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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #11 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Inarching To May-Apple

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #11
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Inarching
The following practical observations on Inarching by separating the branch from the parent tree, and plunging the end of it in a jar of water, or planting it in the earth, will be interesting to our r...
-Inarching - An Improvement
In my last I gave a description of my improved method of Fruit Bud Grafting. I have also made some improvement upon the method of inarching, as described in the January number of the Horticulturist ...
-Inarching The Grape-Vine
This age has often been most emphatically termed the age of improvement. Not only have men ceased to be contented with the quality of that which perfectly satisfied their fathers, but they desire to i...
-Increase Of Horticultural And Agricultural Interests
It is both gratifying and surprising to note the rapid increase and extension of interests connected with the pursuits of rural life. But a few years have passed since the list of journals wholly devo...
-Increase Tour Planting Of Small Fruits
We beg to urge the attention of every owner of ground to the importance and value, as a health product for family use, of the small fruits, so termed, such as strawberries, raspberries, etc. Without a...
-Of Indian Construction
Under the name of Indian Architecture, may be included Hindustan, Gentoo, Chinese, or Turkish; which latter is a mixture of the other three. But this construction is distinct from the Gothic, in havin...
-On Indian Corn And The Improved Cultivation Of Land
In Agriculture and Horticulture, as in all other sciences, nothing is so well calculated to reward the practical man with a remunerating profit for his labor, as is thorough examination of the subject...
-Indian Perfumes
From all Indian flowers, essences are distilled. The center of this manufacture is Ghazepore, a town situated on the north bank of the Ganges above Benares. The process is extremely simple. The petals...
-Indian Summer
De Quincey, in the new edition of the Confessions of an English Opium Eater, has described the advent of Indian summer, in the following passage, more beautifully than any master of the English langua...
-Indicator Bee Stand
An ingenious lover of bees has invented a plan for weighing his honey as collected, and gives the following account of his method: Having lately devised a plan by which to increase my own enjoyment o...
-Indigenous Oil-Bearing Plant
The French government has given orders for the introduction of one of our native oil-bearing plants, the usefulness of which we appear to have ignored, though it has long been known and described by b...
-Indigestion
Indigestion may be the result of two causes - first, a diseased state of the stomach, and, secondly, by passing into a healthy stomach some cartilaginous substance which is not naturally adapted for i...
-Indigofera Decora
A dark green handsome bush, with somewhat glaucous branches. The leaves are pinnate in from two to five pairs and an odd one, quite smooth on the upper side, but slightly covered on the under side wit...
-Indoor Decorations
On being asked to decorate part of the house on the event of a social gathering, I was puzzled; our exotics were not showy enough for the occasion. A pleasing sensation of relief crept over me when I ...
-Industrial. Universities For The People
Published in compliance with resolutions of the Chicago and Springfield Conventions, and under the Industrial League of Illinois, by J. B. TuRNer, Chairman of the Committee.. The object of this pamph...
-Influence Of Air on The Soil
It has been seen that the influence which the atmoe-ipberio forces exert upon the soil is various and extensive. Their action, indeed, is not rapid nor energetic, and a very perfect exposure of the so...
-Influence Of External Agents On Vegetation. From Darby's Botany Of The Southern States
The agents which exercise a decided influence on vegetation are light, heat, water, and earth. The concurrent influence of all these agents, in a greater or less degree, is absolutely required for th...
-Influence Of Graft On Stock
The influence of the graft on the stock is seldom referred to in our horticultural works. Downing says: The influence of the graft on the stock seems scarcely to extend beyond the power of communica...
-Influence Of Gypsum On Vegetation
Ever since Franklin's great experiment, gypsum or sulphate of lime has generally been considered as possessing much fertilising power, and of being of great importance in agriculture. Having paid some...
-Influence Of Soil Upon The Character Of Wines
PERHAPs nowhere is the influence of the soil and its ingredients so apparent as in the difference of character of our native wines. It is peculiar that it will assimilate more of the ingredients of th...
-Influence Of Stocks
A CORRESPONDENT of Colman's Rural World, from long experience, feels convinced that fruit grafted on seedling stocks will partake more or less of the nature of such stocks, and in support of this theo...
-Influence Of Stock On Scion
I HAVE been much interested in the notices given from time to time as to the influence of the scion on the stock, and vice versa. In the early vinery here we have a couple of Muscat vines worked on th...
-Influence Of The Stock On The Graft
SURELY, the study of horticulture in its various details, is one of the most beautiful that the mind of man can be engaged upon. I do not allude to that effervescent study given to it by nurserymen wh...
-Influence Of The Stock On The Scion, And Vice Versa. Essay By Josiah Hoopes, For The American Pomological Society
BOTH theory and practice teach us that the relationship existing between the, root and the top of a tree cannot be impaired to any great extent, by any artificial intervention of man. The very moment ...
-Influence Of The Stock Upon The Cion
IT is claimed by some writers that the stock has more or less influence upon the cion; and one writer upon the subject goes so far as to hold that the better the fruit of the stock, or the nearer its ...
-Influence Of Trees Upon Rainfall
A CORRESPONDENT of the Popular Science Monthly, gives a strong illustration in proof of the influence of trees upon rainfall. A friend of the writer who spent the months of February, March, and April ...
-The Influence Of Water On Vegetation
If I were asked the question, What point do you consider of most importance in the management of plants? I would unhesitatingly answer, the application of water; and I believe the answer would be en...
-Influence of Light On Plants
Plants and their leaves, if excluded from light, become of a white or pale yellow color, in which state they are said to be blanched or etiolated. This is occasioned by their being neither able to dec...
-Influences Of Temperature
ED. Western Horticulturist: Ordinary thermometers indicate the temperature only at the instant of observation. Unless observed constantly the duration of any degree of temperature is not shown. Practi...
-Ingram's Seedling Apple
The Journal of Agriculture, St. Louis, recently published a drawing and description of an apple under the above name, since which we have received samples of the fruit, forwarded us by the courtesy of...
-Injured Apple Trees
I HAVE in former articles, in various horticultural publications, called attention to the tall, old, and in quality of fruit, not the best apple trees in New Jersey, damaged by causes that operate in ...
-Of Inoculating Or Grafting
ED. Western Horticulturist: Although we are wont to believe that modern practices are, as a general thing, preferable to those of ancient times, and, as a consequence, discard the old, it is sometimes...
-Inorganic Analysis
I am indebted to Mr. George Ronalds for the following analysis of the strawberry, made by Thomas Richardson, of England, quoted from page 318 of the Annual Report of the Progress of Chemistry and th...
-Inquiries And Answers
Editor Horticulturist : I often read in your journal and others interesting articles by correspondents, but which lack much of the interest they should have, by not giving the residence or location of...
-Inquiries Concerning Soil, Climate, Cultivation, Varieties Of Fruit
1. Face Of The Country Is it low or elevated, level or hilly, wooded or otherwise; and what situation and exposure do you find most favorable for orchards and fruit gardens! Have you observed any ins...
-The Inscriptions
This vase was erected, by his friends, in memory of Andrew Jackson Downing, who died July 28,1852, aged 37 years. He was born, and lived, and died, upon the Hudson River. His life was devoted to the ...
-Insects
A correspondent at Baldwinsville sends us some shoots of an apple tree, on which are several clusters of long, narrow, grayish cocoons, each containing a small moth from an eighth to a tenth of an inc...
-Insects (2)
(V. W., Wyalusing, Pa.) It is some sort of a Borer. We hare taken steps to ascertain. Insects #1 (A. G. H.) The Plum twigs sent are covered with the scaly aphis. Wash the parts affected with the f...
-Insects (3)
The Hawk-Moths, or sphinges, are a family of large and robust lepidopte-ous insects; the caterpillars of which are known as the potato and tobacco worms. Some caterpillars of this family erect the for...
-An Insect Palace
Sir John Hill has given the following curious account of what appeared on his examining a carnation: The principal flower in an elegant bouquet was a carnation; the fragrance of this led me to enjoy...
-Insects And How To Destroy Them
The numerous species of aphides under the name of blight are, as is well known, most troublesome enemies to all fruit trees in the open air: one regrets that orchard-house trees are not exempt from...
-Insects In, Orchards
In the discussion on insects at the late meeting of the Minnesota Horticultural Society, many interesting facts were elicited concerning insects in that State. Much trouble has been experienced with l...
-Insects Injurious To Fruit-Trees
At the recent Yale College Lectures, Dr. Fitch made the following interesting remarks on Insects Injurious to Fruit-Trees. He is certainly mistaken, however, in saying that but one slit is made on a f...
-Insects Injurious To Fruits And Fruit Teees
In a country where there are few, if any, old orchards, insects injurious to the trees are not likely to abound. I have never seen the apple borer with us, and never had a tree sustain any injury from...
-Insects On Apple Trees
A. J. Downing. On my property near this city, I have a small young orchard of apple and peach trees, which early in the spring, gave promise of a fine crop of fruit. The trees are very thrifty, and ar...
-Insects Upon The Larch - What Are They?
In passing a fine young larch a few moments since, I discovered the first appearance this year, of an insect which has infested the same tree for the two previous seasons. It is a small, downy bug, ab...
-Insects, No. 2. - Illustrated
Though the insects under consideration in this article have been well described and illustrated in the Agricultural Patent Office Report for 1854, I nevertheless copy from my own drawings and observat...
-Insects, No. 3 - Illustrated. Grape-Vine Caterpillars
As early as the 6th of July, and as late as the 15th of September, we often find herds of small, greenish-yellow caterpillars on the under side of the grape leaves, feeding side by side, in considerab...
-Insects, No. 5. - Illustrated - Aphidiphagi
Having, in our last article, considered several species of plant lice, we will now consider those insects known to feed upon the aphids, in three sections. The First, larvae of coleopterous insects - ...
-Insects, Slugs
The cultivation of fruits in this region is an almost incessant battle against insects. In addition to our old pests, we have now in Medford (five miles from Boston) and adjoining towns, a slimy slug ...
-Insects. Aphis, Or Plant Lice
This prolific and obnoxious family of vegetable parasites is interesting, on account of its anomalous character, being considered viviparous during the summer, and oviparous in the autumn, by that dis...
-Inside, Detached, And Divided Vine Borders. Prevention Of Mildew On The Grape
The editorial article in the last number of the Horticulturist, on the New Method of Constructing Vineries, afforded me much gratification. I esteem it a high compliment to find my plan of inside bo...
-An Interesting Letter From Michigan, Oh Various Topics
What shall we do to get rid of the Peach worm! It seems to me most writers on fruit-culture entirely underrate the mischief they do. This is certainly the case, if they are as troublesome in other par...
-Interior Arrangement
This house stands 50 by 40 feet on the ground. The front door opens from the veranda into a hall, 24 by 14 feet, in which is a flight of stairs leading to the chambers above. On the left a door leads ...
-Interior View Of Conservatory In The Birmingham Botanic Garden, England
AN American gardener feels a thrill of interest in reading the descriptions of the finished Conservatories and Botanic collections so famous on the European continent. Whether it is owing to lack of s...
-Interior Views - No. IV. - Exotic Graperies
Much has been written on the subject of border-making, and also very much about the gross feeding propensities of the vine. It is considered by men of experience in Europe as in America, that the vine...
-Interior Views - No. IV. - Exotic Graperies. Continued
Now, where the natural ground that surrounds a vine border is poor, and the made border rich, the consequence is just what we have already stated, good roots are soon out of it and into the poor soils...
-Interior Views, No. 5. - Exotic Graperies
We recollect many years ago, Mr. Editor, when our whole soul was in rapport with that most bewitching goddess, Flora, how all the faculties of the human mind were assiduously directed to the tint...
-Interior Views, No. 5. - Exotic Graperies. Continued
The reader should understand that there is a vast difference between heaping masses of such decomposing materials as are commonly recommended for use in vine borders, and the applications of the same,...
-Interior Views, No. 6. - Exotic Graperies
Now examine and study scientifically, if you please, the difference between a border composed of the materials advised, and the materials by which a border is made impervious to air and water. We all ...
-Interior Views. No. 2 - Exotic Graperies
How beautiful is the external! Art and wealth combined have produced a most lovely effect upon the lawn, or in some cozy part of the grounds where it pleases the taste of the proprietor. This little b...
-Interior Views. No. 3. - Exotic Graperies
In our last paper we endeavored to show the reader that the natural results produced by our conventional system of practice and education, in the use of the two classes of vines, good and bad, or, in ...
-Interior Views. No. 3. - Exotic Graperies. Continued
Fig. 2 will illustrate the root action of poor vines when planted erect, or without being layered. We affirm that a strong vine, with a plentiful supply of large, living roots, containing their propor...
