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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #13 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Orchards To Portable Poultry House

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #13
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-The Orchard
The writer justly advises good cultivation of orchard trees, and especially young trees. There is, however, a medium to be observed; for if young trees are stimulated too highly, their duration of lif...
-Orchard Culture
A few years since, a person, for the sake of employment, took an agency from a reliable nursery for the sale of their trees. He was wholly inexperienced in tree culture; still, on visiting farmers and...
-The Orchard House (2)
[THE following is an extract from the Report of Mr. Coit to the American Pomological Society, and will be of interest to our readers. We paid Mr. Coit a visit last summer, and are enabled to state tha...
-The Orchard House (3)
We have some practical remarks for publication next month on the Orchard House in America, by our practical friend Fox Meadow. Letters on Modern Agriculture, by Professor Liebio, edited by John Bl...
-Orchard Houses (4)
ORCHARD HOUSES, in certain quarters, constitute a subject which is now attracting no small measure of attention. We can not perceive the same necessity for them here which may be supposed to exist i...
-Orchard Houses (5)
Leafring, in your April issue, asks for some information about Orchard Houses. As I have had some experience in this new mode of culture the past three or four years, I shall take the liberty to answe...
-Orchard Houses (6)
The most complete establishment for this system of culture that it has yet been our good fortune to see is in the grounds of Wm. Beech Lawrence, Esq., at Newport, Rhode Island, and under the care of M...
-Orchard Houses (7)
It is but a few years since when one had only to plant a peach, or nectarine, or plum, and be quite certain of obtaining the fairest and finest fruit; and we were accustomed to look with great compass...
-Orchard Houses (8)
The reader will find, in the present issue, a valuable article on Orchard Houses, to which we desire to direct attention. Their use is very extensive abroad, and they are gradually creeping into favor...
-Orchard Houses (9)
We should like to show the incredulous a box of fruit now before us from an Orchard House Cultivator of some years' standing - excellently flavored, well colored Peaches and Nectarines, among the form...
-Orchard Houses (10)
Fox-Meadow gives some practical hints in the present number, regarding Orchard Houses; one of his remarks applies particularly to planting out in the border. Now this may answer very well, but the b...
-The Orchard House At Audley End
In a recent visit to this charming seat nothing struck me so vividly as the perfect success of the orchard~house culture. The orchard house under the management of Mr. Young, who has been head gardene...
-Orchard House Produce
The following is the amount of produce of an orchard house here for the last four years: PEACHES. 1855 1856 1857 1858 Noblesse, 2 plants.......
-Orchard House of J. S. Lovering
Mr. Lovering's Orchard House is 165 feet long by 14 wide, is a lean-to, points south, under shelter of a hill. Back wall 12feet high, 8 feet stone work; on top of wall 4 feet of wood, in which the ba...
-The Orchard House,. Or The Cultivation Of Fruit-Trees In Pots Under Glass
From the Fifth London Edition, 1858. A Few Words Of Preface And Apology To The First Edition It has been, and is, too often the custom of writers on horticulture and agriculture, to write first and ...
-The Orchard House, Cultivation Of Fruit-Trees In Pots Under Glass. Part 2
The Chasselas de Fontainebleau grape, our Royal Muscadine, ripens there in the open air, in average seasons, on the 25th of August: this is as nearly as possible the time when it ripens here under gla...
-The Orchard House, Cultivation Of Fruit-Trees In Pots Under Glass. Part 3
* These respective heights of front and back are a matter of choice: they may be exceeded; for I find that trees in pots make most vigorous growth. Fig.1. Top end of Rafter. Fig.2. Bottom end of...
-The Orchard House, Cultivation Of Fruit-Trees In Pots Under Glass. Part 4
In one house forcing is commenced early, so as to have ripe peaches or other fruit in May; the second succeeds it with peaches in June and July; and the third, without heat, gives its crop in August, ...
-The Orchard House, Cultivation Of Fruit-Trees In Pots Under Glass. Part 5
The following is the estimate recently given me by Mr. Rivett for a large span-roofed orchard house, built in the plain manner, as given in figs. 6 and 7: An orchard house thirty feet long, twenty f...
-The Orchard House. - A Few Suggestions
Mr. Editor: - It i said necessity is the mother of invention. The truth of this is made manifest daily. Necessity and repeated failures are oftentimes the means by which the observing mind trac...
-The Orchard House. - A Few Suggestions. Continued
We know of over a thousand lineal feet erected in this way for the exotic grape alone, which is all heated throughout with hot water; and as to the general appearance, there are hundreds of houses tha...
-Orchard-Houses Of Col. Colt
Being recently in Hartford, we made a brief visit to Col. Colt's. The leading feature here is the large extent of glass, there being, we should think, not less than 2,000 feet of it. A very considerab...
-Orchards - Pruning And Thinning
WITH several years close observation and experience, we have come to regard late spring, and on into mid-summer, the most favorable season of the year for pruning in this latitude - varying with the s...
-Orchards In Grass
IF a man desires fruit for himself and family only, and is indifferent as to the time he gets it, and indifferent about the quality and quantity, then he may plant his trees in grass ground and keep t...
-Orchards In Grass - Protection
ED. Western Horticulturist: - There are very few old orchards in this part of Jasper county, and of these only one was injured by the severity of last winter, and that one is past all redemption. Othe...
-Orchards. The Advantages And Disadvantagcs Of Shelter Belts
WC. FLAGG, of the Prairie Farmer, read an essay upon the above subject, at a late meeting of the Champaign Horticultural Society. We copy his summary of the advantages and disadvantages of shelter: - ...
-Orchid
An orchid has lately flowered which is pronounced by Professor Reichenbach to be an entirely new species of Epidendrum. Herr Reichenbach pro-poses that it be called Epidendrum eburne-um, in consequen...
-Orchids (2)
There are but few who have special structures for the growth of this family. They are proverbially of easy culture, and many of them grow well under ordinary greenhouse treatment. Like other plants, t...
-Orchid House At Hillfield, Near Reigate, England
THE illustration which graces our frontispiece this month, represents an interior view of one of the most famous Orchid Houses in England. It is situated at Hillfield, near Reigate, and is part of the...
-Orchids, And Their Management
Those who have had an opportunity to visit an Orchid house in England, where this tribe of plants is much admired, have beheld a display of curious and beautiful flowers that afford the highest gratif...
-Orchitis
Several of the winter-flowering varieties will now be in full beauty. Zygo-petalon crinitum being now fine, and, on bright, sunny days, will perfume a large house. These plants are growing all the yea...
-Origin Of The King Apple
Having given the subject a pretty thorough investigation, I present the following as the true history of the King Apple of Tompkins County: About fifty-six years ago, Jacob Wycoff brought it from War...
-Original Disseminator Of The Delaware Grape
A short time since we saw, in a Western paper, a record of a trip among vineyards; Dr. Grant was one of the party, and it was stated that he, Dr. Grant, was the original disseminator of the Delaware G...
-The Original Scuppernong
J. Van Buren writes to the Southern Cultivator that The original vine of the Scupper-nong Grape is growing on Roanoke Island, and was first discovered by the colony landing with Sir Walter Raleigh in...
-Ornaments
Rustic stumps and baskets are highly ornamental, when kept in perfect trim. Few things look better in front of a cottage than a basket on a pedestal of nnbarked timber; the basket itself woven of stou...
-Ornament For Dried Flowers
The accompanying drawings, made for us by an accomplished lady, represent a pasteboard hanging vase, covered with moss, and attached to an oak branch, for a parlor ornament. From the material employed...
-Ornamental Flowers-Stand
The annexed figure represents a design for an ornamental flower-stand, to be made of wire, which we commend to workers in this material. Where a greenhouse is well-managed, there will be no difficulty...
-Ornamental Foliaged Plants
At the Royal Horticultural Show in June last, the Messrs. Veitch exhibited Croton Wisemannii as the best new ornamental foliaged plant. The leaves are beautifully mottled and marbled with green and ye...
-Ornamental Grass. Briza Maxima (Greatest Quaking Grass)
Hoots annual, and consisting of many white, fibrous rootlets. Leaves arising direct from the crown of the root, about half an inch broad at their base, about four inches long, smooth, milky green, and...
-Ornamental Grass. Stipa Pennata - ( Feather Grass)
This Grass, so often found in the windows of our seedsmen's shops, is one of the most graceful of its tribe. It is among the grasses what the Bird of Paradise is among birds. It is a perennial, with ...
-Ornamental Grasses
For the purpose of embellishing our homes in winter with elegant and pretty groups or bouquets of dried flowers, there are no class possessing more graceful and attractive forms than such as are terme...
-Ornamental Grasses (2)
Many garden folk are very fond of cultivating plants of this class, as many of them are very grand, stately, and graceful in their habit of growth; others are remarkable for the great beauty and delic...
-Ornamental Grounds At Hamilton College
The readers of the Horticulturist will remember that mention was made in this journal, a few months ago, of certain contemplated improvements in the grounds pertaining to Hamilton College, at Clinton,...
-Ornamental Iron Work
I like these specimens, for they don't require much paint, and they never rot. With stone foundations, bedded in the ground below frost, and the posts well drilled and leaded into them, they stand for...
-Ornamental Pear-Trees
There is probably no species of tree that produces greater variety in form of growth than the pear. It would be difficult to imagine any form in a deciduous tree that is. not duplicated in some of the...
