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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #1 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Rhododendrons To Stoves

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #1
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Rhododendbon Chamubcistus, Z. Nat. Ord. Ericaceoe
Native of the Alps of Europe. Habit compact and very neat. Leaves very small, crowded, elliptical, acute, smooth above and below; margin ciliated with stiff, short, glandular hairs. Flowers terminal, ...
-Rhododendrons
The London Florist gives the following description of these new Rhododendrons, from Mr. E.G. HEndERson: Rhododendron Nuitalll This, the largest flowered Rhododendron kncwn, has foliage handsomer tha...
-Rhododendrons (2)
These were well exhibited by Messrs. Ivison, Gaines, and Lane, and constituted by no means an unimportant feature of the show. It may be interesting to know that the spotted white and rose-colored sor...
-Rhododendrons (3)
Foremost among evergreen shrubs stands this beantiful genus; beautiful in its foliage and habit of plants, but beautiful, gorgeous and magnificent in its flowers. This is true of our native varieties;...
-Rhododendrons (4)
Rhododendron Argenteum A fine hardy or half-hardy shrub, with large oblong-obovate leaves silvery beneath, and dense heads of flowers, pale rose color in the bud, changing to cream color and white. S...
-Rhododendron Show At Boston
The Rhododendron show on Boston Common was a sight never to be forgotten - the finest in colors and display of choice varieties this country has ever beheld. It was with considerable difficulty the ba...
-Rhododendron, And Apples
Mr. Van Buren, of Clarksville, Georgia, writes that he now thinks Mr. McDowell's Rhododendron, figured by us in 1856, is the Catawbiense. It grows, he says, so much more luxuriantly, and is so much...
-Rhos Ootdtoides (Nutt)
In the January number of the Horticulturist the culture of the Sweet Gum tree (Liguidambar styraeiftua) is recommended. This is well, and we hope it will be commonly cultivated; because it is indeed...
-Rhubarb (2)
Rhubarb, or, as it is often named, Pie Plant, is composed of a number of varieties that have emanated from two species of the genus Rheum, viz: R. rha-ponticum and R. undulatum, each of which in a nat...
-Rhubarb - Which Is The Best
To the child of twenty years since, the word Rhubarb was suggestive of anything rather than the most delicious pastry. And when late in the season, wanting the brisk-flavored, aromatic Spitzenberg or ...
-Rhubarb, Or Pie Plant
It is remarkable how the cultivation of this has increased within a short time. Twenty years ago it would have been difficult to find a dollar's worth in New York markets - now thousands of dollars wo...
-Ribbon Gardening
We frequently see allusions to Ribbon Gardening in the foreign papers; the following will attract some of our enthusiasts of beautiful gardens to the subject: - Among the more recent innovations in...
-Rice Paper
The plant from which the Chinese Rice papier is made, has long been unknown, and many conjectures have been hazarded regarding it.There can be no doubt that the paper is composed of cellular tissue, a...
-The Rice-Paper Plant
On the morning of the 20th of April last the steamer in which I was a passenger dropped her anchor a little way up one of the rivers on the north-east part of Formosa. As this was my first visit to th...
-The Right Talk
A very intelligent, well-known gardener, in renewing his subscription, uses the following language, which we give as representative of much more to the same effect from others : Every practical gar...
-Ringing The Grape-Vine
Those who wish to try this mode of culture may do it with good effect I am not acquainted with any fruit-bearing tree, of which the fruit can be so much improved and accelerated to maturity by ringing...
-Ripe Fruit A Preventive Of Disease
Good old Doctor Kennicott, well known by a large number of our Western readers, used to say to us that in his practice of medicine he found his calls upon a family reduced in proportion as they came i...
-Ripe Peaches
A correspondent writes us from Cleveland, O., giving an account of the ripening of peaches on the 23d May, in the fruit-house of W. J. Gordon, Esq. Mr. Gordon is, and has been, absent traveling in Eur...
-Ripeniho And Preserving Fruit
At a meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, May 31, the following report from the Fruit Committee was read by the Chairman, accepted and ordered to be printed. The Fruit committee, to wh...
-Ripening And Marketing Fruit
All present who had tried the Flemish Beauty, had found it (in common with many other sorts), greatly improved in flavor by picking a few days before maturity, and ripening within doors. This treatmen...
-Ripening Of Fauns In Michigan
June 21st Gathered the crop of seven or eight trees of the Black Tartarian Cherry, part of which have now borne for three years. The tree proves very upright and vigorous, and quite ornamental; and t...
-Ripening Or The Catawba Grape
The ripening of the Catawba Grape is very uncertain in this latitude. About one year in three the average temperature* is sufficiently high, and the season sufficiently long, to make the fruit worthy ...
-A River Cottage
This cottage, designed by Mr. R. G. Hatfield, architect, of New York, is intended to be located upon a sharp declivity where a fine view, either upon a river or extended valley, is to be had from the ...
-Rivers On Orchard Houses
To the temporary displacement of several esteemed articles from correspondents, we have made room to-day for about one-half of Mr. Rivers' extremely interesting and agreeable little book, from the fif...
-Rivers's Rose Amateur's Guide
We gladly welcome the new issue of this very useful and now famous guide. The continual changes that take place in public taste, the ever altering claims of varieties to general favor, the capital, th...
-Roadside Improvements
Too often, as we have traveled over the country this summer, have we witnessed a fine house, good buildings, and fences, but the roadside outside of the fence line containing more or less rubbish, evi...
-Robert Pearsall Smith. Publisher's Card
A long connection with the public as a publisher, and especially of agricultural and horticultural works as well as an innate and fostered love of these topics, has induced me to become the proprietor...
-Robins In Rhode Island
Mr. Editor, - Rhode Island is one of the breeding-places of the robin, and so numerous are they here, that we are obliged to cover our cherry trees and raspberry bushes with nets, if we expect any fru...
-Rochelle Blackberry
Having recently visited New Rochelle, Westchester county, N. Y., and there learned many particulars respecting the discovery of the New Rochelle or (as it is more commonly called) Lawton Blackberry, I...
-Rochelle Or Lawton Blackberry
Messrs. Geo. Seymour & Co., of Norwalk, Conn., sent us a colored drawing of this fruit, accompanied with the following observations on their mode of culture and treatment We had the annexed woodcut pr...
-Rochelle, Or Lawtov
We have seen accounts in the newspapers, this season, concerning the enormous size and wonderful productiveness of this fruit, which appeared almost incredible. Messrs. Geo. Seymour & Co., nurserymen,...
-Rochester Pippin
AT the winter meeting of the New York State Horticultural Society in January last, there was a plate of seedling apples presented and raised by Jacob Moore, of Rochester, N. T., who said it was a hybr...
-Rochester, June 10
The length of our Spring is exciting remark. Our Tulip beds are yet gay and Horse Chestnuts, Lilacs, Thorns, Laburnums, the early Spiraeas, Azaleas, Rhododendrons, and such things as are usually passe...
-Rock-Work
A rockery is a very interesting feature in gardens. We do not mean a pile of rocks fantastically heaped in mounds in the midst of highly kept flower beds, or those perpendicular walls of boulders occa...
-The Rocket Larkspur - Delphinium Ajacis
The Rocket Larkspur was introduced into England, from Switzerland, in 1573, although not supposed to be a native of that country. It is of a compact habit of growth, and its blossoms appear set around...
-Roessle's Celery Culture
Mr. Editor: - Being curious to see the above work, by the modest manner in which its coming was heralded, I purchased a copy; and believing that I have paid pretty dear for my whistle, I beg you wil...
-Roessles Celery Book
How to Cultivate and Preserve Celery. By Theophilus Roessle, of the Delavan House, Albany, N. Y. Edited, with a Preface, by Henry S. Olcott. - Mr. Roessle has for some years been known as a successful...
-Rogers' Hybrids In Iowa
HAVE set over 40 varieties of grapes in my garden and among them 10 different numbers of the above Hybrids. The latter very pleasantly disappointed me in their behavior during the summer, which in the...
-Rogers' No. 8 Grape
Among the many numbers and varieties of the Rogers Hybrid Grapes, my attention has this day (29th September) been called by Professor J. R. Kirtland to an examination of one under designation as No. 8...
-Rogers's Hybrid
(See Frontispiece). We have lately been several times thwarted in getting up our monthly frontispiece. We had the Creveling grape, but that was destroyed by fire. We had also the Emma Cheney Dahlia, ...
-Rogers's Hybrid Grapes
Mr. Editor, - Having read in the Horticulturist, of 1858, an account of the Hybridization of the Grape, by Mr. Edward S. Rogers, of Salem, and recently seen some fine specimens of the fruit on exhibit...
-Roldo
The American public were greatly entertained, two years ago, with wonderful reports of the curative properties of a new plant, Cundurango. Although we know that in one case it did prove of great eff...
-The Rolla Apple The Baldwin In Michigan
An Orchard Saved By Mulching Ed. Western Horticulturist: - A few notes from this quarter of the State may be of interest. Most of the bearing apple trees in this region were badly injured by the last...
-The Rolling Prairies Of The West
It is the universal impression among western men that all writers have utterly failed in describing a prairie; at least, it is a rare thing to find one who has never seen a prairie whose conception of...
-Rolling The Ground
A correspondent of the Germantown Telegraph writes: On dry or wet ground the effect of the roller is found to be salutary. Plowed and prepared for sowing, dry land is much helped by the roller. The b...
-Room Plants
THE present is an appropriate time to say a few words about growing plants in rooms. There are many persons without the convenience of a greenhouse, but in whom the love of plants is so strong that ...
-Room Plants (2)
One of our correspondents, we remember, asked us to furnish an extended list of plants suitable for growing in rooms. He can make up a list from the following: Azalea, Fuchsia, Primula Sinensis, Cuphe...
-Room Plants (3)
There are few persons, we apprehend, but what find pleasure in the presence of plants and flowers, and would desire to cultivate them in their dwellings during the long winter months, if any method co...
-Roots
The root is the organ through which food is conveyed from the earth into the plant, and is the part which is soonest developed, increasing in length by the addition of new matter at its point, much as...
-The Root (2)
Vegetable physiologists are now turning their attention to the great cause of the evils that plants are heirs to, and which has been so long neglected. The microscope is revealing the actual condition...
-Roots (3)
In a former number, page 7l, we commenced to make some remarks on roots, a subject which has more interest, perhaps, to the planter than any other, but which is very generally neglected; carelessness ...
-Roots (4)
Dr. Cloud - Dear Sir, - To learn the conditions of success in the pursuit of any object, is certainly a matter of prime importance; even if success might follow, nine times out of ten, without such in...
-Roots (4). Continued
Trees with tap-roots are much more difficult to transplant than those of the other variety, and a different course should be pursued in the operation if we would ensure success. To remove the oak or p...
-Roots (5)
I have read with much interest the articles by Mr. Fuller on the propagation of plants; but I must confess that on reading the one on the propagation of plants by divisions of the roots, I was not a l...
-Root And Top Grafting - Twenty-Five Years' Observation
ED. Western Horticulturist: Dear Sir - I believe there is at this time no diversity of opinion among Pomologists in regard to the alleged fact, that many varieties of fruits are greatly affected in si...
-Root-Grafting
SEVERAL correspondents have requested our opinion concerning the respective merits of root-grafting and budding or stock-grafting, in the propagation of apple trees. A considerable degree of interest ...
-Root-Grafting. Continued
We are very confident, however, that Mr. Hovey does not speak from experience. We once entertained opinions of root-grafting much the same as his, but it was from the want of experience, and we appreh...
-Root-Grafting Grapes
Some cultivators are of opinion that the tenderness of our native grapevines is more attributable to want of energy in the root, than in the formation of a firm, well-matured vine. If in this there is...
-Root-Grafting Roses
Mr. Editor: In the Horticulturist (Jan. 7,1856), you publish a short piece on Root-Grafting Roses, by an English gardener; as I have practised this mode of propagating the rose for the past ten ye...
-Root-Pruning
Pruning the roots of trees is an operation conducive to fruitfulness not practised to that extent which it merits. In the hands of intelligent cultivators it is a valuable expedient, much more certain...
-Root-Pruning Grape-Vines
We have, during the past year, made some comments respecting the advantage of root pruning grapevines, much as pears are done, with a view to check redundancy of growth. We hope some of our readers wi...
-Root-Pruning The Grape
In all of dwarf tree culture, when the system is performed upon a tree whose roots are of a free growing stock, it is the practice to root prune, because it has come to be well known that without root...