-Intermediate Native Fruit Report
The Committee of the American Pomological Society on Native Fruits, respect-folly submit to the President'of the American Pomological Society its first Intermediate Report. In presenting these Reports...
-International Flora
J. Q. A. Warren, corresponding member of the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society, at the request of members of that Society, is striving to inaugurate a system of exchange of the flora of this State f...
-Intricacy In Gardening
It would be difficult to select a more striking passage from any author on gardening than the following from Sir Uvedale Price's noble work on the picturesque: According to the idea I have formed of...
-Iona Island
We recently paid a visit to this beautiful spot, and were kindly entertained by its genial and hospitable host and hostess. In our Chapter of Visits will be found some extended remarks of a former v...
-Iona On The Hudson
About three miles above Peekskill, and prominent among the jutting promontories that slope up from the water along the ten miles to West Point, stands one, if not more prominent, more noted than any o...
-Iona On The Hudson. Continued
It remained for the present owner to open this mine, and most effectually he has done it. From the closest figuring of the amount he has taken year by year, and the quantity applied per acre, we concl...
-Iona, Pelham, And Wodenethe
A brief visit to the three above-named places of interest up the Hudson, was enjoyed during the past season. At Iona - a rocky isle of about three hundred acres, near the west shore of the Hudson, tw...
-Iowa Horticultural Society
We notice this Society has issued a call for a meeting to be held early in January. Iowa is fast growing to be a fruit State, as the exhibit of its products the past year show; and we hope this meetin...
-Iowa Prairie Sketches
Morning dawns upon westward-bound travellers, who, but a few hours before, were enjoying all the loveliness of a bright spring day, and gazing with delight on meadows of grass, wheat fields of livel...
-Iowa Prairie Sketches (2)
THE contrast to view first Just three months have elapsed, and how great the change their fleeting days have brought! Vast fields of grass, in gently undulating waves, now rise, and bow and rise agai...
-Iowa Prairie Sketches (3)
The unnumbered swells of a rolling prairie, covered with tall grass, and waved by the wind, have been, by many, likened to a view of the sea with her swelling tides. But there is another feature in wh...
-Iowa Prairie Sketches (4)
January, the infant month of the new year, gave us rather a cold salute at his advent, when we hailed his approach at the first dawning morn of 1860; rough, angry winds wailed and howled around our dw...
-Iowa Prairie Sketches (5)
The principal genera of flowers appearing in Iowa, from the middle of May till the last of August, are the following: Potentilla and Oxalis, common in the Eastern states, but more abundant here; and t...
-Iowa Prairie Sketches (5). Continued
Yes, Mr. Editor, you shall have, at some future time, seeds of these my favorites; and hope you will admire them no less than I do, although you are surrounded by the cultivated flora of Eastern garde...
-The Iowa Strawberry And Its Seedling Varieties
It seems not to be realized that this is a distinct species of the Fragaria family. Torrey and Gray, and other botanists, have failed to elucidate the fact, that the mighty prairies of the West have p...
-Ipomaea Learii
This is a most charming plant, and no conservatory or greenhouse where climbers are grown should be without it. It is a most rapid growing plant, covering an immense surface, and ramifying into an ast...
-Iris Iberica
This is one of the most remarkable and interesting plants that has ever been introduced into cultivation. Its dwarf habit, gigantic flowers, great snow-white erect sepals, its equally large strangely-...
-Iron Clads
THE peculiar necessities of the Northwest have been the means of developing a peculiar class of fruits, which on account of their hardy character in tree, have acquired the soubriquet of iron clads....
-Iron Clad Evergreens
For many years our pomologists have been throwing together their experience at their different meetings and through the press, in regard to fruits and fruit-raising in the Northwest. Lists of iron cl...
-Iron For Pear Trees
I had a very fine pear tree (Flemish Beauty) that became affected, first by blight in one limb, which I removed, and then another and another was affected in the same way, until I had removed a consid...
-Irrigation
It seems to be an inevitable conclusion forced upon strawberry growers, that they must begin irrigation. The seasons are now becoming so treacherous, and periodically or entirely dry about the time of...
-Irritability Of Plants
In alluding, incidentally, so much to cleanliness, I give it/' says an eminent writer, a prominent place in the elements of success. A great point is gained when we come to look upon a plant as an o...
-Irving Park
A novel and very admirable idea is in process of being carried out at Tarry-town, on the Hudson. About one hundred acres of ground, adjoining Sleepy Hollow - made memorable by Irving's pen - have been...
-Is Asparagus A Marine Plant
This question was, several years ago, discussed in the New England Farmer, a paper which does equal credit to its accomplished editor as to those who support it by their subscriptions. A writer stated...
-Is Grape Culture And Wine-Making A Failure In This Country?
THE direful effects of two sharp night-frosts at the end of last April, in the wine districts of France and Germany, causing the loss of no less than two-thirds of the presumable crop for 1873, togeth...
-Is Pear Culture Profitbale?
HIs is a question that can not be answered properly in a few words, yet we are over and over again requested to answer it within the limits of a brief letter. We propose, therefore, to devote a shor...
-Is Strawberry Culture A Success! By Henby T. Williams
Within the last three years berries have brought extremely good prices, and berry growers have made goodly sums of money. Instances of good fortune have frequently come to light, passed around the nei...
-Is Tax-Bark A Fertilizer?
The question has been mooted, is tan-bark a fertilizer, in one of the late numbers of the Horticulturist. Mr. Doweing speaks highly of it as a mulcher for strawberries; and on the authority of Prof...
-Is The Apple Crop A Failure?
EDITOR Western Horticulturist: With the greatest profusion of flowers, and the finest prospect for a large crop of apples last spring, we are now compelled to believe that the crop will be small in qu...
-Is The Kalmia Latifolia Poisonous
SOME years ago, travellers gave us startling accounts of a tree, the very odor of which was death to animated creatures. Nothing would grow beneath its immediate shade, and all in its vicinity was sea...
-Is The Scuppernong Grape The Grape Of America?
So sayeth an enthusiastic gentleman of Iuka, Miss., who quotes an Episcopal clergyman as having recommended it to the Southern people, and the New York Watchman as having delightful memories of swe...
-Is The Seed A Necessary Part of The Fruit
The theory of some horticultural writers, that in the most of our cultivated fruits the fruit is but a swollen capsule, inclosing the true fruit, the seeds, always seemed to me sufficiently reasonable...
-Isabella Grapes
We have received from E. A. McKay, of Naples, a box of Isabella Grapes from his vineyard - the largest and most perfectly ripened we have seen this season, and as fine as we have ever seen. Part of th...
-The Isabella Grape - Its History
Fruits - indeed anything which have become celebrated - are an interesting subject of history. Of such is the Isabella Grape, a story about which, many years ago - perhaps twenty - I chronicled in the...
-The Isabella Gray Rose
The English public is greatly excited by the appearance of the Isabella Gray Rose. It is a noble yellow, and the only yellow everblooming rose we have; a noisette climber, of about the hardiness of th...
-The Isabella Not A Native Grape
It is generally supposed by botanists and horticulturists, that the Isabella grape is indigenous in the Carolinas. About the commencement of the present century, Mr. Lespeyre, a Frenchman, on returnin...
-Isabella Or Ape
This is an American Grape, a native of Dorchester, South Carolina, and was introduced into this state by Mrs. Isabella Gibbs, the lady of George Gibbs, Esq., of St. Augustine, who then resided at Broo...
-Isabella Wine
We are indebted to Mr. Bartholmew, of West field, Chatauque Co., N. Y., for samples of Isabella and Blackberry Wines, the latter being very good of its kind. The Isabella is a real wine, without any f...
-An Italian Cottage
I do not suppose I can furnish the readers of the Horticulturist with any designs that will compare with the truly beautiful ones already presented to its readers; but perhaps I can present something ...
-An Item For Tree-Growers
Chas. Downing says that he once witnessed a remarkable change produced on the body of a pear-tree by means of wrapping it in straw. The tree was a Brown Beurre, grafted about seven feet high from the ...
-Item Of That Society
Since my last visit to Boston, they have built a splendid building for their own use, for discussions on fruits and flowers, potatoes and cabbages, and the showing of the same on their fete days. It i...
-Items From Ohio
Messrs. T. & S. B. McMillan, of East Fairfield, Ohio, send us the following interesting items : In Eastern Ohio, our Strawberry season commences about the first of June with Jenny Lind, Burr's New P...
-Ivy
This invaluable evergreen climber is not sufficiently appreciated in this country; wherever it will thrive it should be planted,both for covering walls and to run up the blank stems of trees, using bo...
-An Ivy Covered Rural Seat
Giant or Irish Ivy has frequently been recommended in this periodical for ornamental purposes, as well as a beautiful green plant whicb is perfectly adapted to warm rooms, where it grows with great ra...
-The Ivy For In-Door Decoration
We do not know a single vine so suitable for growing in the ordinary air of living-rooms and will stand so much hard usage as the Ivy. The only point on which cultivators err by neglect is the failure...
-Ivy For Indoor Decoration
I DO not know a single plant that will stand so much hard usage as Ivy. The only point on which cultivators err, is not keeping the leaves clean. If it be well washed two or three times a week, and th...
-The Ivy Plant
One of the most beautiful rural sights can be seen any day by the traveler, as he passes St. Paul's church, Fourth avenue corner Twenty-second street, in this city. Five or six years ago, some attenti...
-The Ivy-Leaved Pelargonium
The Garden says, that amongst the numerous plants now in use for the ornamentation of hanging baskets, for draping vases, or for training loosely up conservatory pillars, few surpass the Ivy-Leaved Pe...
-J. J. Smith
Dear Sir: I have just received the Horticulturist. In the August number, page 346, are some remarks about the Osage Orange so much at variance with my experience here, in Northern Illinois, lat. 42&de...
-J. Jay Smith, Esq
Dear Sir: A Washington letter-writer in the Traveller, comparing the Chinese sugar-cane with that grown in our Southern States, and referring to the mode of propagating the latter (by cuttings), says:...
-Jackman's Clematises
Among the returns that have been made as to the effect of the late drought on particular plants, the value of these new hardy clematises as additions to our summer budding plants must not be overlooke...
-Jackson Apple
Mr. Wilson Dennis, of Appleback (what a capital place to grow apples), Bucks County, Pa., sends us specimens of the Jackson Seedling Apple, with the description, as follows: Tree a good grower, and b...
-The Jalousie De Fontenay Vendee Pear
(See Frontispiece). Our Frontispiece this month is a beautiful specimen of the Jalousie de Fonte-nay Vendee Pear, grown by Dr. Grant at Iona Island, from which we have the following description: Th...
-James Eadie
The idea that the dipping of the pipe is new, was quite errouneous; it had been , practised in England years ago, as well as in this vicinity, in Montgomery county. Mr. Pollock made tome remarks in c...
-James Jones
Regarding the Essay as embracing and explaining all that it is important for us to know, relative to the principle of the action of manure on the soil, I need only say that the ideas of Prof. Stephens...
-James Mathews' Curculio Remedy
A communication from Mr. James Mathews (now of Knoxville, Iowa), relating to his remedy for the Curculio, is too lengthy for our limited pages, and as it still does not reveal entirely what the secret...
-Jaminette Pear
Fruit - Size, medium; form, globular, obovate, obtuse, pyriform; skin, rough; color, light greenish, yellow ground, dotted and marbled with russet, especially around the stem insertion and calyx basin...
-The Japan Lilies
These magnificent Lilies, although for many years in cultivation in this country, are still scarce. The high prices - one, two, and three dollars apiece - at which they have been held, as well as the ...
-The Japan Lilies. Continued
A few plants may be retained in the greenhouse, with a view to have them in flower earlier; indeed, I place some of my bulbs in a moderately close, warm house early in March, and I manage to have them...
-The Japan Pea
As this vegetable is beginning to attract some attention among horticultu-tsts, it may not be amiss to make a few observations on its qualities as an article of food and rofit Season before last, Mr. ...
-Japanese Apricot
We learn from the Touinbouw Flora that the Butch have succeeded in fruiting the Japanese Apricot, called by botanists Prunus (or Armeniaea) Mume A colored figure in the same work gives so good an idea...
-Japanese Dwellings
THERE are few Japanese dwellings of the middle class which have not .their little . private gardens, quiet retreats for sleep, for reading, fishing in the tanks, or indulging in libations of tea and s...
-Japanese Lilies
The Japanese Lilies are so hardy, as well as beautiful, that they should become as common as the Turk's Cap and Tiger Lilies. They are now all moderately cheap, and if one only has a bulb or two to st...