-Ornamental Planting Near Railroad Stations
MR. H. W. S. Cleveland, of Chicago, by a forcible address on the advantages of ornamenting railroad grounds has stirred up a very lively interest On this topic, and it is believed there will be some g...
-Ornamental Shrubs - How To Take Care Of Them
Deciduous shrubs are propagated by cuttings, layers, offsets or divisions of the root and seed. Cuttings are made of the ripe wood of the same year's growth, cut in November and heeled in - that is, t...
-Ornamental Shrubs For The Million
Among shrubs employed in the embellishment of ornamental grounds, there are a certain number which recommend themselves under nearly all circumstances; or, as pomologists say of fruits, worthy of gen...
-Ornamental Trees - Double Flowering Peaches
A correspondent of the Tribune is heartily enthusiastic in encouraging the growth of Double Flowering Peaches in our American orchards. He says: We have seen groups composed of some six different c...
-Ornamental Trees - The Cotton-Wood
My northern readers may not recognize this well-known tree under this popular name, which it commonly bears in the Southwestern States. It is the Populus Canadensis of the books. There are two or thr...
-Ornamental Trees - The Lombardy Poplar
Were I disposed to solemnize, after the fashion of Natty Bumppo, in the midst of the Catskills, while gazing alone from one of its topmost peaks far away down into the broad valley of the Hudson at th...
-Ornamental Trees And Shrubs
AT last meeting of the Western N. Y. Horticultural Society, lists of valuable standard, or new trees and shrubs, were submitted by various members, of which the following, accompanying Mr. Ellwanger's...
-Ornamental Treks Or Panama
The most femous of all the ornamental plants is the Couronpita odoratissiiua. Seem., combining a most delicious fragrance with a splendid flower. In the Morro, a forest near the village of Rio Jesus, ...
-Ornamental Vines
These may be classified into two divisions, the one with perennial and woody stems, the other consisting of annuals, to be raised from seeds every season. The first of these is of the greatest import...
-Ornamental Water
When appropriately introduced, the effect of water in pleasure ground scenery is always pleasing, ana frequently, strikingly beautiful. The first requisite is, of course, an ample supply of water; the...
-Osage Orange
In 1833 I received two species of Osage Orange, M. and F.; the former died, the other lived, and, strange to say, once bore one single fruit The tree was a beautiful one, perfectly acclimated, and had...
-The Osage Orange (Madura Auran Iaca)
This plant has some very good qualities for the purpose, but it requires great attention - more, it has often been found, than the generality of busy farmers can afford to give to it; if neglected, it...
-Osage Orange Hedges
M. L. Sullivant, Esq., the great land proprietor of Columbus, Ohio, has engaged, says the Ohio Cultivator, twenty bushels of Osage Orange seed, to hedge his Illinois lands. Success to the enterprise! ...
-Osage Orange Hedges (2)
WE think this subject may be classed among those which can properly, and profitably, be discussed in the Horticulturist. While entertaining these views, we have been anxious to see some one give his e...
-Osage Orange Hedges (3)
Premising that the hedge has been successfully planted, the first thing that will claim attention will be to prevent the disastrous effects of drought, if it occurs during the early part of the season...
-Osage Orange Hedges (3). Continued
We shall have to state briefly our objections to methods generally adopted, as this article is already much longer than we anticipated. Some persons practice cutting off the tops of the plants one foo...
-The Osband's Summer Pear. Osband's Favorite, Summer Virgalieu
The Osband's Summer is one of the most beautiful of all our American Summer Pears. Until about the year 1846 it was known only to a few persons in Wayne and Monroe counties of this State, but about th...
-Osiers, And Basket Making
South Edmeston, August 23,1856. Mr. Jay Smith. - Dear Sir: Being somewhat engaged in the Osier or Basket Willow growing, which looked very sanguine for a profitable business till last spring, I have ...
-Oswego Horticultural Society
As Secretary of the Oswego Horticultural Society, I am requested to give you some account of our doings. At the annual meeting in January last, the following officers were chosen for the ensuing year....
-Oswego Horticultural Society (2)
The September exhibition of this Society, was held on the 14th Sept., 1652, at the City Hail. Hon. E. B. Talcott, President, in the chair. As a testimonial of respect to the memory of the lamented Do...
-Other Fruits
The same journal says: The finest Medlars in the country were there, and, also, the ' Prickly Pear' of the South of Europe - a very wholesome fruit, which makes a beautiful dish in the dessert. This ...
-Other New Fruits In England. Apples
Cox's Orange Pippin proved last year to be the best apple in England of the old varieties. Among new kinds, the following are among the best: Taylor's Seedling and Lord Raglan as kitchen sorts; Frogmo...
-Ott
Though this is not a new pear, it endures extreme cold so well here, it is well worthy of trial further North, as an early pear of most excellent quality. It is a seedling of the Seckel, which it very...
-The Ott Pear
This is a native Pennsylvania pear, originated on the grounds of Mr. Samuel Ott, of Montgomery county, Pa, said to be a seedling of the Sockel It was introduced to notice a few years ago by Dr. BRINCK...
-Our Artists
This being the season of compliments, we embrace the occasion to pay a well-merited one to our artists. We think we are warranted in saying, that our engravings for the past year will compare favorabl...
-Our Batteries
The new year has burst upon us, and we hope that with it will burst many new and gloriously good practical ideas. No men in the world know so well the wants and necessities of the horticultural world,...
-Our Climate
A fitful climate is ours, and it seems to grow more and more so every year. Some ten or fifteen years ago only, we reckoned upon such and such sorts of weather at certain periods of the year, especial...
-Our Engravings of Fruit
It has been our intention to give engravings of fruit taken from nature, and not merely copies of old engravings. Taking charge of the Horticulturist on the first of January last, we have, of course, ...
-Our Frontispiece
We present this month a plate of eight well-proved excellent varieties of Cherries. We cannot say that we are partial to this mode of illustration - one or two varieties, with foliage, would make a mu...
-Our Fruit Books
The remarks of A. Thorn, in our last number, set us to thinking about our fruit books, and to studying up a little as to the sources from which their authors derived information. In apples, peaches, p...
-Our Fruit Prospects In Minnesota
ED. Western Horticulturist: - Winter is here earlier than usual by fifteen days, having set in October 22, though it is possible this snow may leave before more comes, and let us have some good weathe...
-Our Greatest Enemy
The Codling Moth is likely to be, if it has not already become, the most formidable enemy the Western orchardist has to contend with. For several years past they have been largely on the increase in t...
-Our Improving Agriculture
The present Governor of Massachusetts, in his proclamation for thanksgiving, suggests as an occasion for public gratitude, the increased attention given to agriculture; and perhaps there is no chan...
-Our Improving Agriculture. Continued
She tells us how the beautiful Oriole, so often regarded and destroyed by the market gardener, as an enemy of his peas, is only devouring the larvae of the pea-bug, which is already full grown in the ...
-Our London Correspondence
I was amused the other day, at seeing a paragraph in the London Leader, on dinners, in which it is stated that Caulaincourt (ambassador to St. Petersburg from Napoleon I.) once gave a dinner, at whi...
-On Our Meetings
Do you not think there is too much time wasted in laudation? I have no wish to detract from the merits of the Society or Officers, but I think we have had glorification enough, and that it would be be...
-Our Native Wines
An opinion prevails in Borne of the eastern cities - doubtless encouraged by the importers of foreign wines - that our native wines are gradually falling into disuse. I am happy to say that this opini...
-Our Native Wines Abroad
During the session of the Society, Mr. Husman desired to hear from the President some account of his experience with our native wines during his recent visit abroad. The President said that on his ar...
-Out-Door Culture
In this there is no more skill required than for ordinary crops of other vegetables. It is well to make choice of tend which has been cultivated the previous season. Dig or plough deeply in the fall; ...
-Out-Doors At Idlewild
Rural neighborhoods ought to be very much indebted to Mr. Willis for this sprightly and enlivening book, consisting of the letters published originally in the Home Journal. The author possesses more t...
-Over-Rich Old Gardens
No doubt every observant gardener has seen spots of ground that by over-manuring for a succession of years had ceased to be productive. The only remedy to make them again useful, is to clear a good po...
-Overbearing of V Ineyards
We know there are a few persons who believe in permitting the vine to set and ripen all the fruit it will; but we also know that whenever we have watched the practice of such advocates, it has resulte...
-Overworked
That word describes our feelings precisely. We are almost used up, but with an unabated desire to go ahead, and go ahead we shall as long as there is any thing left of us. Our present number may be a ...
-Owabgena. Grapes
We hope to add a few words to those in which Mr. S. Miller, in your June number, expresses his interest in the culture of the grape. At this time, when not only plums, apricots, and nectarines, but ou...
-Oxalis Bowei
It may not be generally known that this succeeds well as a bedding-plant. It produces its beautiful rose-colored flowers in great profusion, until destroyed by frost in autumn; and when planted in con...
-Oxalis Floribunda
Wore I desired to select the most picturesque plant, yielding a long-oontinned and profuse crop of flowers without artificial attention to its' after-growth, I should without hesitation fix upon this....
-Oyster-Shell Lime
While spendingafew hours on Staten Island lately, we saw a simple and efficient mode of making oyster-shell lime, which we record for the benefit of such of our readers as have the opportunity to put ...
-P.S
What 1 have seen of McAvoy's Superior and Russell's Prolific leads me to believe they are distinct; but I doubt if McAvoy's Superior and Buffalo are so. C. Downing once told me the two latter were the...
-P. Argyraea
A well known species, beautifully variegated. Like the preceding one, it is a strong grower and soon monopolizes more than its due share of room, still it should find a place in every fernery, as it i...
