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Another Hardy Garden Book | by Helena Rutherfurd Ely



In writing this little book, I have given only the result of my own experiences in raising vegetables, fruits and flowers, during a period of many years. It is not intended to be a treatise upon any of the subjects referred to, or in any way to take the place of the many admirable books upon gardening. It is a brief statement of simple methods of conducting gardening operations, particularly in the small home garden. If it gives any help, however little, to its readers, and serves to interest those who are already cultivating their own gardens, or causes others to make a beginning in the fascinating art, its object will have been accomplished.

TitleAnother Hardy Garden Book
AuthorHelena Rutherfurd Ely
PublisherThe Macmillan Company
Year1918
Copyright1905, The Macmillan Company
AmazonAnother Hardy Garden Book

By Helena Rutherfurd Ely, Author of "A Woman's Hardy Garden," etc.

With Illustrations Made From Photographs Taken In The Author's Garden By Professor Charles P. Chandler

-Chapter I. Introduction
THE aesthetic side of Nature has always appealed most strongly to woman. The shadows on the mountain side, the deep green coolness of the forest, the mighty trees and tropical-like foliage of the thic...
-Chapter II. The Vegetable Garden
THE size of the vegetable garden will naturally depend upon the space at your disposal. Let everyone with even a little ground give a certain portion, no matter how small, to the growing of vegetables...
-Artichokes
The French Globe is the best variety. Seed may he sown in boxes in the house, or in the hot-bed about March 1st and the plants set out in the open ground the end of May in rows two feet apart each way...
-Asparagus
When there is space there should always be an asparagus bed. There is trouble in making it, but once done it is there for years to come. For a family of eight, four rows twenty-five feet long and thre...
-Brussels Sprouts
Most books on vegetables tell one to sow the seed in hot-beds or cold-frames, but I have always had the seed sown thinly in drills in the open ground about the middle of May. When well up the plants a...
-Cauliflower
There is certainly great satisfaction to the garden lover in seeing the beautiful solid white cauliflower heads of her own raising, surrounded with their blue-green leaves. The soil must be rich and t...
-Celery
Seed for celery can be sown in the open ground in mid-April in a small bed where the soil has been finely pulverized and made rich; they should only be covered with a quarter of an inch of earth, whic...
-Mushrooms
Any one can raise mushrooms who has a cellar under an out-building. For obvious reasons it would not be agreeable to raise them under a house. We have raised them successfully; a bed about six feet by...
-Okra
When all danger from frost is over, the okra can be sown, and if the Summer is warm there will generally be a fine crop. If the Summer is cold, okra frequently does not bear in the North. It should be...
-Onions
No garden should be without onions. Two ounces and a half of seed will raise quite enough; sow them in drills a foot apart about the middle of April; cover the seed lightly but firmly with soil. The y...
-Peas
Every one likes peas and everyone wants their season extended as late as possible. My orders to the gardener are to plant a new crop as soon as the first is two inches above the ground and to continue...
-Peppers
The seed for peppers may be sown in the hot-bed, but I have it sown directly in the garden about May 10th; two packets of seed will raise quite enough plants. The soil should be rich and finely pulver...
-Rhubarb
Every garden should have at least a few plants of rhubarb. A dozen roots can be bought for about a dollar and a half, and will last a lifetime. They should be planted in a corner where they will be un...
-Spinach
Seed for early Spring spinach should be sowed in October, well covered with leaves or coarse litter at the end of November and uncovered at the end of March. By the 20th of April it should be ready to...
-Herbs
In every vegetable garden there should be a corner devoted to herbs, and a couple of packets of the seeds of each variety will raise enough plants. Being perennials, they need only to be kept free fro...
-Chapter III. Fruits
WTHEN the fruit trees blossom in late April and early May, the whole country where we live becomes, from the many orchards on all sides, one great garden. The exquisite pink-tinged apple blossoms, the...
-Apples
In gardens, apple trees may be planted from twenty-five to thirty feet apart; in orchards they are usually set forty or more feet apart. The young trees must be well pruned when planted and from one-q...
-Cherries
The sweet cherry is another long-lived fruit tree. It has a fine form, retains its foliage until late in the Autumn, like the apple tree, and is beautiful alike when in blossom, in bearing time and th...
-Pears
