- Very closely allied to the preceding tribe, from which they are distinguished by their curved suckers, and especially by the glandular under-surface of the leaves; a character almost exclusively confined to Roses of this section. They have the same persistent calyx-lobes and thick disk closing the mouth of the calyx-tube. There are only two species in this group which merit our attention, they are : R. lutea, the Eglantine, which should not be confounded with R. sulphurea, previously mentioned under the Burnet Rose section. This, which appears to be a native of the South of Europe, though it may be only naturalised, is a bush 3 to 6 feet high with straight prickles not intermixed with bristles, and shining dark-green leaves whose leaflets to the number of 5 to 7 are oval, slightly concave and toothed, and more or less pubescent and glandular beneath, and glabrous above. The flowers are large, cup-shaped, sometimes wholly yellow, sometimes yellow without and reddish brown within. Their odour, which has sometimes been compared to that of a bug, without being exactly disagreeable, but feebly recalls that of the other Roses. In most French works this species bears the name of Eglantine, and it is generally considered to be the veritable R. Eglanteria of Linnaeus. It has produced comparatively few variations, and apparently no crosses. The Capuchin Briar (fig. 87), flowers yellow outside, and of a more or less vivid reddish brown inside; Harrisonii, with yellow double flowers, not uncommon in England; Persian Yellow, entirely of a bright yellow and very double, one of the prettiest yellow Roses we possess.

Fig. 87. Capuchin Briar. (1/2 nat size.)

Fig. 87. Capuchin Briar. (1/2 nat size.)

R. rubiginosa, Sweet Briar, is found in some parts of England. A very dense bush about 6 feet high, bearing numerous curved spines; leaves usually of seven dull green leaflets, glandular below, and very odoriferous when bruised between the fingers. The flowers are rose or very pale carmine, slightly scented; the fruit very variable in shape, smooth or hispid, retaining the convergent calyx-lobes until ripe.

R. micrantha is a much commoner closely allied form with less strongly scented foliage and deciduous calyx-lobes.