-Japanese Plants
Mr. Fortune has recently sent home from Japan a collection of plants, which were shown at the late exhibition of the London Horticultural Society. The following account of them is taken from the Pro...
-The Japanese Primrose As A Pot Plant
This new floral visitor, condemned by some as an outdoor plant, is yet most highly recommended by D. T. Fish, in The Garden, as fit to take high rank as a pot plant. It bears moderate forcing remarkab...
-Japanese Trees
A few days since, while sitting in our office, there walked in a gentleman, with an intelligent face, and frank, pleasant manner, introducing himself as Dr. Hall, of Japan, whom we had for some time w...
-Jasminum Nudiflorum
This out-door, winter-blooming plant makes a sensation wherever it is introduced. No garden should be without it. It was introduced from Nankin, only so late as 1844 through Mr. Fortune. It is a shrub...
-The Jefferson County Apple
About a year ago our attention was called to this Apple, by our friend S. Worden, of Minetto, Oswego county, N. Y., and last autumn he sent us a box of specimens, from which we made the following desc...
-Jeffreys Still Alive
The former readers of the Horticulturist will welcome back to its pages a favorite writer over the signature of Jeffreys, who used to criticize with an unsparing but just pen, editors and contributors...
-Jersey State Agricultural Society
The annual meeting of this Society was held at the Capitol, in the city of Trenton, on Wednesday, the 15th of January last, at eleven o'clock a.m. The meeting was fairly attended, a very large proport...
-A Jog In The Fruit Garden
When the month of November comes, it is worth while to look about a little, and see how yon stand in the garden and orchard. Yon must be a miracle of expertness if you hare not failed in some crop or ...
-John Chinaman
On the first information received in this country that (holies were imported into Cuba under an apprenticeship contract, a very erroneous impression was created here respecting their treatment A few o...
-John Jay Smith, Esq
My Dear Sir, - L. F. Allen speaks pear knowledge for the Buffalo region very truly, no doubt, but not for Southern Ohio. With us they do much better. Last year I got four dollars the bushel for Bartle...
-Joliet, Will Co., ILL., Nov. 7,'1866. Mr. Jay Smith, Esq
Dear Sib: In looking over the Gossip in the Editor's Table of the October number of the Horticulturist, I observed that the Newport News says he saw fifty potatoes weighed, and the result was a tota...
-Jottings Of A Flying Visit To Boston And Vicinity
Being a thorough-bred Yankee, my first instructive lisping, so they tell me, was Go-ahead. When I became a tall boy, I was afflicted with sundry diseases peculiar to the teens, among which was a l...
-Journal Of The New York State Agricultural Society, August
The Dudley Observatory and the Scientific Council Statement of the Trustees. Albany, 1858. The Astronomers have somehow or other, instead of pointing their instruments at the heavens, run the whole af...
-Jucunda
Although in high culture a good bearer, under ordinary care this is a variety that will fail to meet the expectations of many growers who have bought and planted it upon the reputation given it by som...
-The Judas Tree
This is a beautiful genus of ornamental trees, flowering early in spring, and looking very pretty planted singly on a lawn, or trained to a wall or trellis; it is not a large tree, seldom reaching hig...
-Juglans Regia Bartheriana
This variety of cultivated nut (Juglans regia, Linne), of which we have here a drawing of the fruit and of a branch, is remarkable for the shape and principally for the length of its fruit, which is e...
-July The Month To Prune Apple-Trees For The North And Western States
We are aware that many advocate pruning in the spring, especially when increased vigor is desired to be given to the tree; but we confess that careful observation for many years has taught us that we ...
-June 21st
The Society met at Wardrop's. J. Murdoch, Jr., exhibited eight Tarieties of Mors Roses - Celine, Crietata, Mottled, Laneii, Angelique, Adelaide, and common pink - exceedingly fragrant and beautiful. M...
-June Meeting Of The Michigan State Pomological Society
TO the Editor of the Horticulturist: - The June meeting of the Michigan State Pomological Society was held at Kalamazoo, on the 25th, 26th and 27th. Notwithstanding the extreme severity of the past wi...
-The Juniper
This family varies much in form, color, and habit; some being compact, upright and pyramidal, others open and spreading; some a dark grass-green, others, again, tinged with blue. It becomes rusty in w...
-Kansas Pacific Railway
The main line extends from Kansas City, Mo., and Leavenworth, Kansas, both flourishing cities on the Missouri River, through Central Kansas and Eastern Colorado 639 miles, to Denver, Colorado, and wit...
-Keep The Surface of The Ground Loose
We have many years watched the varied results of the cultivator who keeps frequently stirring the surface of his soil, and the one who hoes or cultivates only when the weeds compel him to the work; an...
-Keeping Evergreen In Winter
An exchange remarks that trees purchased in autumn, and for localities where it would be doubtful if they lived during the winter if planted, can be safely kept in a cool cellar or a damp room, in whi...
-Keeping Fowls In Orchards
The public has yet to learn the full advantages of keeping poultry. Few seem to appreciate the service they may do among the trees in an orchard. Let any one try them in an orchard of a quarter or hal...
-Keeping Grapes
W. S., (New-York.) If you wish to preserve your grapes very perfectly, take large earthern jars and fill the bottom one inch in depth with dry charcoal dust. Pick the clusters in a dry cool day - dip ...
-Keeping Qualities Of Grapes
The Fruit and Wine Reporter says, there is a great difference in varieties for winter keeping. The very early sorts are, in general, poor keepers. Hartford and Adirondacs are examples of the earliest,...
-Keeping Winter Fruit Out-Doors
LAST week we had two days' respite from severe cold, and the snow being gone from my orchard, I picked up a basketful of nice Baldwin apples from under a tree, where they fell last November, and had l...
-Keeping Winter Pears
At the winter meeting of the Ohio State Horticultural Society, at Zanesville, Mr. Bateham explained Dr. Ayer's successful method of keeping winter pears out of doors during the winter. This is simply ...
-The Kelsey Pear
About fifteen years since a small pear-tree seedling came up in the garden of William Kelsey,Esq., Columbus, Ohio, and by him was staked and cared for, until about five years ago it fruited. At first ...
-Kentucky Horticultural Society
Saturday, August 6th, was a proud day for the managers and friends of this Society. The display was by far the most imposing of the season, and in some of its features might have challenged a comparis...
-Kentucky Horticultural Society (2)
The drenching rain of Saturday did not prevent our spirited horticulturists from bringing many fine specimens of fruits, vegetables, and flowers to the regular weekly exhibition. In peaches we notice...
-Kentucky Horticultural Society (3)
We are indebted to Thomas S. Kennedy, Esq., the energetic President of this Society, for an account of the last three weekly exhibitions, which we are compelled to condense more than we should if we c...
-Kentucky Horticultural Society - Exhibition At Louisville
This exhibition was held in the very large and airy room in the Farmers' Tobacco Warehouse. The room was brilliantly illuminated, and the numerous pillars were richly decorated with evergreens. The ta...
-Kerosene And The Curculio
THE readers of the Western Pomologist for 1871, will recollect a communication from H. Gregg, Downey, Iowa, in the use of kerosene for expelling the curculio from his plum trees, and in the course of ...
-Kew Gardens
The account of a visit to Kew Garden is continued in this number, and will be concluded in the next; its object will have been attained if it interests the reader to reflect on the immense variety of ...
-The Kew York Park
Mr. Editor - You are aware that the Commissioners chosen for carrying out the Central Park of New York, some time ago, offered four prizes for designs, the value of which respectively were $2000, $100...
-Khasia Orchids
Dr. Hooker, in his travels in the Khasia mountains, mentions Eria, CoeIo-gyne (Wallichi, maculata, and elata), Cymbidium, Dendrobinm, Snnipia, and other beautiful air plants, as growing at the top of ...
-Killing Blackberry Bushes
One of the editors of the Rural New Yorker, in answer to the question how to kill blackberry vines, says: I have not only planted but killed out several acres of blackberry bushes during the last ten ...
-Killing Currant Worms
Mr. J. L. Stickney, of Wauwatosa, Wis., says a neighbor applied Paris Green to his bushes. It was mixed with four times its weight of flour, and very thoroughly applied; it killed the worms, sure enou...
-The Kilmarnock Weeping Willow. Salix Caprea Pendula
This beautiful weeping plant having lately attracted attention, its history may not be uninteresting. There lived in a sequestered corner of Monkwood estate, near Ayr, an aged botanist, named James Su...
-King Apple
Mr. Mattison, of Jacksonville, N. Y., left on our table some large and very fine specimens of the King Apple and the Henrick Sweet, for which ho will please accept our thanks. Of the latter, however, ...
-Kingston, Ulster Co., N. Y
Editor of Horticulturist - Dear Sir; I send you, this morning, per American Express Company, a sample of an apple cultivated a little in this vicinity, and less known in other places. It is called Phi...
-Kiosques Or Summer Houses
(See Frontispiece.) - Having given in other numbers, sketches of summer houses, or covered garden seats, in rustic work - as the least expensive and most appropriate for the majority of situations, wh...
-Kirri Cottage. Suburban Residenceof Mrs. Cornelius Davis, Senior, At Newark, New Jersxy
The name is derived from the Japan tree, standing in the front ground; English name, Pawlonia. This tree, if not the most graceful in its form, is the fastest growing, most exotic looking, and the ric...
-The Kirtland Cherries
However strange it may seem, and unwilling as the world may be to believe that one man could in so short a time originate from seed so many superior varieties of cherries, it is nevertheless true. Sea...
-Kirtland's Morello
This variety was first described as Kirtland's Large Mo rello; afterward, in my book, as Large Morello. I now prefer to name it Kirt-land's Morello, because it is not of the largest of its class...
-The Kitchen Garden
EGETABLES, and their cultivation, are now attracting much Mention; information is eagerly sought, as we have abundant evidence in the number of inquiries we are almost daily receiv-ing. The hints we...
-The Kitchen Garden. Continued
We frequently hear people say, we have so many vegetables that we are at a loss how to dispose of them, when the truth is they have scarcely anything but what should be thrown to the hogs. Finally, ...
-Kitchen Garden Reform In England
In our travels in Europe nothing in relation to gardening struck us more forcibly than the superiority of French, Belgium, and Dutch garden vegetables over those of England, and of the greater skill a...
-Kitchen Gardening
I was much interested, recently, in the complaint of a brother gardener, that his employer cared no more for a rare plant than for a bunch of Beets. I merely inquired, Does he care for the Beets? ...
-Kitchen Gardening. Continued
In this class we have the Pea, Potato, Tomato, Corn, Cabbage, Squash, and Lima Bean. I do not specially provide for Celery, as it follows my first crop of Peas; nor for Turnips or Endive, which follow...
-Kittatinny
This new wonder among the blackberries can not claim large size as one of its merits, as it is not quite as large as the New Rochelle, but it is of far better quality, and probably the best-flavored v...
-Kittatinny Blackberry
At a meeting of the committee of the invited guests of E. Williams, held at Newton, N. J., on the 8th ult., consisting of P. T. Quinn, J. J. Thomas, L. Wetherell, R. S. Swords, and Geo. E. Woodward, t...
-Kramer Seedling Strawberry
Among the many new strawberries introduced the past season, the one above named received considerable favor in the place of its origin. What it will prove elsewhere we have yet to learn; but as the or...
-Kyanizing Plant Labels
The following method of Kyanizing wooden labels that are to be used on trees or in exposed places, is recommended in a German paper: Thoroughly soak the pieces of wood in a strong solution of copper...
-L. Berokmans
It is doubtless known to many of our readers, that L. Berckmans, Esq., a distinguished Belgian pornologist, has taken up his residence permanently in this country, near Plainfield, N. J. He has there ...
-La Caucasse
Mr. Walker: Bunches seven inches in length; berry over two inches in circumference; sweeter than the Versaillaise. Mr. Saunders inquired if any one knew the Red Antwerp Currant ? Mr. Steele of North...
-Label Your Trees And Plants
Label all your ornamental trees, plants and varieties of fruit. Do it now, and do it durably. It will save endless confusion and trouble of reference to a chart. The best as well as cheapest label, a...
-Lachenalia Tricolor
Amidst the numerous varieties of bulbous - rooted plants that adorn our green-houses during the earlier months of the year, few deserve or are better entitled to the gardener's attention than the one ...
-Lack Of Gardens
He complains, and with perfect justice too, that with all our facilities of fruit culture, and an admirable climate, we have lost the love of gardening. I am nearly disheartened to see the houses in...
-Ladder And Basket
The arrangement which we give in the accompanying design, offers a new and convenient plan of a basket, containing the nails and necessary utensils for paling up a garden wall. This basket is of willo...