The garden should contain at least six pear trees. If well cared for, they will bear fruit during a long lifetime. The early kinds ripen in August and the late varieties will keep well into the winter...
-Grapes
A few grape vines, particularly if grown over a modest pergola, or an arbor where their shade would make a pleasant place of refuge through the Summer days, give delight by the beauty of their foliage...
-Strawberries
A fine strawberry bed is much to be desired. But strawberries, perhaps because they are such an addition to the fruit garden, are more difficult of cultivation, must be more frequently renewed, and, l...
-Chapter IV. A Little About Trees
IT is with hesitation that I have ventured to approach so large a subject in a limited space. A landscape gardener to whom I confided the fact that this little book would contain a short chapter upon ...
-Deciduous Trees
First and best of all, though not of so rapid growth as other trees, are the white oak and the pin oak. These two trees must be severely pruned upon transplanting. Next perhaps in value are maples. T...
-Evergreens
Too much cannot be said in favor of evergreen trees. They are beautiful objects, give depth and background to all growth in Summer, and are a blessed delight in Winter, either as the only bit of green...
-Evergreens. Continued
In my garden the severe Winter of 1908-4 caused many losses. Coming out the middle of April to spend a few happy days superintending Spring work, I found a sad state of things. Besides the Catalpa Bun...
-Chapter V. Perennials And Other Flowers
WHEN one whose experience in gar-dening has been bounded by a few varieties of bedding-out plants like Geraniums, Coleus, Salvias, and Petunias, begins to plant perennials, she is apt to be disappoint...
-Perennials And Other Flowers. Continued
From the middle of June until the third week of July, Penstemon barbatus Torreyi, which has a small flower of vivid scarlet growing on tall, slender spikes that in their second year have reached six f...
-Larkspurs
Then suddenly along in July, the color scheme becomes red and white; Poppies, Phlox, Crimson Ramblers, Pen-stemon, Lychnis, Salvias, Cannas, the tall white Auratums, Boconia cordata, and Iris. Then f...
-Larkspurs. Continued
One can learn something from almost every garden, no matter how humble. In walking about a town or village, I often pass a simple door-yard slowly two or three times, and sometimes hang over a fence t...
-Chapter VI. A Garden Of Lilies And Iris
SOME years ago I heard of A Garden of Lilies, a garden where nothing else was grown. The phrase and the description of this garden remained in my mind and the desire to have one where Lilies particu...
-A Garden Of Lilies And Iris. Part 2
But for a moment let me digress and again say a word upon the preparation of the soil, for in this lies the great secret of success in gardening. Make it deep and rich and light, giving to the plants ...
-A Garden Of Lilies And Iris. Part 3
The lovely Candidum, too, has no place in this garden. It does not like our soil or my treatment, and after buying hundreds with scant success I have abandoned their culture. The German Iris began to...
-Chapter VII. Autumn Work In The Flower Garden
IT is difficult for beginners in the gentle art of gardening to realize how much time and patience are required to make success. It is equally difficult at first for them to understand that flowers to...
-Spring
First of all, there are the seeds to be gathered - for why incur the expense of buying when those raised in your own garden may be just as fine and much fresher than those from the seed stores? Small ...
-Spring. Continued
Perennial Larkspurs, too, should now be finally transplanted. These are hardy and long-lived plants, growing from four to six feet in height, often higher. Plant six or eight together, about two feet ...
-Chapter VIII. The Flower Garden In The Spring
WITH the first mild day that comes in March the thoughts of all garden lovers, who spend the Winter months in the round of city life, fly away to their gardens. They know that within the brown earth, ...
-The Flower Garden In The Spring. Part 2
Early in April some fine old manure, to which a small quantity of bone-meal and wood-ashes, about a pailful of each to a wheelbarrow of manure, have been added, should be dug into the ground about the...
-The Flower Garden In The Spring. Part 3
Annuals may be sown from April 20th to May 10th, according to the season. Asters for late blooming may be sown up to the end of May. In planting, tall-growing things should be set at the back of the ...
-A Woman's Hardy Garden
By HELENA RUTHERFURD ELY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN IN THE AUTHOR'S GARDEN BY PROFESSOR C. F. CHANDLER Cloth. 12mo. $1.75 net. A BOOK TO BE WELCOMED WITH ENTHUSIASM BY TEE WILLING N...
-Our Mountain Garden
By MRS. THEODORE THOMAS WITH ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS Cloth. 12mo. $1.50 net. Our Mountain Garden,' by Mrs Theodore Thomas, is one of the latest, freshest, and most enticing calls to the new ...









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