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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #12 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Memoir To Orange-Culture

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #12
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Mcavoy's Superior Strawberry
We had large expectations of this new variety, and have not been disappointed. It has this season been superior to any of the fifty varieties in bearing on my grounds, and besides, I have seen it in b...
-Mcdowell's Rhododendron
Mr. Redmond, the editor of the Southern Cultivator, has favored us with a beautiful drawing of a new, or at least undescribed Rhododendron, which we have great pleasure in presenting to our readers, w...
-Mead
This old-fashioned and by no means despicable beverage, is thus made: Use four pounds of honey to every gallon of water; if a dry mead, only three pounds. Boil gently for an hour, skimming carefully; ...
-The Measures Of Strawberry Culture
Imagine our delight one day this last spring in receiving the following report of sales from our commission agent in New York: Sold 384 quarts for $5. Worst day ever known. Oh, plant strawberries;...
-Measuring The Height Of Trees
A correspondent asks how to find the height of trees, etc. The following plan is the ne plus ultra of simplicity: Cut a triangular board to an angle of 45; support the base of it on a stick at th...
-The Mechanical Structure Of Plants
ED. Western Horticulturist: - The wonderful mechanism of the human eye; the arrangement and construction of the ear; the number and diversified uses of the muscles; the mechanical organisms of plants;...
-The Mechanical Structure Of Plants (2)
IN the above enumeration we first notice a unity of purpose under a variety of expedients. Nothing can be more single than the design, more diversified than the means. Pefficles, shells, pulps, pods,....
-Meconopsis Nipalensis
Of this grand species we have the following account: - This superb plant, when seen from a distance, resembles a small yellow Hollyhock. It was discovered by Dr. Wallich's collectors in Nipal, and I...
-Med Top
Of all the many valuable kinds of grasses, we think none is better than Red Top either for cattle or horses. This is very heavy, and we think that there is less shrinkage in a ton of this hay, after i...
-Medicinally
The pharmacopoeias recognize only the root, as being by far the most efficacious part. It should not be employed till full grown, when the aqueous juices have become milky and bitter, in the months of...
-Meeting Of The American Pomological Society
THE meeting of the American Pomological Society, held at Boston, September 10th to 12th, was a grand affair. The attendance of members was larger, and the display of fruits more extensive and attracti...
-Meeting Of The Minnesota Horticultural Society
ED. Western Horticulturist: - The annual meeting of the Minnesota State Horticultural Society, was held in St. Paul,.January 14th to 17th, and the following named gentlemen were elected officers for t...
-Meeting Of The N. Y. State Agricultural Society
At the annual meeting of this Society, held February 14th, the following Officers were elected for the ensuing year: Judge SAMUEL CHEEVER, President John C Jackson, Isaac E. Haviland, George Vail, Jo...
-Meeting Of The National Pomological Society At Boston
We are unable to give at present more than a rough sketch of the proceedings; as soon as the official report comes from the press, we will endeavor to lay the more important parts of it before our rea...
-Melons
I have found for two years, that melons, and especially water-melons, did far best either on new ground, (which all admit,) or after a crop of tomatoes, where they yielded twice as well as on other ol...
-The Melon Apple. Watermelon, Norton's Melon
This finest of American apples was first brought to notice by Ellwanger & Baery, in 1845, through the Albany Cultivator and the Boston Cultivator. Since that time it has been described in Hovey's Maga...
-Mem
This pear still finds its way to our markets; fruit dealers inform me, that in many localities it remains untouched with this malady, and that their supplies are uniform, and the fruit fine. Mem #1 ...
-Memoir Of Andre Michaux. From Loudon's Arboretum
Andre Michaux was bom in the Park of Versailles, in 1746, and soon evinced . a taste for agriculture and botany, which was fostered by his early patron, the court physician, M. Lemonnier. In 1777, he ...
-Memoir Of Loudon
This graceful memoir is concluded in the present number, and doubtless has interested most of our readers. Mr. Loudon's career was a most useful one; in respect to its close, it resembled Sir Walter S...
-Memoranda On The Culture Of Grape-Vines
Mr. Editor - The following memoranda of the crop of grapes in a cold house, with a span roof, may be interesting to your correspondent, H. B., and other cultivators of the vine. The season here is abo...
-Memoranda On The Culture Of Grapevines
It appears, after all, to be a simple process to grow the best of grapes in a cold grapery, to those who understand it. Some two years ago, I suggested in one of my critiques, the plan of getting up...
-Memories Of May
Q. Flowers, wherefore do ye bloom? A. We strew the pathway to the tomb.* - Jos. Montgomery. From earliest childhood to extreme old age flowers form one of our most innocent, as well as most delightf...
-Merited Rebuke - Mr. Editor
A certain youth who signally failed in establishing the Florist in Philadelphia, has taken upon himself to give an opinion upon what a periodical should be, thus trying to shame his own, while he gi...
-Merry"s Museum And Cabinet, The Oldest And Best
ILLUSTRATED DOLLAR MAGAZINE FOR THE YOUNG. VOLUME XLIII commences January, -1862. This Magazine has held it place for twenty-one years as THE BEST OF ITs KIND IN THE WORLD. The well-known Robeet M...
-Messers. Hovey & Co's Nurseries
This is one of the most enterprising and prosperous establishments of the kind in America. The nurseries are remarkable for the great number of specimen fruit trees, (Pears especially), which they con...
-Messina, A Country Seat On The Hudson
Whoever has not seen the country seats on the upper side of the Hudson, knows nothing of the finest specimens of rural residences in America. There are in the neighborhood of Boston, many beautiful vi...
-Messrs. The Editors Of The Horticulturist, New York: Gents
Please insert the following. Let me call the attention of Reuben to a letter written by N. Longworth, Cincinnati, 18th February, 1850, addressed to the Wine Committee of the Horticultural Society, ...
-Messrs. Thorburns' Bulbs
On examining in detail the bulbs spoken of last month, we find among them some very rare ones, and some quite new, and among others the following: Lilium candidum striatum, L. fulgens incomparabile, L...
-Meteorological Journal, For The Year 1852
We are indebted to Mr. Parvin for a copy of his excellent journal, and extract from it the following miscellaneous remarks, which give some idea of the climate of Iowa: Lowest temperature, January ...
-Meteorolooical Journal, For The Year 1858
We have received a copy of this journal, and extract from it the following miscellaneous remarks: Lowest temperature, Feb. 8th, - 11; highest, Aug. 11th, 02. Range of temperature, 103...
-Method Of Constructing Vineries
IN THE Gardener's Monthly for February we find an intelligent and interesting article with this heading, by Mr. Bright, of Philadelphia. We esteem the subject of the first importance, and give it a ...
-Method Of Grafting
Horace Everett, of Council Bluffs, describes a method of grafting, common in Tennessee, that may be worth knowing in other localities, and which he says is not described in any fruit book that he has ...
-Method Of Raising Mushrooms
The following new and simple method of growing Mushrooms we find described in the French correspondence of the New York Times. The French are noted for their ingenuity and the application of the princ...
-Method Of Using Sulphur For Mildew
I have a small cold grapery, in which the vines have passed their fourth season, and have borne two fair crops. One point in my experience may be worth communicating to the readers of the Horticulturi...
-Method To Bloom Hyacinths And Other Bulbs, In The Winter Season, In Pots And Glasses
This is the season for planting bulbs for the parlor, and greenhouse, whether in soil or water. From Mr. H. A. Dreer's catalogue we cut the following plain and proper directions: - For this purpose S...
-The Methodist
THE LARGEST AND BEST PAPER IN THE DENOMINATION. THE METHODIST has now been before the people nearly a year and a half, and its course has been such as to win the ENTIRE APPROBATION OF THE CHURCH. IT...
-Mice And Rabbits
Mr- Editor; From different sources I hear of the depredations committed upon trees, the past winter, by the mice and rabbits. Thinking the method, whereby some can be yet saved (which will otherwise p...
-Mice Disbarring Trees
A stitch in time is an old saying; and a careful examination around trees, from time to time, at this season of the year, will often prevent depredations of mice and injury to the trees. After so m...
-Michigan Agricultural Society
A little farm well tilled, a little house well filled, and a little wife well willed, are three most desirable objects, says Mr. J. S. Tibbits, in the Transactions of the Michigan Agricultural Socie...
-The Microphtlla Rosa
The Microphylla Rose, according to Loudon; was introduced into Britain, from the East Indies, in 1628. Its specific character is, Leaflets, finely serrate, shining. Calyx muricated with very dense pr...
-Microscopic Photographs (2)
Some microscopic photographs exhibited at Manchester, England, excited much admiration. One, of the size of a pin's head, when magnified several hundred times, was seen to contain a group of seven por...
-The Middle Apple. Mittel Apple
Some time ago we received specimens of this Apple from A. W. Hovey, Esq., of Pontiac, Mich., and since that time we have procured some particulars concerning it, through the kindness of several gentle...
-Mignonette
Sow a few patches of Mignonette in various parts of the garden; the scent is very pleasant and refreshing and is also useful for bees, which should be kept by dwellers in the country. Sweet Peas and ...
-Mignonette Sauce
Sauce is sold under this name in Paris, but it is only white pepper crushed into small granulations, and made into a sauce piquante. The French eat oysters with white wine and Mignonette Sauce. The...
-A Migratory Rose
Strange as this heading may appear to the reader, the flower is nevertheless an entity - a thing that exists, and may be bandied; a plant almost as regular as the swallow in its Sittings to and fro; o...
-The Mildest Climate In The Northern States
A visit to Newport, Rhode-Island, this season, and a close examination of some of the grounds and gardens there, has convinced us that the popular estimation in which the climate of Newport is held, i...
-Mildew
Fruit cultivators are gradually becoming aware that mildew in some one of its various developments, is the most prevalent and insidious enemy with which they have to contend. Exotic grapes are so subj...
-Mildew (2)
The subject of Mildew, proposed by Mr. Graasie, V. P., was then taken up, by the reading of the following Essay: Mildew, whether on the Tine, the stems of wheat, the leaves of the chrysanthemum, goos...
-Mildew And Red Spider
We understand that there is great probability of an effectual remedy for mildew and red spider having been discovered, wholly free from the objections attaching to sulphur either in powder or in a vol...
-Mildew On Roses - Budding 61n Manetti
This fungus appears likely to become as destructive to the Rose (if indeed it is not so already) as it is among the vines. A few years ago it was confined to a few plants, or to some one or two variet...
-Mildew On The Gooseberry
Sir: I am not well used to writing, and would any time prefer to use the spade instead of the pen; but I think it is a duty we all owe to each other to communicate any facts we know in return for thos...
-Milwaukee Gardens
Milwaukee is somewhat noted for its Florists, having some fine private residences with green houses attached, but its market gardeners and plant houses are of no mean proportions. As prominent as any ...
-Miner Plum
This variety has excited considerable attention at the West, particularly in Wisconsin, where the fruit has been exhibited. Young trees were sent to us for trial last spring, by Geo. P. Delaplaine, Es...
-Miniature Gardening. An Evergreenery
The word Evergreenery may be hardly proper; but I can find no other which suits my purpose so well or will better convey an idea of the thing I propose to describe. Arboretum is a higher sounding wo...
-Minnesota As A Fruit-Growing Country
As this country is now attracting considerable attention, and its climate, soil, productions, etc., are becoming subjects of great interest to thousands, I have concluded that perhaps a short communic...
-Minutes Of The Philadelphia Society For The Peomotion Or Agriculture, From Its Institution In Feb-Rvary, 1785, To March, 1810
The appearance of such a publication as this is a striking proof of the public interest in Agricultural affaire at the present time. In these Minutes we find but little beyond mere mention of topics...
-Mioroscopic Insects The Cause Of Pear Blight
MR. DOWING - Dear Sir: I am mora and more convinced of the utter uselessaess of talking about blight.blightWhat is blight? Simply the death of certain portions of a in the only way they can 4ie of ...
-Mioroscopic Insects The Cause Of Pear Blight. Part 2
All these manifestations are more usually found near a bud or branch, a short crotch in a limb, or at the points where the bark is changing from smooth to rough, as if partial to places where there is...
-Mioroscopic Insects The Cause Of Pear Blight. Part 3
Allow me also to say, that since I have been engaged in these inquiries, I have most deeply felt the need of such an Industrial University,* endowed by Congress lands in each of the states of the , as...
-Miscellanea
The soil of old vineyards is found to be deficient in potash. To remedy this, it has been suggested that granite should be heated to redness, plunged in water, and ground to powder. Mix this with abo...