-The Ladies' Floral Cabinet
This new household journal, started by the publisher of The Horticulturist, to fill the field for a popular ladies' floral and home journal, has now reached a permanent circulation of nearly 30,000. I...
-Laelia Pumila, Var. Major
From R. Warner, Esq. This was also a small weak plant, and proved to be identical with the Cattleya pumila, var. major, of Lemaire (L'lllust. Horticultural,vi., t.193), who proposes to reduce Laelia...
-The Lafayette Pear
Some time since we alluded to the Lafayette Pear from Connecticut. It fruited at the time of Lafayette's last visit to this country, and this circumstance suggested its name. It has not yet been distr...
-Lake Shore Grape-Growers' Society
The annual winter meeting of this Society was held in Cleveland, 19th to 21st February, and, from the reports received, was well attended. The subject of growing grapes, inasmuch as it comes home prof...
-Landers' Love Of Flowers
He was always drawing analogies between children and flowers, and there was no mere fancy in the well-known lines: And tis and ever was my wish and way To let all flowers live freely, and all die W...
-Landmarks
We have lately been shown some sheets of a new work under this title, by Dr. C. W. Grant. A more expressive title, perhaps, would have been Pomological Landmarks, as the work will be devoted to pomolo...
-Landscape Adornment
Ornamental planting, artistically considered, is a grade of landscape adornment but seldom attempted, but it is one that should receive attention in the present condition of landscape art, an art that...
-Landscape Adornment (2)
Color, as used in ornamental planting, enables one to produce many varied, beautiful, and artistic effects, not only by appropriating aerial perspective, but by opening a study in the habits and chang...
-Landscape Adornment (3)
In all the various departments of Art, there exists much diversity of opinion in regard to true excellence; scarcely any two acknowledged authorities agree in what is truly artistic and beautiful, and...
-Landscape Adornment (4)
Civil and Landscape Engineer, No. 89 Broadway, New York. The faculty of foreknowing effects constitutes the master in every branch of the polite arts.'7 - Humphrey Repton. We are led to assume tha...
-Landscape Adornment - No. 13. Roads
An ornamental road in any style of landscape embellishment is essentially a work of art, and should, under all conditions, express art in its design and construction. The dignity of a private place de...
-Landscape Adornment - No. 17. "Terraces"
By Geo. E. Woodward, Civil Engineer And Architect, No. 20 Broadway, New York. If there is a department of Landscape Art more noted than any other for its frequent failures, it certainly must be the c...
-Landscape Adornment - No. 18. " Arrangement."
By Geo. S. Woodward, Civil Engineer And Architect, No. 20 Broadway, New York. When one sets himself to work systematically to build a house, having in view the principles of convenience, economy, and...
-Landscape Adornment - No. VIII. Terraces
The right line style of landscape gardening has now almost, by common consent, become obsolete - it is looked upon as one of the memories of the past. Still it has been no easy matter to yield up our ...
-Landscape Adornment - No. X. "Gates."
By Geo. E. Woodward, Architect And Landscape Gardener, 29 Broadway, New York. The introduction of the old and well-established principles of the truss in the design and construction of gates, is an i...
-Landscape Adornment - No. XIX. "The Approach"
By Geo. X. Woodward, Civil Engineer And Architect, No. 89 Broadway, New York. The most prominent feature in the embellishment of a country estate, next to the mansion, is the approach, and, if of suf...
-Landscape Adornment - No. XX. "Entrances"
By Geo. B. Woodward, Civil Engineer And Architect, No. 29 Broadway, New York. Evert place, says Mr. Loudon, may be considered as producing three leading impressions on the mind of a stranger, viz....
-Landscape Adornment - No. XXI. "Plantation"
THE embellishment of ground may be very properly considered under two heads, one of which relates to its money value, and the other to its beauty and enjoyment; and as, in the progress of taste in all...
-Landscape Adornment - No. XXII. Flower And Shrubbery Beds
By Gko. E. Woodward, Civll. And Landscape Engineer, St Park Row, New York. The process of laying out circular and elliptical flower-beds is familiar to many, but the rules hitherto given for laying o...
-Landscape Adornment - No. XXIII. Roads
There is, perhaps, as much skill to be displayed in the location and construction of an ornamental road as in any other branch of landscape adornment, and there is precisely that knowledge wanted that...
-Landscape Adornment - No. XXIV. "Ornamental Water"
Water is one of the most enlivening features of the landscape, and deserves a prominent position in the list of rural embellishments. It possesses an attraction that is always pleasing, and gives a va...
-Landscape Adornment - No. XXV. "The Line Of Grace And Beauty"
By Geo. E. Woodward, Civil Engineer And Architect, No. 87 Park Row, New York. The most general practice of laying out ornamental roads and walks is by inspection, the lines being decided upon by the ...
-Landscape Adornment, No. 12. Roads
Prim gravel walks, through which we winding go, ln endless serpentines, that nothing show, Till tired, I ask, ' Why this eternal round? And the pert gard'ner says,' Tis pleasure-ground.' Much has ...
-Landscape Adornment, No. IX. The Beautiful And The Picturesque
Among modern landscape gardeners the natural style of landscape adornment is divided into two somewhat distinct branches, and are designated the Beautiful and the Picturesque; and although frequently ...
-Landscape Adornment, No. XI. Ornamental Water
There is nothing in the whole range of materials made use of in Landscape Adornment that is so effective, attractive, and beautiful as water, and wherever it can be had at a reasonable expenditure, it...
-Landscape Adornment, No. XIV. Appropriation
The appropriation of all that is beautiful in adjoining or distant scenery is undoubtedly a self-evident right of the landscape artist; and as the hill and valley views, the broad river, or the distan...
-Landscape Adornment, No. XV. Roads
It is a simple thing to show how to spend money, no talent whatever being required to commit the most wasteful extravagances. In landscape work, the error of extravagance is one most frequently commit...
-Landscape Adornment, No. XVI - Working Plans
The successful pursuit of Landscape Gardening, like all other liberal arts, depends upon a thorough understanding of results, and no work of excellence can be perfected without a close and careful stu...
-Landscape Adornment, No. XXVII. - Contracting
By Geo. E. Woodward, Civil Engineer & Architect, No. 37 Park Row, New Tore. The execution of ornamental landscape work by contract is a subject that admits many arguments on both sides, it presents m...
-Landscape Adornment. No. XXVI - Roads
Handsomely located, regularly graded, and well-constructed roads are chief among the attractions of a fine country place, and constitute one of its most effective improvements. When well done, they ar...
-Landscape Engineering
It may be a matter of surprise to many to learn how intimately the arts of design are united with those of construction, or rather the great use made of a draftsman's skill in developing a work of art...
-Landscape Engineering And Gardening
To one who has devoted any thought or attention to Landscape Gardening, the greatest inconsistencies must be apparent between its theory and practice, while it is universally admitted to be worthy of ...
-Landscape Gardening (From Turner's Florist, Fruitist, And Garden Miscellany, London)
In the course of our professional journeyings immediately round about the metropolis, it has been a matter of surprise to us that the gardens of villas, large and small, exhibit in their arrangement l...
-Landscape Gardening As Applied To Rural Cemeteries
In the application of the rules of Landscape Gardening to public and private grounds in this country, we have as yet but in few instances arrived to the highest degree of excellence. The subject is co...
-Landscape Gardening In New-England, By Geo Jaques, Worcester, Mass
I venture to offer for publication in the Horticulturist a few hints, having a somewhat local bearing upon the subject of landscape gardening. It is not my purpose to dazzle your eyes with any light ...
-Landscape Gardening: Or Parks And Pleasure Grounds
With Practical Notes on Country Residences, Villas, Public Parks, and Gardens. By Chaeles H. Smith, Landscape Gardener, Garden Architect, etc.: with Notes and Additions by LEwIs F. ALLEN, author of ...
-Landscape In Connection With Tree Planting
WHEN instructed taste goes hand in band with cultivated nature, scenery may be created; by studying the varying forms, and seizing on what some author calls accidents, graceful groups may be produce...
-Landscape In Connection With Tree Planting, N0. 2
NOTWITHSTANDING Kent's mistakes, so many country-seats were capable of great improvement by merely clearing away redundant formality, the painter's ideas were not entirely neglected, and, accordingly,...
-Landscape In Connection With Tree Planting, No, 4
(CONCUSION). IF we have succeeded in getting the ear of the landscape improver, by illustrating to the eye the effects of grouping, we have only now to add, that the study of the subject, to be effec...
-Landscape Or Home Adornment
The readers of the Horticultttrist will remember that in the February number a few remarks were made relative to home adornment, and a promise also made to depict further some features of beauty found...
-Landscape Or Home Adornment. Continued
Had this same fountain been placed a little to one side, just where a glimpse of it could be had from the drawing-room windows, and then had for its association near by in the grounds a weeping birch,...
-Landscape, Or Home Adornment - Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O
The value of everything that approaches the beautiful is enhanced by an appropriate setting. Even the most beautiful flower of nature is improved by its surrounding of delicately tinted green foliage....
-The Lantana
The Lantana requires similar soil and treatment to the Calceolaria - except that it is of a stouter, a more woody nature, and needs no support. Its compact head of flowers of different and changing hu...
-Lapageria Rosea
This splendid plant has hitherto evaded many attempts among us to cultivate it. We find the following account of its treatment recommended in the Gardener's Chronicle: - The handsome Lapageria rosea ...
-The Larch
The European and American Larches, says Michaux, are more strictly confined than any other resinous trees to the northern zone of the two continents, and they are the first to disappear in approaching...
-Large Experimental Orchards
Our Western friends excel in large collections of native and foreign apples, which they are growing and fruiting toward establishing knowledge of their comparative values at the West, as well as aidi...
-Large Globe Tripoli
The largest onion grown; globe-shaped, inclining to oval, light-reddish green; does not keep well; flavor very mild. This is the best variety for roasting; and, when properly cooked, makes a most savo...
-Large Morello Cherry
At Whalley Abbey, Lancashire, died, during the last autumn, the celebrated Morello Cherry, which was considered one of the finest trees of the kind in the North of England. Symptoms of decay had been ...
-Large Or Small Trees - Which For An Orchard
There is probably no subject on which advice has been more uniform in our horticultural journals, than that regarding the size of fruit trees for transplanting into an orchard. The nation which is so ...
-Large Peach Crop
The Brothers Loughry, of Adams County, Ohio, raised the past season thirty-six hundred bushels of peaches, which brought them in the Cincinnati market an average of three dollars per bushel, or an agg...
-Large Peach Farms
Near Middletown several large peach farms were visited. The farm of the late Cantwell Clark contains one thousand acres, two hundred and eighty of which are devoted to peach orchards, and the balance ...
-Large Pine
Turning over the leaves of an old journal a few days since, we came across an account of a pine tree cut down in the State of Maine, in the year 1839, that measured seven feet diameter at the stump, a...
-Large Plums
The Farm Journal says: - One of our neighbors was recently showing us a specimen of his fruit orchard in Philadelphia, only a few feet square, attached to his dwelling, which illustrates how much can...
-Large Rose Trees
I have often heard amateurs, when admiring some of the large specimens in the nurseries here, express astonishment at their prodigious size, which they attribute to their great age, and good soil. But...
-Large Specimens Of The Duohesse D'Angouleme Pear
In the ad interim fruit report of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society mention is made of a Duchesse d'Angouleme of enormous size - nearly five inches long by four and a quarter broad, and weighing...
-Large Stock Of Small Fruits
Our West Jersey friends have had it all their own way with the small fruits for several years past, but they must look well to their laurels, or other sections of the country will take the lead. Parry...
-Large Trees
IT is curious that the large trees of the United States east of the Mississippi river, and especially the size to which the different species attain have received little attention since the time of Mi...
-Large Trees In The State Or New York
It is much to be regretted that do work has ever been published with well engraved portraits of the finest specimens of our noble American forest trees, many of which are annually disappearing, either...
-The Largest Pear
Dr. J. M. Ward, of Newark, N. J., sends us a Duchease d'Angonlemo Pear, grown by himself, the size and weight of which are positively fabulous to those who have not seen it. When taken from the tree, ...
-A Last
A gallant gardener, discoursing on parlor plants, introduces his readers to feminine charming collars, and neat, spotless, embroidered wristbands, and says: A lady is none the less a lady, if she dis...
-Last Part Of Ques. 5. - Best Time For Pruning Apple Trees?
Sharp. - Whenever you see a limb which ought to be removed, cut it off; but, as a rule, general pruning after the flow of sup has commenced is injurious; has learned this from experience. B. Fish obj...
-The Last Winter
The long cold, worst winter that the oldest inhabitant ever knew has at last passed away, and spring, smiling and gay, with warm sunshines, genial showers, the rich song of birds, has come to gladd...