-Root-Pruning To Promote Fruitfulness
Fruit trees are planted with a view to produce fruit, and all the labor of the cultivator, after the trees are planted, has this primary object in view. But how best to attain this result is a questi...
-Rooting The Carnation
ED. Western Horticulturist: In the March number of The Horticulturist I see the following query: What is the matter with my Carnation cuttings? Now, Mr. Editor, I have asked the same question of o...
-The Roots Of Plants
It is long since we paused from our observations on the science of gardening, but we will now resume (from vol. iii. p. 330) our remarks relative to the roots of plants. We have seen that plants sear...
-Rosas
If we are surprised to hear that a peach-tree may and does attain a much larger size than a man's body, we might be still more astonished to learn that the apple bearing rose-tree measures sometimes...
-Rosas Of 1854
Never since Roses have been cultivated in England to any extent has such a fatal season as the past been experienced by the growers. The severe frost in winter killed nearly all the buds of the Tea-sc...
-Roses
Fortune'* Double Yellow is a dull buff, with a tinge of purple; flowers small, semi-double, and loose; about as hardy as a Tea Rose - at the best, it falls far below expectation. We see the Philadelph...
-Rose (2)
Probably the Queen of the Prairie, We can tell you if you send us a flower, with a small piece of the wood and a few leaves. To have Roses blossom through the Summer and Fall you must plant ever-bl...
-Roses (3)
We are indebted to Mr. Dailledouze, Brooklyn, for specimens of Madame Boll and Francis 1. Roses. The latter is a rose of medium size, full, of good form, and a beautiful dark crimson color. It promise...
-Roses (4)
In the enterprise displayed by nurserymen, horticulturists and florists of our country, in importing, and their skill in raising, all the new and choice varieties of plants grown in Europe, few only h...
-Roses (5)
IN my last month's communication on New Roses, I named several varieties of Hybrid Perpetuals and Teas flowering for us during the past summer, and referred to the success of the European growers in h...
-Roses (6)
W. C. B., (Buffalo.) Ton win find Malmaison,Solfaterre, Devoniensis and Chroma-tella, free bloomers in winter, if you give them plenty of room, and allow them to make long shoots. Water with liquid ma...
-Roses (7)
To form well-furnished and finished beds of roses, procure such kinds as Souvenir de Anseleme, Sombrieule, Amie Vibert, Glorie de Rosamene and Fellenberg, and plant them so that the stems may be readi...
-Roses (8)
Dear Sir: - The Vicomtess de Cazes is certainly a most magnificent rose, and almost constant in bloom. It does well planted out in the summer, and the best protection you can give any rose in the w...
-Roses (9)
The following list contains, says the Gardener's Chronicle, some of the very finest varieties selected from the whole London exhibition. Blush: - Madame Vidot, Madame Rivera, Dutchess of Orleans, Augu...
-The Rose And Its Culture
While spring with lavish flow'rets glows, From the gay wreath I pluck the rose. The exquisite beauty and delicious fragrance of the Rose has earned for it the title of Queen of Flowers, and enc...
-The Rose Bug
Contrary to our expectations, and, we may add, past experience, the Rose Bug is this season more abundant than we remember to have seen them for a dozen years past. They have usually been comparativel...
-A Rose By Any Other Name Would Smell As Sweet
Mr. Editor, - Were it not that I know you personally to be a man of good sense and gumption, I should class you among the green ones. Could not you see from the hand write that my article, published...
-Rose Champion Geranium
(See Frontispiece). Our frontispiece this month is a drawing of a fine American seedling Geranium, named Hose Champion, raised by Mr. Cranstoun of Hoboken, N. J. It has been exhibited several times a...
-Rose Culture
Four things are absolutely essential in high rose culture - a rich and deep soil, judicious pruning, freedom from insects, and watering when requisite. If any one of these be wrong, the success will b...
-The Rose Geant Des Batailles, (Giant Of Battles)
In our last number we gave a drawing and description of one of the finest of all the light-colored Hybrid Perpetual or Remontant Roses, the Caroline de Sansal; now we present a portrait of the best an...
-Rose Hedges
In our Southern States the Cherokee Rose has long been grown as a hedge plant, and we have seen miles of it perfectly beautiful in appearance, and at the same time a complete barrier against intruders...
-Rose Stocks
It appears still to bo a mooted question as to the merits respectively of the Dog Rose and the Manetti as a stock for budding roses upon. I have little to say in favor of the Dog Rose as a stock, whic...
-Rose Suckers
Notwithstanding what may be said, a large number of the hybrid perpetual roses grown and sold are budded on the Manatti stock, and at this season of the year the cultivator of such roses needs to watc...
-Rose, "James Sprunt"
This new climbing rose will be found one of the most valuable in the Southern States. In the Northern States it will do for summer exposure or greenhouse culture only. It grows to a height of six to t...
-Rose, Peach Blossom
This is a new hybrid perpetual variety recently illustrated in the Florist, of London. It is described as a large, full, and exquisitely shaped flower, the tint being that of a delicate peach blossom,...
-Rose-Colored Chinese Winter Radish
(See Frontispiece). According to the Flore des Serres, this handsome radish was brought to notice in Europe by the Abbe Voisin. We procured some seed of it from Commodore Perry just after his return ...
-The Rose-Slug
A correspondent writes: If you will publish something that will save my roses from the deliberate slaughter of these murderous pests, which have nearly destroyed my large and choice varieties of bea...
-Roses - Bians And Insects
I am very much obliged to you for the information you gave me last autumn, as to the winter disposition of my roses; it kept them as nicely as possible,and this summer they bare made me quite famous, ...
-Roses Blooming Late In Autumn
Some remarks having appeared in a late number about roses then in bloom, I took pains to go to-day (Nov. 16) round the rose, quarters in Mr. Epps' nursery, at Maidstone, and found the following fully ...
-Roses For Bedding
The following make beautiful beds: Devoniensis, Mrs. Bosanquet, and Souvenir de la Malmaison. The most striking bed that I have ever seen, however, was made with dwarfs of Geant de Bataille, with the ...
-Roses For Winter-Blooming
A selection for this purpose should be made from the Tea and Sourbon families, on their own roots or budded very low. Presuming the plants brought from he nursery are in the small pots they are genera...
-Roses In Pots
In compliance with your permission and wish that I shou'd inform you of the mode adopted by me in growing roses in pots, as specimen plants, and for exhibition at our local shows in the months of May ...
-Roses In Winter
D. Beaton, one of the best gardeners and writers for the Cottage Gar-doner, says, respecting the treatment of roses in winter, in the open ground : - The philosophy of the thing stands thus: All the ...
-Roses, American Culture
The rose never wearies us, we enjoy every mention of it, and though not a new beauty, yet its beauty never wears out. Read what The American Rural Home says about planting Rose-beds: The rose likes a...
-Roses, Etc., From Pittsburg, Pa
Mr. J. S. Negley, of Pittsburg, Pa., has backed our recommendation of his nursery by an elegantly packed box of novelties of superior excellence, and as an evidence of the advance of horticulture in t...
-Rosin Smoke As A Remedy For Greek Fly
The Aphis is one of the most annoying insects that the gardener has to contend with, especially under glass. Fortunately, the Aphis is measurably under our control; tobacco smoke, whale oil soap, etc....
-The Rostiezer Pear
The Rostiezer Pear, which we present this month as our frontispiece, is one of the very finest foreign varieties now cultivated in this country. We think we may safely say that in its season it has no...
-The Rosy Hispa And The Drop-Worm
[In the latter part of the month of August we were traveling through Jefferson county, N. T., and observed through the whole country that the Basswood trees, which are very abundant in that part of th...
-The Rot In Grapes
The following article was read at the meeting of the Cincinnati Horticultural Society, on the 17tb of July, and directed to be published: From recent and careful investigation, I am inclined to belie...
-Rot In Grapes - A Suggestion
The Catawba grape seems particularly liable to be affected by a peculiar disease, which is termed rot; the berries when about full grown become spotted and exhibit an appearance very similar in struct...
-Rotation In Planting
The opinion that trees, vegetables, and cereal grains do not succeed when planted more than once on the same piece of land in immediate succession, has its foundation in experience; and the advantages...
-Rotation Of Crops In The Esculent Garden
This subject had been set apart for consideration, and James Jones, gardener at Girard College, read the Essay, which was afterwards discussed by Messrs. Saunders, Stephens, Miller, Eadie, Pettigrew, ...
-Rough Flats Glass?On The Roofing Or Hot-Houses
For two years past, much excitement has been produced in England, by a pro-posal to roof plant-houses with a new kind of rough plate glass, for which a patent has been obtained there by Mr. Hartly. Th...
-Rough Notes On The History Of Botany
Though the science of botany is one of the oldest in the world, we cannot but admit that by mankind in general it has been deplorably neglected. For centuries, a knowledge of this delightful science w...
-The Royal Horticultural Society Of London
The Royal Horticultural Society formally inaugurated the opening of its new gardens at South Kensington on Wednesday, June 5, 1861. The occasion seems to have been one of peculiar interest, and was ma...
-The Royal Horticultural Society Of London. Part 2
Why should we not have the three degrees of comparison in the dessert? And, surely, people would need to know for whom the dessert was intended before they could make a proper use of the dishes, fruit...
-The Royal Horticultural Society Of London. Part 3
But I must give you some idea of the new plants from Japan, and all along the front stage; for about collections, if you read over again the reports of the May shows for the last seven years, and sup...
-Royal South London Floricultural Society, September 6
This, the lost of the Society's meetings for this year, was well attended, and as an exhibition it was considerably better than the autumn display of 1852, both as regards the quality and quantity of ...
-Rubus Laciniatus - "Jagged-Leaved Blackberry." By William Lawton, Of New Roghelle, N. T
Having introduced a specimen of this fruit, together with the branches and leaves, at the late meeting of the American Pomological Society, held in Philadelphia, it may be proper to state what I know ...
-Rubus Laciniatus - (Jagged-Leaved Blackberry)
If this beautiful plant is to be extensively cultivated in our fruit-gardens, and our market supplied with its berries, or even if confined to the grounds of the amateur, it should have some short and...
-Rules For Calculating The Length Of Shadows
In selecting situations for gardens' and also for planting trees for shelter, the length to which their shadows will reach during winter deserves consideration, as also does that of the shade caused ...
-Rules For Selection, Planting And Care Of Evergreens
1st. Select the trees by personal examination in the nursery, and always those with single stems. 2d. Patronize your nearest reliable dealer. 3d. Plant in damp weather in the spring, with the least ...
-Rural Architecture
The following article from Repton's Landscape Gardening will answer several inquiries, and we have no doubt will be of interest to our readers generally: Notwithstanding the numerous volumes on Grec...
-Rural Architecture (2)
To build well, and to do so at a low price, is always desirable; and to build artistically, imposingly, attractively, does not imply elaborate finish or profuse ornament. Sand paper and decoration wil...
-Rural Architecture (3)
When one contemplates building, and has put his thoughts and wishes into a tangible form, the leading question asked is, how much will all this cost? for what price in dollars and cents, without extra...
-Rural Cemeteries
ONE of the most beautiful traits in the character of a civilized and christian people is. that respectful and affectionate remembrance of the dead which manifests itself in setting apart quiet groun...
-Rural Cemeteries. Continued
Here is a piece of ground for a rural cemeterv - it is to be laid out - intersected with walks and avenues improved and embellished - and the surveyor is called in to do it. He, with an eye merely to ...
-Rural Cemeteries (2)
It is, doubtless, a dictate of our common humanity, to cherish reverence and affection for the ashes of the dead. Even the savage, driven into the wilderness by the march of civilization, parts from t...
-Rural Cemeteries (2). Continued
There should be nothing in the place or manner of their interment, to detract from our tender and respectful veneration for the dead. But this can hardly be avoided, if their graves are dug in a disma...
-Rural Cemeteries (3)
Nearly twice twenty years have passed since the tract of country situated within sound of the Cambridge bells, and known to every college graduate of the time for its natural and, we may say, unsurpas...
-Rural Cemeteries (3). Continued
Having thus freely found fault with the rural cemetery as it now is, it becomes us to state what we would have, and where in our judgment we would suggest improvements, although this may be inferred f...
-Rural Cemeteries And Public Parks
As we predicted some time ago, parks are becoming the great features in all cities of any importance. The great Central Park of New York has given the initiative, and awakened inquiry and conviction o...