-Miscellanea. The Pike
The pike is one of the largest of fresh-water fishes, and indeed, if the accounts which some writers give are not exaggerated, it occasionally attains a size not greatly inferior to the gigantic inhab...
-Miscellanea. Water
As no seed will germinate unless a certain degree of heat is present, so also does it require that a certain quantity of water be in contact with its outer skin or integument; and this is required, no...
-Miscellaneous
It may strike the reader that the house just described has a lavish appropriation of veranda, and a needless side-front, which latter may detract from the precise architectural keeping: that a dwellin...
-Mixing Up
The thought has often crossed our mind - Does the human race progress as a whole ? We suppose the voice from the aggregate would be in the affirmative; and as examples in proof, reference would be m...
-Mobile (Ala.) Agricultural And Horticultural Society
We have just received a circular from the Secretary of this Society, containing an account of the organization of the Society on the 20th of February last, and other matters, showing the Society to be...
-Mode Of Propagation
It will be well to give a few brief hints on its propagation. We find that grafting is the best; and the stocks used are healthy one year old, seedling peach, growing in nursery rows. The best time to...
-Mode Or Drying The Common Red Currant
Mr. Editor: The currants should be quite ripe when gathered, with the stems attached, and washed or rinsed effectually and drained off. Then stem them and wash them thoroughly, and to each pound of cu...
-A Model Flower Bed
Achimenes magntfica; alias Locheria magnifica. Planchon and Linden in Fl. des Serres, x. t. 1013. - Most people would call this an Achimenes, of which it has all the habit, and, as far as we can disco...
-Model Fruit Crops
The attentive reader of our numerous agricultural journals can not have failed to notice that about the close of every fruit season a multitude of powerful stories find their way into the aforesaid jo...
-A Model Hotel For Country Towns
We copy the following description by Willis, of the Hotel at Taunton - which has become a celebrity - both as a record of progress in architecture and as a warning to landlords about building this kin...
-A Model Suburban Cottage
THIs house was designed for a lot sixty feet wide on a village street, and should be placed quite near the line on the left hand side of the lot, leaving the wide open space on the other side for a ro...
-Modern Pears
Mr. Editor - I embrace the first leisure moment to respond to your request, and herewith subjoin a few extracts from my Notes on Pears. The unpropitious character of the two past seasons, has so se...
-The Modern Style
The numerous difficulties in reconciling the internal convenience of a house to the external application of Grecian c6lumns of any order, at length banished columns altogether, and introduced a new st...
-A Modi Of Repelling The Apple Tree Borer
I have suffered from the effects of the Apple Borer, having lost some seventy beautiful trees during the space of three years. I made use of all the preventives suggested by others that I could get ...
-Moisture And Temperature In Plant Culture
A healthy and vigorous growth of plants in green-houses is dependent so much upon a proper degree of temperature and atmospheric humidity, that he who would be a successful cultivator must be a close ...
-Moisture For Orchidaceous Plants
The Gardener's Chronicle notices the following carious speculation: We observe in a late number of the Revue Horticole, a statement by Mons. Duchartre that Orchidaceous epiphytes are incapable of fee...
-Money Found In Peat Earth
A gentleman was not long since breaking up some peat earth, which he had procured for gardening purposes at Wimbledon, a few miles from London, when his spade struck against a hard sub-stance, which t...
-The Monitor Strawberry
WE present this month a portrait of the Monitor Strawberry, one of Mr. Fuller's seedlings, recently alluded to as No. 42. For a number of months we have been directing a series of experiments, having ...
-Mons Of Preventing Fowls Flying Over Faxons
Recently, I described a ready mode of preventing pigeons flying, for a few days, by soaping one wing. I now wish to call attention to an equally efficacious plan that is adapted to fowls. Being on a v...
-Monstrous Broccoli
Mr, Chorltgn has given in the present number a lucid account of the mode of cultivating the Cauliflower; while we were engaged in reading his article, the following came to our table in an English per...
-The Montgomery Grape
Mr. Editor, - Agreeably to your request, I send you an account of what I suppose to be the Montgomery Grape, lately brought into notice. In the year 1830, on my return to New York, in June, from the S...
-Montgomery Plum
I noticed in an article on plums, in your June number, something requiring explanation from me, but have not been able for want of time, to attend to it. I once called the Montgomery a plum, (though i...
-Monthly Calendar
We have had several requests to publish a Monthly Calendar of Fruit, Vegetable, and Flower garden operations. We are obliged for any suggestions for the improvement of our journal, but in reply to thi...
-Monthly Calendar for The Management 07 The Orchard House Throughout The Year
January Observe the same rules for protection against frost, and give water, if necessary, as directed for December. In bright sunny weather the the ventilators -may be opened, to lower the temperatu...
-Montreal, Feb. 14,1857
J. J. Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: Some typographical errors have occurred in my letter to Mr. Phoenix, published in the December No. of the Horticulturist, which it may perhaps be as well to correct. P. ...
-Monuments
With regard to the material of which monuments may be constructed with a view to durability, it is acknowledged that the best sandstones are every way suitable. They should be made of the compact, fin...
-A Monument Of Trees
A sketch of the history of Thomas Hamilton, Earl of Haddington, recounts his love of tree planting, and the fact of the publication of a book on Forest Trees, composed mainly of letters from his pen...
-A Monument To Mr. Downing
I have thought it would be fitting, c*uld a suitable space of ground be had near where he has passed so many of his useful hours, midst his family and his garden, looking down upon the noble Hu...
-Monument To The Memory Of A. J. Downing
When the loss the country had sustained by the untimely death of the talented and distinguished gentleman who first established the Horticulturist was still fresh in the memories of his numerous frien...
-Moore's Rural New-Yorker
THE LEADING AND MOST POPULAR Agricultural, Literary, and Family Newspaper in America. PROSPECTUs OF VOLUME XIII, FOR 1862. THE RURAL NEW-YORKER, widely known as the most Valuable and Popular Journal...
-More About Boilers
Dear Sir: - a Reader in the June number of the Horticulturist, page 291, asks for facts and figures on the efficiency of hot water boilers in statements addressed to you on the subject. Having sen...
-More About Boilers (2)
Mr. Editor, - My attention hat just been called to an article in the July number of the Horticulturist, with the above heading, in which the beating apparatus put in for me by Wethered & Cherevoy is s...
-More About Grapes
Dear Mr. Editor, - I have been much pleased with the Grape discussion between the two doctors in the last numbers of the Horticulturist, and, at great risk to myself, step in between the combatants an...
-More About Mr. Lawrence's Orchard House
In the August Horticulturist I find I have written, in describing a visit to Mr. Lawrence's houses, thus: Here are to be seen peach trees growing in wire baskets, surrounded with moss, and trained in...
-More About The Big Pears
THE following letter was received a short time after our visit at Mr. Leighton's place, which gives some further description about Mr. Leighton's orchard: Editor Horticulturist: After your departure ...
-More About The Big Tree
The following communication is dated Mogadon, Summit Co., Ohio, July 10, 1855. Editor of the Horticulturist - I see in the last issue of your work a notice of the Wellingtonia Gigantea of Californi...
-More About The Dandelion
Mr. Stauffer having given a comprehensive account of the dandelion in the June number of the Horticulturist, I desire to add a word on that useful plant. It is not a Native American, and is known c...
-More About Ventilation
Mr. Editor : - I have received the August number of the Horticulturist, and through it, the answers to my questions, for which please receive my many thanks. Well, Mr. Editor, I have been and gone a...
-More Gossip From The Northwest
Dear Sir: The pleasant chatty letter from friend Tallant, in the January number, will recall to many of your readers the delightful reunion at Burlington last September; and few who were there will fa...
-More New Apples
WALTON, nurseryman, Malvern Station, Iowa, writes March 17: I send you an apple for a name. A friend of mine has one tree of this sort. We intended to have sent you several specimens early i...
-More Notes On Pears
Among the few varieties which I had an opportunity of observing and tasting last season, were several of those sorts which have not yet become so widely known as to be considered old, respecting which...
-The Morgan Pear
The Morgan Pear originated in New Hanover County, N. C, on the farm of a Mr. Morgan, since dead, and was introduced into notice by the Hon. W. B. Mears, a lawyer of distinction in that State. The spec...
-Mosquito Powder
In the new book of travels by Mr. Fortune, whose services we are happy to know have been engaged by the Patent Office at Washington, there is a receipt for the composition of the mosquito powder menti...
-Moss A Very Valuable Addition To The Soil For Potting Plants
Several years ago I read, if I mistake not, in a German magazine for Horticulture, that dried and pulverized moss from trees, and the large roots of trees exposed to the action of the atmosphere, were...
-Moss Baskets
The smoke which surrounded the Close Observer while he wrote the former article has gradually disappeared, and he finds himself placed between two fires. In the distance he discerns the Second Ba...
-Moss Roses
The Moss roses are all of a very hardy nature, and bear a degree of cold equal to 20 below zero, without protection. They do not, however, bear so severe pruning in this climate as they do in Eur...
-Mosses
In this beautiful class, the varieties are becoming numerous, and we shall doubtless have, ere long, perpetual blooming sorts worthy of the name. Of the kinds now so called, few will bloom more than t...
-Most Valuable Flowering Shrub
The Indigoferadotua, from the descriptions received from abroad, promises to be one of those universal favorites which few plants attain. It was received but lately in England from the South of France...
-Mouldy Roots
Attention is now being directed to the condition of the roots of sickly-looking trees, and it is found that much disease exists there which is unsuspected; hence the just remark that you should know a...
-Mount Vernon And The Ladies
Every patriot rejoices at the decided manner in which the purchase of Mount Vernon has been undertaken by the ladies of the Union. Those associated in the state of New York are doing their duty in a h...
-Mount Vernon Pear
A chance seedling which originated on the grounds of Honorable Samuel Walker, of Roxbury, Mass., and by him named Mt. Vernon. Specimens from which these outlines and descriptions were made came from W...
-The Mountain Seedling Gooseberry
Mr. Wm. Bacon, of Richmond, Mass., communicates the following to the Wisconsin Farmer: This is a variety, brought into notice within a few years past, by Philemon' Stewart, of the United Society, at ...
-Mountains Of North Carolina
Mr. S. B. Buckley has communicated to Silliman's Journal a very interesting paper, from which we make the following extracts. Of the Pyrularia old/era noticed in this journal lately, he says: Among s...
-Mounting Ferns
BY taking a little trouble, pretty pictures may often be made out of fern fronds, considered useless in the greenhouse, or, at all events, by the use of a few which may be cut off and never missed. Af...
-Mouse Plants
There are some plants that appear specially adapted to window-culture. Among the finest of these is the geranium It sports almost innumerable varieties, in colors ranging from pure white through pink,...
-The Moutan Paeonies
When Mr.,Fortune visited China! on the service of the Horticultural Society, the .acquisition of new Montana was one of the first objects to which he attended. In his Wanderings, he mentions the beaut...
-Moved To The City!
Julia has moved to the city 1 Our amiable competitor for early salads and fine camellias, has become entangled in the meshes of love, and for this she has left her garden!! How much of her mdividualit...
-Mowing Machines
Dear Sir: I seldom see anything used but the scythe, in mowing lawns in this country. Now garden labor of all kinds is so dear here, that the mowing machines used in Great Britain, (which I noticed yo...
-Mowing Off Strawberry Leaves After Fruiting
Quite a number of strawberry growers have expressed incredulous opinions of the practicability of this plan, to which we reply that in every case that has come under our notice, it has been a complete...
-Mowing Strawberry Bede
At our recommendation a gardener at Syracuse, N. Y., tried this plan and met with good success, and has communicated his experience as follows: For several years past, I have adopted the practice of m...
-Moyer's Honey Heart Cherry
Mr. Josiah G. Youngken, of Allentown, Pa., through whose hands we originally received specimens of the Jackson Apple of that region, sends us an account of a cherry with the above name, which is highl...
-Mr, Barry's Address, At The Fruit Growers' Association, Burlington, Iowa
Contains the following remarks, so valuable in themselves, that we have thought it a duty to preserve them here: - Let us look at the list of our best foreign pears. The Bartlett is supposed to be E...
-Mr, Barry's Address, At The Fruit Growers' Association, Burlington, Iowa. Continued
The fact is well established, that the fruits which succeed best in particular localities are those which originate there, or in others slightly different. I believe the Baldwin, Hubbardson's Nonsuch...
-Mr. Allen's Reply
The last May number of the Horticulturist is historically a curiosity, as from it dated a series of articles in reply which exercised the writers in various ways, according to temperament; they have e...