-Late And Destructive Frosts
We record, with deep regret, the occurrence of a severe frost on Sunday morning, May 25th. We find, through our correspondents, that it prevailed over a wide extent of country, and proved very destruc...
-Late Cherries
The cherry season began with me this year on the 14th of June, with the Early Purple Guigne, just a week in advance of the earliest date at which I remember ever to have had ripe cherries. Belle d'Orl...
-Late Grafting
It is generally supposed that grafting must be done early in the spring, or it will not succeed; the rule is to graft before vegetation has begun. We have at various times practiced grafting up to the...
-Late Peas
Of fifteen varieties (so called by the seedsmen) the following appear to be the best, as proved in the Horticultural Society's Garden: - American Dwarf, sown April 6. flt for use July 8th; about one a...
-The Late Winter
Numerous communications respecting the effects of the late winter have reached us. From the number we have selected several which have been published lately, and have to regret that space precludes th...
-The Late Winter, Etc. Etc
The effect of the late severe winter being now, in some measure, apparent, it may not be amiss to compare its effects in different localities. We can hardly account for the effect produced on trees an...
-The Lattice Plant
The new and curious aquatic plant from Madagascar, called the Lattice Plant ( Ouvi-randra fenestratis), must be placed among the most remarkable of our recent botanical acquisitions. Its existence h...
-Lawns
When a lawn, from age, becomes filled with moss, its surface should be loosened several times in Autumn with an iron rake, in order to tear it up. Notwithstanding the grass will appear to be much dist...
-Lawns (2)
From the nature of our climate we can not, as a rule, have as perfect lawns, green, velvety, and fresh, as they do in England; but with due care in preparing the soil, and by using seed in abundance, ...
-Lawn And Park Surroundings
The trees and shrubbery which ornament the approach to this house, should be rather of the graceful varieties, than otherwise. The weeping willow, the horse chestnut, the mountain ash, if suitable to ...
-Lawn Grass
A correspondent of the London Chronich, in describing the gar-den of A. Mongredien, Esq., Forest Hill, Sydenham, says: The gardens attached to this prettily situated suburban residence, though not ex...
-Lawn Trees
Among the multitude of trees which are suitable for the embellishment of lawns, the Magnolias are justly entitled to the highest rank. In Europe, whether we look in the little plot of the cottage or t...
-The Lawn. Hints For The Lawn
Judging from the appearance of their grounds, many people are laboring under the impression that the season for work is past, now that the frost has destroyed the foliage on the trees, and the bright,...
-Lawns And Grasses
In my article in the May number of the Horticulturist, on Cultivation of Grasses, I made a few closing remarks on Lawns, and their management Since writing the article in question, I have thought so...
-Laws Of The Road
The New England Farmer publishes the following as the rules of law governing travel upon our public roadways. It contains two points, viz. - that relative to carriages going the same way, and that rel...
-The Lawson Cypress. Cupressus Law-Soniana
This we consider one of the greatest acquisitions that has been made for many years to our list of hardy evergreens. Its foliage resembles the arbor-vitae, but its habit is that of the hemlock. As a l...
-The Lawton Blackberry
The following testimony regarding this fruit is from a New York paper, of the first week of September. Here is another fruit making its appearance in the market: We have before us a specimen of the...
-The Lawton Blackberry In Fruit. Publisher's Visit To Norwalk
It is well known to most of our readers, that the Lawton or New Rochelle blackberry, has been disseminated through the country by Mr. William Lawton, of New Rochelle, in this State, and Messrs. George...
-Lax On Apple Trees
In the last number of the Horticulturist I noticed a cut showing a species of insect that infests the apple tree. Enclosed I send you another specimen of a different breed. It is increasing on the t...
-Layers Of The Grapevine
B. F. J. asks us to say when and how to layer grapevines, to which we reply: Layers of the vine are made by taking taking ,in spring a cane of the last year's growth and bending it down ; lay it alon...
-Laying Out A Garden
If the lines of walks in a garden are ungraceful and inartistic, it is. not likely in other respects it will be an example of good design. But even supposing it were so, the circumstances of the walks...
-Laying Out Gardens
Many gardens are wholly deficient in any distinctive character, from the fact of their having been designed, or more properly jumbled together piecemeal, without any design whatever. It cannot be deni...
-Laying Out Grounds
To strike out the seemingly rude and simple outlines of an arrangement for a villa residence, with its various accessories, requires a reflective mind, alike conversant with the forms of nature and pr...
-Laying Out Grounds Of Moderate Extent
We know that many individuals fancy that there is not much to learn on this subject: on the contrary, that every one knows how he likes to have his place done, and that as it is all a matter of tas...
-Laying Out Grounds Of Moderate Extent. Continued
If in the distant landscape a view of water can be brought in, nothing adds more, and few things so much, to the general effect. In the introduction of the distant scenery, care should be taken to avo...
-Laying Out The Flower Garden
The first thing to be done is to make up one's mind definitely what effect can be best produced with the materials at command. Every large plant - say over three feet in height and diameter - is an ob...
-Laying Out The Garden
In either a large or small vegetable garden, the most economical way to plant is in rows. In small, or family gardens, these should run lengthwise across the patch, one path through the center being g...
-Le Jardin Fruitier Du Museum
Nos. 18 to 21, both inclusive, of this handsome work have appeared, exclusively occupied by figures and descriptions of pears. Among the more interesting are the Poire de Pentecote, with its aliases c...
-Leaf Blight And Cracking In The Pear
Members generally had found these two maladies to go together, but not invariably. The leaf-blight more frequently attacked young plants in the seed bed, and sometimes larger orchard trees. When on be...
-The Leaf Blight Of The Pear
On reading the communication on leaf-blight, by Mr. Hooker, I was reminded of a paper on a similar subject by the late Andrew Knight. On referring to it, I find Mr. Knight's observations so nearly coi...
-The Leaf-Cutting Bee
The genus Megachile (comprising the leaf-catting and some other bees) has long attracted the attention of the curious; and so early as 1G70, it was noticed by Ray, Willughby, Lister, and others. Mr. ...
-Leafless Pear-Tree Living Two Tears Without Pushing
The following is a remarkable instance of a pear-tree living two years without putting forth a leaf. A young rider-tree of the sort called Poire Belgee (?) a kind very much resembling the Beurre Ranee...
-Leaping
In leaping, the horse raises the fore legs from the ground, and projects the body upwards and forwards by the hind legs alone. It Is well known that they leap rivulets, hedges, and ditches, with great...
-Leaves From My Chinese Note Book
Under this title I propose to send you, from time to time, descriptions of Chinese gardens, plants, and other objects of natural history which I consider of sufficient interest to occupy a place in yo...
-Leaves for Leap-Mould
Nothing can answer better than Elm and Sycamore. Beech is more valuable for giving heat, and keeps longer, and, therefore, it requires more time to rot into mould. Oak-leaves are the most lasting; but...
-Legends Of Trees
Mr. Editor: Before me I have a volume of Sears' Pictorial Library, and coming across an article headed Legends respecting Trees, I thought I would copy a few paragraphs from time to time, for occas...
-Legends Of Trees (2)
The Mistletoe, particularly that which grows on the Oak, was held in great veneration by the Britons. At the beginning of their year, the Druids went in solemn procession into the forests, and raised...
-Lena Rivers And The Press
A work of unusual promise. Mrs. Holmes possesses an enviable talent in the study of American character, which is so perfectly developed by acute observation from life, that it would now be impossible ...
-Lennig - Strawberry
We see no reason for calling this strawberry Lennig's White, for it is not a white berry, although when partially ripe it is greenish; when fully ripe it is only light greenish just at the apex, and t...
-Leptodactylon Caufornicum
Hooker and Arnott in Beeckey's Voyage, p. 369 t. 89 ; alias Gilia californica, Bentham in De Cand. Prodr. ix. 316. When this beautiful plant was shown by Messrs. Veitch, under the name of Leptodac-ty...
-The Lessons Of The Year. By The Author of "Ten Acres Enough"
This country presents so vast an area, and is covered by so many degrees of latitude, that uniformity of agricultural experiences is absolutely impossible. Drought will prevail in one quarter, crackin...
-The Lessons Of The Year. By The Author of "Ten Acres Enough". Continued
The runners were kept down, and yet before fruiting the plants covered the ground so that no mulching was necessary. How much money this crop of 5,874 quarts produced was not stated, but at prices re...
-Let Us Know Where You Live
Editor Horticulturist - Dear Sir: Now that the subject has been revived again, in your August Horticulturist, may I have room just to second the very wise suggestion of Mr. Yeomans, in the June number...
-Letter From Georgia
Mr. Editor, - From all parts of the North my friends write me that the fair promises of the spring will not be realized; that fruit is dropping from the trees, and that in some districts fruit crops w...
-Letter From Mr. Rivers
We publish in this number an interesting letter from Mr. Rivers, of Sawbridgeworth, England. Mr. R. suggests biennial autumnal removal, as a remedy for the black blight. The very worst case of bli...
-Letter From Ohio
Throughout the West this has been a remarkable season for drouth, having had less rain in the same length of time than I have known for a number of years, and the present month (December) being more r...
-Letter From Pittsburgh
I send you the proceedings of the last two meetings of our Horticultural Board, chiefly with a view to its bearing on the Strawberry question, As you will observe, the report of last year, which conde...
-Letter From Shirley Hibberd
Stoke NewinGton. London, EnG., Jan. 6, 1871. EDITOR Horticulturist: Dear friend, permit me to make an experiment in order to ascertain if a subject which is of the most common-place order in this cou...
-Letter From Shirley Hibberd. Part 2
During November we rarely have any daylight, and by a peculiar and blessed dispensation, for which God be praised, a good show of chrysanthemums presents a magnificent appearance under gaslight, and a...
-Letter From Shirley Hibberd. Part 3
Mr. Salter appropriated every year a great old lean to conservatory to a display of chrysanthemums, which was visited by hundreds of people, and constituted, during the three or four weeks when the fl...
-Letter From Switzerland
I cannot help thinking of my horticultural friends as I sit each morning at my window, and in the intervals of writing or reading look out upon the vineyard under it, watching the busy fingers of the ...
-Letters From The Woods
Ths Woods AprU 14, 1854. The spring, bo long and so anxiously looked for, comes on apace. Already the snow is melted from the southern slopes of the hills, and the grass looks fresh and green by the s...
-Lettuce
Cauliflower and other plants in frames, should be carefully aired at every favorable opportunity; unless this is properly attended to now, the plants will be likely to suffer when severe colds overtak...
-Liaising From Seed
For raising common kinds, to withstand the winter in the flower garden, it is easy enough to procure seed; but to raise a first-class flower, such as should be considered sufficiently choice to repay ...
-Liberality
At a meeting of the Executive Board of the Pennsylvania State Agricultural Society at Harrisburg, a communication was received from Gen. James Irvin, offering the Board from two hundred to two hundred...
-Libocedrus Doniana, End'Icher; Alias Thuya Doniana, Hooker
This singularly beautiful and interesting plant, which is a native of the north island of New Zealand, where it attains a height of from 30 to 70 feet, has stood the winter at this place altogether un...
-Libonia
One of the most valuable plants for greenhouse decoration is the Libonia flori bunda, which was introduced only a few years ago. It is a small, half-shrubby plant, which, on account of its abundant an...
-The Library
A small library requires the same care as a large one. By this I mean that the small collection of books forming the private library of any rural resident, should be kept in as nice order, and the cla...
-The Library - L
In the plans of country residences which appear from time to time in the Horticulturist and other rural journals, there is often a room marked as the Library, which presupposes the owner to be possess...
-Life In The Country
NOW that cities have been tried and have been found a failure IN. by many in pursuit of happiness - whether it be because business is unsuccessful, or that their minds find little satisfaction and rep...
-Life In The Country - Winter Enjoyments
ONE of the favorite authors of English literature has described the pleasures of country life somewhat after this charming fashion: Let the house be a cottage, embowered with flowering shrubs, so cho...
-Life In The Country Railroad Cars
No man in the steamboat or railroad cars had the slightest appearance of travelling for pleasure's suke. - Gruttan's Civilized America. AND no one can be found who does not acknowledge the benefits...
-Life In The Country. - Neatness
IF we have, in former pages, descanted rather largely on the importance of having a pursuit in a retirement to the country, it has been from a conviction of its absolute necessity for permanent enjoym...
-Life Of J. C. Londos
We have long wished to present this biography of one of nature's noblemen, and the greatest writer on the topics of horticulture, to the American public. By dividing it into three numbers, we trench b...
-Light
The most obvious effect of light on vegetation is the production of colors, and this it effects by decomposing carbonic acid, and depositing the carbonaceous matter. In most cases, certainly, light is...
