2. L. giganteum. - This is remarkable for its tall stout stem from 5 to 10 feet high and large cordate leaves, the lower (or all) petiolate. Flowers sub-erect, 6 to 12 in each raceme, yellowish-white spotted with purple in the throat, odoriferous. Perianth funnel-shaped. Segments 5 to 6 inches long, naked at the base. Filaments shorter than the perianth, pollen yellow. A. very showy species from the Himalayas, requiring slight protection in severe weather. Mr. Baker unites this as a sub-species with L. cordi-folium, a Japanese plant of somewhat smaller dimensions.

3. L. longiflorum, including L. Wallichianum, L. Neilgherricum, and L. exl-mium, etc. - Stem 1 to 4 feet high or more, clothed with numerous scattered linear acute glabrous leaves, and surmounted by 1 to 4 pure white flowers 6 to 9 inches long, and suddenly narrowed into a long tube. Stamens shorter than the perianth; pollen yellow. Varieties bearing the above names are sufficiently distinct from a horticultural point of view. The variety eximium, syn. Takesima (fig. 246), grows from 2 to 4 feet, with usually from 2 to 4 flowers from 8 to 9 inches long. L. longiflorum proper grows from 1 to 2 feet, has broader leaves and usually solitary flowers; and L. Wallichianum, syn. L. Japonicum (of Don, not of Thunberg), is a distinct robust form attaining a height of 4 to 6 feet, and usually solitary very large yellowish-white sweet-scented flowers. L. longiflorum and L. eximium are natives of Japan and China, and are hardier than the others, which are from the mountains of India.

Fig. 246. Lilium longiflorum, var. eximium. (1/6 nat. size.)

Fig. 246. Lilium longiflorum, var. eximium. (1/6 nat. size.)

4. L. Japonicum, Thunberg, syn. L. odrum. - An erect glabrous species from 1 to 2 feet high with from 12 to 20 scattered oblanceolate 5-to 7-nerved spreading leaves narrowed towards the base, and 1 to 3 sub-erect flowers. Perianth 6 to 9 inches long, narrowed gradually to the base, pure white tinged with purple externally. Filaments shorter than the perianth; pollen reddish-yellow. A native of China and Japan. L. Broiwnii is probably a luxuriant form of this with the stem and flowers tinged with purple.

L. Nepalense is an allied Indian species, and is very rare if still in gardens.

5. L. cdndidum (fig. 247). - This is the common White Lily of our gardens, and one of the very oldest in cultivation. It grows from 4 to 6 feet high with several pearly-white flowers and yellow anthers. It is a native of the South of Europe, and hardy in this country. L. pere-grinum is considered to be a slender form of this with rather smaller flowers. There is a double-flowered variety, and another, called striatum, has the flowers striped and spotted with purple. But the most remarkable, though more curious than beautiful, is spicatum, in which the flowers are abortive and replaced by white petaloid bracts.

Fig. 247. Liliuin candidum. (1/6 nat. size.)

Fig. 247. Liliuin candidum. (1/6 nat. size.)

6. L. Washingtonianum. - A very beautiful species of quite recent introduction. It grows about 3 to 5 feet high, and is distinguished from all others of this group by the short spreading lanceolate 1-nerved glabrous leaves being arranged in regular whorls of 10 or 12. Flowers slightly nodding, from 12 to 18 in a raceme, on long pedicels, white tinged with lilac or purple, very fragrant. A native of the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada range in California, and most likely quite hardy in Britain.

7. L. tigrinum, syn. L. speciosum (Andrews, not of Thunberg) (fig. 248). - The Tiger Lily is one of the most distinct, and after the White Lily the one most commonly seen. It is distinguished from the allied species by the purplish cottony stems; linear sessile 5- to 7-nerved leaves usually with round black bulblets in their axils. Flowers bright orange-red with purplish-black spots. A native of Japan and China, and quite hardy in this country. L. Fortuinei is a magnificent robust variety from 6 to 10 feet high and bearing from 30 to 40 flowers on each stem. There is also a handsome double-flowered variety in cultivation.

8. L. speciosum, Thun-berg, syn. L. lancifolium of

Paxton, not of Thunberg. - This beautiful species usually bears the latter name in gardens. Stem glabrous, from 1 to 3 feet high. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, shortly petiolate, 1 1/2 to 2 inches broad, lower ones 7- to 9-ribbed. Flowers 4 to 6 inches in diameter, 3 to 6 or more, corymbose, on long sub-erect bracteate pedicels. Perianth-segments 3 to 5 inches long, spreading from the base, and more or less covered on the lower half inside with papillose tubercles. Filaments variable in length; pollen deep red or yellowish. As a cultivated plant it is very variable in the colour of its flowers - white spotted or tinged with carmine or rose, or wholly white. There are many named varieties, as alburn, punctatum, rubrum, etc. It is a native of Japan, and totally different from the true L. lanci-fdliura.

Fig. 248. Lilium tigriuum. (1/4 nat. size.)

Fig. 248. Lilium tigriuum. (1/4 nat. size.)

9. L. auratum. - This is perhaps the most gorgeous of all the Lilies, and one of the greatest acquisitions of recent years. Its purplish stems rise to a height of 2 to 5 feet and they are clothed with lanceolate shortly petiolate 5- to 7-nerved glabrous leaves from 6 to 9 inches long. Flowers very large, from 6 to 10 inches in diameter, 3 to 6 or many more on each stem. Perianth-segments spreading, 5 to 7 inches long, papillose within below the middle. This species is very variable in the colouring of its flowers. In the original variety the petals are pure white with a yellow band down the centre and scattered car-mine spots, but scarcely two seedling plants can be found exactly alike in the disposition of the colours. Japan.