-Mr. Auuworth, Of Ontario County
The Tyson is a very fine pear; bean a full crop, and is a hardy tree. The Bartlett is very fine, and the tree bears young. The Flemish Beauty has one fault, and that is, that it sometimes rots at the ...
-Mr. Bright's New Book
Bright's Single Stem, Dwarf, and Renewal System of Grape-Culture, adapted to the Vineyard, the Grapery, and the Fruiting of Vines in Pots, on Trellises, Arbors, etc. - We have read Mr. Bright's book w...
-Mr. Chorlton's New Strawberry
J. Jay Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: - The enclosed drawing is a correct representation of a seedling strawberry (Chorlton's Prolific) which I raised seven years ago. The whole branch from which this was ta...
-Mr. Cutbuush's Prize For Dloscorea At The Horticultural Society's Exhibition, St. James's Hall
I fear that some misunderstanding has arisen regarding the prize I offer for 20 Diosoorea Batatas. I distinctly stated that it should be given for the best 20 roots from sets not weighing more than 1 ...
-Mr. Downing And The Horticulturist
WE had barely time to announce in our last number, the sad intelligence of the death of Mr. Downing, Wc had hoped to present this month, an elaborate memoir, prepared by an intimate friend of Mr. D.,b...
-Mr. Downing And The Horticulturist. Continued
His style of writing is unaffected and flowing, and his diction, though elegant and ornate, is never verbose or tiresome. Such a style grew naturally out of his characteristics of mind and habits of t...
-Mr. Downing's Letters From England
My Dear Sir - If my English letters have told you mostly of country places, and country life, it is not that I have been insensible to sight-seeing in town. London is a great world in itself. Ink enou...
-Mr. Downing's Letters From England. Part 2
It is half-past four in the afternoon, and the fashionable world (who dine at seven all over England) is now taking its morning airing. If you will sit down on one of these solid-looking seats under t...
-Mr. Downing's Letters From England. Part 3
My London friend, who evidently enjoys our astonishment at the vastness of the London Parks, and the apparent display and real enjoyment they minister to, calculates that not less than 50,000 persons ...
-Mr. Downing's Letters From England (2)
I received in London, a note from the Duke of Bedford, which led me, while I was in Bedfordshire, to make a visit to Woburn Abbey. This is considered one of the most complete estates and establishmen...
-Mr. Downing's Letters From England (3)
Dropmore is the seat of Lady Grenville, and has been celebrated, for some time, for its collection of rare trees - especially evergreens. It is in the neighborhood of Windsor, and I passed a morning t...
-Mr. Downing's Letters From England (3). Part 2
The last word reminds me that I must say a word or two here, about the English railways. In point of speed I think their reputation out-runs the fact. I did not find their average, (with the exception...
-Mr. Downing's Letters From England (3). Part 3
In the library is a great bay-window, and a spacious fire-place set in a deep recess lined with books, suggesting warmth and comfort at once, to both mind and body; and the air of the whole place, joi...
-Mr. Ellwanger
As a rule, the grapes that ripen early are the kinds that keep best. A very great objection to the Isabella for wine is, that in the manufacture of Isabella wine we must add sugar. Mr. Longworth, of C...
-Mr. Ellwanorr
There is one thing in the Delaware that must not be overlooked, and which is very much in its favor: if not wanted for eating, nor for market, it will make a good wine; and it always ripens. Mr. Mood...
-Mr. Fuller's Strawberries
We recently, in company with a committee from the American Institute, visited Mr. Fuller's nursery for the purpose of examining his seedling strawberries; and we are compelled to say that we have nowh...
-Mr. Glover's Model Fruits
Our neighbor, Mr. Glover, Fishkill Landing, N. Y., who is both an artist of talent, and a zealous amateur of horticulture, has turned his attention, for some three or four years past, to the productio...
-Mr. Gray's Geruniums
Several gentlemen of the Flower and the Garden Committees, having visited the greenhouse of Wm. Gray, Jr., at Dorchester, brought back enthusiastic reports of the beauty of the plants and the brillian...
-Mr. Hovey And The Bonte De St. Julien Strawberry
Mr. Hovey, in the September number of his magazine, alludes to our remarks about the Bonte de St. Julien Strawberry in a manner which we are not disposed to leave unnoticed. His allusion to our unfort...
-Mr. Hovey On Root-Grafting
In the course of some observations on Root-Grafting, in the May number of this journal, we asked Mr. Hovey to explain the superiority of budded, or stock-grafted over root-grafted trees; in reply to w...
-Mr. Hunnewell's Estate
With beautiful Italian gardens, a very picturesque lake and fountains, lawn, garden, and fruit houses, there is nothing left forgotten or untried in landscape decoration here. In a small portion of th...
-Mr. Longworth And Mr. Meehan On Sexual Changes In The Strawberry
[The strawberry question is a very important one, so far as the credit and character of a nurseryman are concerned, though, it has very little bearing, in a practical point of view, where a distinct...
-Mr. Longworth On The Strawberry Question Once Mcore. A Proposition
I regret to learn that your brother of the Prairie Farmer has not faith enough to accept my proposition, in regard to the sexual character of the Strawberry. I will test it further. The Hudson, Keeked...
-Mr. Longworth's Experiments With The Clinton Grape
Thinking that the readers of the Horticulturist would like to hear what Mr. Longworth thinks of the Clinton Grape, I venture to transfer the following for your columns, from his letter to me of the fi...
-Mr. Macintosh's Nursery, Maida Yale
We remarked here an excellent specimen of the charming Veronica Andersonii, in the shape of a pryamidal bush about three feet high and two feet six inches across at the base, the under branches hangin...
-Mr. Mathew's Curculio Remedy
Finding a notice of the committee appointed to test this remedy, in the June number of the Horticulturist, with the two following observations - That I objected to the large committee appointed by the...
-Mr. Mathews And The Curculio
The Hon. James Mathews is decidedly one of the most energetic and untiring horticulturists in the West At a comparatively early age he had the good fortune to be elected to Congress. For this honorabl...
-Mr. Mathews' Curculio Remedy To Be Tested This Spring, By Committees
Having received a letter from Hon. James Mathews, of Coshocton, Ohio, requesting me to act as an agent for him in the Eastern States, with reference to his Curculio remedy, and having given my consent...
-Mr. Moody, Of Lockport
With proper summer pruning, the buds may be developed so as to bear surely every year. Mr. Ringucberg, of Niagara county, said his vines averaged sixteen pounds of fruit to the vine, planted in rows ...
-Mr. Peter B. Mead
Dear Sir, - I understand that you are a member of the Imperial Society Of Natural History of Russia, and that their diploma was conferred upon you for the distinction that you have gained by your know...
-Mr. Peter B. Mead, Ed
Dear Sir: In your favor of the 1st of this month, you asked of me to name to you the best native grapes for wine. Of these the Delaware is undoubtedly the first, although it may not be the most profit...
-Mr. Peters's Pear Orchard
In our October article, we were unable to give precise statements about Mr. Peters's famous pear orchard, but since that time he has favored us with additional facts. There are in all, near Wilmington...
-Mr. Richardson's Seedling Dahlias
We have heretofore spoken of some of these fine seedlings, especially Mrs. Richardson, a large blush white, of fine form and good substance, and Emma Cheney, a lovely rosy red, very distinct, and of r...
-Mr. Satterthwaite's Pear Orchard
Mr. Satterthwaite's orchard, near Philadelphia, is quite as celebrated among horticulturists as are those of Mr. Quinn, near New York, or Messrs. Wilder & Hovey, near Boston. But the peculiarity of M...
-Mr. Thomas Hogg
Some few weeks since our old and valued friend, Mr. Hogg, bade us good by, and took his departure for a new field of labor in Japan. We parted with him, as did scores of others, with feelings of the d...
-Mrs Mary J. Holmes' Popular Stories. Dora Deane And Maggie Miller
In One neat 12mo. Volume 474 pages. Price $100. Mrs. Holmes endeavors to touch the heart, to take what is pure and excellent and hold it up to the reader in contrast with what is rile and deceptive. ...
-Muck And Peat - Prof. Johnson's Forthcoming Report
It is known to our readers, says the* Homestead, that Professor Johnson has been employed in the examination of the mucks, peats, and swamp deposits of our State. We have been publishing from time to ...
-Mucue Sugar
I regret extremely that I did not subject some of my plants to experiments with this substance, which, however, I intend to do another season. Prof. Draper states - when a solution of grape sugar, co...
-Mulching
This is an operation in tree management that begins to be pretty well understood and appreciated. - A very intelligent and observing lady, of Port Gibson, Miss., writes us as follows: This matter of...
-On Mulching (2)
If we were asked to say what practice, founded on principle, had been most beneficially introduced into our horticulture - we should answer mulching - mulching suggested by the need of moisture in our...
-Mulching (3)
Are we not a singular people, fond of extremes, novelty, and innovation? Let any subject strike the popular ear, and it is ridden, Gilpin like, without either rhyme or reason; when the fit is off, a...
-Mulching (4)
Prof. Coppock has experimented more extensively and perseveringly in this direction than any one that I know, and I have had frequent opportunities of observing his successes. As I have before said, I...
-Mulching A Protection Against Drouth
Our article on mulching published two years since, was widely copied throughout the United States, and has had au effect in drawing the attention of fruitgrowers to this practice as the only true and ...
-Mulching Blackberry Beds
WE had never heard or seen an instance where a grower had mulched his blackberries for any length of time until we met a case near New Brunswick, N. J., last June. The proprietor planted an exact acre...
-Mulching Dwarf Pears
In reading over your leader of the December number, I was struck with a remark yon made on mulching dwarf Pear trees. In former years, I have been much troubled with mice girdling young trees in my fr...
-Mulching Fruit-Trees In Autumn
There is no general or sweeping rule which can be applied to manuring and stimulating trees. Some are already in a thrifty, rapidly growing condition, and do not need any pushing; others are stunted, ...
-Mulching Grape-Vines With Straw
Read before Wisoosin State Horticultural Society. I PLANTED one thousand vines of Concord on ground plowed twice, but new and full of live roots of oak trees that had been grubbed, so that 1 could no...
-Mulching Strawberries
In a former number of the Horticulturist I detailed some experiments on the virtues of spent tan, as tested by many years experience. Those remarks having elicited many inquiries from strawberry growe...
-Mulching Trees
It is surprising to witness the difference between the growth of trees, and especially the dwarf pear trees, from the effects of mulching the roots. Such trees I have found to have made masses of fibr...
-Mulder On Wine
In the last number will be found some extracts from Professor Mulder's work on The Chemistry of Wine. The first chapter only is devoted to the grape vine, and that is not of very especial value to h...
-The Mural Club Of New York
We have not bad space hitherto to notice properly this new and strong association of rural character. It numbers nearly 50 persons of prominent literary connections, or gentlemen of wealth, taste, and...
-The Muscat Hamburgh Grape
A beautiful portrait of this great fruit appears in the last London Florist, with the following description: This fine grape is a seedling, raised at Wrest Park, Bedfordshire, by Mr. Seward Snow, wh...
-Musemelons
The rather flattering success which has attended my plantation of melons, contrasted with the failure of many neighbors, especially during the past season of unusual drouth, has elicited inquiries as ...
-Mushrooms
Many persons who have a fancy for these are deterred from attempting to cultivate them from the supposed difficulty. They are so easily raised, that any one having the convenience of a dry cellar may ...
-Music And Nature
Some of our lady readers may possibly think from the opening pages of this number that we there preach a crusade against all music. We do not wish to be so understood, for in its place none esteem it ...
-Mutch Your Dahlias
If you want free, rapid, vigorous growth, and full abundant bloom. Much the best substance or mulch for this purpose, is the soft spongy meadow moss, though leaves and coarse sedgy meadow hay will do....
-My Life In The Country: Or Chronicles Of Oakland Home. Chapter III. Builds A House And Buys Experience
The next thing of course was to build a suitable house. I well remembered the old maxim that fools build houses and wise men but them. I think, however, that the fools must be a very useful class of...
-My Life In The Country: Or, Chronicles Of Oakland Home
Our large cities are enlarging their borders and daily becoming more crowded by the industrious and earnest pursuers of wealth; yet there are few in this eager crowd who are not looking forward to the...
-My Life In The Country: Or, Chronicles Of Oakland Home. Chapter IV. Spring In The Country - Engages A Gardener
It was in the spring of the year - that beautiful season so much lauded by poets- that I took possession of my country home. Being anxious to commence operations early, and lured by a warm day or two ...