-Lilac Dr. Lindley
This is by far the / best addition which has been made of late years to our hardy forcing shrubs. We hear and see a good deal of the French productions in the way of white Lilac, but their plants are ...
-Lileum Giganteum
Have any of oar correspondents this new and elegant flower! One is recorded in Norfolk (England), eleven feet in height, having; twenty flowers upon it - the first leaf only thirteen inches from the...
-Lilies
Behold the Lilies, how they grow. Thiers is something in the very name lily* that seems to imply grace and beauty. Kow naturally does the mind associate ideas of loveliness with the words of the Sa...
-Lilium Auratum
Although late in season to plant bulbs of this beautiful lily for flowering this season, it should be remembered that the bulb is perfectly hardy, and that the strength of stalk and size of bloom are ...
-Lilium Humboldtii
Is a valuable acquisition. The plant is of stately habit, growing from six to seven feet high; flowers of pure yellow, spotted with scarlet, produced on low peduncles; drooping, very flowriferous, mak...
-Lilium Lanciflolium
This is the season when these superb flowers are blooming. Let us compel all who have either of the varieties, to save seed, and to hybridise them with some of our native species. Some growers have do...
-The Lilium Thompsonianum, (Da. Thompson's Lily)
We find a colored drawing and a description of this Lily in the Flore des Serres. It was discovered more than thirty years ago, by the celebrated Dr. Wallich, or by collectors in his service, in the m...
-Lilium Tigrinum More Pleno
A beautiful novelty was introduced here last year, and flowered for the first time. It has the habit of the old, well known and popular Tiger Lily, but is very distinct from it, in the fact that it co...
-Lilt Of The Valley
This, although a common border plant, is a great favorite with the ladies in early spring, but it is by no means an easy affair to force it early. Strong crowns are indispensable, and these must be so...
-Lily Of The Valley
A. P. Calder, who had been remarkably successful in forcing the Lily of the Valley, was called upon to give his method. He said that he commenced to force this flower because he found it necessary in ...
-Lima Beans (Phaseolus Lunatus)
There are several varieties known by this name. The large white is about the best. Being tall growers, they require more space than the dwarf sorts. The most usual, and on the whole the best method, i...
-Lime For Orchards
THE most successful apple orchard in the Eastern States owes its success entirely to the application, yearly, of liberal quantities of lime broadcast over the land. Very few farmers seem to realize th...
-Lime Vs. Ashes
PLACE a piece of iron or steel in damp ashes, and it will soon corrode with rust. Place the iron or steel in lime mortar, and it will remain bright and the rust will disappear. Sow small grain where a...
-Limited Duration Of Varieties Of Plants
A. J. Downing, Esq. - Dear Sir: I accede with pleasure to the request of your correspondent, Mr. Marshall, to state what grounds I have for subscribing to the theory advanced by Andrew Kkight, respect...
-Limited Duration Of Varieties Of Plants. Continued
Possibly there may be readers of the Horticulturist not much acquainted with Mr. Kniogt's labors, and who may not, therefore, be able to appreciate the deference which is due to him as a patient, inge...
-Limited Duration Of Varieties Of Plants (2)
Dr. Lindley next touches on the apple; fortunately he has referred to three English varieties which are supposed to be in the winter of their age; the Golden Pippin, Golden Hervey, and the Red-streak....
-Limited Duration Of Varieties Of Plants (2). Part 2
Now for evidence of the decline of this once famous apple. In Martyn's edition of Miller it is said, the Red-streak so much celebrated by writers of the last century, appears almost to have survived ...
-Limited Duration Of Varieties Of Plants (2). Part 3
Proofs of the degeneracy of varieties of the potato, are too numerous to admit of doubt. The changes induced in a variety by time, are, I believe, Very accurately described by the editor of the Irish ...
-Limited Duration Of Varieties Of Plants (2). Part 4
Another high authority in these matters, minutely describes the effects of age on varieties of the anemone. The constitution of anemones, says Mr. Maddock, undergoes considerable changes with...
-The Linden Or Lime Tree
This beautiful shade tree is more commonly known in this country by the name of Basswood. It is a lofty, rapidly-growing, handsome, upright, and regular-shaped tree; much esteemed, and well suited for...
-Linnaeus Rhubabb, Or Myatt's Linnaeus
As rhubarb, or pie plant, is an article coming into general use, we have a word to say in favor of Myatt's Linnaeus, because it appears not to be so generally known as it ought to be. It originated wi...
-Lippincorr's Pronouncing Gasetteer Of The World
A correspondent from Illinois, last month, said: Maps are far behind the age so far as they have a reference to the West, where towns spring up even while the binder is putting the gilt trimmings upo...
-The Liquid Fertilizer
In 1852, the Horticulturist promulgated the mode of using a liquid manure that was highly popular, and we may add, extremely satisfactory. It consisted in simply dissolving half an ounce of sulphate ...
-A Liquid Fertilizer For Choice Plants
Dear Sir - I am confident that there are many of your lady readers, and perhaps many of the other sex, who are puzzed among the many new manures, and having failed with some, and injured their plants ...
-Liquid Grafting Wax
Mr. L'Homme-Lefort (or, as others spell the name,Lhomme-Lefort) invented, not many years ago, a grafting composition, which, when generally known, will, no doubt, supersede all others now in use, eith...
-Liquid Manure
There is nothing in the able Report of the Board of Health, of more horticultural importance than the evidence collected on the mode of applying liquid manure. Not that it contains anything new upon t...
-Liquid Manure For Gardens
No one doubts the utility of liquid manure, but we cannot get enough of it, and it is, after all, some trouble to make it; perhaps no more trouble with it than it is worth. A Pennsylvania gardener giv...
-Liquid Mineral Manures - Remarkable Results
A curious discovery has recently been made public in France, in regard to the culture of vegetables and fruit trees. By watering with a solution of sulphate of iron, the most wonderful fecundity has b...
-Lisbon
This season we have a new variety introduced, called the. Lisbon Purple Grape. As its name indicates, this is a purple grape, but unlike any of ours, for it varies from the darkest shades to a light a...
-List Of Apples Recommended By The Society For General Cultivation
American Summer Pearmain - Amateur. Benorie - Market. Baldwin - All purposes. Belmont - Do. Cooper - Market. Domine - Do. Early Harvest - All purposes. Strawberry - Amateur. Fameuse - All purposes....
-List Of Apples Unworthy Of Cultivation
Gilliflower Black. Striped. Scalloped. Alexander. Twenty-Ounce Pippin. Pumpkin Sweet. Romanite. Cheeseboro' Russet. Pennock. Tewksbury Blush. Recommended for Further Trial. Green Newtown Pippi...
-List Of Books Published By C. M. Saxton, Barker & Co
No. 25 PARK ROW, NEW YORK. Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin..$1 00. Arnold's Life of Patrick Henry........ 50. Allcott's Gift Book for Young Men.... 75 *' Ladies.. 75. Young W...
-List Of Choice Gladiolus
This list is recommended by American Rural Home: Dr. Lindley Flowers large, of a light rose color; edges of the petals striped with carmine. Due De Malakoff Orange scarlet, striped with pale yello...
-A List Of Fruit For New York
A committee was recently appointed by the American Institute to prepare a list of fruit adapted to the vicinity of New York. They first decided to adopt only a limited number of each kind; next, to pa...
-List Of Peaches Usually Planted
Peach growers now usually choose a list like the following, named in the order in which they ripen: Troths' Early, Large Early York, Crawford's Early, Crawford's Late, Reeves' Favorite, Ward's Late Fr...
-A List Of Plants Suitable For Winter Boquets, With The Proportions Of Each Kind
25 Eupatorium elegans, From cuttings. 25 salicifolium, 25 Stevis serrats, 25 peniculata, 25 Sweet Alysaum, From seed. 25 White Candytuft, 25 Heliotropes, From cuttings. 25 Mignonett...
-List Of Prizes Offered By The New York Horticultural Society For 1858
We are glad to see New York in the field with such a liberal list of prizes, and we hope they will bring out an active competition. There is no lack of material There are two monthly shows, a semi-ani...
-List Of Rhododendrons
We are also indebted to the same source for the following selection of choicest, hardy varieties: Album Elegans A large, white flower; plant exceedingly well adapted to standards. Bertie Parsons L...
-A List Of Roses
At this season almost every one is making their selection of roses. We need not give a list here of any elaborate varieties, but only repeat the following, which, by general agreement of the florists,...
-A List Of Six Dwarf Pears
No. 1. Louise Bonne De Jersey Amateurs need not be frightened at this long French name, as they can drop all but the Louise, which they will find bon, whether of Jersey or any other island. It is a...
-List Of Stats Fruit Committers
Massachusetts. Robert Manning, Salem. Vermont, C. Goodrich, Burling tun. Maine, Henry Little, Bangor. Connecticut, V. M. Dow, New-Haven. New-York, B. Hodge. Buffiilo. A. Saul, Newburgh. New-Jersey, T...
-List Of Trees
N. S. R., (Branchville, N. J.) We recommend the following for your good gravelly loam soil, in the northern part of New-Jersey. Apples. - Early Harvest, Early Strawberry, Red Astracban, Porter, Fall...
-A List Of Twenty Pears For Cultivation - The Choice Of One Hundred
First-rate early summer pears are scarce. Erhard's Seedling, which the Tribune named the Ravenswood Pear gives excellent promise, but it is not yet disseminated and proved in various localities, so ...
-Lister's Bone Meal
For the past three years we have used on our fruit grounds large quantities of bone meal, which has proved of admirable efficacy in stimulating a rapid but healthy growth of all our fruit trees and St...
-Lists Of Flower Seeds
The following lists were made out this spring by Henderson and Fleming, for the information of members of the Farmers' Club : First: List of annuals suited to rather poor ground and earth thrown up f...
-Literary Notices
One of the most interesting evidences of the advancement of rural taste is furnished in the attention given to this subject by the literary men of the day. We have now before us nearly a dozen works, ...
-The Literature Of The Garden. Men And Women Blossoming Every Tear -Our Food, Exercise
ALL our best literature teems with allusions to gardens; most happy do wo esteem those who resemble the man of whom it was said, The fields his study, Nature was bis book. Leigh Hunt's Sudden 'F...
-A Little Funny
In one of the recent Western fruit meetings an essayist commences with saying: Pruning, according to Dr. Warder, is done in summer for fruit, and in winter for wood. Now, as these principles of prac...
-A Little More Grape
DuRing my acquaintance with grape growing, I know of no record of a season when the grape crop has been so full throughout the entire North and West as it has this year of 1867. There have been seaso...
-A Little More Grape. Continued
I consider the variety now generally grown at the West as not the true Isabella, but a sub-variety, possibly a seedling, that has been introduced, and that while the oval berry of the true Isabella ca...
-A Little More Grape (2)
One year since, in making a record of the season relative to the crop of grapes at the West, I was enabled to chronicle it as one of the most successful ever known throughout the North and West. The p...
-A Little Talk In The Apple Orchard
[The following pithy, spirited, and practical article - one of the best ever sent us, will commend itself to every reader. Ed.] The inquiry is frequently made, At what season is it best to prune app...
-A Little Talk In The Apple Orchard. Continued
Again, spring pruning is most convenient, because in summer we usually have our orchard land under cultivation, and by pruning then, the crops must be much injured by trampling them down, and by the b...
-Local Societies, And Their Importance
There can be no doubt of the importance of local Horticultural Societies, for the guidance of each district or climate. All plants have a zone of their own; their successful growth is dependent upon v...
-Locomotion Of The Horse
Editor Horticulturist: The young people of our neighborhood have interested their elders in the subject of the manner in which a horse moves his legs and feet, which, it seems, we have disagreed on. W...
-Locusts
The Swiss naturalists are earnestly discussing the subject of the swarms of locusts which ravaged the valley of the Rhone in the Lower Valais last summer; swarms so numerous that they were hours passi...
-The Logan Nursery And Its Evergreens
A short walk from the Nicetown cars brought us to the well-kept grounds of Wm. Bright, Esq. During the past year the improvements have been numerous and extensive; it would take considerable more than...
-Lois-Werden Culture
I see in the agricultural papers from abroad, frequent notices of the success of tile Lois-Weedon mode of culture. Can yen oblige your readers with a brief account of it? W. P. S. The Iiois-Weedon ...
-Lombardy Poplars
Dear, Editor: L. F. A. has contributed an article on Lombardy Poplars, to your excellent journal. He seems to hold it in very high estimation for ornamental purposes, calling it a universal tree, ...