-P. B. Mead, Esq
Dear Sir: It has been my pleasure to receive instruction from the pages of the Horticulturist for some years. We have some fine Grape lands along the shore of Lake Erie, In our county, and although Gr...
-P. B. Mead, Esq (2)
Sir: Permit me as a subscriber to the Horticulturist, to make a few inquiries. I wrote to you for this purpose in November, but the letter may have shared the fate of many more valuable documents des...
-P. B. Mead, Esq (3)
Dear Sir, - In the engraved plate of Strawberries which you present in your last number, the same error is renewed which has been heretofore committed, and by which even Mr. Downing was misled, descri...
-P. Barry. The Editor To The Reader
Downing - we never write the name without emotion - said in reply to an announcement that we had pitched our tent in a rural home, now in the limits of the city of Philadelphia, You are now one of m...
-P. Monterey
Your cone is from Pinus tuberculata. It was first discovered by Dr. Coulter in your neighborhood, South of Monterey, in latitude 86, near the level of the sea, and growing almost close to the bea...
-P. P
Your lawn has been well broken up, well sowed, except that you omitted a portion of white clover, but is now filled 'with switch-grass, etc. You must either mow it very frequently, or pasture it wi...
-On Packing Trees And Plants
To one accustomed to packing nursery stock, nothing seems more simple; while to outsiders it seems something of a mystery how plants which they have been taught to believe require such nice proportion...
-The Paeony
Mr. Prince, we see, has in the December number of the Gardener's Monthly begun a series of articles describing the different species of the Paeony, a most interesting group of plants, many of them by ...
-Palace Gardens, Hampton Court
In no previous season do we recollect having seen these in better condition than they are at present; and that their noble avenues, broad gravel walks closely shaven verdant lawns, and shady retreats,...
-The Palisades
Though we are not just now in the region of the Palisades, in thinking over the extraordinary beauties of the Hudson, it occurs to us to remark that we have never been able to find an individual who k...
-Palms
Linnaeus rightly called the Palms the princes of the vegetable world, for they surpass all other plants in the grandenr and majesty of their port. Cuba possesses such numbers, and a considerable varie...
-The Pampas Grass
Several paragraphs in this journal have lately alluded to the Pampas Grass as highly ornamental. A number of questions regarding it have reached us, to which we reply, that it is scarcely known among ...
-The Pampas Grass (Gynerium Argenteum.) From The London Florist
Within the last few years, those who were so fortunate as to possess plants of the Pampas Grass, and transferred them to the open soil, have been gratified in witnessing, each summer, the beauty of it...
-Pampas, Dekalb Co., III. Soil, Climate, Productions
This town is situated a little east of the center of the county, and the county is about the center of the State east and west and in the second tier from Wisconsin line. The soil is a black muck, in ...
-Pamphlets And Circulars Received
List of Premiums of the Brooklyn Horticultural Society for September Exhibition, September 17,18, and 19,1856. Fourth National Exhibition of the National Agricultural Society, at Philadelphia, Octobe...
-Pamphlets Received
Circular from Western Virginia Agricultural Society and Industrial Institute, calling attention to the Autumn Exhibition at Wheeling, September 13th, 14th and 15th. We are glad to see energy displaye...
-Panama
Plants clamber up every wall of masonry, burst in masses on every ledge, spread over and possess the tiled roofs, wreathe chaplets and crowns on ruined towers, and hang in festoons from every port hol...
-The Pansy
The beauty of this plant can only be fully appreciated when seen under good cultivation; for the Pansy, above all other plants, must have a rich, light soil to develop its good qualities, both as rega...
-The Pansy Or Heartsease - Viola Tricolor Maxima
This favorite flower has of late years been brought to great perfection, and blooms exhibited in April last before the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, might well vie with the finest English variet...
-Paper On Grapes
Read before the Aiken (S. C.) Vine-Growing and Horticultural Association/' September 15th, 1859, by H. W. Ravenel, Esq. The Grape, like all other domesticated plants long subjected to cultivation, h...
-The Para Squash
This is one of the latest and most important additions to our list of winter squashes, and we extract a few remarks concerning it from an article of a correspondent of the American Rural Home: It is ...
-The Paradise D'Automne Pear
I have been much surprised at several depreciatory notices in relation to. this fruit, and especially at the statement of the President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society - that it has been ov...
-Parian Ware
A beautiful flower-stand in Parian ware, is one of the many forms into which this elegant material has been wrought The stand has been exhibited in the windows in Chestnut Street, and our artist h...
-Parks
We are continually hearing from abroad of gifts of land for parks, by liberal individuals, as perpetual places of enjoyment for pent-up citizens. A Mr. Adderley has just given ten acres forever to the...
-Park And Botanic Garden At Hamilton College
It may not be uninteresting to you and your readers, to learn that the friends of Hamilton College, at Clinton, N. Y., are now engaged in improving and adorning the grounds which surround the building...
-The Park Question In New York
We are indebted to Samuel J. Gustin, Esq., of Newark, N. J., for reports, documents, and proceedings relative to the New York Parks. The question is yet, we believe, undecided. Some are in favor of J...
-Parks And Pleasure-Grounds For The Farmers
THE present is a time of agricultural improvement and progress without a parallel in this country. Improved implements, improved stock, better cultivation, better fences and buildings, meet us everywh...
-Parks For Philadelphia
Will it be believed, by future generations, that twelve years have elapsed since the great city of Philadelphia purchased ground for a park, and that, up to this day, the. site is a desert? We possess...
-Parks In Ran Cities Or New York - The Great Central Park
When the time shall come that enterprising men on the Desert shall enclose one of the Oases for a pleasure ground, there will be a propriety in designating it as - Mungo Park. Before adventure and ent...
-The Parks Of Stockholm
THE beauty of its parks is one of the distinguishing features of Stockholm. The Djurgard, or Deer Park, is singularly picturesque, from the abundance of wood and water. The circumference is about 21 m...
-Parks Versus Villages
EDITOR. And so, my worthy friend, you have turned rural improver, and are planning not only for your own homestead, but actually laying out a Tillage? Improver. Ay, am I! The railroad from the cit...
-A Parlor Flower Box
A device for holding easily a large number of window plants is thus mentioned by Forest and Stream: Among the not expensive window gardens we may name a device we used in our own sitting-room, which ...
-Parlor Plants
Mr. Editor, - On reading the communication of your lady contributor, Frances Mary, in your January number, I feel induced to take the reply to it, in part, out of your hands, believing that, though ...
-A Parlor Window Garden
In our parlor window I have at present a delightful garden, consisting of a new green-leaved Myrtle in the center, on each side of which is placed a plant of India-rubber tree, and between these and t...
-Parlour Cultivation - Ferns
In princely balls and courts of kings Its lustrous ray the diamond flings, Yet few of those who see its beams, Amid the torchlights dazzling gleams, As bright as though a meteor shone, Can call the c...
-Parsonage Pear
The Parsonage is also believed to have originated at New Rochelle. It stands on the premises of the Rev. Dr. R. M. Morgan, and is a constant and abundant bearer, of from ten to twenty bushels annually...
-Parsons & Co.'s Nurseries, At Flushing, L. I
Before leaving the vicinity of New York, to which, before this series of visits can be completed, we shall be obliged to return to finish our notes, we paid an interesting trip to the nurseries of o...
-The Passiflora
The tribe to which the Passiflora belongs is called, in the natural system of Botany, the tribe of the Passifloracae. It belongs to the sixteenth class, second order, of the system of Linne. The trib...
-The Passiflora - (Continued)
The treatment of the Passiflora is very simple. It requires rich but porous soil, which may be prepared by mixing leaf mold, perfectly decayed sods from old pasture grounds, and well-rotted cowdung to...
-The Passiflora - (Continued). Continued
Some of the readers of the Horticulturist may remember a charming specimen of P. quadrangularis var. Decaisneana, not more than seventeen inches high, with fifty-one buds and open flowers on it, which...
-The Past Season
Mr. Editor. - The past, has been a season of unusual scarcity of fruit in this section, and indeed seems to verify the assertion that raising fruit seems to be attended with a great deal of uncertaint...
-The Past Severe Winter
We fear horticulturists, all over the country, will be forced to remember the past winter as one of the most severe known in the United States for the last half century. Fahrenheit's thermometer has f...
-The Patent Office
A Committee on the Patent Office has reported favorably on the qualifications of Mr. D. J. Browne, and forwarded their conclusions extensively. We are indebted to Hon. J. Humphrey for the Report of t...
-The Patent Office Report Of 1860
It affords us much pleasure, Mr. Editor, to send you a little synopsis of the Horticultural department of the above-named Report. Especially gratifying must it be to every one interested in horticultu...
-Patent Office Seeds
We are indebted to Mr. Charles Mason for a package of seeds from the Patent Office. Geo. C. Thorburn, of Newark, N. J., sends us his large catalogue of the best new Dahlias, Fuchsias,Verbenas, Petuni...
-The Patent Office. - Agricultural Department
It is well known that, for some years past, efforts have been made by prominent agriculturists in various sections of the Union, and especially by the United States Agricultural Society, which holds i...
-Patent Silicious Stone
This material appears to have become a considerable article of manufacture at Ipswich, in Suffolk, England. It is called Ransome's Patent Silicious Stone, respecting the excellence of which for durabi...
-Patents In Horticulture
If patents are necessary to protect inventors in other branches of science, why not in horticulture? Are not the fruits of the earth of as much value to mankind as the glittering ornaments which may a...