-My Own Experience In Transplanting
It is truly gratifying to find, in the last number of the Hrrtiecuturist, so correct a view, and such valuable suggestions presented by the editor, in regard to the transplanting of fruit trees. We di...
-My Plants Being Potted - Which Operation Is Complete About This Time
I place them on ashes under a north wall in some sheltered part of the garden, until the frosts of November compel me to put them in cold pits, keeping them, since their being re-potted, as dry as I c...
-My Window Garden
IT had been a dream for years - an Oriental sort of a picture - with plants arranged in graceful groups, a fountain with musical drops falling and tinkling in the center, and birds hopping and singing...
-Myrica Californica
Raised from seeds collected by Hartweg in California; received at the Garden June 5th, 1848, and said to be collected in woods near Monterey; growing twelve feet high. This was originally gathered by...
-The Mysore Hexacentre (Hexacentris Mysorensis)
This charming stone climber from India is well worthy the attention of amateur or professional growers of new and rare plants. It was shown first in England, in May, 1852, before the London Horticultu...
-N. B
I send, by express, sample, so that you may judge as to size and. quality. I. A. F., V. P. Hocking Valley Horticultural Society [We are obliged to our correspondent for the record of his experiment ...
-Naigile's Winter
Originated some twenty-five years since with one Charles Naigile, who is now dead. Tree, an enormous bearer of fruit, which is always smooth and perfect. Growth, upright while young, but as it reache...
-The Nannyberry
We have received the following communications in relation to the Nanny-berry, inquired about by a New Jersey Subscriber, in our April number: In the April number of the Horticulturist, a subsc...
-Napoleon Hi. Strawberry
Messrs. G. E. & F. W. Woodward, 37 Park Row, New York City - Gents: Your letters are received, acknowledging receipt of the sample of the strawberry Napoleon III., and we regret to learn that they arr...
-Nata Bene
We must say, once for all, that the editor of the Horticulturist can enter into no controversies regarding advertisements inserted in the supplementary sheet attached to this work. If an advertiser th...
-National Agricultural Convention
Whereas the Massachusetts Board of Agriculture, at its meeting held in Boston, January 14, 1852, requested its President to enter into correspondence with the Presidents of Stale and other Agricultura...
-National Agricultural Society
The following are the premiums for fruit and wines, to be awarded at the National Exhibition of the United States Agricultural Society, to be held in Philadelphia the 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, and 11th of ...
-National Floricultural Society, September 7
Several seedling Dahlias were produced; Mr. Dodds, of Salisbury, had Miss Herbert, bronzy pink, with light tip; Lord Raglan, a flower like Sir John Franklin, but lighter; and Mrs. Stowe, bright lilac ...
-A National Gift
Several of our associates in the advancement of horticulture have spoken of the magnificent gift bestowed by the Hon. Marshall P. Wilder upon the floriculture of this country by a deposit of more than...
-National Horticultural Society
Quite a strong feeling now prevails among horticultural circles, to assist in the formation of a National Horticultural Society, to hold its session in alternate years with those of the American Pomol...
-Native And Foreign Fruits
It has been so often said that native varieties of fruit are necessarily better adapted to the locality where they grew, because, thus growing, they acquire characteristics peculiarly fitting them to ...
-On Native Fruits
Dr. W. D. Brinkle, Pa.; F. R. Elliott, Ohio; E. Tatnell, Jr., Del.; Thomas Hancock, N. J.; Benjamin Hodge, N. Y., and H. P. By ram, of Kentucky. Native Fruits #1 Changes of opinion have also taken p...
-Native Grapes
One word as to native Grapes, and my offering for the present shall be closed. Among those which have come to notice recently in this region, may be named - Stetson's No. 1, Ames, Bulxs, Richardson's...
-The Native Localities Of Strawberries
Europe presents us with three species, which in their normal state all produce fruit of small size. Two of these species have hermaphrodite flowers, and the third (Fragaria elatior) combines male, fem...
-Native Of Orange Co., (Described Elsewhere)
Fruit ripened the first week in September, and the wood fully ripe to tips by the first of October; exposed to twenty-nine and a half degrees below zero, as indicated by a registering thermometer. Uni...
-Native Raspberries
Owing to the great difficulty attending the cultivation of foreign varieties as a field crop for market, the attention of fruit growers has been turned to the improvement of our hardy, native raspberr...
-Native Shrubs For Lawns
Just the hobby we wish some one would ride. Who is there there that can boast special devotion to the study of ornamental and native shrubs for rural decoration? Whose place is there to be found conta...
-Native Varieties
I have before spoken of the production of new varieties of fruits adapted to our country. But as it is line upon line, and precept upon precept, that makes a durable impression, let me remind you ag...
-Native Wines
The Cincinnati wines are working their way into the market. Mr. Lonowobth has established an agency in Rochester. His object, principally, is to let incredulous people know how good their Ohio wines a...
-Native Wines And Temperance
It is gratifying to observe the interest now so widely felt in grape-culture. New seedlings of merit are introduced every few years, and acres upon acres of approved varieties are annually planted. Of...
-Native Wines And Temperance. Continued
But it is not true that the inhabitants of the wine-producing regions of Europe are not addicted to intemperance. Certain pleasure travellers, flying over the grand tour of the continent, visiting o...
-Nativity Of The Delaware Grape
Mr. Editor:- It is really amusing to see the various and conflicting notions about the Delaware grape; but, depend upon it, it is nothing else but a North American native grape. Any one who is accusto...
-Natural Grape Arbors
Mr. Editor:- The annual grape-pruning season has brought to my mind a subject upon which I have been cogitating for some five or six years past; but before proceeding further, I may as well - for fear...
-Natural Objects
To define the differences between the pleasures derivable from the works of nature and those of man, is a difficult subject. Natural objects are common and obvious, and are imbued with an habitual and...
-Natural, Truthful, And Enticing. The Homestead On The Hillside And Other Cales
BY MRS. MARY J. HOLMES, The Popular Author of Tempest and Sunshine end The English Orphana, In One Volume, 38 Pages, 12mo. Price $. . The numerous and delighted readers of TUMBEST AND SUNERINE...
-Nature's Greatness In Small Things. From Household Words
To the imagination of man, magnitude presents itself as one of the noblest and most impressive attributes with which material objects are clothed.' The colossal grandeur of the Alps, amid the wonders ...
-Nature's Greatness In Small Things. From Household Words. Continued
Bones, cartilages, muscles, nerves, and every tissue were traced to their origin in cell-growth. Man himself appears as a congeries of cells; his growth the expression of the sum of their growth; the ...
-Ne Plus Ultra - A Fine Late Brocooll
Preeminently superior among the new varieties of vegetables which from time to time come before the public, stands this new Broccoli, being by far the best variety of that esteemed vegetable that has ...
-Neapolitan Cabbage Lettuce
Sown April 10th; still remained in the cabbage form without running July 27th. Compact, finely blanched, crisp, and tender; leaves having the margins dentate, a little curled. As in the last season, s...
-Neapolitan Violets
When sheltered and protected from severe weather these violets are disposed to produce their blossoms through the whole winter. The treatment required, to enable them to do this in perfection, is as f...
-The Necessity Of Drought, And Its Benefits
The State Agricultural Chemist of Maryland, Mr. Higgins, publishes a paper, showing the necessity of droughts to replenish the soil with mineral substances, carried off to the sea by the rains and als...
-Necessity Of Thorough Draining For Fruits
Having a small piece of stiff soil, about half an acre, (clay loam on a clay sub-soil,) near my farm-house, which lay in a dishing shape, and of course catching and holding the water flowing on to it ...
-Necrology
We should have recorded sooner, but for an accident, the death of Robert lies-ton, gardener to Colonel Polk, of Tennessee. Mr. Meston was an occasional contributor to the Horticulturist, and evinced, ...
-Nectarines
Elruge Ohio, New Jersey, Massachusetts, New York. Early Violet Ohio, New Jersey, Massachusetts, New York. Quinces Orange Apple Ohio, New Jersey, New York. Portugal Ohio, New Jersey. Nectarine...
-The Nectarine A Smooth Peach - A. J. Downing, Esq
Dear sir: Having read much in the Horticulturist, pro et con, concerning a peach stone producing a nectarine and vice versa, I thought a circumstance that transpired under my own observation the past ...
-Neglect Of The Apple-Tree
Our correspondent T., of Torch Hill, Georgia, gives, in the Southern Cultivator, the following picture of a neglected apple-tree he has in his memory; it represents, too exactly, the condition in whic...
-The Negley Pear
(See frontispiece). Upwards of fifty years ago my grandfather leased a lot in East Liberty, to a man by the name of Wolff, who, at that early period, was noted for his skill and taste in Horticulture...
-The Negley Pear (2)
In your May number the frontispiece is an engraving of the above-named fruit, and accompanied with a historical tradition of its history and origin, so far as known to the writer, all of which is inte...
-The Negley Pear (3)
In the June number of the Horticulturist, Mr. Heaver, of Cincinnati, questioned my statements relative to the Negley Pear, in a manner which did not admit of a reply, except by positive contradiction....
-Neighborhood Improvement
This month is the great month of the year for transplanting tree, shrub, and plants toward beautifying and improving our homes and their surroundings. By planting fruit-trees we add to the prospective...
-The Nelumbium
A few weeks since, I received from J. B. Hawkes, Esq., of Louisiana, a small package by mail, on opening which, I found a few seeds of a dark color, resembling small acorns, with the, following note: ...
-The Nelumbium Speciosum
Last year you published a small sketch from my pen of the suc cessful treatment of this plant in the open air at Springbrook, and I think I implied a promise to report on the result of its trial out d...
-Nem. Con
Last season, I took a different method, and from the first to the middle of December, they were in eating, and a truly delicious pear they are. It has given me especial pleasure to introduce them amon...
-Neotarines
The fruit of my Elrudgs Nectarine dried of last rammer just before its period of maturity. The tree was of perfectly healthy and vigorous growth, three yean from the nursery, had been regularly shorte...
-Nerine Fothergilli
Of this beautiful tribe of plants much has been said, and the great beauty of the far-famed Guernsey Lily is a recognized fact, but it has sunk into comparative insignificance by Nerine Fothergilli an...
-Nettles
Most gardeners look upon the Nettle as their enemy, and hence it has been driven forth into by places, or waste land, or the shadow of hedgerows. Nevertheless its fibre makes good linen as the Dutch h...
-Never Stake A Tree
A tree that is carefully and correctly planted and headed back, will never require a stake. Stakes are troublesome, unsightly, and form good excuses for carelessness in setting the earth about the roo...
-Never Too Late To Learn - Or The Amateur And M. D. Gardener, By Fox Meadow
ON a beautiful morning in the month of July an amateur stepped into a garden of which an M D. had the charge. Good morning, sir, Raid our amateur - so you are pruning and stopping your young pear tree...
-New And Desirable Plants
We have received from Mr. R. Buist two boxes of plants that deserve attention. Accompanying the boxes was the following, as usual, laconic note: - Rosedale Nursery, Philadelphia, June 10,1857. Mr. J...
-New And Valuable American Grape
Mr. Downing - As it is the horticultural fashion, at present, to abuse the one who may be instrumental in bringing forward any new plant or tree, by which an amateur may be deprived of his two dolla...
-New And Valuable Botanical Work
Nothing has hitherto been made public so well calculated to impress the mind with admiration of the Himalayan vegetation as a thin folio volume* by Dr. Hooker which has just appeared. During his resid...
-New And Valuable Trees And Fruits
One of the most remarkable catalogues ever published has just appeared in Leyden; it contains a priced list of the Japanese plants actually cultivated in the nursery of Siebold & Co., of that place. A...
-New Catalogues
The new seed Catalogues of Messrs. Henderson & Fleming, are unusually well printed, while the size has been doubled, and the number of illustrations have been largely increased. The Plant Catalogue o...
-The New Crystal Palace At Sydenham
It is now pretty well known that the site chosen lor the re-erection of the Crystal Palace is an irregular parallelogram of about 800 acres, extending from the Brighton Railway, where it has a frontag...
-The New Edition Of Downing's Landscape Gardening
THE American public is greatly indebted to Henry Winthrop Sargent, Esq., for this new (the sixth) edition of the 'Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening: it could not have! been committed ...
-The New Englander
The August number of this able quarterly has been received. Contents: 1. A Hymo and its Author - Augustus L. Hillhouse - by Dr. Bacon. 2. Reflex Benefits of the Clerical Office - a Letter from a Count...
