Small shrubs or trees with opposite or whorled leaves. Calyx coloured, tube produced above the ovary, limb 4-lobed. Petals sessile on the mouth of the calyx-tube. Stamens 8, on slender filaments. Style long and slender. Fruit a pulpy berry. The species are estimated at about fifty, with the exception of two from New Zealand, all natives of America. Named after Fuchs, a German botanist. Almost any of the species and varieties will flourish in the open air during the Summer months, and some of them will withstand our winters without protection if treated as herbaceous plants, while one or two succeed well trained against a wall, in the more favoured localities. F. fulgens (fig. 108) is one of the tenderer species belonging to a distinct section, having a very long calyx-tube and short sepals.

Fig. 108. Fuchsia fulgens. (1/2 nat. size.)

Fig. 108. Fuchsia fulgens. (1/2 nat. size.)

The following are some of the hardier species or varieties:-F. globbsa (fig. 109). - This variety is readily known by the globular form assumed by the incurved sepals, and is probably a variety of F. macrostema, syn. F. Magellanica. Indeed, it is very probable that all or nearly all of the hardier varieties are forms of that species, which is a native of the extreme South of America. The variety called coccinea in gardens it has lately been discovered has no title to that name, but belongs to this group. The true coccinea, sometimes called gracilis, has nearly sessile leaves and other differences, and is now very rare in British gardens. Its native country is probably Brazil. F. Riccartoni is perhaps the hardiest of all the varieties, and one of the most profuse bloomers. In the south and west it attains a large size against a wall, and is sufficiently hardy to withstand our Winter in such a position. This has red straight sepals and a purple corolla. F. conica, discolor, etc., are near allies.

Fig. 109. Fuchsia globosa. (1/2 nat. size.)

Fig. 109. Fuchsia globosa. (1/2 nat. size.)