-The Patients' & Physicians' Aid
A HAND-BOOK FOR EVERY HOME. JUST PUBLISHED, BY DR E. M. HUNT, A. M., M. D., AUTHOR OF PHYSICIANS' COUNSEL ETC. This is a new and valuable book, which tells How to Preserve Health; What to do in Sudd...
-The Patrons Of Husbandry
We at first looked with suspicion upon the formation of this species of Agricultural Society, feeling that it might in time develop some purpose or personal motive in the minds of the leaders which wo...
-Pawlonia Imperialis. Ry If. W. Philips, Edwards, Miss
Some three to five years ago I was at a neighbor's spending the day, and a hot day it was; some remark about trees called to mind a new tree growing in cultivated land. To him, the like had never been...
-Pbnnsylvania Horticultural Soctety
The stated meeting of the Society was held at Concert Hall, January 15,1856, Robert Buist, Vice-President, in the chair. Premiums were awarded as follows, by the Committee on Plants and Flowers: - C...
-The Pea
A dish of well cooked Green Peas is always acceptable on the dinner-table, and no garden is perfect, if a portion be not occupied, in the proper season, with this universally esteemed favorite. The P...
-The Pea Bug (Bauchus Prisi)
The same paper gays that the Pea Bug can be effectually got rid of, by taking the seed when ripe and dry; put it in bottles and cork it up perfectly air-tight. The larvae, though not so minute as not ...
-Peabody's New Seedling Strawberry
This much-praised variety has not come up to my expectations, though some of the berries are of fine size. I make some allowance, however, for the soil in which my plants are growing, and am in hopes ...
-Peach
The able Secretary of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has sent us the new seedling peach, raised by Mr.E. W. Keyser, 9th Street, below Vine, Philadelphia, which is a promising acquisition. In s...
-Peach Borer And Yellows
It may be interesting, as well as useful, to some of the Horticulturist readers to know of a safe and effectual method by which the fatal attacks of the peach borer may be prevented. Having tried all ...
-Peach Crop Of Delaware
Peach culture on the Delaware peninsula has developed with such rapidity in five years that it is unequalled in magnitude by any of the fruit sections of the world. The number of peach trees now on t...
-Peach Culture
It is with much pleasure we present our readers, in the present number, with an account of the mode of culture of the peach, written by Samuel T. Jones, Esq., to whose eminent success we have repeated...
-Peach Culture In Delaware
We believe it is generally conceded that Delaware is the best peach-growing region in the Union. Her soil and climate appear peculiarly adapted to the production of the peach in its greatest perfectio...
-The Peach In The North - How To Train It
It may appear out of place in me to submit any remarks on the peach, to cultivators in this country, where this fruit is cultivated to such an unlimited extent. The best manner of training this tree, ...
-The Peach In The North - How To Train It. Part 2
Hence the great necessity of growing all plants and trees from the first stage of growth, well, full of health and thriftiness, etc. We shall suppose they hare been well grown in their early stages, a...
-The Peach In The North - How To Train It. Part 3
Formerly a stock was in cultivation called the Brompton Plum, a variety of very thrifty growth, but on Which the peach was pre-disposed to disease, and on which it did not live long; this variety is n...
-The Peach In The North - How To Train It. Part 4
It will be observed in the past year we had but three branches, which had been headed down in spring to two eyes each; we have, therefore, now six branches, which must be trained at full length with a...
-The Peach In The North - How To Train It. Part 5
From the [taints B.B. where the shoots had been stopped, several branches will break, but not more than two should be suffered to grow from each shoot; that number will be sufficient to fill up the tr...
-Peach Plum. Prune Peche, Noisette, Poiteau
The tree is a pretty strong grower, with stout smooth shoots. Fruit very large, shaped more like a Peach than a Plum, being usually wider than its depth; regularly formed, roundish, much flattened at ...
-The Peach Plum. Prune Piche, Of Noisette
This Plum, though rather coarse, and ranking not more than good as to quality, is yet worthy of much more general culture than it has received, on account of its great size, beautiful appearance, and ...
-Peach-Trees
Junius, (Princeton, N. J.) From the account you give of the difficulty of raising good peaches in your soil as compared with twenty years ago we should say your soil is exhausted of the proper food fo...
-The Peach-Tree And Its Enemies
(See Frontispiece). I now send a Peach branch, surrounded by insects that belong to the history of the Peach-tree, as they so largely contribute to that fatal disease, the Yellows; that disease about...
-Peach-Trees In Pots
J. R. Comstock, Dutchess County, N. Y., writes that he practices with success growing peach-trees in pots and tubs, and wintering them in the cellar, from whence they are taken in spring, after all d...
-The Peach: Curious Facts In Its History
A CORRESPONDENT of the Maryland Farmer, after speaking of the magnitude of the peach interests of Maryland and Delaware, their advantages for its culture and the superior excellence of the fruit grown...
-Peaches
The first to ripen was the wee bit Nutmeg, which came the 22d day of June as the harbinger of good things which kind Natnre had in store for us; and next the Early Anne - good, very good, because ju...
-Peaches (2)
While the apple crop in this section of the country has partially failed this season, probably in consequence of previous over-bearing, the peach crop has been one of almost unrivaled abundance. Stake...
-Peaches (3)
Crawford's Early and Early Bernard were recommended for general cultivation. The Early York, best Early Peach, large White Cling, recommended. Tippecanoe, not well known. Old Mixon Free, good, but sur...
-Peaches (4)
As the season arrived, a greater crop of peaches was found on trees than counted for by a majority of growers. In some sections the curl in spring seemed to check and destroy, and many concluded their...
-Peaches And Nectarines
Few fruit trees give more satisfaction in the orchard house than a choice selection of peaches and nectarines: when in blossom, in early spring, the trees are so fresh and beautiful; they are so excee...
-Peaches And Nectarines. Part 2
Let us now proceed with the culture of our maiden tree. A season has passed: it is early spring, say the middle of February, and our tree, with its nine branches of the last summer's growth, is before...
-Peaches And Nectarines. Part 3
A very simple and agreeable method of retarding such mid-season peaches as the Noblesse, Royal George, and Grosse Mignonne, and all mid-season nectarines, may be practised as follows: - Remove the tre...
-Peaches And Nectarines On One Tree
Sir: To verify the statements made to you the last season, and which you were kind enough to place in the columns of your Journal - having reference to the peach and nectarine growing upon the same st...
-Peaches And Nectarines One Species
Enclosed I send you an account of a curious union of the Peach and Nectarine, which was found on a farm but a few miles distant from this place, last summer. I did not have the pleasure of seeing it m...
-Peaches At The South
Our remarks upon the peach will be concluded by a few notes upon the varieties cul-vated here, in regard to quality, time of ripening, and productiveness. The times of ripening of the peaches describe...
-Peaches At The South (2)
The Peach is the favorite, and in many instances almost the only fruit tree cultivated by our planters. Requiring a soil of but moderate fertility, its culture is so easy, its enemies and diseases are...
-Peaches At The South (2). Continued
Here the peach does best budded or grafted on its own roots. Plana stocks they would soon overgrow and break off, while probably they would be no more safe from the borer. We can begin our budding in ...
-Peaches Under Glass
I am anxious to try the cultivation of the Peach under glass in houses similar to the orchard house of Mr. Rivers. Mr. R. suggested the idea in the Horticulturist in August, 1854. You made no remark t...
-Peaes
On pears this blight was more injurious by far. The branches not only died down to the lowest black spot, as was the case with the apple, but they continued to form black spots of bark still farther a...
-Pears
Of the newer varieties which have been considerably proved, none appear to be more generally admired than the Doyenne Boussouck. for size, growth, productiveness and quality. We have never heard a wor...
-Pears (2)
Mr. Thomas had once adopted the opinion that standard pear trees were the best for orchards, and dwarfs were the best for small patches of land. This opinion prevailed extensively, and was very diffic...
-Pears (3)
As to the article page 541, of December, let me remark that: Mr. Morton seems not to well understand the planting of Dwarfs: the remark page 542, where Mr. Menaud thinks well of Dwarfs if planted dee...
-Pears (4)
The old Pear trees are pretty nearly used up; many of them entirely dead, and many more no better. Their almost leafless branches show conclusively that henceforth they will only be cumberers of the g...
-Pears (5)
Williams's Bon Chretien, Colmar d'Aremberg, Duchesse d'Angon-leme, Esperen, Beurre Clairgeau, Nouvcau Poiteau, Alexandrine Douillard, SpoBlberg, and other very productive varieties, succeed perfectly ...
-Pears (6)
Madeleine ripened from July 10th to 22d. Meynard, July 22d to 31st Jargonelle, July 27th to 30th. Osband's Summer, July 30th. Bloodgood, July 29th to August 5th, Belle of Brussels, August 1st to 22d. ...
-Pears (7)
You will find some notes from a correspondent, whose statements you can rely upon as correct in this locality. You Invite your readers to ask questions; therefore allow me to Inquire whether budding ...
-Pears (8)
We present the readers of the Horticulturist with outlines of some new French Pears with high-sounding names, from a valued correspondent in Belgium; but we do so with a caution attached. It may save ...
-Pears (9)
While the general complaint, during the past summer and fall, was of severe drouth, all around us we were over-supplied with rain, having had a very wet season. The ground on which our specimen trees ...