-Rural Cemeteries, No.2. Planting
Art, Glory, Freedom, fail, but Nature still is fair. - Byron. What trees may best adorn the mountain's brow, And spread promiscuous o'er the plains below? What, singly, lift the high-aspiring head,...
-Rural Cemeteries, No.2. Planting. Continued
The Aspen. The Lombatdy Poplar, in selected spots, The White and Paper Birches, The Liquidambar, The Ginko tree, European and American Larches, Deciduous Cypress, White Fringe tree, Laburnum, T...
-Rural Cemetries
The poor chrysalis, in his lonely grave, Seemed sinking hopeless in oblivion's wave. But lo! what magic bursts the dreary tomb! What voice angelic bids the sleeper rise! He wakes arrayed in beauty's ...
-Rural Churches
Comparatively speaking, there are but few good examples in our country of the rural church. When we consider the progress of architecture during the last few years, as displayed in the country reside...
-Rural Comforts
Among the most enthusiasticai lovers of Horticulture will be found a numerous class, who have selected some little sunny spot near a large town or city, built a cottage, and surrounded it with rural d...
-The Rural Cot of Mr. Knott
My worthy friend, A. Gordon Knott, From business snag withdrawn, Was ranch contented with a lot Which would contain a Tudor cot 'Twixt twelve feet square of garden-plot And twelve feet more of lawn. ...
-Rural Gothic Cottage
The accompanying sketches represent a design and plan for a suburban cottage of the rural gothic style. By glancing at the plan it will be readily seen that it is intended for the home of a gentleman...
-Rural Life In Hungary
Messrs. Editors: It was in the beginning of May that I reached a village in the central part of Hungary, lying in the great plain which stretches from the Theiss to the foot of the Carpathians, on the...
-Rural Life In Hungary. Continued
The English in Hungary too say it is impossible in that clear, oxygenated climate, to keep up their habits of beef-eating and drinking. The first meal among the Hungarians is taken at seven or eight ...
-A Rural Residence
The accompanying drawings illustrate a cottage now being erected in Spring Valley, N. Y., for a merchant of this city, and which will be found, upon examination, to combine economy with beauty, and s...
-A Rural Sketch In The Sandwich Islands
Honolulu - .We let go anchor abreast of the town about 3 P. M., and were immediately surrounded by canoes and bum-boats, swarming with natives, who rushing up to us, pulled out what looked like diplom...
-Rural Societies - Their Rise, Progress, And Failure
Your long experience, friend editor, in the management and organization of Horticultural Societies, must have enabled you to judge of the utility of the same, as now generally conducted, and must have...
-Rural Societies, No. 2, And Conclusion
The emergency having passed away that induced me to reenter the pages of the Horticulturist as a contributor, having for several years denied myself the pleasure of being found there, I have no longer...
-Rural Taste And Its Mission
THE cultivation of the beautiful in Nature has been rightly considered an importat element in culture. The abstract, philosophical considerations, which render the esthetic purifying and elevating in ...
-Rurre Clairgeau Pear
I send a fine specimen of this superior large pear; its acquaintance will be worth one year's subscription to your friends - ripe in all October. It does well as a dwarf, and the fruit is as fine 12 i...
-Russelia Juncea
This graceful plant is not half so much grown as it deserves to be, its peculiar habit of growth rendering it an object worthy of a place in any collection; it, however, requires great attention in re...
-Russian Mode Of Preserving Green Peas For Winter Use
The peas to be preserved are chosen full grown, but before they become at all farinaceous; they are carefully shelled, it is expeditiously strained off from them, the peas are then immediately spread ...
-Rust And Cracking Of The Pear
No satisfactory cause has been assigned at any of the meetings where the subject has been discussed, for the rust and cracking which injures some varieties of the pear and apple, and particularly the ...
-A Rustic Basket Oat In Summer
The Rustic Basket is the best design for a flower-garden; and.if people wonld bat countenance such artistic designs, instead of the present race of hideous mongrels which offend the eye at almost ever...
-Rustic Fancies, And Their Realization! By A Working Carpenter Of New York
Mr. Editor: I am going to write a letter to the Horticulturist. Yon must know I am a carpenter, bred in the city, with uncles and aunts living in the country, whom I visit occasionally. Now, it is a m...
-Rustic Furniture. - First Article
There are many persons who would be glad to use tools for useful purposes if they only knew how. Rustic furniture is one mode of amusiug themselves usefully. Though in the open air this kind of seats ...
-Rustic Furniture. - Second Article
In apple wood, gnarled and bossed into natural rosettes by frequent pruning, and nature's efforts to heal the wounds, will be found material well suited to the purpose of making Rustic Furniture. The ...
-Rustic Ornaments
Many good pictures exist of Rural Ornaments for gardens, and yet strange to say, rarely are perfect and satisfactory specimens to be seen. The fastidious eye is offended by some detail in many instanc...
-Rustic Plant Baskets
The Floral Cabinet makes hanging baskets for ornamental plants as follows: Get a wooden bowl, six inches deep, and a foot or more in diameter, and a few pieces of red cedar, with the bark on, and some...
-Rustic Shelter - Prospect Park
The frontispiece this month is illustrative of a handsome specimen of decorative rustic art in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. It is situated at the summit of a natural elevation, approached from the entranc...
-Rustic Work
I see that one of your correspondents is inquiring about rustic work. I therefore beg to send you a plan of making rustic vases, as I made a few about twelve months ago. As most of our florist friends...
-S. S
We find the following answer to your inquiry all ready in the Cottage Gardener: Large Hydrangeas in Small Pots. - The way they get those enormous large heads of Hydrangeas in 48-pots is this: They ha...
-Sacred And Classical Planting
Tree planting in general has been actively prosecuted of late years; but there is one section of arboriculture which has not, in my opinion, been carried to that degree of perfection of which it is su...
-Sacred And Classical Planting. Part 2
To see Lebanon and its cedars was, in ancient times, accounted a great privilege; and the anxious desire with which Moses and the people of Isreal, whilst jour-ueytog in Egypt, looked forward to this ...
-Sacred And Classical Planting. Part 3
The Mulberry is generally reckoned as a biblical tree, but it is very doubtful if it has really a right to be so included. Loudon, without inquiring whether our translators were right in rendering the...
-Sacred And Classical Planting. Part 4
To the Olive tree the Sacred Writings abound in references; it has been from the earliest ages the emblem of peace, and the bounteous gift of heaven. In the garden of the Horticultural Society at Chis...
-Sacred And Classical Planting. Part 5
The term occurs in six passages of Scripture, and in them all it is given as an appropriate title to one of the noblest trees in the garden of Nature. As the apple tree among the trees of the wood, s...
-Sacred And Classical Planting. Part 6
Throughout that country, sandy swells or eminences facing the morning sun, were fixed upon as the best sites for this plant, and to this day, south-eastern declivities are preferred to any other aspec...
-Saddle Grafting
Saddle grafting is seldom practiced, except upon small stocks or upon the terminal shoots of young trees. ' The stock and cion should be nearly of the same size, although the stock may be a little lar...
-The Sage Grape
This is a free country, and if folks prefer these hard-pulped, musketball grapes, why let them enjoy them, in all conscience. The more you tell a man that his taste is bad, the more sure he is ...
-The Sage Grape - A Humbug
Sir; - In Allen's work on the grape, p. 134, is a description of what he calls, the Sage grage, which is so highly praised, I was induced to send to Mr. Sage for some plants. He sent me two, for whi...
-Sago Manufactory At Singapore
The unprepared sago is imported from the neighboring island of Borromeo, and consists of the pith of a short, thick kind of palm. The tree is cut down when it is seven years old, split up from top to ...
-Saint Paul (Min.) Horticultural Society
A Horticultural Society has been planted at Saint Paul in Minnesota. We hope it may grow up to be a great and flourishing institution in that far-off country, and produce much fruit. We are indebted t...
-Sale Fairs
The New Jersey State Agricultural Society are about to inaugurate a new feature in the agricultural exhibition of this country. They have put forth the programme of a fair, to be held on their grounds...
-Sale Of Mr. Downing's Residence
By reference to an advertisement in our columns, it will be seen that the beautiful residence of the late Editor of the Horticulturist is to be sold on the 7th of this month. It is to be regretted tha...
-Sale Of Mr. Downing's Residence (2)
The last number of the Home Journal, hat the following letter, dated Highland Terrace, from one of its editors, N. P. Willis, to his associate) G. P. Morris. It will be read with interest by all Mr....
-Sale Of Orchids
There was a large collection of Orchids offered for sale by auction, at Mr. Stevens's Sale Rooms, King street, Covent Garden, on the 4th inst There were two parcels, one consisting of East Indian, and...
-Sale Of Plants At Ealing Park
The sale of Mrs. Lawrence's magnificent collection of stove and greenhouse plants commenced on Thursday last, and will be finished to-night The first day was wet and cold; nevertheless upwards of 60 p...
-Sale Of The Springbrook (Mr. Cope's) Collection
A goodly company attended this, the largest sale we remember in the neighborhood of Philadelphia, both for extent and variety. The bidding opened quite spiritedly, and we soon found that our distant f...
-The Salem Grape
A writer in the April number calls tor information in regard to this grape, wishing to know the color, etc., stating that Hovey's Magazine describes it as black, or, in other words, so much like No. 4...
-The Salem Grape - What Is It?
The information which has been given of this grape, through the press, seems to be of a very conflicting nature, and I think it would be well for the parties who are now engaged in its dissemination t...
-Sales Of Orchids, Ferns, And Of Fremontia Caufornica
Mr. Stevens, at his auction rooms. King Street, Covent Garden, sold on the 17th, 149 lots of Orchids and Ferns, besides the plant above named, which was thus described in the catalogue - By order of ...
-The Salisburia, Or Ginko Tree
We find the following notice of this beautiful tree in a late number of the Gardeners' Chronicle. It is perfectly at home in the climate of Rochester: - In the scramble after noyelties there is a ri...
-Salsify, Or Oyster Plant
Among vegetables of the kitchen garden, few know the value of the Salsify, or Oyster Plant. It is too late to sow it now; but those who have beds of it should remember that if the plants stand too thi...
-Salts
The day has long passed when it was disputed whether saline bodies are promotive of vegetable growth. It is now determined that some plants will not even live without the means of procuring certain sa...
-Salt On Trees
EDITOR of The Horticulturist: - I notice in your May number a note on the destructive effects of common salt on trees. I apprehend that the injury done is more frequent than is often suspected. Last w...
-The Salt Water Aquarium
A gentleman and his daughter have written us a joint letter, iuvoking information as to the best books that are accessible regarding the fishes and insects, shells, etc., which inhabit the sea in thei...
-Salvia Gesneraeflora
I propagate and cultivate this without heat. I take cuttings in March or April; good plants always push from the base or the roots in March; as these are useless for flowering, I cut them off, and sel...
-Salvia Splendens
This is one of the oldest of winter-flowering plants, and is the most suitable for conservatory decoration, at that season. It is highly ornamental when the plants do not exceed twelve or fifteen inch...
-Salvias, Etc. Ac, And Their Culture. From The London Gardeners' Chronicle
These are very important adjuncts of the plant-house in winter; indeed, indispensable. The best kinds for winter work that I have met with are S. splendent and S. Gesneraflora; the S. fulgent may also...
-Sargent's Edition Of Downing
It is Dot every one who holds a pen for the public, that could have written so gracefully the following notice of Mr. Sargent's new edition of Downing's Landscape Gardening; it could have come in fa...
-Save The Dead Leaves
Very few gardeners would be guilty of so foolish a thing as to waste barn-yard manure. But they are almost all guilty of a waste not a whit less excusable. We mean the waste of dead leaves that fall a...
-Save The Waste Bones
There is in almost every family a daily waste of bones, that if saved and applied to the roots of the pear-trees and grapevines in the garden, would supply yearly sufficient manure for one hundred pla...
-Saving Of Seed
As the saving of seed is of some importance, a few remarks on this head may be of service. Without stopping to discuss the physiological point respecting the reproduction of permanent varieties by see...
-Saving Seeds - Vitality Of Seeds
A horticultural friend in Canada writes us a pleasant letter, from which we extract the following hints. They may be useful to some one. The early part of my life was passed in wandering about the e...
-Saving Squash Seed
Many plans have been suggested for saving Squash and Melon seeds pure. The following, furnished to the Rural New Yorker by the Rev. Mr. Langstroth, would seem to be a good one. The process might be si...