-A London Horticultural Snow
IN no one department of gardening can we form a better idea of the progress of the times than by attending an exhibition, such as the following paper attempts to describe. And these fairs are the medi...
-London Horticultural Society
The event of the past week has been the second show of the Horticultural Society at Chiswick. A sunless but dry day brought together 9383 visitors,form-ing such an assemblage of rank and fashion as is...
-Longworth Grape
The report of the Ohio Pomological Society's meeting, as published by the Secretary in the Ohio Farmer, notices a grape under the name of Long-worth, and describes it as follows: A very delightful fr...
-The Longworth Wine House Gbape Premiums
Our readers are doubtless all cognizant of the offer made by the Long-worth Wine House at Cincinnati - 1st, for the best general wine grape of our whole country; 2d, for the best wine grape for the St...
-Longworth's Prolific
Most of the Cincinnati nurserymen have sent out spurious plants for this new variety, and thus greatly chagrined multitudes in this country; but I have seen the genuine in bearing in three or four cou...
-Lonicera Fragrantissima
A sub-evergreen hardy shrub. Flowers whitish, very sweet-scented. Native of China. Belongs to Caprifoils. Introduced by the Horticultural Society. This is one of the plants obtained from China by Mr....
-Loof
Herewith I tend you a few seeds of a vegetable celled Loof brought from Grand Cairo, in Egypt, last year by my uncle, Rev. Dr. Dorr, of Philadelphia, which he hat just seat me for cultivation. The...
-Loudon, The Great Gardener
Loudon, the great English landscape gardener, was a man possessed of an extraordinary working power. The son of a farmer near Edinburgh, he was early inured to work. His skill in drawing plans and mak...
-Louis Van Hontte's Nursery
Toour importing nursery men and florists the name of Van Houtte, the great Belgian horticulturist, is as well known as a standard book. Everything done by him is on the highest possible scale. For ins...
-Louisville (Ky.) Horticultural Society. The Strawberry Show
We called in at the store of A. G. Munn & Co., on Saturday, to examine the disay of Strawberries exhibited as the first weekly show or the season, held under the auspices of the Kentucky Horticultural...
-The Love Of Nature
Beautiful sentiments, expressed in fitting language, take a strong hold upon the heart, and are never entirely obliterated from the memory. The opening lines of our own Bryant's Thanatopsis, beautiful...
-Love Of Nature - Birds - The Chick-A-Dee
It is impossible that we should be other than an admirer of Nature. In all our solitary rambles, whether upon the wild and lonely hill-side, or in the heart of the pastoral valley; at the edge of the ...
-The Love Of The Beautiful And Useful
There is a class of human beings - its name is legion - who are good and benevolent to an infinite degree, in theory. They would perform wonders if they had the power; but their vast ambition to pursu...
-Love of Home - Rural Embellishments
There are few things better calculated to attach us to our homes - where the social virtues love to congregate, and to dispense their blessings - than rural embellishments. This is true whether we app...
-Low Prices Of Fruit Every Where
Peaches are not the only sufferers. For pears, good Bartletts, have yielded only five to eight dollars per barrel, and grapes have sold as low as four cents per pound. Blackberries fell to two and fo...
-Low Trees Versus High Ones
In years gone by, as the remaining trees in old orchards show, there was an almost universal practice of throwing the tree-tops high into the air; first, by allowing the trunks to arise some six or se...
-The Lowell Wire Fencing
This fencing, manufactured by J. E. Butts & Co., Boston, Mass., we are disposed to think, would be found very useful in many places where it is unknown. The proprietors say: - Our Wire Fencing, repres...
-Luck
There are believers, even among gardeners, in luck. Oh 1 says one, he had a good chance; another declares his successful friend was a lucky fellow. The luck which has made the fortune of the...
-Lucomb's Nonsuch
Quite mediocre. 20. Autumn Gage A prodigious bearer; quite late, and nearly first rate. 21. Cloth Of Gold Early; but too dry and small to commend it to favorable notice. 22. Red Diaper, (Or Mimms...
-Lupines
Lupinusperennius - an elegant and showy plant, a native of our dry hills, scattered all over certain parts of the country; well worth cultivation. Three or four sorts have been introduced from the nor...
-The Luxumbourg Orange Trees
The pomegranate and orange trees of the Gardens of the Luxembourg are at present being transferred into new cases of larger size. The collection of orange trees belonging to the Luxembourg is one of t...
-The Lyman Grape
It will be recollected that in our March number we copied a description of a grape under the above name, which had been issued by the secretary of the Ohio Pomological Society as a new grape, and that...
-M'Glashan's Transplanting Apparatus
For several months past the English and Scotch journals have been giving accounts of an apparatus invented by a Mr. M'Glashan, of Edinburgh, for transplanting trees without disturbing the roots. Sever...
-Macaroni And Vermicelli
In writing from Naples, Mr. Weed takes the following notice of the manufacture and use of macaroni and vermicelli in Italy: Italy, you know, abounds in macaroni and vermicelli. The making and eating ...
-Machines For Mowing Lawne
In the April number of the Horticulturist for 1852, a communication from a Montreal Subscriber is published in reference to Mowing Machines for Lawns, he represents as doing the work in a superior...
-The Madras Radish
(From the Rouve Horticole). ThE Madras, or Edible Pod Radish, was obtained in 1858 at the Edinburgh Botanical Garden by M. Courtois-Gerard, and was introduced into France by that skilful horticulturi...
-The Magazine Of Horticulture
A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF Horticultural Science, Landscape Gardening, and Rural Art. THE FOURTH VOLUME OF THE FOURTH SERIES. EDITED BY C. M. HOVEY, AUTHOR OF THE FRUITs OF AMERICA. Complete Se nty-eight...
-Magnificent Greenhouse Plants
Early in February we made a hurried call at the houses of Erastus Corning, Jr., Esq., of Albany, and found some of the most superbly grown plants we remember to hare seen in this country. Miniature tr...
-Magnificent Specimens Of Magnolias
We find the following in the Juno number of Hovery's Magaeine. It shows how successfully the finest Magnolias, both Ohinese and American, are grown in the climate of Boston: Mr. J. A. Kenrickk's Magn...
-Magnolias
The acuminata, or cucumber tree, is as hardy as your fruit tree. The purpurea or Chinese purple, we think will also stand your climate. Magnolias #1 F. T, (Maine.) The only Magnolia known to be ha...
-Magnolias (2)
Our favorite family, the Magnolias, for the most part, will strike readily from cuttings, or may be increased by layering the branches, which is the plan most generally adopted with hardy species; the...
-Magnolias (3)
To this family, many varieties of which are the pride of our Southern States, too little attention is given by the majority of tree planters; whether it is because of good plants being difficult of ob...
-Magnolia Campbellii
It is not our intention to compare what we know of cuItivated Magno-lias, with the magnificent plant shown by the illustrations of Himalayan plants from Messrs. Hooker, Son & Thomson. But before enter...
-Magnolia Conspicua
In looking over Mr. Prince's new catalogue, he says: The above Magnolia conspicuasare grown from seed, seven years old, well branched, very vigorous, and perfectly hardy, and are splendid specimens* ...
-Magnolia Grandiflora
This most magnificent of all flowering evergreens is perfectly hardy. There are many specimens from four to ten feet in height I lately had the pleasure of seeing one twenty feet in height, with a ste...
-Major Apple
Fruit - size large, form roundish, often oblate, slightly inclining to conic, sides sometimes unequal, slightly angular; skin smooth; color, greenish yellow, ground mostly overspread, striped and spla...
-Major Madden's Rhododendron
Every one has either heard or read of Dr. Hooker's discoveries of Rhododen-drons, in the Himalayas. So very beautiful are they, that the Doctor's journey would have been amply repaid had he found no o...
-Make A Map
We think the best way of labeling trees or vines is to make a map of the orchard or vineyard in a book, and then designate the row and number of trees, and position in a row, of each kind. The loss of...
-Making A Country Place
It is an old saying, that every one likes best to learn from his own experience, As with many other matters which have passed into proverbs, there is a deal of truth in this. There is something perver...
-Making Fish Ponds
Professor Bryan, of Philadelphia, publishes in the Plow, Loom and Anvil, an interesting article on the construction and value of fish ponds - especially in the interior of the country. He gives an acc...
-Making New Lawns
As we have had numerous inquiries lately, repecting the laying down of grass surfaces for lawns, we shall comfor the benefit of all our readers interested in the matter. A fine lawn, as everyone know...
-Mammoth Grape-Vine
All the world, at least all that part of the gardening world which inhabits Great Britain, has heard of a surprising Vine at Hampton Court. Everybody goes to see it at least once in his life; it is a ...
-A Mammoth Rose Bush
A Mammoth Rose bush, the largest we think in the United States, adorns the cottage of one of our correspondents, Mr. S. A. Rendall, Santa Rosa, Cal. From the description forwarded to us, we take the ...
-The Mammoth Tree Of California. Sequoia Gigantea
The growth and appearance of this new California evergreen are extremely graceful and beautiful. With foliage between the arborvitae and cy-press, it throws out its limbs or branches at first horizont...
-The Man At The Pump
We will just take a look through, if you please. We understand you have commenced forcing? Look through with pleasure, sir; but you will see no forcing. No forcing? No, sir, no forcing Why, I...
-Management Of Bouvardias
It is singular that a family of plants so rich in color as this is should not have been, until recently, more generally cultivated, for certainly a more gorgeous bed for the flower-garden, than one pr...
-Management Of Camellias
An excellent paper in the Midland Florist, on the Management of Camellias, contains the following advice: In a general way, we can afford to cut all the shoots a good way back, some as far back as...
-The Management Of City Grounds (2)
A Great change of taste is manifest in the last few years in the management of city grounds. Formerly the chief object seemed to be to crowd into a small space as many trees - principally evergreens -...
-Management Of Cuttings
The great stimulants of vegetable life are heat, air, light, and moisture, and in the management of cuttings those agents must be regulated with care and precision; the kind and degree of care will va...
-The Management Of Green-House Plants At The South
To be a thorough good plant-grower requires no mean competency, and an amount of practice by no means insignificant. But to be such in the southern states, is almost saying you have reached perfection...
-Management Of Lawns
In all. well-kept garden establishments, lawns not only form the principal features, but they occupy the larger portion of time and manual labor. Whatever is calculated to lessen this, or to make it m...
-Management Of Old Trees In Bad Health
Cut in the head to half its present size, and cut out altogether some of the weakest branches, that there may be room for a healthy growth from the shortened branches; at the same time that the head i...
-Management Of Pyramidal Trees
In the August number of the Horticulturist, page 337, there is an extract from the London Gardeners' Chronicle, by William Mason. Mr. Mason complains of the absence of good pyramid pruning in that cou...
-Management Of Water - Its Uses And Abuses
Ik every part of our country where the surface is at all hilly or undulating, the multitude of transparent streamlets offer, to those who are fortunate enough to live in their vicinity, many opportuni...
-Managing Lilacs, Roses, And Honeysuckles
A writer in the Gardners' Chronicls says: If taste and a knowledge of colors are observable in the distribution of the plants in the flower borders, we may also perceive a certain degree of skill in ...
-Manetti Rose Stock
I hare cultivated this stock these 10 years on a portion of my nursery ground, consisting of about three acres of light poor soil resting on a subsoil of gravel The better part of it is light sandy lo...
-The Mangosteen
We have shown by actual experiment that our climate is superior to that of either England or France for the production of various foreign fruits and vegetables; the Victoria Regia was found to produce...
-The Mangosteen, Or Mangostan
This extraordinary fruit is just now attracting considerable attention in England, in consequence of its having been fruited successfully at Syon House, the seat of the Duke of Northumberland, where a...
-Manual Of the Botany Of The Northern United States. Second Edition
As horticulturists, we may be proud of the want which has called for a new edition of this well-known work. The author, we need scarcely remark, stands at the head of the science as an authority, and,...
-Manure
A. P., (Baltimore.) If your ground is free from frost, dig in a heavy dressing of the fresh stable manure - the more litter the better - all the gasses will be taken up by the soil, which will also be...
-Manure For Fruit-Trees - Where To Feed Fruit-Trees
The great secret in cultivating all plants successfully, lies in furnishing them with food best adapted to their growth and healthfulness. Whenever a tree or plant is found naturally growing and attai...
-Manure For The Grape
THE following, taken from a work on Manuring the Vineyard, is good advice. We are of the opinion that the application of a compost thus made, will benefit a vineyard, however rich or poor the soil may...
-Manure From Fishes
I hasten the development of my house grapes very much during the sturgeon fishery in August, by burying large subjects in my borders, about eight feet from the stems of the vines, carrying out one of ...