-New Evergreens
The following new varieties have been recently introduced by T. C. Maxwell & Co., of Geneva, N. Y., and have decidedly valuable characteristics. (They were omitted, by accident, from January No.) Vic...
-New Fruits
[In Rivers' Supplement to Catalogue of Fruits, published last November, we find the following commentary on fruits which he has recently tested. Such information is looked for by those who are in s...
-New Fruits (2)
I HAVE a large number of crossbred seedling grapes, some of which have fruited this year for the first time. A number of these are promising, but further trial is requisite in order to select the most...
-New Fruits And Flowers
I was glad to see the strictures upon what have been represented as two of the latest and most remarkable horticultural and floricultural acquisitions, and for one of which I have been informed from $...
-The New Glass Mosaic Jardiniere
We had occasion to refer to Mr. Ransome's improvements in artificial stone-work for vases, edgings, and statuary. We here call attention to a new style of decoration in connection with plant culture, ...
-The New Grape In Missouri
Among the new grapes Walter has done well; foliage perfectly healthy; fruit of most excellent quality and very early ripening this season; the first of full fruiting along with Hartford and before Mar...
-The New Grennel Vermont Grapery
Three is a man now living (1828) who remembers a circular fruit wall at Shirburne Hospital (Durham), the wall with the fruit trees, and consequently wherein they were planted being movable, so that t...
-New Jersey State Agricultural Society
It is not my purpose, neither does it come within the limits of the Horticulturist, to descant upon the merits of cattle and such kind, but he may judge somewhat correctly of the quality of his more i...
-New Jersey State Agricultural Society - Its Coming Fair
We learn from the editorial columns of the journals of our neighboring sister State, that this time-honored association, after a rest of several years, is about to hold a fall exhibition on grounds of...
-New Publications
Hussey's National Cottage Architecture. This large quarto volume, issued in same style as Woodward's National Architect, contains twenty-seven designs for buildings and sixty-two plates of details. T...
-New Remedy From Creeping Things
At a late meeting of the Academy of Sciences at Paris, M. Millot-Brule exhibited a black powder, obtained from a purely natural substance, which, should it come into general use, will gladden the hear...
-New Series
THE KNICKERBOCKER FOR 1861. Commencement of the Fifty-seventh Volume. From the first of January, 1861, the Knickerbocker Magazine will be published by the undersigned. With the change of Publisher ...
-New Subscribers
The time has nearly arrived when we look for a large accession to our subscription list. New names are already coining in, and if our old friends would interest themselves a little, the number would s...
-The New Venison
The splendid parks of England have always been one of her most striking features in the eyes of continental visitors. Glorious in their hill and dale, their ferny brakes, their rich pastures, their ri...
-The New York Central Park
Hon. Fernando Wood, the present Major of New York, and by far the most efficient one that New York has had for many a year, refers to the Park in his late Message as follows: The commissioners appoin...
-New York Farmers' Club
The Secretary read translated extracts from a paper in the Revue Horticole of Paris, Sept., 1855, by M, Klotzsck, of the Royal Academy of Sciences, Vienna, on the utility of hybrids. M. Klotzsch has c...
-The New York Horticultural Review
A brief paragraph from the publisher of the above work, last month, announced that it had been merged in the Horticulturist. After six months of unbounded advertising, and efforts of various kinds, th...
-New York Horticultural Society
This Society made arrangements, at the close of last year, to hold informal or conversational meetings for the discussion of topics connected with Horticulture. A set of rules for the proper conductin...
-New York Horticultural Society (2)
Semi-annual exhibition, to be held at Metropolitan Halt, Broadway, on Wcdne*lay, Thursday, and Friday, June 0th, l0th, and 11th. 1852. New York Horticultural Society #1 The first semi-annual exhibit...
-New York Horticultural Society (3)
The second exhibition of this Society was held on the 20th, 21st, 22d, and 23d of Sept., at the Metropolitan Hall, New-York, and we rejoice to say was very successful and creditable to the managers of...
-New York Horticultural Society (3). Continued
Messrs. Hogg & Co. obtained a discretionary premiumi also, for a very neat and well cultivated, but not very extensive collection of Com-riEA, which contained amongst them plants of Cedrus Deodora and...
-New York Horticultural Society's Exhibition
The show of plants, flowers, and garden vegetables, in June, at Clinton Hall, was worthy of note in several points of view. In the first place, It was the show of a society numbering some three hundre...
-The New York Observer
1s A Religious and Secular Newspaper. PUBLISHED ON A DOUBLE SHEET, SO As TO BE EASILY SEPARATED INTO TWO DISTINCT PAPERS. In Religion it is free from sectarianism, and gives a fall, fair, and impart...
-The New York Observer, For 1862
THIs NEWSPAPER is now the largest and cheapest of its size in the whole country, possessing attractions peculiar to itself, and giving it a wide circulation in all part of our country. It is loyal, n...
-New York Pippin
Baltimore Red, of southern Illinois. Baltimore Red Streak, of southern Illinois. Victoria Red, of some parts of Missouri. Kentucky Pippin, of southwestern Kentucky. Red Pippin, in some sections of ...
-New York State Agricultural College
On the 15th of April last an act was passed by the Legislature of this State incorporating the New York State Agricultural College. No appropriation has been made by the State for this college, but ...
-New York State Agricultural Society - Fair Or 1854
The Fair for the present year is to be held in New York city, on the 3d, 4th, 5th and 6th of October. By the following proceedings of a meeting held in New York, May 5th, it will be seen that the Amer...
-New York State Fair
Floral Hall consisted of an ell ptical tent 80 feet wide and 140 feet long. Its interior arrangements were designed in excellent taste. Next to its outer circumference, and extending round the whole t...
-New York State Fair - Horticultural Exhibition
We had expected to receive long before this, a correct copy of premiums awarded. The reports published in the newspapers were so incorrect as to be worthless, and a correct report; although promised, ...
-New York Statu Agricultural Transactions
Mr. B. P. Johnson (the able Secretary) has placed us under obligations for a copy of these valuable Transactions. In the first article of this number will be found some of the reasons why books were f...
-New Zealand Spinach
A correspondent who is a good judge of greens, complains that we have never recommended one of the most of which may be had at Thorburn's or any other of the large seed stores. Ed. New Zealand Spinac...
-New Zealand Spinach - (Tetragona Expansa, Linn)
This plant is a native of New Zealand and the South Sea, and was introduced into Europe by Sir J. Banks in 1772. Captain Cook, in the relation of his voyage around the world, mentions it as a good veg...
-New-Haven Horticultural Society
We sometimes find it matter of convenience to know the names of officers of sister societies, as we find them in the Horticulturist. Possibly it may be equally interesting to some to know the names of...
-New-Jersey
The N. J. Horticultural Society have resolved to hold their next Annual Exhibition at Jersey City, on the 24th, 25th and 26th days of September, and have issued a liberal list of A few words on our p...
-New-Jersey. Continued
On all sides, in our large towns, we have churches built after Gothic models, and though highly fitting and beautiful as churches, i. e., edifices for purely devotional purposes - are quite useless as...
-New-Jersey Horticultural Society
The annual exhibition of the above Society, will be held at Jersey City on the 24th, 25th and 26th Sept. A liberal schedule of pre-miums is offered on fruits, flowers, and vegetables, which is open to...
-Newburgh Bay Horticultural Society
We had the satisfaction of being present at the fall exhibition of this thriving young society, held at Newburgh on Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 24th and 25th. As the edifice in which it was held was...
-Newburgh Vineyards
Enjoying recently the hospitality of Mr. Woodward, at Newburgh, we took occasion to examine a few of the vineyards for which Newburgh will soon become famous. Our time being very limited, we made the ...
-The Newer Deciduous Trees And Shrubs
In addition to the more common and usually planted deciduous trees and shrubs, there has been a great and very charming accession to our ornamental plantations, within the past five or six years. The ...
-Newport
A few lines from Newport thus speak of the late winter: Our evergreens look sadly brown and red, but I think they are not seriously injured. This has been the most severe winter ever known at Newport...
-News To Florists
A writer in Harper's Bazar says, the florists of this country devote but little attention to this branch of floriculture (roses.) This is certainly news to us, for it is well known that roses are a...
-The Next Pomological Congress
Dr. Brinckle of Philadelphia, the President of the American Pomologfcal Congress, has given public notice that the next meeting of this body, will be held in Philadelphia on the thirteenth day of Sept...
-Nickajack Apple
This very fine and beautiful Southern Seedling Apple originated in Macon County, North Carolina, among the Cherokee Indians, in the vicinity of Nickajack Creek, from which the name is taken. It was fi...
-Night Temperature
Facts have been found sufficient to demonstrate that it. is the purpose of nature to reduce the force which operates upon the excitability of vegetation at that period of the twenty-four hours when, f...
-The Night-Blooming Cereus
In October, 1846, Mrs. T. W. Williams brought from Avon Springs to New London a slip from a plant of the cactus species, then comparatively rare in our country - the Cereus grandiflorus, or Night-bloo...
-No Evil Without A Compensating Advantage
The total failure in this county of the crop of stone fruit, Cherries, Plums, Apricots, Nectarines, and Peaches, in consequence of the severe cold days of January 13th and February 8th, 1861, may poss...
-No More Mowing For Lawns!
From several sources, including our London correspondent, we have received accounts of a perfect substitute for grass lawns in gardens, etc, which requires no mowing. Think of your lawn always green, ...
-Noisette Roses
27. Aimee Vibert Pure white, blooming in immense clusters, very showy. There being a scarcity of good white Autumnal Roses, this will be found useful to group in contrast with the strong growing Bour...
-Nomenclature
Mr. Editor: Are we to forever have such an utterly Babylonish confusion in our horticultural nomenclature ? Is there ever to be - can there be - any plan invented by which the naming of our fruits can...
-Nomenclature Of Pears
I wonder, very seriously, Mr. Editor, whether we shall ever be able to say that the time has arrived when the nomenclature of our fruits is perfectly free from confusion? At present, the prospect is n...
-Nonsuch - Or, I Know Not What To Call It
This is a pear which I got from Judge Buel thirteen years age, with other pears, under the name of Beurre D'Aremberg - which it certainly is not. It is a winter pear. It is a strong and vigorous growe...
-The Norfolk Ac. Soc
The annual Fair of this Society was very successful, and the anniversary dinner passed off with great spirit, on the 24th of September. The Horticultural display was excellent. The dinner to over a th...
-North And South
March 1st - My Daffodils, Jonquills, Buttercups, Valley Lilies, and Blue Bells, that border the garden paths, are in full bloom. Peas, Radishes, Cabbages, Lettuce, etc., are in a fine state of progr...
-North Carolina
We hear quite too little of the amateur horticulturists of North Carolina, and therefore hail with particular pleasure the Annual Address delivered by Senator Thomas L. Clingman, before the State Agri...
-North Carolina Pears
This old state has generally been esteemed as fit only to produce tar and turpentine; but she is now about to redeem herself, and we take the opportunity of giving her a good position in the pomolog...
-North-Western Convention Of Fruit Growers
The above mentioned Convention held its third annual session at Chicago, Ill., from the 4th to 7th last month (October.) Dr. Kennicott presided, and it was well attended. Some fifty contributions of f...
-North-Western Convention Of Fruit Growers. Continued
Ellwanger & Barry exhibited one hundred and eighteen select varieties of pears, and a collection of foreign and native grapes. A few dishes of peaches were shown, but it was too late except for such a...
-The North-Western Fruit Grower's Association
The Annual Meeting of the Northwestern Fruit Growers' Association will be held in Burlington, Iowa, on Tuesday, September 25th, 1855, and will continue in session four days. This Association, organiz...
-North-Western Pomological Convention
Many of the most devoted lovers of Pomona, have been looking forward with bright anticipation to the assembling of this body of very intelligent pomologists. The meeting was held at Chicago from the 4...
-Northern Illinois Horticultural Society
An organization has been effected under the title of The Northern Illinois Horticultural Society, and the following gentlemen elected for the ensuing year: President - Samuel Edwards, La Moille, Bure...
-Northern Limits of Vine Cultivation
(translated from a. De candolle's geographib BOTANIQUE). With Remarks by R. Buchanan, Cincinnati, Ohio. In Europe the limits of vine cultivation on an extensive scale, and for the purpose of wine-ma...
-Northern Limits of Vine Cultivation. Continued
To return to the present limits of the vine, there are extensive vineyards in Bohemia (notwithstanding the elevation of that country), in Moravia, and more still in Hungary. The chain of mountains cal...