-Saxe-Gothaea Conspicua
This remarkable plant, to which His Royal Highness Prince Albert has been pleased to permit one of his titles to be given, and which will probably rank among the most highly valued of our hardy evergr...
-Saxe-Gothaea Conspicua (2)
This remarkable plant, to which His Royal Highness Prince Albert has permitted one of his titles to be given, and which will probably rank among the most highly rained of our hardy evergreen-trees, is...
-Saxifraga Longifolia
As a flowering species, this is the finest in this section, forming large and elegant depressed rosette-like leaf-crowns, 6 to 8 inches across, each formed of densely set circle-like rays of rigid sil...
-The Scale Insect Of The Apple
Nearly every person who grows an apple tree, has observed that the branches of the older, and stems of the younger trees, are frequently covered with a minute scale, showing in general no appearance o...
-The Scarlet Bouvardia
S. 0. J., in answer to a question in the New England Farmer, about the successful cultivation of this Scarlet Bouvardia says : We have not always been successful in the culture of the Scarlet Bouvardi...
-The Scarlet Geranium At Sea
In the year 1825 I sailed for America in a ship conveying emigrants to Canada, all of them humble people from a rural district, to whom the inside of a ship or the waves of the sea were as strange obj...
-The Scarlet-Fruited Aubergine
The Aubergine, or mad apple with scarlet fruit (Solatium Pseudo-Mdongena of Tenore), has been introduced into France by M. Louesse, one of our most distinguished horticulturists, who received the seed...
-Scene In West Laurel Hill Cemetery
In the Frontispiece is depicted one of the most attractive scenes, which are characteristic of Philadelphia's famous cemetery. Celebrated equally with Mt. Auburn, near Boston, or Greenwood, near New Y...
-Scene. - The Editor In His Chair. A Neighbor Draws Another, Lights His Cigar, And Discourses
Neighbor You have lately made some remarks on the disadvantages of cities; if I recollect rightly you give the preference to country life. Do you sufficiently reflect that cities concentrate advantag...
-The Scent Of A Strawberry Bed
June brings its strawberries with much more certainty than most fruits, and while our pages are flying through the land on the wings of the modern iron-horse, it may be hoped that the line upon line a...
-Schools for Young Ladies
A garden should be considered a necessary - even an indispensable - appendage of every institution of learning. There both the mind and body of pupils and teachers, wearied and worn by study, might fi...
-Science And Horticulture. Pear Blight
An article in the last Horticulturist, by Terra, somewhat timidly suggests the probability of the disease known as Leaf blight and cracking of the Pear, being caused by a fungus somewhat similar t...
-Science For Common Schools
One reason why Horticulture and the kindred sciences have not, heretofore, been taught in our common schools, may lie in the fact that we have not had suitable text books to favor the object. But time...
-Science Vs. Prejudice. The May Apple
While on a visit to a relative, one of our practical German farmers, a man of good common sense and a close observer, I found that he entertained peculiar prejudices against horticultural journals, an...
-Scientific Gleanings
The Hieracettm plumbeum of Fries has been ascertained to be a native of Britain, by Mr. J. Backhouse, jr., of York. It grows on Falcon Clints, in Tees-dale. Mr. Backhouse, who has had an opportunity, ...
-The Scientific History Of A Plant
Esq., Lecturer on Chemistry to the Hunteriau School of Medicine. (A Lecture delivered before the Royal Medico-Botanical Society Of London.) At the request of my friend, the learned Professor of Chemi...
-The Scientific History Of A Plant. Part 2
For the decomposition of carbonic acid and water, we find that light is required; that where there is a deficiency of light this action goes on put partially. Researches have proved that while the blu...
-The Scientific History Of A Plant. Part 3
There is hardly anything in vegetable physiognomy that makes so irregular and ineffaceable an impression upon a newly arrived person, as the sight of an arid plain thickly covered, like those near Cum...
-The Scientific History Of A Plant. Part 4
But the greatest of all these circular changes is that which subsists between the animal and vegetable kingdoms - the principles of the two systems of life requiring the refuse, the one of the other. ...
-The Scientific History Of A Plant. Part 5
Silicates are more or less decomposed by the action of hot water; the opacity of the windows in hotbeds is an example of this. Lavoisier, on distilling some water from a clean glass vessel, found it l...
-A Score Of New Pears
[A year ago we had the pleasure of presenting, from the pen of Col. Wilder, a valuable chapter on New Pears that promise well. He has again very kindly yielded to our request, and favored us with th...
-The Scotch Weeping Elm. Ulmus Montana Pendvla
The habit of this variety of Weeping Elm is very irregular, sometimes spreading its branches fan-like, at others drooping them almost perpendicularly downward. It is a tree of rapid growth, with an ab...
-Scott's Seedling
Rapid grower, perfect flowers, very handsome, long conical berries, of bright scarlet color, and bears abundantly, but is quite deficient in flavor; might undoubtedly be profitable for marketing. - C...
-Scott's Suburban Home Grounds
IT is nearly a year since we announced the preparation of a new volume on Landscape Gardening and Rural Taste, which would prove to be the finest ever issued in this country. It has now been printed b...
-Scraps Of History Of Popular English Fruit
The increase and skillful application in the adornment of our parks, gardens, and dwelling-places with beautiful flowers and plants has ever been regarded as one of the most commendable and meritoriou...
-A Sctentific Exposition Of The Cause And Cure Of The Potato Rox
The above is the title of a book just published by J. N Chandler, Adrian, Mich. A very small book it is, but it may be all the better for that. Mr. Chandler holds that there are two causes, primary a...
-Scuppernong Grape
This seems to be the grape for the South, and for making wine, which is in greater demand than any other made there from native grapes. John H. Weller, Brinckleyville, N. C, makes and sells this artic...
-Scuppernong. Is There Any Profit In Its Production?
THIs question is asked together with another, viz.: Will there likely be any market for the fresh juice at figures that would pay? First. We have abundant proof to answer, unhesitatingly, yes, provid...
-Sea Flowers
This cold weather is rather adverse to the full enjoyment of water scenes, and to talk of shoal gatherings, and brook dragging, might make delicate folks shrug their shoulders; but I find it very agre...
-Sea Kale
I think this is a vegetable too seldom seen in this country. I do not remember to have found it for sale in any of the city markets more than once or twice. I suppose this is because it demands a litt...
-Sea-Side Cottage
Truly one of the prettiest designs, although not specially new, which has been figured. Will not the designer write out somewhat of specifications as to cost, naming the price to be paid for lumber, b...
-Seaside Cottage
Designed By F. 8. Copley, Artist, Tompkinsville, States Island, N. Y This cottage was intended for a summer resort on the sea-side, for a small family keeping but one servant. It will be seen to comb...
-The Season
Up to this date (December 16) the season has been one of extraordinary mildness. With us in Western New York, where winter usually sets in about the middle of November, we have been able to continue o...
-Season For Transplanting
Much difference of opinion prevails respecting the most suitable time for transplanting. Some prefer early in the spring, others late in the fall; and both parties are generally enabled to refer to su...
-Season For Transplanting. Continued
In my earliest gardening days, long before I remember to have read any work on vegetable physiology, so that my opinions were not influenced by any theoretical views, I had arrived at the conclusions,...
-Season For Transplanting Evergreens
As in many other things, there are many and various opinions respecting the proper time of year to transplant evergreens. Some assert that the only true time is that just previous to their bursting in...
-Season For Transplanting Evergreens. Continued
Vineland, N. J.t Jan. 19, 1867. mr. Editor : Having been engaged in fruit-growing for twenty-fire years, and daring that time planted on an average over one thousand trees annually, and furthermore, h...
-The Season Of 1855
The extreme cold weather which prevailed in February of 1855, was fraught with danger to all kinds of fruit-trees and vines. Fortunately, with us in Western New York, the peach-tree and grape-vines we...
-The Season Was Not Sufficiently Advanced For Our Best Cherries
The only kinds in perfection being the May duke, Elton and American Heart. A premium for the best cherry (the Elton) was awarded to Mr. Barnard, and deservedly too. Mr. Worden had as usual a large col...
-A Season's Ramble Among Wild Flowers
The dissolving snows of winter remind us of the pleasures of spring, and as the frosts relax their hold upon the soil, the ever teeming earth is ready to put forth a thousand forms of life and beauty....
-The Season, Fruit Ceop
The season, up to this date, (June 20th,) has been highly favorable to vegetation. From the opening of the buds we have had no violent changes - no cold cutting winds, such as we usually experience du...
-Seasonable Hints
If you wish to raise the earliest vegetables, or get the best growth possible in any annual plant, be sure to use well rotted manure. The chemists may say what they please about the loss of ammonia an...
-Seasonable Hints (2)
If you wish to raise the earliest vegetables, or get the best growth possible in any annual plant, be sure to use well rotted manure. The chemists may say what they please about the loss of ammonia an...
-Seats And Chairs
At the late Chiswick exhibition, seats and chairs were shown in abundance. Some were admired for their cheapness; others, like Dean's and those from the Panklibanon Company, for the beauty of their ca...
-Seckel Pears
Any person conversant with fruit, who will take the trouble to walk through the markets of Philadelphia - where more Seckel Pears are to be seen than any where else in the world, cannot but be struck ...
-Second Annual Report Of The Bradford County (Penn.) Agricultural Society, For 1854
This is a flourishing Society, but the severe drouth of last summer was a serious detriment to the fall exhibition. As an evidence of the taste and spirit which prevail in that region, we clip the fol...
-A Second Barnum
Surrounded by a cloud of tobacco smoke, sir! strong enough to suffocate any of the fair sex in the metropolis, I-sit down, and give vent to my feelings upon a subject that has filled my thoughts for s...
-A Second Barnum. Continued
In this basket, where the cup is full of water, and into which place the spongioles, according to the inventor's calculation, are to seek for food, it will be impossible to withhold the water, to a ce...
-Second Dat
T. T. Lyon, of Plymouth, Mich., introduced a preamble and resolutions cogently setting forth the usefulness of forests, belts of timber, roadside trees, etc., in sheltering gardens and orchards, the d...
-Second Evening
The superior hardiness of seedling peaches over budded ones, was proposed as a subject for discussion. W. Tracy stated that peaches could not be raised at Utica except within the city, the warm and m...
-Second Question: Has Grape Growing Proved Profitable ?
Of course I can only speak for myself, and others in my immediate neighborhood. In my own case I cannot do better than copy a few items from my sales book. In 1869, the average price was 13 cents per ...
-Second Session. - Best Six Summer Apples
II - Select lists for family use - Which are the best 24 varieties? The six best summer varieties, two for the table, one for baking, and one for cooking? Mr. Barry said the Early Harvest is the most...
-Second Year
The first pruning for the second year should be done before the buds burst, and may begin any time after the severest winter weather is over. The plants, whether from buds or grafts, should be pruned ...
-Second. Method
Prepare the ground the same as for corn, and a similar soil. Mark it with a plow for rows, three feet apart at right angles, and set a tree in each angle. To set one acre will require 4,820 trees. If ...
-Sect. III. Family Syrphidae
These are gayly colored flies, frequenting flowers, and sporting themselves in rapid motions. Some, like the Volucella, often mistaken for Bombi themselves, lay their eggs in the nests of Bombi and Ve...
-The Sedum As An Edging Plant
Bomb years since we had a bed or border, in which we grew annuals, encircled with sedum album ; and recently reading an article in the Cottage Gardener upon the use of sedums as edging plants, our min...
-Sedum Glaucum
Differing widely from the preceding, this low-growing, spreading plant quickly occupies its al-loted space, and unlike many others may easily be kept in that line. It is of a pale whitish green color,...
-Seeds
There are probably few branches of horticulture so ill understood as the management of seeds. A package of seeds may be placed in the hands of two men, divided between each, and sown by each in his ow...
-Seeds. Part 2
Air, in conjunction with light, hardens the outer coat - chemically speaking, fixes the carbon - which it is the object of germination to destroy. I have no doubt seeds would swell in distilled wate...
-Seeds. Part 3
Repeat the operation a few times, and you may easily have Peach trees the same year from stones sown in the spring. We have over a quarter of an acre on our Bethlehem road nursery, from seed sown this...
-The Seed Business In Philadelphia
This good old city of horticultural renown has long been the seat of a thriving and lucrative business in seeds. The venerable and excellent Bartram, and his neighbor, Marshall, in the infancy of our ...
