In floral characters this genus is very near the last, but the disposition of the flowers is very different, being in spicate secund or distichous bracteate panicles. Leaves all or nearly all radical and rosulate, spathulate or oblong, not linear. There are about fifty species, chiefly abundant in the saline districts of Western Asia. The name is derived from 2 Statice 368 to stop, in reference to the astringent properties of some of the species.

1. S. Limonium. Sea Lavender. - This is the commonest and the largest of the indigenous species. It is technically distinguished from the others by the calyx-lobes being furnished with intermediate teeth. Flowers lilac-blue or white. S. Ba-husiensis, syn. S. rariflora, is a variety with lax spikelets. Native of the coast of England and extreme South-west of Scotland, flowering from July onwards till late in Autumn.

2. S. elata (fig. 205), syn. Goniolimon elatum.- This is a handsome species from Siberia, with bright green glabrous foliage, and blue flowers, produced from July to September.

Fig. 205. Statice elata. (1/20 nat. size.)

Fig. 205. Statice elata. (1/20 nat. size.)

S. Gmelini is a similar species from the same region as the last. S. latifolia is a large-growing species from Southern Russia, with ample oblong obtuse foliage and spreading panicles of light blue flowers; S. eximia, from Soongaria, has pink or rosy flowers; S. incana, from Egypt, crimson and white; and S. Fortunei, a tender Chinese species, has yellow flowers.