-The Northern Muscadine
Mr. Prince considered as belonging to the same class as the variety last discussed. Mr. Buist observed that it had been brought before a committee of which he was a member, and that it was greatly aga...
-Northern Muscadine Grapes
We have received two boxes of the fruit of this new variety from E. Fowler and P. Stewart, of Shaker village, New Lebanon, Columbia county, N. Y. The specimens first received were somewhat injured by ...
-Northern Peach-Trees At The South
The following remarks on northern fruit trees, from a correspondent in South Carolina, deserve an insertion as a rejoinder to contrary statements from other experienced southern cultivators. The quest...
-The Northern Spy Apple
In writing about the culture of this excellent fruit, our pomologists say much of its requiring careful pruning and rich cultivation, but without telling the public why or how it requires such pruning...
-Northern Vs. Southern Nursery Trees
A leading nurseryman informs us of the reason why pear trees are so generally preferred from Central New York, instead of from further South, for Southern planters. Because in the North fully eighty-f...
-The Norton Grape, Or Norton's Virginia
We have for some time been engaged in tracing the history of our native grapes, sifting the testimony and collating the facts. Some of these we are now prepared to lay before our readers. We shall beg...
-Nos. 4 And 5. Gras-Uk (Sometimes Spelled Grashlin)
Large, 4 inches by 2 3/4. Form long obovate. Skin yellow, with many green russet dots and patches. Stem 1 1/2 inches long by 1/8 in the middle, gradually thickening towards both extremities, inserted ...
-Notable Things In The Paris Exhibition
Some of the things exhibited are well worth attention. There is Beaumont and Mayer's thermogenic engine! which heats water and generates steam without fuel or fire. As yet, its applicability to mechan...
-A Note From A Farmer's Wife
Mr. Dow* ing: What think you has become of the New England country girl, who used to contribute to your pages, over the name of Wild Flower?*' I suppose she is married, as few who are belles are apt ...
-Note Of 28th Of September
1. Superphosphate of lime and sulphate of potash. This plot has afforded the largest amount of melons of full size, and contains most at present, matured and maturing. No. 2. Burned Turf The cluster...
-Note On Lysamachia Stricta
About twenty years ago I found some specimens of Lysenachia stricta on the banks of the Schuylkill, and not having before seen it in Pennsylvania, I took them up and plant-ed them in my garden, where ...
-Note On Mastodon Giganteus
Most of the skeleton of a mastodon giganteus was found during the winter of 1851 and '52, three and a-half miles north of Natchez, Mississippi, in a better state of preservation than any we believe to...
-Note On The Cladrastis Tinctoria, (Virgilia Lutea Of Michaux.)
In several numbers of the Horticulturist, and various nursery catalogues lately published, the Cladrastis tinctoria is called by Michaux's old name, Virgilia lutea, * which has been discarded by most ...
-Note On The Garden Of A. Brown, Esq., Natchez, Miss
About the first of last June, on the route north of the Mississippi River, I stopped at Natchez to visit Mr. Andrew Brown, who had said that if I would call on him he would show me a fine garden. I di...
-Note On The Green Sweeting Apple
What a luxury, Mr. BarrY, we have in this fresh and delicious Apple! I believe we have each tried its merits in the supply from RobertH. Brown's orchard. Possessing a very mild and agreeable sweet, an...
-A Note On The True Soldat Laboureur Pear
My Dear Sib: Two and three years since, I planted one thousand pear trees, embracing most of the varieties that are much esteemed on quince stock. Most of them fruited last year, but a few varieties n...
-A Note On Vine Culture
Dear Sir - I suspect your correspondent, H. B., has got the prying faculties very largely developed, as he inquires so very particularly about the two stoves which were used in the cold vinery at th...
-Note Ox The Probable Effect Of Sweepings Of Blacksmiths' Shops And Charcoal On Fruit-Trees, Ac. Ac
I notice in the January number of the Horticulturist, a communication from R. B. Warren, in which he says: In preparing the ground for setting them (Pear trees), I put into the holes a half bushel...
-Note To The Article On Evergreens, June No
Arbor Vitais, to give the very finest effect, and make a thick, impervious mass of verdure, should have their lower branches growing out from very near the roots; and these trailing branches should be...
-Note: On The December Number
With this number closes the year of 1866 - a year, perhaps, of more promise and disappointment than usual; but while we have had, comparatively, a small crop of fruits, yet in many sections they have ...
-Noted American Trees, Past And Present
AN interesting Volume might be written upon this subject, full of romance and stirring incidents, connected with the early days of the colonies. Many of the old landmarks bare passed away ; time, or t...
-Noted American Trees, Past And Present. Continued
All readers of American history will remember the romantic incidents connected with the capture of Major Andre. When the brave men, who scorned to be bribed, seized Andre, they took him under a large ...
-Notes About The Acacia (Yellow Locust.) By S. L. B., Brookdale Farm, Mx
In additon to the remarks of Mr. Bement upon this tree - vol. xvi, page 169 - I desire to add a few notes concerning its history, uses, quality, growth, etc., and in doing so I shall present several e...
-Notes By A Michigan Corresponoent
I notice your Baldwinsville correspondent's inquiry regarding cocoons on the apple tree. I have frequently detected them in my orchard here, but had not detected the moth. So far as I can ascertain, t...
-Notes By The Way
Bedding Plants grown in a warm, moist greenhouse should never be removed directly to the open ground, but rather give them a transition state, where they may gradually harden up their delicate succu...
-Notes From Illinois
Sir; It is rather late in the season to inform you of the effects of the last winter, but as I do not observe any mention made of it by correspondents from Illinois, I will give you a few items - alth...
-Notes From Iowa
Thinking that a few hints on the natural productions of Iowa may be interesting to your numerous readers, I propose making a few remarks on the wild fruits, and some of the most important forest trees...
-Notes From Lake Ontario
Many persons in your city, or farther seaward, suppose the region of the great Lake Ontario, one, if not inhospitable in soil, very severe in its climate, because it verges toward Canada. But it is qu...
-Notes From My Diary
March 31. Uncovered vines to-day. Weather fine. April 9. Weather cool, with frosty nights. 17. Gooseberry in full leaf to-day. 18. Grape buds swelling finely. Weather for the last six days very fine...
-Notes From My Garden
IN this region, the past season has been unusually favorable for horticultural experi-ments, as we have had abundance of rain and no lack of heat or sunshine. I had this spring eight varieties of str...
-Notes From My Garden (2)
IN establishing a garden, six year? ago, I proposed to make it supply my table with fresh vegetables and fruit all the year round. With vegetables, the result was obtained the first season, and the s...
-Notes From The College Farm
It appears that the Ida strawberry so highly commended from the College Farm, succumbed to the effects of the past winter. May 30th, Professor Matthews, of our State Agricultural College, writes us: I...
-Notes From The Mountains Of North Carolina
Dear Horticulturist: Knowing that you feel an interest as well as many of your readers, in all that is lovely to the eyes, pleaeant to the senses, and refreshing to the various wants of man, I hasten ...
-Notes Front The Pines. Spring Foliage
There is much in the varied hues of the just developing leaves to attract the observer who has an eye for the minor beauties of nature. The expanding leaves of the pear and those of the ash-leaved map...
-Notes In The Kitchen Garden
Perhaps there is no season when the want of a supply of good vegetables fur the family is more felt, than the spring. At this season the winter's stock of every thing but potatoes, is pretty well exha...
-Notes Of Some Of The Early History Of Fruit Culture In This Country, With Records Of The Prominent Early Actors And Abettors
One of our leading horticulturists has long been and is now gathering material for a record of the history of fruit culture in this country, together with short accounts of the most prominent men whos...
-Notes On Apples
Editor Horticulturist: - During an extended observation of several years, we have noticed a peculiar adaptation of varieties of apple trees to site and soil. We have found the English Golden Russett s...
-Notes On California Vineyards
The following is a list of Vineyards in the city and county of Los Angeles, California, from the official lists of city and county assessors, 1860: NAMEs OF proprietors, etc, BEARING VINES...
-Notes On California Vineyards. Continued
The charge of adulterating wine should not wholly be laid to the manufacturers, as the mixing process is mostly performed by parties who buy up good and poor wines, and doctor them up in San Francisco...
-Notes On Cincinnati
Cincinnati is renowned for her Strawberries and Strawberry Growers and for her fine Catawba Vineyards, but these are not all her horticultural attractions. She has within her environs a large number o...
-Notes On Country Seats Near Beston
1doubt whether your correspondent is correct in saying that the houses are too small, or that the barns are too large. That is a very strange fault to find with country seats generally; they are quite...
-Notes On Decorative Gardening - Architectural Terraces
I have, in my last communication, shown how terraces may be produced at an exceedingly moderate expense, suitable to various styles of cottage and villa architecture, and it is on this moderate scale ...
-Notes On Evergreen Trees
The Deodar Cedar is the most popular of all the new evergreens yet proved in this country. It deserves its popularity. It is at once the most hardy, the most beautiful, and the most rapid growing of t...
-Notes On Evergreen Trees (2)
Most comforting words to the nurserymen! - the most hardy, the most beautiful, and the most rapid growing of them all - the evergreens. Pretty high praise that, Mr. Downing. My good old father used...
-Notes On Forfy-Four Varieties Of Strawberries
Enough, in all conscience. Yet it is well to try all things, and hold fast unto that which is good. For a venture, I will select out from this forty-four, the following four kinds - leaving out the ...
-Notes On Forty-Four Varieties Of Strawberries
WE are just closing another highly favorable season of that beautiful and delicious fruit - the strawberry. The skies and the genial rains have been propitious indeed, and in no previous season have m...
-Notes On Fruits In Their Season - (Strawberries)
Another strawberry season has come and gone, and hundreds of cultivators have met once again to consult, compare, and comment for or against varieties - the results of which amount to just about the s...
-Notes On Fruits In Their Season. Raspberries And Blackberries
According to my observation and information, the canes of raspberries in northern Ohio and a large portion of the West matured well last year, wintered with comparatively little injury, and in their d...
-Notes On Gabdbn Vegetables
I imported the year before last some Lettuce and Cos seeds from Paris, and have been so much pleased with some of the kinds that I think them worth knowing. I tried both the Green Cos and the Grey Cos...
-Notes On Gardens And Country Seats Near Boston
Belmont Place, the residence of J. P. Gushing, Esq., Watertown. This is one of the most noted places in this neighborhood, remarkable especially for its completeness in all departments, and upon the w...
-Notes On Landscape Gardening
I should like to see a proper definition of the term Landscape Gardening. There certainly can be no fixed rule about it. Many ingenious and many absurd books, have been written on this subject. The...
-Notes On Landscape Gardening, By Thos. Meehan, Philadelphia
Dear Sib - Landscape gardening is a source of the highest pleasure to those who patronise it. Those who hold pleasure to be the result of mere accident, do landscape gardening a great injustice. Pleas...
-Notes On Orchards, Fruits, Etc. Etc
The early days of September, 1858, have never been exceeded by a purer atmosphere, or a more brilliant and cheering sun. From the 9th to the 12th it was a luxury to be out of doors, and during that pe...
-Notes On Peas
In our last number we spoke of Carter's First Crop having bloomed in advance of all others planted at the same time. Now, having grown and eaten of some thirty varieties this season, we feel prepared ...
-Notes On Peaches, Pears
I NOtice by the agricultural papers of Baltimore, that late spring frosts have lately cut off the peach crop so frequently that the growers of this fruit are disposed to give up its cultivation in des...
-Notes On Pears
Dear Sir: I send you for publication a few notes on Pears, Plums, Horsechestnuts, etc. Having fruited a large number of pears the present season we naturally had a desire to test their merits, and in ...
-Notes On Pears (2)
There has probably never been a single species of fruit, which, in all its varieties, has attracted so large a share of attention in the same space of time, and absorbed so large a monied investment w...
-Notes On Pears (3)
Mr. Allen looks on the dark side of the picture. Still he may be partially right. Let us compute the number of Pear trees advertised by the different nurserymen in this March number of the Horticultur...
-Notes On Pears (4)
Want of leisure mast be my apology, Mr. Editor, for not sooner responding to your request for more Notes. The past has been an unfavorable season for testing new varieties, it having been remarkably...
-Notes On Pears (4). Continued
Doyen Dillen A very handsome, oblong pear, of good size; pale yellow, juicy, and sweet. Very good. First of December. Doyenne D'Alencon Medium, or rather small; skin thick, very rough; dull green a...
-Notes On Pear Blight In Illinois
The principal horticultural event worthy of notice last season, in these parts, was the great and unparalleled blight and failure of all sorts of fruit. The spring frosts killed the plums, peaches, a...