-The Seed Business In Philadelphia. Continued
Orders from the most interior parts of India where the Englishman penetrates,* from South America, from the West Indies and our own possessions on the shores of the Pacific, poured in with a celerity ...
-The Seed Business Of The West
The great West has become a vast empire within itself, and among the varied items that go to make up its commerce, that of the Seed Business is deserving of notice. And yet, when we turn to the page...
-Seed For Lawns
This month is a good time for seeding down new lawns. Let the ground be first thoroughly prepared, that is, dug at least one foot - better to be eighteen inches - deep, and all of this depth to be of ...
-The Seed, The Stock, And The Graft
There are very few people to whom a portion of good fruit is not both grateful and beautiful, if partaken of with propriety; and there can be but very few, who are in any way engaged in the cultivatio...
-Seed-Bed
If no hot-bed or cold-frame is to be used, let the seed-bed be made (out of the soil selected, or prepared as above) in some situation in the garden, sheltered from the cold winds, and having a southe...
-A Seedling Applb
R. B. Wabrbk, Esq, of Alabama, Gen. Co.. N. Y.t very kindly sent us a box of handsome Russet Apples, about the size of our Golden Burnt, (described in some of the books English Golden Burnt,) but mo...
-Seedling Apples
I inclose you a small sample of a dried Apple, which you will see is quite remarkable for its whiteness. [Almost as white as snow. - Ed.] I received it from Mr. L. Nob-bib, of Windsor, Ohio, who assur...
-Seedling Apricots
The generality of Apricots formerly cultivated had bitter kernels, the Breda and Turkey forming the only exceptions worthy of notice. But besides the two just named, there must now be included in the ...
-Seedling Camillias
No information is more welcome to the really enthusiastic Floriculturist than that which tells him where to meet with something good that he cannot get elsewhere. Last April we paid a visit to Mr. Bol...
-Seedling Cherries
Mr. Elliott writes us, that Charles Pease, Esq., has fruited this year, for the third or fourth time, some seedlings, among which he has selected and made drawings of two that give promise of value, b...
-Seedling Cherries. Produced By Dr. J. P. K1rtlaxd, East Rookport, Ohio
1. Tecumsek Large, black, fine flavored. Valuable. 2. Red Jacket Size - medium. Color - red. Lively flavor. Matures late. 3. Shannon Large and valuable Morello. 4. Kirtland's Large Morello Very...
-Seedling Dahlias
MR. GERHARD SCHMITZ, of Philadelphia, for the past twenty-five years has ocoupied a large part of his time in the improvement of his favorite plant, the Dahlia, and has in past years produced some ver...
-Seedling Foreign Grape
We received on the 12th of June, in excellent order, from John Fisk Allen, Esq., of Salem, Mass., some fine samples of forced grapes, and among the rest a new seedling originated by him. This seedling...
-Seedling Grapes
Two new varieties have been produced by that well-known vine cul-turist, J. F. Allen, Esq., of Salem. One is a white Grape produced by a cross of Borne exotic variety on the Isabella. This has been ex...
-Seedling Grape (2)
Mr. Downing - Pear Sir: Herewith I send yon a few bunches of grapes from a seedling vine, which has produced fruit this season for the first time, and should like to have your opinion as to the qualit...
-Seedling Grapes From Charles Arnold, C. W
Mr. F. R. Elliott, of Cleveland, Ohio, sends us the accompanying drawings from which our cuts are made, and also descriptions of some new seedling grapes which have originated with Mr. Charles Arnold,...
-Seedling Pinks
A friend recently called our attention to his bed of seedling pinks, claiming them among the most beautiful ever grown. An examination satisfied us of the correctness of his statement, as we found blo...
-Seedling Potato
IN the fall of 1871, I received from E. S. Brownell, of Essex Junction, Vermont, seedling potatoes of three different kinds, one of which I have tested under very unfavorable circumstances, and find i...
-Seedling Potatoes
This season I have assorted from a lot of seedling Potatoes of various ages, about one hundred, as being worthy of further trial They are all the produce of new varieties raised here, and are now in t...
-Seedling Rose Dr. Kane
Having determined to send out my New Seedling Rose Dr. Kanb, the following spring by subscription, I am now prepared to receive subscriptions for the same. The Dr. Kane is a very LARGE SULPHUR YELLOW...
-Seedling Strawberry
I send you a description of a new Strawberry, the most prolific I have ever known. This berry fruited about five years since, in my father's garden. Its history is this: My mother was in the habit of ...
-Seedling Strawberry Nicanor
Recently, while attending the Strawberry Exhibition of the Western New York Horticultural Society, my attention was specially drawn to a seedling strawberry exhibited by Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry, of ...
-Seedling Tree Peonias
Among all of our showy early blooming hardy shrubs, perhaps none are more to be prized than Tree Peonias. The price of them, as compared with other shrubs, has undoubtedly prevented many a person from...
-Seedling Trees. By. Thomas Meehan, Germantown, Pinna
Raising young nursery stock is not the simple operation some imagine. It is easy enough when thoroughly understood, as, indeed, anything else is. As something that will pay, it is worthy of better att...
-Seedlings Of Pennsylvania
Mr. J. Jay Smith: Why is it that we Pennsylvanians do not improve and discriminate our seedling fruits? We certainly have some amongst the best apples and pears in the country; should any fine fruit c...
-Seedlings Vs. Grafts, Or Top-Grafts Vs. Root-Grafts
Seedlings, it is not necessary to define. Grafted, or budded varieties, are those selected from the former on account of the superiority of the fruit, and other good qualities, as hardihood and produc...
-Seedlings Vs. Grafts, Or Top-Grafts Vs. Root-Grafts. Continued
The crowning effort of nature is reproduction. But man has interfered and diverted her energies from the formation of the most and best seeds to the production of fine flowers or fruits, making every ...
-Seeds From California
We are greatly indebted to B. B. Bedding & Co., of the State Journal, Sacramento, California, for a package of seeds of value. Among them is one of the greatest vegetable curiosities, called the Sing,...
-Seeds Of Timber Trees
I shall be glad if you would tell me the method how and when to pull, preserve, sow, etc, the seed of the following forest trees: - Fraxinus excel-sior Aser psuedo-platanus, AEsculics hippocastanum, ...
-Selaginellas
IF any apology is needed for the following remarks on Selaginellas, it is the fact that after repeated efforts to find something like a correct technical description of the species herein enumerated, ...
-Select Hyacinths
An old grower of hyacinths writes the London Journal of Horticulture, giving the following as among the best varieties. He considers single flowers more beautiful than the double, and hence names but ...
-Select List Of Fruits Adapted For Orchard-House Culture
Placed in the order of their ripening. The sorts marked thus,* may be selected by those requiring only a few trees. Apricots Red Masculine. Musch Musch. Large Early. *St. Ambroise. *Kaisba. Blenheim...
-A Select List Of Gladioli
Among garden bulbs, the Gladiolus is perhaps one of the most popular, or at least is in a fair way of becoming so. The introduction of Gandavensis, a few years since, gave a new impetus to their culti...
-A Select List of Ornamental Shrubs, Vines
Planters and improvers are now looking over their lists of garden shrubs, flowers, and vines, and may not object to read in our columns, lists of a few that are valuable, if not indispensable; while t...
-Select Lists Of Market Fruits
A very valuable result was obtained, by each member preparing, in the form of a ballot, a list of the twelve best pears, twelve best apples, and six best peaches, exclusively for marketing. Twenty-one...
-Select Luts
It was proposed that such gentlemen present as were familiar with the best varieties of the pear, should furnish a list of the three best, or such as they would plant the most largely for their own us...
-Select Roses
A Young Florist, (New. York.) We recommend one dozen hardy ever-blooming rosea, as follows: Perpetual* - Madam Laftay, Giant des Batailles, Baron Pre-vost, William Jesse, La Reine, Duchess of Sutherla...
-Select Small, In Preference To Large, Evergreens
The growth of small as compared with large trees, transplanted at the same time, produces some very curious results, which might puzzle those not sufficiently familiar with horticultural science. We h...
-Selecting Fruit-Trees From The Nursery
Two year old trees are as large as any orchardist can safely select; if older, it is more than probable the trees will sacrifice a large portion of their roots in the ordeal of digging and transplanti...
-Selecting Grapes To Plant
Messrs. Editors: I am a novice in grape-growing; have about ten acres of land; have out about four acres in Catawba, one in Delaware, and about one more in varieties - Concord, Iona, etc. Now, I want ...
-Selection Of Plants
The first runners that arc produced from the plants in the summer are undoubtedly the best, inasmuch as they are stronger and better rooted than those that are produced later in the season; further th...
-Selection Of Trees
The associations with the beauty of trees about our rural homes enter deeply into the best elements of our character; and we hope that what we have written may induce some of our readers to plant tree...
-Selection Of Beet Fruits
P. P. writes like a man who knows what he is about. There is no greater folly in the world - I know it by experience - than for one to take up a nursery catalogue, and run over the lists of the fruits...
-Selections Of Best Fruits
What is the question, Mr. Editor, that more of your correspondents are likely to ask about this time of year, than any other? What are the best Fruits? They are busy with head-work, while the groun...
-On Self-Renovation In Timber Trees
There is a Walnut-tree here, the history of which is curious and instructive; and as it tends, in some degree, to confirm what I have lately stated concerning bark and wood, I beg to say a word or two...
-Self-Sealing Cans And Jars
The preservation of Fruits, without sugar or spirits, is a matter of great importance, and we are happy to see it attracting attention. We expressed the belief a short time ago that the ingenuity of o...
-Sell For Gladiolus
The Rural Messenger says, that a deep mellow soil with an abundance of sun and air, yet light and rich from the previous year's manuring, is far better than soil in which fresh manure has been just ap...
-Selleck Pear
A box containing fine specimens of this Pear was sent, by Mr. Albert Bresec, of Hubbardton, Vermont, to the recent meeting of the American Pomological Society at Rochester. Having, however, been accid...
-Sensitive And Moving Plants
In our notes of a Day at Kew, we omitted to notice a singular plant, of which a few specimens only were seen in this country some years ago; it is the Desmodium gyrans, usually called the Moving Plant...
-Sensitive Plants
M. Leclerc, of Tours, finds in sensitive plants not only a nervous but a muscular system. The muscles are placed in the irritable portions of the plants, and are tuberculous and moniliform in their st...
-Serious Damage To A Vineyard By Lightning
A NEAR neighbor of mine has a very promising young vineyard, rows ten feet apart and 360 feet long; about midway of the length of the vineyard stands a small chestnut tree 20 feet from the outside row...
-The Sermon Of The Flowers
[Extract from an address on Ornamentation of Grounds, delivered before 1U. State Horticultural Society, by Dr. J. M. Gregory.] FORTUNATELY in our land adornment, the number of available objects in wh...
-The Service Berry - Pyrus Arbutifolia
From the journal of my son, Henry W. Elliott, during his three years' trip connected with the laying of the Overland Telegraph Company's wire in British Columbia and Russian America, I take the accomp...
-Seventeen Year Locusts
The hum of this singular insect fills the woods and gardens of Maryland at the present time, and the country there is alive with them. Though the Seventeen year Locust only appears during this long in...
-Sewing Machines
The change which has come over the world in regard to machinery to abridge labor, is one of the evidences of a better educated community than once existed among us. It is not many years since certain ...
-Sexes Of The Strawberry
Within the last few years there has been so much written about the sexes of the strawberry, that it may be thought superfluous to say any thing more upon this question. But there are certain cultivato...
-Sexual Character Of The Strawberry
So much has been said and written on this subject, that there seems to be room left for very little more. I have long felt with your illustrious predecessor, that the prevailing notions about the sexe...
-Shade Tree
A celebrated writer has lately issued a work to show who was, or who was not, he writer of the world-famed Letters of Junius; I wish some one equally anxious o display the acuteness of their logical...
-Shade Trees (2)
A house with shade and rait trees set around it, a neat fence or hedge in front, a row of box or pansies growing by the walk, and a climbing rose growing by the door, will sell for much more than if t...
-Shade Trees (3)
[Read before the Germantown Horticultural Society.] The question as to what are the three best street trees, and as to trimming in cities and towns, is as interesting as it is broad. It is a curious ...
-Shade Trees (4)
The Gardener's Monthly, for May, tries to enlighten its readers on the most successful modes of planting shade trees in the city. It cautions us not to provide trees for our sidewalks except those tha...