-Manures And Manuring
HOW to prepare and apply manures is a matter in which every cultivator of the soil must feel deeply interested. It matters not to what expense and trouble we go to procure the finest fruits or vegetab...
-Manuring (Gurneyism)
This term (occasionally met with in agricultural writings) has been applied to a kind of manuring adopted by a Mr. Gurney, in England. The operation consists in covering grass land with straw, coarse ...
-Manuring Forest Trees
A correspondent of the Gardener's Chronicle says on this important subject: - I have made a few experiments and observations how trees might recover their health and become useful and ornamental to ...
-The Maple And Its Enemy
Few trees in our varied forest claim more deservedly our admiration than the Maples, for few have so much merit, or repay our care more satisfactorily. Unexceptionable as shade trees in the highway or...
-The Maple As An Ornamental Shade, Avenue, And Street Tree
Foe symmetry of form, varied and interesting aspect of tree at different seasons of the year, for density of foliage, for beauty in the expansion of its buds in early spring, and in the many colored h...
-Marantas
Plants with variegated foliage are now in much esteem for decorative purposes, and well 'they deserve to be so, for many of them are exceedingly useful, being striking and interesting objects irrespec...
-Maranta Makoyana
A lovely, dwarf-growing stove perennial, belonging to the front rank of plants, with ornamental foliage. The leaf stalks are slender, erect, of a dull, reddish purple, and support an ovate blade, some...
-Marechal Niel Rose
This rose, which commanded so many words of favor last season, and induced many to purchase, is said, by a writer in the London Journal of Horticulture, to be, as recorded, a beautiful rose, when the ...
-The Marengo Crab And Other Apples For Extreme Latitudes
Since the appearance of the May number of the Horticulturist I have been besieged by a fresh batch of inquiries concerning the Marengo Winter Crab, occasioned by your article on Apples for Extreme No...
-Margaret
We scarcely can name a single plant that is more useful in ornamenting a garden than the Canna major; the leaf has an oriental appearance, shall we say more palmlike than anything else so easily obtai...
-Marietta, Penn'A
Dear Sir: A few days ago I examined, for the first time, though well aware of its existence, your elegant horticultural publication, and am so highly pleased with its contents, beauty, and value, that...
-The Market Gardeners Of London
The market gardeners of London, says a gardener of judgment, ' are skillful, industrious men. Some time ago I was engaged for three or four months along side a market garden of twelve or fifteen acr...
-Market Gardening
The land can well sustain so much cropping, on account of the heavy dungings, trenchings. and hoeings, which it receives. If you ask a market gardener what is to succeed this or that crop, the answer ...
-Market Gardening (2)
The very first question to be settled in considering this subject is, have you a market for your crops when they are raised? If yes, then have you a soil and location suitable for the purpose? A light...
-Market Gardening (3)
No. 2. Amid the hurry and bustle of planting, you must not forget or neglect to care for your strawberries. If you have not a bed of them, put in a piece of ground at once with the Wilson. If you wis...
-Market Gardening (4)
No. 3. Let us now turn for a few moments to the expenses of running a good sized garden-Here you have the advantage over your eastern friend. While a few, say $3,000 to $5,000 would be a great help t...
-Market Grapes
G. F. R., Toms River, N. J. - We are just below latitude 40 - some miles back from the ocean, and the soil a sandy loan, with considerable clay and gravel stones, and high and rolling; would it ...
-Market Pea As
In planting 500 trees for standards to constitute a market orchard, would you plant mostly Virgalieus, as some of my neighbors have done, or a proportion of other sorts, and what should these be? M. W...
-Marketing Grapes
The grape may be shipped to distant markets with less liability to damage than any other of the small fruits. There are, however, some exceptions to this statement. Some varieties are quite tender and...
-The Marketing Of Fruits
Judge La Rue thought that fruit growers were often at fault in the quality of fruit they ship, and recommended the division of all fruit into extra first class and second class, with the name of the g...
-Marks On Barks
In 1800 M. De Candolle bad cut down, in the forest of Fontain-bleau, a trunk of a Juniper (Juniperus communis), which was found to present, near its centre, a layer which had been affected by frost, c...
-Marshall Pinckney Wilder. Biographical Sketches Of Distinguished American Horticulturists
Few men enjoy a more desirable and extensive fame than the subject of this narrative. For a long coarse of years, he has been favorably known on both sides of the Atlantic, on account of his zealous a...
-Marshall Pinckney Wilder. Biographical Sketch. Part 2
Mr. Wilder's business and military offices in his native State made him favorably and extensively known there, and secured him a large number of valuable customers in Boston, where he transferred his ...
-Marshall Pinckney Wilder. Biographical Sketch. Part 3
The evening he devotes to study, This system he has steadily pursued for a long course of years; and in his strict adherence to it lies the secret of his success, and of his elevation to the distingui...
-Marshall Pinckney Wilder. Biographical Sketch. Part 4
Downing is dead !Yet how little of such men can perish! The clayey tenement may indeed fall and crumble; but to him who dwelt in it, a place is assigned in the firmament of American genius, far above ...
-Marshall Pinckney Wilder. Biographical Sketch. Part 5
In 1851, Mr. Wilder, with others, called a convention of delegates from local agricultural societies in the State, to meet them in the State House, in Boston, and of that body he was chosen President....
-Marten's Seedling Plum
In obedience to a request made by the late editor of the Horticulturist, I submit a few specimens of a new plum, called Marten's Seedling, (from the fact of its having originated in the garden of a ge...
-Martha
This grape has received commendation as of superior quality to any white grape. We do not so consider it. As we write, we have Lydia, Rebecca, Cuyahoga, and other white sorts before us, and in tasting...
-The Martha Grape
In the November number of the Horticulturist I notice some remarks upon this new grape, which, according to my observation and experience, are certainly none too flattering. Although I would not comme...
-Mary
This is another seedling, grown by Chas. Carpenter, Esq., that prom-ises to become a superior table grape, ripening about the same time as Isabella. The vine is perfectly hardy, and a strong grower; w...
-Mary Morris Hamilton
Vice Regent for New York. New York, July 20th, 1858. Ladies' Standing Committee: - Mrs. Millard Fillmore, Buffalo; Mrs. Pierre Van Cortlandt, Croton; Mrs. William H. Seward, Auburn; Mrs. Gouverneur M...
-Marygolds
These are out of fashion now, suggests some modern florist; well, they may be, but the flowers are just as showy as ever they were, and I don't believe any of the novelties, with great long latin name...
-Maryland Horticultural Society
The Society held its annual exhibition on the 27th, 28th, and 20th of September. The various departments were well sustained, and an improvement observable in some respects* compared with former exhib...
-Mas. Catlbugh's Nursery, Hans Place, Chelsea
This is one of those places in which certain kinds of plants are grown by the thousand for Covent Garden market. It is, therefore, not uncommon to see here a large houseful of Pelargoniums all in full...
-Masqu'E Verdel
This is a natural cross between the Grizzly Frontignan and the Verdelhoe, the wine grape of Madeira. Bunch large, shouldered, loose; berry rather small, about half an inch in diameter, round, pale red...
-Mass. Horticultural Society
The annual meeting of this Society was held in the Library room, at Horticultural Hall, in School-street. About fifty members were present. Samuel Walker, Esq., the President of the Society, on assumi...
-Mass. Horticultural Society (2)
At a recent meeting of this Society, Mr. Cabot, from the committee for establishing premiums for 1851, reported a list amounting to $2,200, which was adopted and ordered printed. From this list, we se...
-Mass. Horticultural Society (3)
We notice by the reports of the Exhibition, that J. F. Allen, Esq. of Salem, exhibited very fine hot-house grapes in six varieties, as early as the 81st of May. Messrs. Story and Hovey & Co., also exh...
-Massachusetts Fruit Report For 1854
In common with the whole country, the State of Massachusetts has severely suffered from the long continued drouth that has prevailed during the summer, materially affecting both the quantity and the q...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Report
Mr. Eben Wight, Corresponding Secretary, has laid us under obligations for a copy of the above report, and a schedule of prizes for 1857, which are all in money, and not in books or periodicals. The r...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The following are the officers of this Society for the present year: President - JOSEPH S. CABOT. Vice President - Benj. V. French, Cheever Newhall, Edward M. Richards, Josiah Stiokney. Treasurer -...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society (2)
May 27, 1854 - The Society met porstiant to adjournment The President presented a report from the Executive Committee, and, on his motion, the matter was reeomitted. The following gentlemen were appo...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society (3)
The following is a list of the premiums awarded at the late Exhibition of this Society. Prizes. Apples For the best 80 varieties, of 12 specimens each, the Lyman plate, rained at $80, to Messrs. Bu...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society (4)
The Society met on Saturday, October 7 th. On motion of W. G. Strong, it was resolved that a committee of three be appointed by the chair to consider the expediency of employing lecturers to deliver l...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society (4). Continued
Apples For the largest and best collection of Apples - 1st, to B. V. French, the Apple-ton medal, $40:2d do.. A. D. Williams &Son, $20. For the best 12 varieties of 12 specimens each - 1st, Josiah L...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society - Saturday, April 1st, 1854
The President (Hon. J. & Cabott, of Salem), called the meeting to order. The minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary, (Mr. W. CL strong). The President presented a communication from M...
-Massachusetts Vs. New Jersey
New Englanders are such a wandering people, and move from home so easily when they think they see a possible advantage in change of residence, that it will be difficult to persuade them that it is not...
-Massachusetts Vs. New Jersey (2)
In order to force vegetation successfully, we must have control of heat which can be applied at will to both the roots and the foliage of the plants we are cultivating. This control of heat is acquire...
-Massachusetts Vs. New Jersey (2). Continued
After considering the natural habits of the violet, Mr. Calder decided to follow a different system of treatment. The violet is a spring plant; blossoms most freely before the weather is warm, when th...
-The Massachusstib Horticultural Society
In your August number of the Horticlturist you pass some strictures upon the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, which appearances do most certainly justify. It is proper, however, to state that the ...
-Massonusetts Horticultural Society
At a meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, held Saturday, Aug. 7,1852, the following preamble and resolutions reported by a committee chosen at a previous meeting, were unanimously passe...
-Mat Weather In Ohio
The change of weather last week after our items were made up, was a remarkable one, if any thing can be remarkable with regard to climate. Thursday morning was cold enough for a March day. The vines s...
-Matanzas
Having engaged passage to New Orleans, we found time only for a short visit to Matanzas. Understanding that the accommodations of the hotels were desperate, we took pains to find out the best, and as ...
-Mated, And The Director Is Monsieur Hardy
A book, by M. Field, on Rural Architecture, just published in New York, by Miller & Company, asserts that the greatest lovers of the country, are those who live in cities 1 This will be news to most. ...
-Materials for A Cutting Pot
Provide either broken potsherds, pebbles, or chips of stones from a mason's yard, and place them in the bottom of the pot. Over these put rough fibrous peat or turf; this will act as drainage, which i...
-Mathews' Curoulio Remedy
In the September number of the Horticulturist, you make the inquiry, in regard to Mr. Mathews' Curculio Remedy. I made an application to quite a number of trees, and in every instance I was very succe...
-The Matilda Strawberry
Mr. A. S. Fuller, in his report in Horticultural Annual, 1871, at last confesses that this variety does not maintain its promise - it is splendid in every respect except -quality, and in this I fear...
-Matthushek Pianos
It is not our custom to refer to advertisements inserted in our advertising columns, but in the present case we think we are doing our readers a favor by calling their attention to the advertisement o...
-Maxatawny
Not quite ripe, but it has flavor, and we put it down as a promising grape. We have also received a number of grapes without name, and some of them quite imma- ture. - From Dr. Weeks two varieties, q...
-Maxatawny Grape
In 1843, several bunches of grapes, growing at Maxatawny, Berks county, Pennsylvania, about twenty miles above Zeiglersville, were sent to a friend residing at Eagleville, Montgomery county, Pennsylva...
-The Maxatawny Grape (2)
We last month published a description of this Dew Grape by Dr. Brincke. We have just received the following letter from Mr. Berckmans, which contains some interesting particulars in addition to those ...
-Maxims On Propagating
The more heat, the more moisture may be allowed, and, vice versa, the less heat, the less moisture. Hence, if the heat of the dung-bed declines, or if there come cold weather, at once reduce the suppl...
-May I Give My Conifers Guano ?
When I am asked this question, my reply is, Most certainly you may, with the best results.Indeed, there is hardly a plant (probably not one) to which this invaluable manure may not be applied benefi...
-The May-Apple
The May-Apple, so extensively diffused throughout the United States, is a well-known jndigenous herbaceous plant, growing luxuriantly in almost every moist and shady woods, often in dense patches, pro...









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