-Notes On Pears For 1872
ED. WESTERN Horticulturist: I hand you brief notes on sack pears as I have fruited the past season. Madeleine Fruited well, was ripe July 25, twenty days later than last year; tree a slow grower, bu...
-Notes On Pears In 1854
In fulfillment of my promise, I send you some brief notes of my experience with Pears. Most of the varieties were fruited upon young trees, many of which were bearing their first crop. This should not...
-Notes On Pears In 1854. Continued
Columbia, although ripening in November, was very good - much better than I expected - and beautiful in form and color, the latter a soft yellow. It has so far borne very early and profusely, especi...
-Notes On Pears In Maryland - Our Most Desirable Sorts
IN your notes on the pear, Mr. Williams, in the October number of The Horticulturist, you ask pear culturists for the names of the pears which proved to be the best and most remunerative to the plante...
-Notes On Plums
In the Horticulturist for April you publish an article from your correspondent, C. G. Scrivers, of Cincinnatth on the Gen. Hand Plum. After reading your former notice, (with a drawing attached,) I dis...
-Notes On Raspberries
Doolittle and Miami, both abundant bearers, -we think leave nothing further to be desired in black caps. Should be planted about equally, for home use, and for market plant mostly Miami, as it is a we...
-Notes On Richmond Pare
Will you permit me with the greatest respect, to correct what appears to be an error in one of your most interesting letters on the parks of London, which has been copied into several of the papers. I...
-Notes On Roses
The question has been so frequently put to me, What are the names of the best new roses, or the best old varieties? that I propose to answer some of the inquiries through the columns of your valuab...
-Notes On Strawberries
It is desirable, now that so many new seedlings are coming into notice, to define, if possible, what qualities are the most desirable. Those which I consider as constituting a perfect strawberry, are ...
-Notes On Strawberries, Grapes And Plums
There is a communication in your last number, headed Staminate Strawberries productive/* and refers to Hovey's Seedling, Methven Scarlet, and Burr's New Pine. I have much to learn, if these are stami...
-Notes On The Central Park
As you talk to your readers through the medium of the Horticulturist from month to month, it is natural that they should feel at times a desire to ask some questions make suggestions, or at least to a...
-Notes On The Central Park. Continued
The elements of variety and expression do not appear to be well worked out. A greater variety in the style of the bridges and other structures, and of the material employed in their construction, migh...
-Notes On The Cultivation Of The Apricot
A modern writer says: It is remarkable that a fruit of so much excellence as the Apricot, ripening before the best early peaches, should be so little known, commanding as it does the highest price in...
-Notes On The Culture Of Aquatics And Native Plants
Dear Sir - For the gratification of such of your readers as may have a taste for the cultivation of aquatic plants, and have not an appropriate situation for their culture, I would subjoin for the Hor...
-Notes On The Culture Of Melons In The North
The Melon is one of the greatest luxuries that can be grown in our climate, provided we have it ready for the table during the warm season. But if it is not matured and ripened until the chilly days o...
-Notes On The Culture Of The Foreign Grape
At the end of the Grape season, I feel inclined, from habit, or a better reason, to make a few comments on the past, but not to put on airs of importance, for I have but a small vinery, and nothing to...
-Notes On The Curculio
Dear Sir - I notice you invite horticulturists and others to contribute to your valuable Journal, even rough notes of experience; accepting your invitation, I will speak of the curculio, that most unc...
-Notes On The Diseases Of Fruit-Trees In The West
Dear Sir - I confess my delinquencies as a correspondent; but I have been unusually engaged this past fall in attending Institutes and delivering lectures on the Education of the Industrial Classes,...
-Notes On The Gladiolus
Among summer flowering bulbous plants, the varieties of Gladiolus gan-davensis may not inaptly be considered as one of the very best cultivated. It is difficult to conceive any thing more truly beauti...
-Notes On The Gooseberry
This fruit is grown in this vicinity to considerable extent for the New York market, and I believe almost any quantity might be grown, if cultivators would pay more attention to the selection of soil,...
-Notes On The Grape
Dear Sir - In your Horticulturist for September, page 410,I notice an article headed The Isabella Grape - Its History, etc. You have some remarks appended thereto, a portion of which I quote, viz: ...
-Notes On The January Number
January, eighteen sixty-seven - an odd number that. Can it be that, according to the views of a deceased horticulturist, we are to have a barren fruit year, or, stepping across a broad chasm, that, as...
-Notes On The November Number
Where climbing plants are protected by the trees into which they climb, the leaves of the trees receive the injury, and the climbing plants and their fruit are protected. Where plants and shrubs are n...
-Notes On The Seasons In Maine
M. Downing - You have desired information respecting the effects of the late severe winter upon various orders of vegetation in different parts of the country, and as I think the suggestion a most val...
-Notes On The Seasons In Maine. Continued
In 1726, April 27, the venerable Smith remarks, people generally planting; this month has been wet and Uncomfortable; 'tis generally thought in these parts to be a backward spring. May 20, the peach...
-Notes On The Strawberry
Some distant readers of the Horticulturist have desired me to send to the Editor a sketch of my observations and experience with the strawberry the current season. This I will cheerfully do, if I am p...
-Notes On The Wearing Out Of Varieties
A. J. Downing, Esq Tour learned correspondent, Mr. Townley, in an essay on the Conditions required for the growth of Parasitic Fungi, published in the Horticulturist for July, uses the following la...
-Notes On Thirty-Two Varieties Of Plums
Living in a plum growing district, where the fruit is produced in great perfection and abundance, I may claim a right to know something about plums and plum trees. I therefore send you a few scraps fr...
-Notes Or The Season
The new year opened with fine sleighing, a cool healthful air, and smiling, but not a very warm sunshine. The southern sky looked soft and agreeable enough for September, in the early part of the day,...
-Notes Upon Apples
In my selection of Applet for my family's use, I have found the following kinds not only very choice bat forming a succession of ripe ones. Commencing with the Hawley, the very Prince of Fall Apples, ...
-Notes Upon The Fruits of 1857
Mr. Editor: It may be interesting to fruit growers, in other States, to learn our experience in Massachusetts during the past season. I send a few notes, and will commence with the early small fruits....
-Notes Upon The Hollyhock, With A Descriptive List
For many years there has been a steady progress in the Hollyhock in the form of flower, size, and texture of petals, as well as in color. The great attention which has been devoted to this plant by su...
-Notice Of Books, Pampblrts Etc
Chemical. Field Lectures for Agriculturists. By Dr. Julius Adolphus Stocehaedt, Professor in the Royal Academy at Tharand. Translated from the German. Edited, with Notes, by James E. Teschemacher. Cam...
-Notice of Two Large Plums
1. English Pond's Sredling When I was in your country, two years ago, I paid a visit to Mr. Pond's garden, at Cambridgeport, Boston. I showed htm the portfolio which contained the drawings of all the...
-Notices Of Book, Papmphicts
Transactions of the North western Fruit Growers' Association. Third Annual Meeting, held at Chicago, Oet 4th to 7th, 1858. This enterprising association is prosecuting its duties with true western en...
-Notices Of Book, Papmphicts. Part 2
Apples By T. WoWhorter - Have proved valuable in his locality: Red June (Blush June), himmer Rose, Sweet June, Early Harvest, Summer Queen, Spice Sweet, Summer Pearmain, ravenstein, Maiden's Blush, F...
-Notices Of Book, Papmphicts. Part 3
Mr. S. says: ' These Apples are all raised in my immediate vicinity, or by myself and prove valuable in Michigan. Apples By E. Bareness & Sons - (Fruit Farm, Peoria, I11.): Summer - Early Harvest, ...
-Notices Of Books, Pamflets
SecoNd FEsttval or THE Soxs of NEW HampsHIRE, Celebrated In Boston, Nov. 2,1803 The proceedings at this Festival, and an account of the proceedings in Boston on the day of the funeral at Marshfield, ...
-Notices Of Books, Pampblets
The North American Sylva : Or a Description of the Forest Twos of the United Steles, Canada, and Nora Sootia, considered particularly with respect to their use in the Arts, and their introduction into...
-Notices Of Books, Pampblets (2)
Bubal Essays. By A. J. Dowing. Edited, with a Momolr of the Author, by George William Cuetis; and a letter to his Friends by Frederika bremer.. New York: George G. Putnum & Co., 10 Park Place. While ...
-Notices Of Books, Pampblets (2). Continued
That request explains the want of delight with which he remembered his childhood: because it shows that his good, kind mother, in the midst of her baking, and boiling, and darning the children's stock...
-Notices Of Books, Pampblets (3)
Farm Implements, and the Principles of THRIE Construction and USe: an elementary and familiar trestise on Mechanics, and on natural philosophy generally, as applied to the ordinary practices of Agricu...
-Notices Of Books, Pampblets (4)
Practical Landscape Gardening, with reference to the Improvement of Bond Residences, firing the general Principles of the Art, with full Directions for Planting Shade Trees, Shrubbery end Flowers, end...
-Notices Of Books, Pamphlets
Elliot's Fecit Book; or, THE AMERICAN FRUIT Growers' GuIdE IN ORCHARD aNd GaRDEN. By F. R. Elliot. New York: C. M. SaXtoN, 1854. For several years past a book on fruits, or A Western Fruit Book, ha...
-Notices Of Books, Pamphlets. Continued
Twenty varieties of Currants are described - nine in first class, and eleven unworthy of cultivation. Among the latter class we find the Cherry, which is decidedly the largest Currant known, and one w...
-Notices Of Books, Pamphlets (2)
INAUGRAL Adsbebs, delivered at Former's College Commencement Day, Jane 7,1854, by Isaac L ALLEN, A- M., President, and Proteasor of Mental and Moral Science, and of the Institute of Civil Law. An Agr...
-Notices Of Societies
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will hold its 24th grand Autumnal Exhibition on the 15th, l6th, and 17th September, in the Philadelphia Museum buildings. The American Pomological Congress will...
-Notices Of Trees
Under this head it is proposed to give occasionally a sketch of such trees as may come under the writer's notice, that are any way remarkable in size, beauty, or rarity, with such remarks as may gener...
-A Novel Horticultural Society
A floral, gardening and horticultural society was formed the last year at Friends Academy, Union Springs, N. T., and at the first meeting twenty-four persons, mainly students, enrolled their names as ...
-Novel Hybrid
An old and zealous correspondent (R. T. C.), says the Gardeners' Chronicle,has left at our office two most interesting seedlings, the produce of one plant (a florist's Piootee), and, it is believed...
-Novelties In Field And Garden
Some ingenious writer will one day favor the world with a volume whose title should be The Curiosities of Horticulture. Neither literature, the sciences, the mechanic arts, nor any of the multitudin...
-Novelties In Flowers
Two novelties among flowers have been discovered, so rare and wonderful that we are almost tempted to treat them as of fables until their verity is established by our own vision. One is a black lily i...
-Novelties In The Kew Gardens
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture, writes in a gossipy manner respecting several novelties at the Kew Gardens. Several Yuccas are in flower. Y. recurvifo-lia is perhaps the most ha...
-November
Ventilation the same as in October. On the 5th give each tree a gallon of water, the last for the year. The autumnal top-dressing and watering encourage the emission of young roots, so that the tree i...
-November, 1862. The Journal Of Rurral Art And Rural Taste
Eftablifhed by A. J. Downing in 1846. PETER B. MEAD, Editor. GEO. E. WOODWARD, Associate Ed. MEAD & WOODWARD, Proprietors & Publishers, 37 Park Row, Hew York. Vol, l7 - No. 11.- Whole No. 197. Po...
-Nueserymen's Reputation
I think it is high time for the public to know what a nurseryman is, and how a respectable nursery is conducted, as their regular and systematic way of pruning and transplanting, to insure success to ...
-Numbers Already Published
No. 1. - CHRISTIAN RECREATION AND UNCHRISTIAN AMUSEMENT, Sermon by Rev T L. Cuyler. No. 2. - MENTAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN, Addresses by Rev. H. W. Banana* and Hon. Jas. T. Brady. No. 8. - ORANDEURs OF A...
-Nursebyman's Labors
We have often thought the labors of a careful nurseryman were little appreciated, and as compared with the intelligence required for the business, less remuneratively compensated than those of any oth...
-Nurseries
There are two in the Arboretum; one specially intended for planting the Kew grounds with ornamental trees and shrubs, and rearing a stock for exchange; the other (formed at the desire of the First Com...