-Shade Trees - The Clinton Grape
I heartily endorse most of Mr. Bacon's remarks on shade trees in the March number. There may be too much of a good thing; and if you can have trees all handsome, variety is better than sameness The Ma...
-Shade Trees In Cities
DOWN with the Ailanthus! is the cry we hear on all sides, town and country, - now that this tree of heaven, (as the catalogues used alluringly to call it,) has penetrated all parts of the union, an...
-Shade Trees In Cities. Part 2
*Two acquaintances at ours, in a house in the upper part of New-York, are regularly driven out by the Ailanthus malaria every season. Oh, that our tree- planters, and they are an amy of hundreds of t...
-Shade Trees In Cities. Part 3
A tree with the habit of the Tulip, lifts itself into the finest pyramids of foliage, exactly suited to the usual width of town streets - and thus embellishes and shades without darkening and encumber...
-Shading Greenhouses
Where plants, such as the Fuchsia, Gloxinia, Achimenes, etc, are kept under glass during summer, it becomes necessary to break the force of the sun's full rays, and this is frequently done in a sloven...
-The Shake Plant Or South America
Venomous serpents abound in all the tierras calientss (hot lands) of America. The frequent fatality following their bite - particularly among the Indians, who roam barefoot through the tangled woods -...
-Shakespeare's Knowledge Of Horticulture
A recent writer has asked the question: What did Shakespeare know of gardening? and thereupon sat down to examine his works for the evidences, which he found to be as follows: Of English wild flowers,...
-Shall The Cultivation Of The Raspberry For Market Be Abandoned?
The question of profit in the cultivation of fruits for market is one which interests many of your readers, and is deserving of serious consideration. The Raspberry is cultivated to a great extent in ...
-Shall We, Or Shall We Not Enjoy?
BECKFORD's celebrated house and park, Fonthill, England, is now in complete ruins. The publication of his life has just brought out some recollections of the man and the place, which are interesting. ...
-Shallow Planting
Very shallow planting is urged by Mr. Bright, as of great importance in grape-culture, as well as in all other branches of horticulture. While we do not believe in very deep planting, we also look upo...
-Shank's Improved Grass Cutting And Rolling Machines
The complete success which has attended the introduction of this machine for mowing grass, and its fine adaptation for cutting the grass of lawns, has been fully proved by the numerous instances where...
-The Shank's Lawn Mower
Mr. Henry W. Sargent, long a valued correspondent of the Horticulturist, writes us under date of June 20th, the following interesting in for. mation from Wodenethe on the North River: The most succe...
-Shanking Of Grapes
This is a disease which attacks the footstalks of the bunches, and appears to he occasioned by the temperature of the soil being much below that of the house in which the vines are growing; the supply...
-Shed And Fish Experiments
Mr. Darwin, the eminent naturalist, says the Gardeners1 Chronicle, is continuing his experiments on the vitality of seeds, with a view to arrive at data as to the distribution of plants. Among the poi...
-The Sheldon Pear
This pear has for some years past attracted considerable attention in Western New York. It has been brought into the Rochester market, from the neighboring town of Penfield, and sold sometimes as Brow...
-The Sheldon Pear - Effects Of Thinning
We have often alluded to the necessity of thinning a heavy crop of fruit in order to secure fair and finely grown specimens as well as to save the tree from injury; but with all that has been said, th...
-A Shell Grotto
The following description of a grotto at Goodwood, Eng., possesses interest: Within an inclosure there is a shell grotto of architectural design and admirable workmanship; its length including an alc...
-Shelter
A correspondent writing from Trumansburg, N. Y., says: I think your article on 'shelter' is particularly applicable to my case, as I have an orchard of from one to two hundred peach trees growing in...
-Shelter For Orchards
The value of shelter or climatic screens for orchards is becoming more and more apparent every day. As our forests become cleared away, the climate grows more harsh, dry, and absorbent of vital life, ...
-Sheltering Lands
Every observer has noticed the difference between the starting of vegetation in spring in different localities, and those often but a few feet separated. In the mountain glen, shut out from cold winds...
-Shene Pear
The dignified coolness with which you receive the bold assertions of Messrs. T S..EA Co., is quite refreshing. I am pleased that said company have now boldly asserted that which by implication they ha...
-A Short Account Of The Life And Writings Of John Claudius Loudon
John Claudius Loudon was born on the 8th of April, 1783, at Cambuslang, in Lanarkshire, the residence of his mother's only sister, herself the mother of Dr. Claudius Buchanan (the author of a work ent...
-A Short Account Of The Life And Writings Of John Claudius Loudon. Part 2
When writing a book, his object was to obtain the best possible information on the subject he had in hand; he was never deterred from seeking this by any considerations of trouble or expense. That th...
-A Short Account Of The Life And Writings Of John Claudius Loudon. Part 3
This work was much more voluminous than any of the preceding ones; it was ornamented by some elegant copperplate engravings of landscape scenery, drawn by himself, which, in 1801, were republished, wi...
-A Short Account Of The Life And Writings of John Claudius Loudon
The Continent, after having been long closed to English visitors, was thrown open in 1813 by the general rising against Bonaparte, and presented an ample field to an inquiring mind tike that of Mr. Lo...
-A Short Account Of The Life And Writings of John Claudius Loudon. Part 2
During this long and interesting journey, Mr. Loudon visited and took views of nearly all the palaces and large rural residences in the countries through which be passed; and he visited all the princi...
-A Short Account Of The Life And Writings of John Claudius Loudon. Part 3
During the whole of his tour through France, he visited the gardens everywhere, and made memoranda of everything that he thought would be useful for his intended work. He also made sketches of all the...
-A Short Account of The Life And Writings of John Claudius Loudon
In the year 1827, Mr. Loudon suggested the idea of planting some public walk according to the natural system, ana naming the trees in the way that has lately been done in Kensington Gardens. The same ...
-A Short Account of The Life And Writings of John Claudius Loudon. Part 2
Nothing, however, could stop him in the performance of what he considered his duty, and, indeed, I believe his eagerness to see his mother overpowered every other feeling. It was also a singular circu...
-A Short Account of The Life And Writings of John Claudius Loudon. Part 3
In 1839, Mr. Loudon began to lay out the Arboretum so nobly presented by the late Joseph Strutt, Esq., to the town of Derby. In the same year, he published his edition of Repton, and his Second Additi...
-A Short Account of The Life And Writings of John Claudius Loudon. Part 4
Previously to Mr. Loudon's illness, I had agreed to write a little book on the Isle of Wight, and to visit it for this purpose. This arrangement I now wished to give up, but his medical men advised us...
-A Short Chapter On Gardners And Experimental Gardens
THE topics most in men's minds are often the ones that, for some cause or other, are most rarely discussed by the press. Gardeners, is one which is left to itself, because this useful class is very na...
-A Short Gossip About The Wist, And The Fruit Growers' Muting At Burlington
My Dear Sir: - I have been much away from home of late, and now that I am at home I find myself quite too busy to indulge in writing, yet I must give you a few notes concerning the West and Western fr...
-Short Hints
Places of limited extent require far more of study and knowledge to create beauty and due effect than those which cover acres, and bring from time to time, by reason of their extent, some change of vi...
-Short Notes Of A Trip East
With a view to refresh my memory on fruits, and to see if, in my practice of landscape gardening, I had by any possibility got behind the age, I recently packed up a few traps in a little carpet sack;...
-Short Notes of A Trip East
In these notes the records of what some of our leading pomologists are doing is the valuable feature. I think we do not enough value those men who, sacrificing money and time, devote themselves to tra...
-A Short Ramble
Once, a long time ago, I heard a very pretty song; I believe it was called Molly Bawn. I recollect two lines at the end of a verse ran thus: And the stars above are brightly shining, Because they ...
-A Short Ramble. Continued
Reasoning from the facts stated above, I think it is highly probable that the soil in which Mr. Franklin's Asparagus grows, goes right through also. Mr. F. has a little orchard of the choicest pear...
-Should A Republic Encourage The Arts
No: except the arts of attack and defence', either in billingsgate or boxing - not much matter which, for they are both practiced in Congress, at Washington. We are a government of the people, and ...
-Should A Republic Encourage The Arts! By Calvert Vaux, Newburgh, N. Y
[It has been honestly urged by some of our severest democratic presses, that a government like ours should necessarily confine its duties to making and executing the laws, and that no powers being del...
-Should A Republic Encourage The Arts! By Calvert Vaux, Newburgh, N. Y. Continued
The thing then to determine, is, supposing perfection of plan and execution to be provided for in any public building, what is the next perfection of which it is capable? To decide this intelligibly, ...
-Should We Let Suckers Remain, Or Not On Fruit-Trees
We have always held the opposite opinion, and, with knife in hand, have whipped them off from every tree we could possibly reach; but recently a Delaware pear-grower called attention to a fact in his ...
-Shrubs
At the recent meeting of the Western New York Horticultural Society, at Geneva, N. Y., the question was asked: What newly or recently introduced ornamental trees, shrubs or plants are worthy of speci...
-Shrubberies
In arranging pleasure grounds and shrubbery plantations, more especially when the space, is of small extent, errors are frequently committed in planting too thickly of the largest growing trees, and h...
-Shrubbery
It was composed of a miscellaneous collection of popular shrubs planted closely, requiring no hoeing or culture. Shrubbery #1 The aridity of our climate, and want of shade and shelter in many situat...
-Shrubbery And Pleasure Grounds
The application of water to recently planted trees, requires discrimination. Where the soil has been prepared as formerly recommended, there will be no necessity for watering deciduous trees, unless t...
-Shrubbery Plantations
THE most distinguishable feature in English gardens is, the massiveness of their ornamental plantations, and the rich verdure of the grass. On analyzing these shrubberies we shall find that, while muc...
-Shrubby Calceolarias
A very great improvement has lately been effected in this most useful decorative plant by Mr. Cole and others, who have devoted some attention to hybridizing for the purpose of obtaining improved vari...
-Shrubs For The Lawn And Dooryard, Care Necessary
The art (for it is an art) of pruning and keeping shrubs in neat shape is yet to be learned by most of the ruralists of the country. We have known of cases of people so stupidly ignorant that they pru...
-Shrubs With Ornamental Berries
There is quite a number of shrubs that are chiefly valuable for their ornamental fruit: many, in fact, rest their whole claim to our attention on their peculiar beauty in this respect. I have thought ...
-Shrubs With Ornamental Berries. Continued
9. Cerasus Caroliniensis (The Carolinian) And C. Lusilanica (The Portugal Laurels) Cerasus Caroliniensis (The Carolinian) And C. Lusilanica (The Portugal Laurels) are evergreen shrubs of the first or...
-Shrubs With Ornamental Berries (2)
18. Gaultheria Shallon And G. Procumbens Small shrubs, with handsome flowers, succeeded by numerous edible, black berries. A kind of bread has been made of the berries of the first species, in Califo...
-Shrubs With Ornamental Berries (3)
27. Rhus. The Sumac R. Cotinus, the Mist-tree, or Green Fringe, is perhaps one of the best known. It can be scarcely said to be valued for its purple berries, for it produces these sparingly, but rat...
-Shrubs With Ornamental Berries (4)
A friend has kindly written to me, to point out an error in my paper on the above subject, which I hope you will give me the opportunity to correct. In treating of Gaultheria shallon and G. procumbens...
-Siebold's Japan Plants
Editor of the Horticulturist.-DEAR SIR: In a late number, yon refer to this fine collection, and, after naming some of the principal, inquire who will be the first to advertise these in America? I ...
-The Sierra Nevada
And here let me renew my tribute to the marvellous bounty and beauty of the forests of this whole mountain region. The Sierra Ne-vadas lack the glorious glaciers, the frequent rains, the rich verdure,...
-The Silver Fir
The name of silver fir is derived from the color of its leaves on the underside, which are shorter or broader and set thicker on the spray than those of other firs, and have a beautiful silvery appear...
-Silver Wedding Session Proceedings
THE Silver Wedding Anniversary of the American Pomoligcal Society, was celebrated in Boston, on the 10th, 11th and 12th of September, with unusual splendor and interest. Never before has there been ga...
-Silver-Leaved Mountain Ash
A friend writes us that recently, at the gardens of Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry, Rochester, N. Y., he saw a seedling mountain ash of their growing, with leaves of a silknowledge of farming may have been...
-The Single Stem, Dwarf, And Renewal System Of Grape-Culture
In the June number of the Horticulturist I observe that the credit of first announcing the Single Stem Renewal System of Grape Culture, which forms the basis of my recent work on that subject, is give...