-Pears (9). Continued
Serruriers Medium, greenish-yellow. Stalk - inserted in a moderate depression. Calyx - large and spreading, in a deep cavity. . Flesh - coarse-grained, very juicy and melting, with a high, vinous fla...
-Pears (10)
I observe in the Chapter on Pears, which appeared in your July number, an error caused by your correspondent's supposing that the date affixed to Doyenne d'Alenfon was its teaton of ripening, when...
-Pears (11)
As long as Pears have grown in our country, how many of our population, think ye, hare yet to learn what a real delicious, melting Pear is? More than one half, we believe, are yet wholly ignorant of t...
-Pears (12)
I send you the outlines of some fine fruit forwarded to me by Hon. J. S. Cabot, of Salem, Mass. Owing to European uncertain seasons, a great many fine varieties, once or twice tested (years ago), have...
-Pears (13)
Five Most Profitable Winter Pears Vicar of Winkfield, Lawrence, Easter Beurre, Glout Mor-ceau, and Prince's St. Germain. For Cooking Pound or Cattillac The first is the best keeper. Chaptal and Fat...
-Pears (13). Continued
Zenas.- West Brighton, III. The Passe Colmar is one of those Pears to which a score of synonyms have been given. The word Pane is of various significations in French; in this case it appears to indic...
-Pears (14)
Bloodgood Conn., Vermont, New Jersey, Delaware, Penn., Georgia, Ohio, Mississippi. Doyenne D'Ete Conn., New Jersey, New York, Maine, Mass., Ohio, Indiana, Mississippi. Tyson Conn., New Jersey, Pe...
-Pears (15)
We notice in the Gardener's Year Book, published in London, England, and edited by Robert Hogg, Esq., the pomological director of the Royal Horticultural Society, descriptions of four new varieties of...
-Pears (16)
The foregoing article has been already extended beyond my intention. I will therefore close it by referring briefly to some other varieties of recent introduction which give promise of being worthy of...
-Pears (17)
Pyrus, (Philadelphia.) The non-productiveness is owing to deficiency in the soil. The best special manure that we have tried for pear trees is the bone-black of the sugar re-flners - that may be had f...
-Pears (18)
I place pears first, because they are my favorite fruit. To begin,-1 would plant but three early summer pears, viz: the Dearborn's Seedling'-always a sure and most abundant bearer, and the fruit alway...
-Pears (19)
Ananas d'Ete, Andrews, Belle Lucrative or Foudonte d'Aulomne, Beurre d'Anjon, Beurre d'Aremberg, Beurre Busc, Bloodgood, BurTum, Dearborn's Seedling, Doyenne d'Ete, Flemish Beauty, Fulton, Golden ...
-Pears (20)
Me. Editor: Io fulfilment of my promise, I annex descriptions of a few modern pears, which promise to be worthy of extensive cultivation. Although we are indebted to Europe for many of our best fruits...
-Pear And Apple Tree Arbors
Many persons appropriate the ground devoted to the main walks in their gardens by planting grapes, and so training them as to form an arbor under which they walk. It is undoubtedly a good plan, but by...
-Pear And Grape Culture
The emphatic negative given by Mr. Allen, in the May number of the Horticulturist, to the question, Can Pears be profitably grown for the market/' has brought out by way of reply, equally ardent arti...
-The Pear Blight
The Pear is now esteemed as one of the indispensable luxuries connected with a suburban or country residence. It is, therefore, not only important that the amateur and the novice should have informati...
-The Pear Blight. Part 2
Liebig, in speaking of the inorganic constituents of plants, says: Many of the inorganic constituents vary according to the soil in which the plant grows, etc. Again: Most plants, perhaps all of th...
-The Pear Blight. Part 3
In either case, it is the destruction of the natural functions of the tree, producing disease and death. The former is often tardy in its work, but the latter generally rapid and instantaneous. In the...
-The Pear Blight (2)
I am cultivating the Pear quite extensively, both on its own and Quince roots; and having been a sufferer to a very great extent, this season, from the effects of the frozen sap blight, I have watched...
-Pear Blight A Fungus
Dear Sir: Having learned, by unpleasant experience, that enthusiasm in the development of hidden truths, either in ethics or science, ofttimes entails ridicule upon the humble devotee, I have almost a...
-Pear Blight And Honey Dew
Is there any connection, either in cause or effect, between blight in pear-trees and the substance called honey dew? We have had both here, to an unusual extent, and the latter more largely on pear-tr...
-Pear Blight In Illinois
What a patient, indefatigable man, Professor Turner is! Why, one-quarter of the difficulties he has to contend with, would wear out the patience of half the modern Jobs in the universe. What with the ...
-The Pear Controversy
IT is marvellous to what extent controversies are carried on, at the present day, by mutual misrepresentation. Devontly as I had hoped that the charm thrown around the study and practice of horticultu...
-The Pear Controversy. Continued
Now, with such testimony in favor of my successful culture of these varieties of pear on quince stock - testimony corroborating that of our most distinguished Pomologists - with what justice should I ...
-Pear Crop In New England
The Ploughman, Oct. 11. says: This season has been remarkable for the immense production of pears. The trees are loaded in every direction. We visited an orchard the other day that yields this year ov...
-Pear Culture
Our favorite mulch for the pear - both standard and on quince - is the coarsest unfermented manure the stable and yard can furnish, and applied, invariably, in the fall of the year, that the tender ro...
-Pear Culture (2)
The delay of this article on the comparative success of the pear on the quince and its own stock, is owing, it must frankly be acknowledged, more to the reluctance we have felt to approach the examina...
-Pear Culture (4)
To redeem the promise with which my last article closed, I shall proceed at once to consider the causes of the failures of some varieties of pear that ordinarily do well on the quince, and that, in ot...
-Pear Culture (5)
The question of profit in the cultivation of any article, whether it be grain or fruit, is the one to which interest mostly attaches. In the present number, our friend, Lewis F. Allen, in his peculiar...
-Pear Culture In California And France
EXPERIENCE has demonstrated that the pear withstands the vicissitudes of the climatic influences of California, even better than the apple; and that its culture in all parts of the State has met with ...
-Pear Culture. Growing Pear Trees
By. M. B. Bateham IN considering the question whether it would not be better for me to plant a large pear orchard, instead of replanting my peach orchards, which were ruined by the past winter, I hav...
-Pear Culture. Mr. Hovey Gives It Up! - The Quince-Stock
I have been a looker-on in Venice, Mr. Editor, during the well conducted little joust we have had regarding pear culture on the quince, and have not a little applauded the course of the Horticulturist...
-Pear Growing In The State of Mississipp
This fruit has only been recently cultivated to any extent in our State. I learn there are trees yet growing, (supposed to have been planted by the early French and Spanish colonists,) upon the Bluff...
-Pear Growing In The State of Mississipp. Continued
Beurre D'Amalis, On Quince And Standard Fruit very large, not unlike Beurre Diet in size and shape; flesh rather coarse, but buttery and melting; quality very good; ripens in July and August. Beurre...
-Pear Notes
I PROMISED to send you some pear notes, from observations made during the last two years. In a paper, read before the Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society, two years ago, and published, I believe, in T...
-Pear On The Thorn, Imported Vs. American Pear Stock
ED. Western Horticulturist: - In regard to Bartlett and F. Beauty, on the White Thorn, I have quite a number of fine, large trees of each sort. Some of them are grafted into the limbs of large thorn t...
-A Pear Orchard
It will be recollected that Messrs. Parsons, of Flushing, Long Island, parted with a large portion of their standard pears which were set out as an orchard for market fruit, on account of the land the...
-Pear Orchard On The Grass System
On the grounds of the Agricultural College Farm at Newark, is an experimental farm and fruit garden under the direction of Prof. E. D. Porter. Here is a pear orchard of one thousand trees, planted ten...
-The Pear Slug
Ik the Horticulturist for September of last year, there appeared a very interesting article, from the pen of a lady, upon the natural history of the Pear Slug. I refer to it here, in order to make a s...
-The Pear Slug-Worm
The slug-fly is of a glossy black color, except the first two pairs of legs, which are dirty yellow or clay colored, with blackish thighs and the hind legs, which are dull black, with clay colored kne...
-On Pear Stocks
Mr. Field moved to strike out Beurre d'Artmberg - strongly objected to - notwithstanding it occasionally cankers. Generally very fine. Mr. Wilder moved, that the Stirling be added to the list for gen...
-Pear Tree Blight
A series of interesting experiments have been conducted during the past two years, by William Saunders, on the grounds of the Agricultural Department, at Washington, D. C, in relation to pear blight. ...
-The Pear Tree In France
Business called me in the fall of last year to France; and I was so much pleased and surprised by what I saw thore, in reference to the universal culture of the pear, that I am induced to send you som...
-Pear Trees For The West
Parker Earle, at the last meeting of the Illinois State Horticultural Society, thinks that the Flemish Beauty has proved the most generally hardy in the north, and although it blights badly, that it a...
-Pear-Trees
Every one knows that when a man's head is set, it is very difficult to turn it - that when an idea or opinion has once possessed a brain, it is not easy to dislodge it, even if it is a poor tenant who...
-Pear-Trees. Continued
He will see to it that no marauding caterpillars fatten there, that no curculio whets his tooth in that first fruit; for he will walk in his garden in the fresh morning, in the shimmering noontide, an...
-Pears - Felix De Leim And Cadette De Vaux
The outlines and descriptions of these pears we now give more to draw attention of pear-growers to them, than to advise their planting. It has been said they might possibly prove identical with variet...
