maiden-hair Meadow Rue.

Tritoma uvaria, (and vars.).......Red-hot Poker, needs covering in winter with litter.

Tunica Saxifraga...........Rock Tunica.

Yucca flamentosa..........Bear-Grass.

Perennial Ornamental Grasses

1. Arundo Donax............Great Reed.

2. " " versicolor........Variegated Reed.

8. " conspicua...........Silvery "

4. Erianthus Ravennca..........Ravenna grass.

5. Eulalia Japonica var..........Japan Eulalia.

6. Festuca glauca............Blue Fescue.

7. Gyneriun argenteum.........Pampas grass.

8. Panicum virgatum...........Wand-like Panic.

9. Phalaris arundinacea picta.......Ribbon grass.

10. Stipapennata.............Feather grass.

In the climate of New York, Nos. 1, 2 and 7 need protection; Nos. 1 and 2 by litter over the roots, and No. 7 by covering it with a cask or box. In the order of their hight, No. 6 is 6 inches, 9 and 10 a foot, 5 and 8, 8 to 4 feet, and 1, 2, 8, 4, and 7 from 6 to 12 feet, according to the age of the plants.