-Singular Electrical Phenomena
Prof. Loomis has submitted a paper to the American Association for the advancement of Science, on some remarkable electrical phenomena exhibited in New-York. He states that for months in success on, e...
-A Singular Instance Of Arboreous Vigor
Our old friend, Charles Waterton, has commenced to write for the London Gardeners' Chronicle with his former terseness and tact. We copy the following curious fact: Trees in walls are always rude int...
-A Sir Trehern Thomas
A magnificent variety color fine; bright crimson flowers, very large. Amongst summer flowering greenhouse plants, it will not be too much to say, that the many fine varieties of achimenia are amongst...
-Situation As Affecting The Grape-Vine
THE expedition to the Rocky Mountains found, on the borders of the Arkansas and near the eastern side of the Great Desert, hundreds of acres of the same kind of vine (vitis vinifera) which produces th...
-Size Of Pots
In potting trees for this description of culture, pots of different sizes may be used, according to the taste of the cultivator. If large trees for large houses are required, 15-inch pots (15 inches i...
-Skimmia Japonica
This fine new evergreen shrub, which is attracting a good deal of attention in your columns, and elsewhere, was discovered by me in the winter of 1848, and introduced to England in 1849. I met with it...
-Sleeping Flowers
Almost all flowers sleep during the night. The marigold goes to bed with the sun, and with him rises weeping. Many plants are so sensitive that they close their leaves during the passage of a cloud. T...
-Slugs
Procure a gallon or two of wheaten bran, or brewer's grains, and on a mild evening, just before or after a shower, place little patches of it about the garden in all directions, especially near box-ed...
-Small Evergreens
We are very frequently asked the question, as to when is the best time to plant small evergreens? our answer is, any time when the ground is in a mellow, free condition (except the months of July and ...
-A Small Experiment In Gbape-Culture
A correspondent at Meadville, Pa., writes us as follows: I have an old frame, seventeen feet long, facing the south, with the other three sides blank wall, glass thin and somewhat broken, in which I...
-Small Fruits
Several members of the Convention thought the Currant might be grown extensively, both for sale and for making wine. Mr. Barry being called upon to state some of the best varieties, recommended the C...
-Small Fruits - The Borer
ED. Western Horticulturist: There is a great amount of careless writing on the subject of fruit raising, which is causing to the people of the State great vexation and irreparable loss. Our Horticultu...
-Small Fruits For 1871
AN unusual number of new seedling varieties have been heralded forth this spring. Most of them seem to have come from the West, near Chicago. Two extraordinary varieties have attracted notice, being c...
-Small Greenhouses. A Question For " The Horticulturist"
WE have a small well ventilated greenhouse, double pitch roof, 50 x 11 feet, fully occupied only in February and March for starting vegetable plants for our market garden; balance of the year as yet u...
-Small Trees V. Large Ones
It is encouraging to see that the attention of fruit-growers has at last been diverted from the idea that a gain is to be realized from the purchase of extra sized trees at extra high prices. Comm...
-Small Trees Vs. Large Ones
Planting large trees is always a costly, laborious, and uncertain operation; very successful in a few cases, but in the majority extremely unsatisfactory. I have satisfied myself of the correctness of...
-Smearing Trees
It is not clear to every one whether smearing trees with pitch or grease in order to keep off insects is mischievous or not; some people asserting that such applications are highly dangerous, others t...
-The Smokehouse Apple
I suppose yon are aware that many of our Eastern nurserymen, and some of our own State, have been crying out against our favorite Lancaster County Smokehouse Apple, or, as it is called by some, Millcr...
-Smooth-Leaved Bumelia, Or Iron Wood
A small and rather elegant tree, from twelve to forty feet high, chiefly an inhabitant of low wet forests, from Carolina to Florida, and in Louisiana, not far from the banks of the Mississippi; but it...
-The Smyths Strawberry
Rumors of new, good, and better strawberries, will ever be the rule rather than the exception. It requires caution to handle the strawberry subject, there are so many interested in the introduction of...
-Soap Suns And Poultry Manure For Grapes
A Horticulturist on a very small scale, having only 4 pear trees and six grapevines, (dating at Pittsburgh,) writes us an account of his mode of feeding a large Catawba grapevine, which may interest...
-Soap Wash For Fruit-Trees
THE beneficial influence of a weak alkali wash upon the bark of fruit .trees is of long standing acknowledgment. Its action is in expansion of the pores, while at the same time it is destructive of al...
-Society Number Four
An influential horticultural society, established in the capital of New England, has a valuable property, a hall, and other real estate; holds creditable monthly displays and a grand annual exhibition...
-Soil
I have cultivated them in a light sand, a sandy loam, both of moderate fertility, and in moist rich sand. I prefer the former, because it secures a slower growth and results in the earlier formation o...
-The Soil (2)
As to this, we would say, choose neither a wet nor a dry locality; rather what might be termed a moist soil. It is a French saying, that the Fig likes to have its foot in the water and its head in th...
-Soil And Exposure
The soil of Medoc, where stand 'Chateau Margaux,' 'Chateau La Fitte,' and 'Chateau La Tour,' is a bed of coarse gravel, among whose pebbles the eye can barely detect soil enough to support the lowest...
-Soil And Preparation
Almost any ground that will bring good corn or wheat, and is well drained, either naturally or artificially, is good for strawberries. Corn that has been well tilled the year previous, is an excellent...
-Soil And The W. W. Pearmain
In the Horticulturist of the present month (November), Mr. Henry Walton wishes to know if the White Winter Pearmain apple succeeds well on prairie soil, and says that, on timber land, they are worthle...
-Soil For Fruit-Trees
Fruit trees should never be transplanted to a poorer soil than that in which they formerly grew before removed. Most nurseries have very rich soil; hence their trees are developed to a fine healthy si...
-Soil For Gladiolus
I am a great lover of the Gladiolus. They are so easily grown, and the varieties now so numerous, furnishing almost every shade and arrangement of color, that I can not see how any one who has a love...
-Soil For Rhubarb
No garden vegetable requires a richer soil than Rhubarb. Sandy land is almost useless. We had the pleasure once of trying it as a market crop to the extent of an acre, but at last became convinced the...
-Soil Most Suitable for Growing The Rhododendron
Nothing suits the Rhododendron so well as good fibrous peat from an old common. The best specimens are planted in nothing else. The peat, in order to suit the Rhododendron, should have plenty of fibre...
-Soils Of The Lake Erie Shore
Some discussion occurred on grape soils, but we gather nothing of value from the report except the following, by Prof. J. P. Kirtland: Alluding first briefly to the Lake Shore climate, he proceeded ...
-Soldiers' Graves
We know of no record of a public cemetery where so much regard has been paid to the last resting-place of those who nobly gave their lives in our late national war as that of the Spring Grove Cemetery...
-Solomon's Gardens At Jerusalem
These celebrated gardens extend along a valley which runs from El-Bownach to Bethlehem. It is the most charming spot in all Palestine. There are murmuring streams winding through verdant lawns; there ...
-Some Account Of An Orchideous House, Constructed At Penllergare, South Wales
I INCLOSE with this the section of the stove, which I promised to send. This will show the shape of the building; the water for the supply of the cascade is couducted to the top of the house by means ...
-Some Bearing Groves
Groves of any considerable extent, old enough to be in full bearing, are far from numerous. Three or four on the Gulf coast, and as many in East Florida, are all that I have any account of. That of Mr...
-Some Facts About Orchards In New-England
Mr. Downing - How strange it is, that after all the preaching you and I, and other sensible men, have done, no more attention is paid in New-England to raising fruit, as a regular source of profit! An...
-Some Facts About The Action Of Cold On Plants
Facts, however trivial in themselves individually, become in the aggregate of immense value in building up a theory or illustrating a practice; for we must recollect that a theory is as often the chil...
-Some Hints For Farming And Gardening, Furnished To A Son When He "Set-Up" For Himself
Always cultivate with your eyes turned towards the nearest market. This ought to be the first rule for a farmer, for, without conveniences to sell your products at fair prices, and to get your manures...
-Some Hints On The Economy Of Planting
A STRIKING illustration of the progress of refinement in America might be drawn from the improvements made in planting, in the kind of ornamental trees and shrubs which we assemble now around our home...
-Some Neglected Natives
Dicentra spectabilis is justly considered one of the handsomest hardy herbaceous plants ever introduced. But we must not lose sight of some of our own natives of the same natural order, and little if ...
-Some Neglected Trees And Shrubs
THERE are many beautiful and valuable trees that have not found their way generally into cultivation; we can count but one specimen of Cedar of Lebanon of commanding size in the United States, probabl...
-Some Of The Best Sweet Cherries
Since the publication of my remarks on Cherries for the West, in the Horticulturist for October, 1867, I have received many letters asking for a selection of sweet cherries most desirable for famil...
-Some Sights At Philadelphia
While in Philadelphia attending the session of the Pomological Society, we received many courtesies from friends there, which call for our thanks; but to Mr. King we are especially under obligations f...
-Some Thoughts On Pear Culture
Although the culture of the pear on the quince is gradually extending, and though, under favorable circumstances, each year brings new evidence of its practicability, the cry with many still is, it n...
-Someremarks On Vegetable Physiology
In what way are new layers of wood added to the stents of growing exogenous trees'! This is a mooted question among vegetable physiologists, and as the subject has been brought forcibly to my mind, b...
-Something About Egypt
Having been a subscriber to the Horticulturist for the past two years, and never having seen any thing in it relative to this section of the country, it occurred to me to drop you a line relative to i...
-Something About The Fruit Conventions
I am, as you know, too much of an old digger, to attend political meetings, agricultural fairs, or even fruit conventions. I am not only a little stiff in my joints, bat it makes me nervous and irri...
-Something Of Vines And Climbers, And Somewhat Of Their Appropriate Uses
By the cottage porch as well as the finished portico; by and in the rustic vase, as well as the marble fountain; everywhere that man seeks to decorate and adorn, do we find some variety of climbing vi...
-Sonerila Margaritacea
For this most beautiful novelty we are indebted to Messrs. Veitch, who obtained it from some part of India, through Mr. Thomas Lobb. It forms a compact branching brittle tuft from nine to twelve inche...
-Southern Apples
Mr. Editor: Having frequently been asked for a list of winter apples, adapted to the Southern and Middle States, I herewith send yon a list that may be relied on; a part of them originated in Virginia...
-Southern Fruit Culture
Dear Sir: As we do not profess infallibility, will you allow me to qualify what I stated in the last Horticulturist in regard to the American Summer Fear-main. This apple I hare noticed two or three y...
-A Southern Or Plantation House
The proprietor of a plantation in the south, or south-west, requires altogether a different kind of residence from the farmer of the northern or middle states. He resides in the midst of his own princ...
-Southern Peach
The Rev. A. B. Lawrence, Woodville, Mississippi, sends us the following description of a seedling peach, which will be interesting to our friends at the South: Fruit - very large, often measuring bet...
-A Southern Vineyard
The largest vineyard in the Southern States is near Fayetteville, N. C. The Eagle of that place, says that it contains 100 acres on which there are 7,000 vines. These vines are chiefly the scuppernong...
-The Southern White Fig
ON page 339 of the November number of the Horticulturist is a notice of the fine figs of the shore of the Gulf of Mexico. It is a little over a year since, in lecturing on fruits to the senior and jun...
-Sowing Flower Seeds
We have often, in the spring, heard the cry, Why don't my flower-plants come up? The seeds are of no account. The seed man has cheated me, etc., etc. We generally listen to such complaints with as m...
-The Span-Worm
You have but few singing-birds in cities, and for that reason caterpillars become very troublesome, and, unless checked by some Ichneumon, or parasite insect, go on increasing rapidly until famine doe...
-Special Culture
Rachel W. Morris. (Wellsboro.) The curled leaves and unhealthy habit of the snow balls, of which you complain, are the work of an insect. It is perhaps too late to effectually get rid of the trouble t...
-Special Manures
An Orchardist, (Mor-ristown, N.J.) The reason you failed to get any good from the top-dressing of lime and ashpletely impoverished the ground where they have been growing and bearing, without any new ...
-Special Premiums
Five dollars to Robert Buist, for a very fine collection of seedling Calceolarias; two dollars to John Pollock: two dollars to Wm. Armstrong, gr. to. Alex. Brown, for a display of Verbenas. New Plants...