-Pears - To Prevent Rotting On The Tree
TO an inquiry in the Southern Cultivator, for a preventive of rotting of the pear upon the tree, and to cause it to ripen up, W. A. James, Btsbopville, S. C, says, strip the bark entirely off the bod...
-Pears And Locusts
It is a curious fact that old trees of the Butter pear, which previous to the last appearance of the locusts, had year after year produced worse and worse fruit, until at last it was nothing but knots...
-Pears And Other Matters At The South
Mr. Editor: - The past winter has been, with the exception of two or three short spells of cold, a remarkably mild one. I have had roses in bloom until about two or three weeks since, and peach trees ...
-Pears And Prices
We learn from the best authority, that sales of pears have been actually made at Philadelphia this season at prices calculated to give an impetus to their culturo beyond any former example. One remark...
-Pears For The Garden
A good list of pears for a dozen trees for the garden we would name as follows: Dearborn Seedling - A good, sure, and abundant bearer; fruit fair, sprightly, and of an excellent flavor. The Rostieze...
-Pears From Boston
Herewith I send you, from Messrs. CURTIs & Lincoln, a sample of Master Beurre Pears, such as they have exhibited of late at our Society. Mr. Curtis listened to the remarks made by yourself and Messrs....
-Pears In New Jersey
E. B. Edwards gives us as his experience of pears, in the neighborhood of Haddonfleld, N. J., as follows: - Duchess d'Angouleme (dwarfs), prolific bearers. Louise Bonne de Jersey, Honey Pear, ...
-Pears In Pots. (From The German Of Diet)
WE give this month another extract from Diel. His treatment of the Pear is less elaborate than that of the apple, but is by no means devoid of interest. His views in the main are sound and practical, ...
-Pears Near Montreal
In a report made to the Montreal Agricultural and Horticultural Society, by Mr. John Archbold, that gentleman states that the following varieties are the twelve best adapted to the climate of the Isla...
-Pears On Old Stocks
After all our discussions, we have seen some instances of successful pear crops the past two seasons that were highly satisfactory. They grew on grafts, on old trees whose fruit was no longer worth pi...
-Pears On Quince Stock
This part of the business was taken up towards the close and the following twenty-two varieties were unanimously agreed to as worthy of being recommended for general cultivation on that stock: Duches...
-Pears On Quince Stocks (2)
THE winter of 1853-4 will be remembered in many parts of the country, as having been remarkably disastrous to Pears on Quince stocks. Large numbers of trees were totally lost, and many others were ver...
-Pears On Quince Stocks (2). Continued
It was at this period, beyond a doubt, that the Quince stocks suffered. Standing first in water, then in ice which bound them with its iron grasp to full six inches below the ground level, with not a ...
-Pears On The Quince
At the last meeting of the London Pomological Society, Mr. Rivers, of Saw-bridgeworth, exhibited three pyramidal Pear-trees, and with them the following memoranda. He said: The trees (Louise Bonne o...
-Pears On The Quince Stock
The late unanimous approval of dwarf pears by the American Pomologi-cal Society, impels me to add my testimony to that of Messrs. Allen, Elliott, and others, in the late numbers of the Horticulturist ...
-Pears On The Quince Stock. Continued
In Hartford, Connecticut, the leading fruit cultivators, such as Messrs. Dewey, Terry, Turner, and others, are almost unanimous against the use of the dwarf pear. Mr. Stillman, is almost the only one ...
-Pears That Promise Well
In conformity with your request, I herewith annex brief descriptions of some of the more modern pears which promise to be worthy of extension. Great caution, I am aware, should be exercised in recomme...
-Pears, With Descriptions (2)
Mr. Editor, - I send you descriptions of a few pears not generally known, which have been tested within the last two or three years at the Syracuse nurseries. I believe none of them have heretofore be...
-Peasantry In Various Parts Of Europe
The horseradish-tree of the West Indies - Moringa - attains the height of twenty-four feet in nine months, and that in a stony, poor soiL The power of vegetation within the tropics, is illustrated by ...
-Peculiar Winters
ED. Western Horticulturist: - This staunch old ship (the earth) has had an unusually hard time in doubling her Cape Horn (the perihelion point) this winter. Nearly all the time since the middle of Nov...
-Peculiarities Of The Climate, Flora, And Fauna, Of The South Shore Of Lake Erie, In The Vicinity Of Cleveland, Ohio
Very erroneous opinions are entertained, by even intelligent people, respecting this section of country, so far as its climate and the species of the animal and vegetable kingdoms are concerned. A ser...
-Pelargoniums
As these advance to bloom, let them receive copious supplies of water. To flower well, the pots should now be filled with roots. Neglect in watering will therefore injure the flowers. The scarlet sort...
-Pelargonium (2)
J am one of those who have been, of late years, in the habit of growing that magnificent flower, the Pelargonium, for exhibition at the Horticultural Societies in London, where those who have attended...
-Pelargonium (2). Continued
About the year 1834 or 1835,(for I have no exact record of the date,) the fioricultural world were generally surprised and delighted by the advance made in the culture of this family, by Mr. Foster, a...
-The Pelargonium, By James H. Fry, New Brighton, S. I
Having noticed in the February number an article on the Pelargonium, I think the author's practice and mine somewhat differ; but I will leave that to be decided by those interested. This being one of ...
-Pelargoniums At Regent's Park Show
Of seedlings, there was a considerable number. The medal for the best scarlet was awarded to Mr. Hoyle, for Regalia, a flower brighter than any other yet exhibited, and of good form; it is also much f...
-Pencil Marks By The Way
I HAVE two cases of strawberry culture here in the west, which I desire to report. Probably neither of them present any extraordinary points to experienced fruit growers, but they are certainly remark...
-Pencilings By A Pomologist
THE novelist who draws his characters and incidents wholly from imagination, and embellishes his tale with the creatures of a vivid brain, acts but his part and in proportion as his incidents are nove...
-Pencilings By A Pomologist. Continued
As the conversation which we have attempted to relate was still in progress, one of the company suddenly exclaimed,. the Post 1 the Post 1 as the echo of a horn sounded over the neighboring hills; n...
-Penn. Horticultural Society
The stated meeting was held on 20th April, Dr. W. D. Brinckle, Vice Preset., in the chair. The exhibition was very fine. The long tables through the center of the saloon contained many interesting pla...
-Pennsyivania Horticultural Society
The stated meeting of this association was held in the Chinese Saloon, Philadelphia, on Tuesduy evening, July 20, 1852. Gen. Patterson, President, in the chair. The exhibition was unusually fine in ea...
-Pennsylvania
The meeting for March was held on the 18th, when there was a fine display, comprising fine collections of flowering plants, from Jas. Ritchie, Jno. Lambert, Robert Buist, A. M. Eastwick, and J. D. Ful...