-Nursery Of L. V. Houtte, Ghent
It is needless to say that this is one of the most important commercial horticultural establishments on the Continent. Visitors to Ghent make a. rule to inspect it, and we never yet met with a lover o...
-Nursery Of Parsons And Co
We find the following in the Country Gentleman: During a recent visit to this celebrated nursery at Flushing, Long-Island, we observed many objects .of interest. It is well known as one of the best in...
-Nursery Reform
Mr. Rivers, in the last number of our excellent contemporary, the Florist, has successfully stripped of its rags one of the idols which the folly of collectors has set up for the admiration of simple ...
-The Nursery. Propagation And Culture Of Evergreens
Samuel Edwards before Eastern Iowa Horticultural Society. As a general rule, it is far better for inexperienced persons to buy plants than to attempt growing them from seed. The constant watching and...
-Nurserymen
24 blooms: 1st, Mr. Turner, of Slough, with Bob, Mr. Selden, Queen of Lilacs, Sir J. Franklin, Malvini, Thames, Bank Hero, Sir C. Napier, Amazon, Duchess of Kent, Miss Caroline, E. Foster, Princess Ra...
-Nurserymen's Reputation
Some of the State reports speak of nurserymen as persons of rather doubtful reputation, and nurserymen's humbugs are sometimes alluded to. We do not think this is unjust; for, with some very honorab...
-Nut Growing
It is somewhat surprising that with all our nation's love of gain, and the general appreciative admiration of beautiful trees for shade and ornament, we have so few instances where nut-bearing trees h...
-Nuts And Seeds
A large Christmas box was carried out, from this region, by the Persia, which will be gratefully received by Sir William Hooker, at Kew Gardens, near London. They are a present from Dr. Darlington, an...
-Oak From California
A few miserable living plants of this secies were sent home by Hartweg from California, and are now beginning to grow in the Society's Garden. It will probably be a hardy evergreen tree, concerning wh...
-Oalcareom Manures
I think that lime is best when mixed with other materials, The farmers in the sandy districts of New Jersey who use marl largely, think it best when mixed with lime or barn-yard manure. Plaster of Par...
-Obituary. - James D. Fulton
Died, suddenly, on the 22d of October, Mr. James D. Pulton, of Marcus Hook (formerly of Philadelphia), in his forty-third year. Mr. Fulton was in New Jersey, with some of his men, collecting packing m...
-Objects Exhibited
Plants by Robert Buist - specimen plant, Clerodendron Kaempheru; collection of twelve - Coleus Blumei, Clerodendron speciossissimum, Clethra arborea, Fuchsia Ariel, Gardenia Fortunii, Stephanotis flor...
-Objects Shown
Plants by R'Buist,-specimen Nurembergia grandiflora; collection of twelve, Cuttleia Mossiae var Camarotis purpurea, Cuphea platycentra, Mussaenda frondosa, Vinea occulata, V. rosea, Polygala dalmasian...
-Observations On Early Forcing
If we take a retrospective view of the science of horticulture for the last ten years, we shall certainly find that forcing early fruits has not progressed, but retrograded ; a few, and very few, exce...
-Observations On Forcing Hyacinths
To make Hyacinths flower early in December, they should be planted the beginning of August, and the pot plunged, in the open air, to such a depth that they may be covered with mould to the extent of f...
-An Octagon House
Mr. Editor. - Dear Sir: Can you give me any information in regard to an octagon cottage or villa? Have you ever seen one? How does it answer the expectations of the occupant? And where is it? are thre...
-An Officer
The Season has been, and still is, a trying one for fruit trees. December, up to the 20th, was mild. Winter then set in with cold and snow, and from that time to March 1, every week possessed the pecu...
-Officers Of The American Pomological Society, 1858
President: Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, of Massachusetts. Vice Presidents: S. L. Goodale, Maine; H. J. French, New Hampshire; Samuel Walker, Massachusetts; Frederick Holbrook, Vermont; Stephen H. Smith, R...
-Official Report Of The California State Agricultural Society's Fourth Annual Fair
California is not unjustly called the Italy of the United States. The difficulty lies in the enormous distance between this great producing State and the older portions of the Union. It is almost impo...
-Ohio Agricultural College At Obeblin
We have received a circular, setting forth the objects and plans of this Institution, and take pleasure in commending them to public notice: Tea Owner To place within the reach of Farmery both old a...
-Ohio As A Fruit State
Let me not be thought tedious, however, and to have taken up the time that should be devoted to a discussion of the fruits before you. I am sure that, on reflection, the importance of what I have adv...
-Ohio Fair
The seventh annual fair of the Ohio State Board of Agriculture, comes off at Cleveland on the 23d, 24th, 25th, and 26th of September next, and is open to competition from other States. The premium lis...
-The Ohio Farmer. Vol. XI. 1862
The eleventh volume of the Ohio Farmer will commence January 4th, 1862. Now is the time for our friends to commence making up clubs. If any man wishes to farm well, or keep the best stock, or do anyt...
-Ohio Overbearing Raspberry
A writer in The Country Gentleman vindicates the Ohio Everbearing Raspberry. He says: Its habits of bearing,moderate crops during the latter part of summer, caused it to be designated 'Everbearing.'...
-Ohio Pomological Society
The eighth session of the Ohio Pomological Society will be held in Cincinnati, commencing on Monday, September 14, etc (during the week of the State Fair). The meetings of this Society are now held bi...
-Ohio State Horticultural Society
The annual winter meeting of what has heretofore been known as the Ohio Pomo-logical Society was held at Sandusky the 3d, 4th, and 5th of December, 1867. The show of fruits was. not numerous, nor the ...
-Ohio State Pomological Society. To Fruit Growers And Nurserymen
As it is expected that there will be a large display of fruits at the coming Ohio State Fair, and many fruit growers and nurserymen will be present on that occasion, it has been thought best to hold a...
-Ohio State Pomologies! Society
A Convention of the Pomologists of Ohio was held at Columbus on 31st day of August and 1st of September, when a fine collection of fruits of the season, were exhibited from diftVmit parts of the state...
-Oidium Or Vine Mildew
A writer in the London Journal of Horticulture says that a complete cure for the above disease may be found by taking one pound of flour of sulphur, one pound of slaked lime, and one gallon of rain...
-Oil Plant
This small tree (Catoglionia lobata), known in Peru under the name of Pinon-cello and cultivated about Sureo, Huacho, and Sambageque, also growing wild in great abundance in those regions, it has been...
-Ok Planting Dwarf Pear Trees
When it was first recommended to plant them so deep that the point of junction of the graft, or bud and stock, should be beneath the surface of the ground, I conceived the plan to be a good one, and d...
-Okra
This plant is the Hibiscus esculentus of botanists, and one of the natural order Malvaceae, the whole of which are more or less mucilaginous. Okra in particular owes its culinary importance to the abu...
-Old Apple Trees
ED. Western Horticulturist: - The question is very frequently asked, what shall be done with the old apple trees? This is more especially the case in New England and those Eastern States which have ma...
-The Old Digger
As promised in the early part of this volume, the whole of the articles written by the late A. J. Downing, and signed An Old Digger, have now appeared in the months for which they were originally wr...
-Old London Doorways And Carvings
Many of the doorways of Old London, put up about the time of Charles I. and Charles II. and Queen Anne, have remained with but little alteration. The old window-frames have been replaced with others o...
-Old Seeds
(B. R. H., New York.) We shall be glad to hear the results of your experiments, although we fear that you will destroy their vitality in the process you propose trying. Various agents have been employ...
-The Old Topiary Work
Old-fashioned gardening embraced a great amount of topiary work, or trimming shrubbery into figures, without which the grounds adjoining the house were considered incomplete. This continued till the t...
-Oleanders
In our rambles about the country we are frequently asked as to the best time for cutting in or pruning oleanders ; to which we reply, cut them back just as soon as they have flowered. They will then p...
-One Word About The Name
The multiplication of synonyms has become a most revolting nuisance, both in Pomology and Botany. What right had Mensch to unsettle a name which had been satisfactory to Aiton, and Curtis, and Redout...
-One Word More About Grapes
Other exhibiters have received prizes for choice displays, and some notice is due to Mr. Caywood, of Modena, Ulster county, N. Y., who has put upon the table, to-night, a choice display of native grap...
-The Onion
It appears somewhat singular that the improvement from an original state of many of our best kitchen esculents, has, or would seem to have had its beginning during the time which is generally known as...
-Onion Maggot
An onion-grower, of considerable experience, says that he destroys the onion maggot in the following manner: As soon as the maggots are discovered at work, remove the soil from the sides Of the bulbs,...
-Onondaga Or Swans Orange
Mr. Walker: Not an A No. 1; holds leaf well, tree a good grower, good bearer; should like to see it advanced. Mr. Field: I like it; it has disappointed many. Often quite astringent and sour; very frui...
-The Onondaga Pear
Although spinning a long yarn, which I fear both yourself and your readers will get tired of - hot it is a gusty, snowy, inhospitable day, and my Short Horns, and Devens, and Southdowns, are all snugl...
-Ontario Peas
This new native Pear was concisely noticed in our Rochester Report Since that time, other specimens have been examined, which enables the Committee to give a more full description of the variety. The ...
-Ontario Pear
We are much pleased with the appearance and qualities of the Ontario Pear, from the nurseries of W. T. & E. Smith, Geneva, N. Y. They first introduced it at the American Pomological Society Of Rochest...
-Oovbbing For Frames And Greenhouses
In the report of the meeting of the London Horticultural Society for December 5th, we find the following: The dearth of Russia mats has caused people to look for other kinds of winter protections to...
-The Opinions Of My Neighbors
A little more than a year since I ventured to write down a little of talk had with my neighbors; and as the Horticulturist very kindly published it, I am induced again to try my hand at tale-telling; ...
-Opinions Of The Press
No admirer of Mrs. Holmes' writings will thank us for a critical opinion of this, her latest and best work. The time for such a thing has gone by. But sorely they will pardon us if we dwell lingerin...
-Opinions Of The Press On The Concord Grape
It will be recollected, by those familiar with our pages, that, at page 37 of our last volume, we made some remarks in relation to this newly introduced fruit, questioning somewhat its vaunted equalit...
-The Oporto Grape
A few years since my attention was directed to a grape cultivated by farmers and amateurs in this vicinity, for the manufacture of wine for medical, sacramental, and social purposes. The cut is a good...
-Orange And Lemon Trees
There is something aristocratic in the appearance of an orange or lemon tree, and although they require no more pains than many plants which are nursed and taken great care of, there is nothing much m...
-Orange Culture In Florida
Mr. Editor : Your note requesting my views on the above is at hand; but as your correspondent has so thoroughly ventilated the subject, I can add but little unless in corroboration of his statements. ...
-Orange Culture In Florida. Continued
During a recent visit to Florida we found the date, papaya (Carica papaya ?), guava, and banana growing freely, and producing abundance of fruit. We have reason to believe that the tea plant would pro...
-Orange Culture In Florida (2)
MUCH has been written and published regarding Orange culture; and it is a matter of conviction that many persons have regretted engaging in the pursuit. Since the close of the civil war there has been...
-Orange Culture In Florida (3)
THE question will be asked: Will not orange culture be overdone and the fruit rendered unprofitable? We are satisfied to the contrary; for the area where this fruit can be produced is limited, and t...
-Orange Culture In Florida (4)
A RECENT number of the Rural South Land contains a letter from a gentleman who has been pensding the winter with Colonel Hardee, of concussion celebrity, near Jacksonville, Fla., from which we extra...
-Orange Culture In Florida (5)
Editor Horticulturist: I am amused at the communication of Oliver Taylor, in your October number, regarding my article on Orange Culture in Florida. I am opposed.to controversy, but dislike to be unju...
-Orange Culture In Florida, Improved
A Few inaccuracies, I imagine, occur in an article on Orange culture in Florida, in the October number, that should be corrected, viz.: Budding orange trees is not a failure in Florida, but will have ...
-The Orange Pear
Tut, tut, gentlemen. This Orange Pear, if it has any merit, will take care of itself. It used to be a pretty good fruit over in Jersey, in old times; and I should be sorry to learn that it had lost ei...
-The Orange Pear (2)
I have read the communication of Col. Hodge, in the last Horticulturist, and am under obligation to him for its history - in Buffalo. As to the rest of the matter, touching its merits, he is partly fa...
-Orange Watermelon Seed
Mr. Editor: I see inquiries made as to where the above-named seed can be had. If you will do your subscribers the favor to mention this, I have some seed to spare, and will send, to any person who wil...









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