-Speing Flowers In The North Of China
In the north of China there are a number of plants which have their flower-buds very prominently developed in autumn, so much so that they are ready to burst into bloom before the winter has quite pas...
-Spergula Pilifera (D. C., Fl. Fr. 4, N. 4391)
Leaves opposite, linear, awned, rather stiff, glabrous, in bundles; stems creeping, branched, tufted; peduncles very long: petals twice as large as the calyx; seeds egg-shaped; hardy perennial; native...
-The Spergula Pilipera
We have lately had a number of inquiries in relation to the Spergula pilif-erat and present the following from the French, as containing, in a brief compass, about all that is known of its adaptabilit...
-Spiraea Callosa, Thunberg, Alias S. Fortunei. Planchon
Under this name a very pretty red flowered shrub is becoming common in collections, having been introduced from China by Mr. FORTUNE. With us it is too apt to form leaves rather than flowers, but the ...
-Spireas
This is a family of which there are a number that are herbaceous perennials, and a still larger number that are shrubs. Among the best of the Herbaceous are Filipendula plena, dwarfish, and with doubl...
-Spiring House As A Plant Conservatory
In Mr. Berckman's Farmer and Gar dener, there is a description of a spring house which is used as a conservatory. Over a bold spring a brick house has been erected, 24 feet in diameter, and arched ove...
-Spores Becoming Permanent
The preservation and improvement of the races of domesticated plants is a most interesting topic. Grafts carry the diseases of the parent with them; again divided, the disease is again propagated, and...
-Sports
There is in the garden of William Hamill, at Norristown, Montgomery county, Pa., a ring willow tree that has stood there many years; last year it sent out a shoot haying all the appearance and habit o...
-The Spottiswoode Rat-Tail Radish
Professor of Chemistry and Natural History in ihe University of Queen's College, Kingston, Canada. In the Horticulturist for July, (vol. xv., p. 308,) you reprint from the Revue Horticole an article ...
-Spring
Who would quarrel with winter when May was present, or grieve over the many disasters that are passed, when the lilac and the apple-blossom were about to present their accustomed beauties? Adieu! all ...
-Spring At The South And At The North
In undertaking to describe some of the peculiarities of a southern spring, I do not aim at special accuracy, or fulness of detail; but attempt, simply, to speak of what is noticeable by a stranger fro...
-Spring At The South And At The North. Part 2
In April, spring is thoroughly established. The first crop of figs attains its full size. Grass makes a fine growth in low, moist situations, but elsewhere, - if perchance the deep, dry sand allows it...
-Spring At The South And At The North. Part 3
Often, too, at the close of a dreary day, the storm abates, a thousand birds break forth in song, and the sun, shining through the parted clouds, floods the earth with light, and spans the eastern hea...
-The Spring Flower Garden
The spring flowers are always the most welcome. How pleasant the sight of brilliant beds of the Crocus and Snow Drop early in April, giving us assurance that dreary winter is over. Then close upon the...
-Spring Hot-Beds
As the season is now coming around for our preparatory spring operations, a few remarks on our manner of constructing hof beds might be of service to some of your readers who are only amateurs in such...
-Spring Hot-Beds And Cold Frames
Spring is again at hand, and with it come our preparations for forwarding and forcing to anticipate Nature by a few weeks or months. I can offer little new in such matters except, perhaps, that, as o...
-Spring Moving
The bustling commercial people of New York City have established the 1st of May as an annual period for removals among its inhabitants, and we have sometimes taken the liberty to doubt the wisdom or c...
-Spring-Flowering Bulbs For A Rhododendron-Bed
*4 Are there any spring-flower-iog dwarf bulbs that would do well planted as an edging to a Rhododendron-bed which is entirety of sandy peat? If so, could you give me a list of say twelve sorts, and a...
-Springbrook
This beautiful country seat, near Philadelphia, became justly celebrated when that floral wonder, the Victoria Regia, first bloomed in this country at Spring-brook. In company with others, we accep...
-Springfield Horticultural Society
Pursuant to a notice for a meeting of the Horticultural Society, for the purpose of making arrangements for the annual exhibition, quite a large body of young men met at the court house, on the evenin...
-Spruces
Like the pines, there are comparatively few spruces sufficiently dwarf in habit for the city or village garden. But the few that are suitable are gems of their kind, and the most beautiful of all is a...
-The Sprues And Its Culture
Why not call them conifers, as do the English, French, and German writers? We like the name, it is so much more expressive than evergreens; besides, conifers, or cone-bearing trees, are not all evergr...
-Spur Grafting - Mom The Same
The interest excited by the method of immediately rendering barren fruit trees fertile by using fruit spurs or buds as scions is so great that we lose no time in returning to the subject. In another c...
-Squash
We received early in December a specimen squash from J. J. H. Gregory, of Mar-blehead, Mass., which has been named The Marblehead. Mr. Gregory finds from his tests, that it has a more flinty shell th...
-The Srawberry In England
Mr. Downing: I discover by a letter in your number for the present month, from a working English gardener, that we are behind the age in general, and Great Britain in particular, in horticulture. I wo...
-Sreds Of Ferns
The naked eye, says Dr. Lindley, in the last Chronicle, cannot detect on the under side of a fern-leaf its seed-vessels; fern seeds are little angular bodies tot minute to be visible, and are expelled...
-St. Anthony's Falls (Minnesota) Horticultural Society
Another Horticultural Society was organized in this far-distant State on the 26th of March, I860. It is a good movement in the right direction, and has our best wishes. The constitution adopted was ve...
-St. Paul Horticultural Society
This Society has made some alterations in its Constitution, having adopted substantially that of the Cincinnati Society. They have also made some alterations in their list of officers, which are now a...
-St. Paul Horticultural Society (2)
This young Society recently held its first public exhibition at St. Paul, and they seem to have had a good time. The secretary, Mr. Hewson, sends us the following account of it: The Horticultural Exh...
-Staminate Strwberries Productive
In the may number of your Journal Mr. Long-worth of Cincinnati, in an article on Grapes, says: That neither Hovey's Seedling or the English Methven Scarlet', will produce half a crop, or bear perfect...
-The Stan Wick Nectarine
This famous fruit, which for a time was one of the wonders of the day in England, has in a great measure failed there, no doubt from the want of sufficient heat We have always thought that our warm su...
-Standard Roses
Standard Roses, now so much in vogue, require a good stake to preserve them from toppling over, the heads being often too heavy for the root A plan of fastening standards to supports has been introduc...
-Standard Rose Trees
I offer to the lovers of standard Roses a little plan of my own; it has succeeded admirably. An artificial prop to standard Roses is unsightly, and is both exposed to decay in the run of time, and to ...
-Standing Committees, - On Fruits
E. Wight, Chairman; Joseph Breck, C. M. Hover, W. R. Austin, F. L. Winship, W. C. Strong, A. W. Stetson. On Flowers. - Joseph Breck, Chairman; A. McLennan, E. A. Story. Thos. Paee, Azell Bowditch, G. ...
-Stanley's Early Apple
Fine specimens of this apple, known in Ohio, where it originated, with another kind we do not know, have been sent us by Mr. James S. Lippincott, of Haddon Lodge, near Haddonfield N. J. The Stanley's ...
-The Stanwick Nectarine
The sensation created in England and France by the introduction of the Stanwick Nectarine in 1846 has had few parallels, but it has subsided on discovering that the climate was not entirely favorable ...
-Starving Pear Trees
We never yet knew any way to make pear trees bear, but to feed them well and take care of them, but even too much of this brings the blight, especially on naturally rich ground. To escape this blight,...
-State Agricultural Journal, Extra
List of Premiums and Regulations for the 19th Exhibition, Oct. 4, 5, 6, 7,1859. Judicious as usual. Annual Report of the Agricultural Society Of New Jersey, for 1858; from Wm. M. Force, Secretary. A ...
-State Agricultural Schools
Just before the Legislature of the State of New York broke up in the late abnormal manner, the bill for the Agricultural College was, at its third reading, quietly laid on the table - chiefly at the m...
-State And Horticultural Fairs
A more than usual success has attended the various State and local Horticultural Fairs this autumn. The attendance of people has been large, and the exhibitions in every branch of agriculture, horticu...
-State Exhibitions for 1857
Alabama, at Montgomery, October 27 to 30. Canada East, at Montreal, September 16 to 18. Canada West, at Brantford, September 29 to October 2. Connecticut, at Bridgeport, October 18 to 16. California, ...
-Stated Meeting, February 17, 1853
The stated meeting was hsld as usual, on Tuesday evening; in the Chinese Saloon. The President in the chair. To the numerous visitors in attendance on the occasion, the exhibition assuredly afforded m...
-Statistics Of Grape Culture
The past winter, though in general moderate and pleasant, was characterized by two remarkably cold days, said to be the coldest for thirty years. Not having seen the oldest inhabitant, I am unable ...
-Statistics Of Vineyards
In accordance with a resolution of the Horticultural Society Of Cincinnati, passed at its last session, calling on the President and Council to report on the extent of the interest at this time engage...
-Stbawberry Culture
A correspondent of The Country Gentleman thinks the plan we recommended, in the August number, of planting in rows, radically defective, and declares himself in favor of beds; but we must let him ...
-Stealing Fruit
It will be seen by the following circular, which the committee requested us to publish, and which we noticed in our last number, that an attempt is being made by our friends in Pennsylvania, to have a...
-The Steam-Engine In Agriculture And Horticulture
A period has just gone by us, in which what is called famine prices have been paid by the rich and the poor; our great cities have actually suffered from want: at one time, it was difficult to procu...
-Steeping Seeds In Glycerine
About the end of March, 1856, some one had given this out as an important discovery, to promote vegetation of seeds. It consisted simply in steeping the seeds in glycerine. Being in the way of receivi...
-The Stem, Branches, And Roots
Every member of the vegetable form, from the minutest root to the most fragile spray, has its epidermis, cellular integument, bark, woody fibre, and medullary matter; these are most apparent in the st...
-Stemming
The fruit having been gathered and selected, the next thing to do is to stem it In Medoc and all the Bordelais this is invariably done. But in Burgundy and other districts they commonly omit it,...
-Stevensdale Institute
FOR the sake of illustrating what we have so often urged in behalf of rural embellishments and ornamental home architecture, we introduce, this month, three exquisite engravings of the Stevensdale Ins...
-Stocks
A Nurseryman, (Bangor.) Grafting pears on apple stocks has been abandoned by all good growers, because the union is not permanent, and the tree is short-lived. The plum tree makes a more enduring stoc...
-The Stockwood Golden Hambro' Grape
SCARCELY a season passes in which we have not something new in the way of fruits; but it rarely happens that they possess anything more than novelty to recommend them. The mass of new fruits puts us i...
-Stopping Summer Growths
You would hardly suppose that there is a man, woman, or child, in all the world, who could not learn the art of stopping the shoots of plants and trees at one lesson - pinch out the top of the shoot...
-The Story Of A White Camellia
THE following beautiful sketch is translated from the German, showing the love of queen Josephine for the Camellia, to whom it is said is to be given the credit of the first introduction of this state...
-The Story Of A White Camellia. Continued
They tell of an exotic white flower, the care of which Madame Bonaparte herself supervised. Do you not remember the lovely parks at St. Cloud? To forsake them and the excellent dwellings there for Ma...
-The Stove
The Plant Stove is an accommodation for intertropical plants, the real beauty of which far excels those of cooler regions; and, as this structure is destined for the culture of such plants as grow in ...
-Stoves And Ventilation
Mr. Downing's leader, in the Nov. number of the Horticultur-ist, The Favorite Poison of America, is however, the article which is most attractive, as most coincident with my own notions: for it I fe...
-Stoves And Ventilation. Continued
Other decorations adorned the windows, and bouquets and vases of flowers in abundance were arranged on the tables, and around the hall. Among the curiosities that attracted much attention, were pears...
-Stowell's Sweet Cork
This is a new sort, and is every way superior to any other we have seen, for after being pulled from the ground the stalks may be placed in a dry cool place, free from moisture, frost, or violent curr...
-Strain Of Amaryllis
The varieties of Amaryllis raised from A. pardina are likely to form the most useful race of all. They flower very freely, which is not the case with the older and better known forms; and, better stil...
-A Strange Coincidence
Under this heading, a writer in the New York Evening Post states, that several years ago Dr. Siebold introduced into Europe (from Japan) a flowery tree called Pawlonia imperialis; and the strange...









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