-Pennsylvania Hart. Society
The stated meeting of this Society was held in the Chinese Saloon, on Tuesday evening, August 17th. Br. W. D. Brickie, V. P.. in the chair. There has not been at any former meeting for this month, to...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Hoc
The stated meeting of this Society was held on Tuesday evening Jan. 30, I832. K. W. Keyser. V. P., m the chair. A few objects of interest were presented, notwithstanding the severity of the weather, w...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
The stated meeting of this Society occurred in the Chi. nese Saloon, Philadelphia, on Tuesday evening, March 18th, 1868, the President in the chair. The sudden change from mild to severely cold weathe...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (2)
The stated meeting of this Society was held at Concert Hall, Philadelphia, on Tuesday evening, June 17,1856, E. W. Keyser, Vice-President, in the chair. Premiums were awarded by the Committee on Plant...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (3)
The stated meeting of this Society occurred on Tuesday Evening, July 15, E. W. Keyser, Vice-President, in the chair. Premiums awarded on this occasion were as follows: - By The Committee On Plants An...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (4)
The twenty-fifth Exhibition of this association will be held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, the 21st, 22d and 28d, of September, in the Philadelphia Museum, corner of Ninth and George streets. A ...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (5)
The twenty-eighth annual exhibition was held on the 16th, 17th, and 18th of September. The city placed one of the public squares at the Society's disposal; over this square the Society erected an imme...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (6)
The stated meeting of this Society occurred at Concert Hall, on Tuesday evening, November 18,1856, Caleb Cope in the chair. Numerous premiums were awarded. The Committee called the attention of the S...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (7)
The stated meeting of this Society was held on Tuesday evening, May 16th, 1854. The President in the Chair. The Hall was thrown open at 5 o'clock, P. If., and was graced by the elite of the city. A fi...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (8)
At the November exhibition, then was a fine display of Green-house plants, Fruits and Vegetables, which drew a large attendance of visitors. A vole of thanks was ten-dered to Mm. John R. Latiner, for ...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (9)
The last stated meeting of this Society gave general satisfaction. The display was very good - collections from four green-houses were shown. In Mr. Buist's there were several new and interesting plan...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (10)
The stated meeting of this association was held on the evening of the 17th April, in Concert Hall, Philadelphia. R. Buist, Vice President in the Chair. The exhibition was remarkable for the richness, ...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (11)
The notice of two monthly meetings in one number, leaves little room to say much of the last one, - pronounced to be the best July exhibition ever held here. The Fuohsias especially were extra fine,...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (12)
The stated meeting of this society, for the month of July was held in the Chinese Saloon Philadelphia, on the evening of the 15th. The president in the chair. The display on the occasion was unusuall...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (13)
The stated meeting this month was held in Concert Hall, July 17. - The President in the chair. The Committee on Plants and flowers - awarded the following Premiums - Petunias for the best display to ...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (13). Continued
Grapes: - for the best three bunches of a black variety, to Mark Hill, gardener to M. W. Baldwin: for the best of a white variety, to John Riley, gardener at the Insane Asylum. Nectarines - for the be...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (14)
The stated meeting of this society was held on Tuesday evening, Oct. 21 - Dr. W. D. Brinckms in the chair. The displays of fruits and vegetables were very rich. One collection of plants from Robert Bu...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (15)
The stated meeting of this Society was held at Concert Hall, on Tuesday evening, March 18,1896, Gen. Patterson, President, in the chair. Premiums were awarded by the Committee on Plants and Flowers. ...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (16)
The stated meeting of this society was held at the Chinese Saloon, Philadelphia, February 17,1852. Gen. Patterson, in assuming the chair, took occasion to indulge in some appropriate remarks, tenderin...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (17)
The stated meeting of this association was held in the Chinese Saloon, Philadelphia, on Tuesday eveuing, May 18, 1863. E. W. Keyser, V. P., in the chair. The dis-pluy was excellent. The tables through...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (18)
At the meeting of this society, August 17, the following appropriate resolutions were unanimously adopted: . Resolved, That we. deeply deplore the afflictive providence which involved, in the destruc...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (19)
The stated meeting of this Society was held at Concert Hall, on Tuesday evening, April 15,1856, M. W. Baldwin in the chair. The following awards were made by the Committee on Plants and Flowers: - Ro...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (20)
At a stated meeting of this Society, held at the Chinese Saloon, Philadelphia, on the 18th March, the following communication was read: To the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society: - In accordance wit...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (20). Continued
2. The Zither, a seedling from the premises of Mr. Samuel Zieber, of Reading. Size below medium; roundish; waxen yellow, with a striped red cheek, and a cicatrix on one side, extended from the base ha...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society - Nov. 18, 1651
The President in the chair. A collection of plants in pots, by John Lambert's gardener, was interesting. This being the show night for Chrysanthemums, there were eight collections presented, in which ...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Meeting At Concert Hall, August 18
This was probably one of the best August exhibitions ever held, in some part owing to the favorable season, but, in a great measure, to the increasing taste and spirit of the exhibitors. The plants we...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Ad Interim Report Of The Fruit Commtitee For July And August
The Fruit Committee respectfully report, that since the June meeting of the Society the following specimens of Fruits have been submitted to their examination: From Mr. Tage, Of Burlington Fine spec...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Report Of The Fruit Committer For Sept
The Fruit Committee respectfully report, that since the August meeting of the Society, several interesting collections of fruits from various localities have been presented for their examination: Fro...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Report Of The Fruit Committer For Sept. Continued
2. Doyenne Robin - Rather large, two and a half inches by two and three-quarters round, ber-gamot shaped; greenish, covered with russet spots and splashes; etem usually very long and thick, from one a...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. May 16th, 1855
The stated meeting of the Society was held this evening. The President in the chair. The following premiums were awarded by the committee of plants and flowers. Pelargoniums - six varieties for the ...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. May Monthly Meeting
Reported expressly for the Horticulturist. - It is gratifying to notice the continued interest taken in these exhibitions by the crowded concourse of visitors, and the increased value set on the effor...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Special Export Of The Entomological Committee, - August 15, 1853
The Committee on Entomology respectfully report: That their attention has recently been directed to several insects, of which specimens, in various stages of transformation, were received from members...
-Pennsylvania Horticurtural Society. June 19. 1855
The stated meeting of this Society was held this evening. The President in the chair. The display was rich in fine Plants and fruits. The following premiums were awarded, - by the Committee on plants ...
-Pennsylvania Hoticultural Society's Meeting. July Monthly Meeting
Reported ex-pressly for the Horticulturist. - A very fine monthly meeting for the season of the year, and very gratifying to the cause of horticultural progress. The most interesting feature was in t...
-Pennsytlvania Horticultural Society
At the last stated meeting of the Society, Mr. E. W. Keyser in the chair, no premiums being provided by the schedule, no displays were presented. The Society had the gratification to inspect a new pl...
-Pentstemon Cordifolius
Raised from seeds brought home by Mr. Hartweg in Juno, 1848, and said to be a shrub four feet high, from the mountains of Santa Ines, in California. A downy-stemmed half-shrubby plant, with a trailin...
-Pentstemon Palmern
Imported into England and flowered by W. Thompson, of Ipswich. He writes of it as follows: ' Pentstemon Palmerii' of Asa Gray is a well marked species, allied to P. cobaea and P. Jamesii. It crows 4 ...
-The People's Park At Birkenhead, Near Liverool
Birkenhead is the most important suburb of Liverpool, having the same relation to it that Brooklyn has to New-York, or Charlestown to Boston. When the first line of Liverpool packets was established, ...
-The People's Park At Birkenhead, Near Liverool. Continued
I obtained most of the following information from the head working gardener. The site of the Park and Garden was ten years ago, a flat, sterile, clay farm. It was placed in the hands of Mr. Paxton in...
-The Perfume Of The Rose Characteristic Of Its Parentage
I have surely chosen a sweet subject, with which every one is conversant, from the Queen to the peasant. Every one, however, may not have remarked the peculiar and distinct perfume which many Roses of...
-Permanent Impressions Or Flowers On Glass
Mr. Robert Smith, of Blackford, England, has contrived a very ingenious and effective plan of ornamenting glass, by producing thereon permanent impressions of flowers, leaves of plants, and other obje...
-The Perpetual, Or Tree Carnation
The appearance of a few plants of this charming flower at the exhibition of the Horticultural Society at Chiswick on Saturday last, reminds me that a few remarks respecting it at this season may possi...
-Persian Asparagus
This is a new and rare variety, surpassing all others for its size, tenderness and delicacy. It is fit for table 3 months after planting; each seed at this short season producing 3 stalks as large as...
-The Persimmon, Or American Medlar (Diospyros)
It is something singular that a fruit with as many good qualities to recommend it as the Persimmon has, should have been so much neglected by horticulturists. As an ornamental tree, with its beautiful...
-Perspective View
This house, which is the property of Mr. David Moore, of Newburgh, was planned for another party, in the first instance, and was partly executed with the idea that it was to be very simply and econom...
-The Pests Of Rosebushes
These arc abundant enough, as every one who has tried to cultivate roses knows, unless the experiment has been made in some region exceptionally free from the ills to which these shrubs are heir. Bugs...
-Peter B. Mead, Esq
Dear Sir, - J have read, with much interest, the discussion of the boiler question which has taken place in the Horticulturist since you published my article on Heating Apparatus for Horticultural Gla...
-Peter B. Mead, Esq (2)
At our last interview you urged me to describe a grape which has come under my observation the past year, in the neighborhood of my residence. My unwillingness to do so heretofore has been from a desi...
-Peter B. Mead, Esq (2). Continued
Editor Horticulturist:- The peaches in this neighborhood, which is along the bay, hare not been hurt by the winter; but west of here I understand about half are killed. This reminds me of an article t...
-Pettit
We have rarely seen bo great a display of fruit blossoms as during the past month. Apples, pears, and cherries, promise most abundantly. We had, at some points around Philadelphia, a hail-storm, of a ...
-Petty Annoyances To Amateur Fruit Growers
Dear Editor: Allow me to say a few words to your readers of the Horticultu-rist about the petty annoyances of the fruit grower. The source of the present sketch might, with some propriety, be ranked a...
-Petunias
Among the new petunias this season, one under the name of Edward Beach, shown by Messrs. Frost & Co., of Rochester, at the June meeting of the Western New York Horticultural Society, is perhaps one o...
-A Pew Pine Roses
The present seems to be a suitable time to make some observations on Roses, and compare notes respecting new or favorite varieties. These have so rapidly multiplied within a few years past, that an am...
-A Pew Remarks On The Culture Of Migno-Nette In Boxes
MIgnonette is of the most simple and easy culture, but we seldom see it so managed as to look, long, neat, and elegant; while, although it is but a simple flower, it is really kept elegant for a lengt...
-Pharbitis Hispida. Choisy
Variety 1. White flower, striated with blot. 2. Kirmiflioe. 3. Viotet. - CWoWulacsm. Judging from the graceful appearance which this group of Twiners presents, the natural mistake of supposing that t...
-Pharbitis Rubro-Ccerulea, Convolrulaceae, Pentandria Monogynia
The appearance alone, and the form of the flower, as well as can be produced in a picture, for want of an example from nature, oblige us to append to the Pharbitis this Ipomaea of authors. In adopting...
-Phenomena In The Cross-Breeding Of Plants
We have lately published something on Hybridizing Plants, a subject of peculiar interest in whatever light viewed. The following interesting article is by Mr. D. Beaton, an old veteran, at present at ...
-Phenomena In The Cross-Breeding Of Plants. Part 2
The garden Cinerarias are sporting plants as much as the Dahlia, yet among a thousand seedlings of each, one may turn up which will come half true from seeds, and when one finds such a seedling in any...
-Phenomena In The Cross-Breeding Of Plants. Part 3
As soon as the anther is emptied of the pollen the stamen begins to grow, and to push up the husk of the anther away from the embryo seed; and by the time the ear is seen the husk is well-nigh out of ...
-Philadelphia
This is certainly a very remarkable variety, which is rapidly gaining favor in localities where the Antwerps fail. Fruit medium to large, globular, dark reddish purple, moderately firm, subacid, and s...
-Philadelphia Horticultural Hall
This new building, now in progress of erection, is the largest of the kind in our country, being 75 X 200 feet, and will afford ample room for the displays of the Society. It is in contemplation to in...
-The Philadelphia Pear. Latch, Orange Bergamot erroneously
Early in September, of the present year, I met with this Pear for the first time. Regarding it as a variety of the greatest excellence, I took a specimen to the recent meeting of the American Pomologi...
-Philadelphia School Of Design For Women
This truly benevolent institution is a branch of the Franklin Institute for the promotion or the Mechanic Arts, at Philadelphia, and its design is to furnish woman another source of maintenance by p...
-Philodendron Erubescens. Nat. Ord., Aroidece
Plants of the Arum tribe are not by any means so generally cultivated as they deserve to be when we consider their singular and varied forms, fine foliage, peculiar and often richly colored infloresce...
-The Philosophy Of Dew
[There are few more beautiful processes in nature than the formation of dew, and few which are so generally misunderstood - The falling dew being in fact only a piece of pure poetry. The following i...
-The Philosophy Of Dew. Part 2
Hence we see, that in order that a body may be covered by dew it must first cool to a certain degree, and the reasons why metals do not become covered with dew, is that they do not become sufficiently...
-The Philosophy Of Dew. Part 3
In order to be certain of the true state of things, glass must not be employed; the supports must be made of polished tin, which hardly radiates at all, and which sufficiently isolates the thermometer...
-The Philosophy Of Dew. Part 4
Derstanding; but on looking over several periodicals I think that it has been entirely misrepresented. In short, the editors of these papers, having perhaps the same opinion as he who first among them...
-Philosophy Of Manures
It is an excellent custom in certain foreign countries, and one which leads to very valuable results, to send from time to time scientific men to travel in the various neighboring kingdoms; they are s...
-Philosophy Of Manures. Part 2
Or, if in place of applying a mixed manure, such as we have imagined, to these two soils, we were to take simple chemical manures - say phosphate of lime and sulphate of ammonia, we should probably fi...
-Philosophy Of Manures. Part 3
But would such a winter garden be attended by the advantages that are expected from it to public health and convenience? That is to say, would it be agreeable to ride and walk under shelter while rain...
-Philosophy Of Manures. Part 4
All hitherto erected structures, however great and noble some of them are, fall far short of answering this end, and I cannot but recommend, now that we do possess a building like the Crystal Palace, ...
-Phlox
The Charming new Phlox Leptodachylon Californicum, the Phlox Speciosum of Pursh is in great favor at the English exhibitions. Catalogues, Pamphelts, etc., on our Table. A perfect shower of periodical...
-Phlox For Garden Culture
We know of but few varieties of hardy plants that better repay the grower than this very beautiful and desirable diversified genus, that will afford such variety of colors and prolongation of bloom. I...
-Phloxes
I was much pleased with the excellent article on this subject with which you favoured your readers in the Chronicle of the 22d of August. Having been an admirer and cultivator of all the best varietie...
-Photographs And Fruits
FROM Gov. R. W. Furnas, of Nebraska, we have three very fine photographic plates. One represents the buildings upon the fair grounds of the State Agricultural Society; the other two, from different st...
-The Phylloxera
SINCE I wrote the article published in the last Horticulturist, I have been anticipating the appearance of the insect; but have been unable, to this date, August 12, 1873, to find a single specimen, e...
-Picea Excelsa Var. Hagemanniana
This variety of P. excelsa, which is quite unique in its appearance, and which by its singular habit can only be somewhat related to Picea excelsa var. viminalis, was discovered in the summer of 1856,...
-Picea Nonius
This, which is still the most beautiful of all the California firs, has for many years past been much admired and sought after by lovers of Conifers. From the small number of seedlings raised when it ...
-Picking
There is no part of the business that requires closer attention than gathering and preparing the fruit for market. It should be assorted as picked, the prime berries put together, and the cullens kept...
-Picking Strawberries
Women, as a general thing, are the best pickers, more careful than girls or boys; but whoever may do the picking, tell them how you want to have it done - send careless pickers away as soon as you fin...
-Picquet's Late Peach
THE Rural Alabamian highly extols this peach for the South. Says: It is the evidence of all who have fruited it, that it has no compeer. Large to very large, bright yellow, and of the most excellent...
-Pie Plant And Asparagus
A Farmer's wife wishes to know if the large stalks of the pie plant are the result of cultivation or of selecting a large sort - the time for manuring - distance asunder in planting - and number of ...
-Piermont, Residence Of Dr. Norris, Wilmington, Del
We have for some time purposed giving the accompanying engraving of the residence of our correspondent, Dr. George Pepper Norris, and have only been waiting for the descriptive matter to do so. A corr...
-Pincer To Mark Trees Or Bushes
The French have several little ways of verification, which we have not yet put in practice. If you purchase a looking-glass in Paris, the vender hands you a candle, and asks you to write your autograp...
-Pinching Or Cutting Back Raspberries
It has been our practice, for some years, to pinch or cut back say one or two inches of the growth of this year's raspberry canes, intended for next year's fruiting, as soon as they have reached three...
-The Pineapple
(See Frontispiece.) - We have for some time back been experimenting in Photography, (or, more strictly, Mr. Morand has been doing it for us,) to ascertain how far this beautiful art could be made avai...
-Pink And Picotee
We have selected for our present Frontispiece two very beautiful flowers, a Pink and a Picotee, both taken from Turner's Florist. They are both new, and rank as first-class flowers. They afford striki...
-The Pinneo And Hebron Pears
I send you the outlines, with descriptions, of two varieties of valuable pears, the Hebron and the Pinneo, the latter unquestionably a native of Connecticut, and the former also, I think. Hebron: Thi...
-Pinneo, Hebron, And Boston Pear
Two of our valued Connecticut correspondents have forwarded separate parcels, without concert, of the pear which goes by this name. Dr. G. W. Russell says it has long been cultivated in the eastern pa...
-Pinus Excelsa
In this species we have a near approach to our White Pine (Pinus strobus), as well as to the European species, Pinus cembra, but the latter tree is also found in Northern Asia. The leaves of the three...
-Pinus Hartwegi - Hartweg's Pine
This species is a native of Mexico, where Hartweg discovered it on Mount Campanario, growing at an elevation of 9000 feet, and ranging immediately above Picea religiosa. It forms a tree of moderate si...
-Pinus Lambertiana. Gigantic Fine
This fine tree is pronounced perfectly hardy, even after the two severest winters we have experienced. Mr. H. W. Sargent, of Wodenethe, on the North River, so pronounces it. As yet, we have few specim...
-Pinus Ponderosa
I have had this out, unprotected, eight years; it passed through those trying winters, 1855-6, when the common road-side Cedars were destroyed, and White Pines and Hemlocks badly injured; and yet this...
-Pinus Sabiniana, Or Prickly-Leaved Pine
The frontispiece represents the cone of the Pinus Sabiniana, about one-half its natural size, a splendid and useful species, found by the late Mr. Douglass on the western flank of the Cordilleras, at ...
-Pinus Stlvestris Spiralis
The Pinus Sylrestris Spiralis is the most singular variety of theSylvestrus Pine; it presents a character never shown until now among any coniferous trees. This character, to which we wish to draw the...
-Pittsburg Horticultural Society
At an adjourned meeting of the Society, President McKnight said that the-meeting was appointed to be held for the purpose of receiving the report of the Strawberry Committee. The President being the c...
-Pittsburgh Horticultural Society
The usual Monthly Meeting of the Society was held on the 7th inst The following is the Report of the Committee on Monthly Exhibitions: Robert McKnight, Manchester, exhibited 7 varieties of Strawberri...
-Plan For A Flower Grarden
ENGLAND possesses many flower gardens of extensive and elaborate' designs, on the grounds of her lords and royalty, and some of them evince artistic skill and superior arrangement. The accompanying pl...
-Plan For A Rose-House And Conservatory
The rapid progress which has been made in Horticulture within the last 15 or 20 years, has very naturally given rise to a variety of forms for glass structures. These forms, and their perfect adaptati...
-Plan For Industrial Universities
The leaven of the necessity for education among the industrial classes, begins to work, we are happy to perceive, in many parts of the country. Massachusetts is likely to be the first to set an Agricu...
-Plan For The State University
There should be connected with such an institution, in this state, a sufficient quantity of land, of variable soil and aspect, for all its needful annual experiments and processes in the great interes...
-Plan For The State University. Part 2
There should also be erected, a sufficient number of buildings and out-buildings for all the purposes above indicated, and a Repository, in which all the ordinary tools and implements of the instituti...
-Plan For The State University. Part 3
As things now are, our best farmers and mechanics, by their own native force of mind, by the slow process of individual experience, come to know, at forty, what they might have been taught in six mont...
-Plan For The State University. Part 4
At all events, we find as society becomes less conservative and pedantic, and more truly and practically enlightened, a growing tendency of all other classes, except the literary and clerical, to omit...
-Plan Of A Flower-Garden
Now that the crocus and the snowdrops, the gay harbingers of spring, decorate our gardens with their chaste, simple flowers, and the warblers of more favored climes begin to greet us with their cheeri...
-Plan Of Grounds
The following excellent plan of a rus in urbe garden and grounds, has been forwarded by one of our valued friends, who has described it, in a familiar letter so well as to leave ns nothing to do but c...
-Plan Of Hunting Park, Between The Built Part Of Philadelphia And Germantown
To J. Jay Smith, Esq., - In fulfilment of a promise made you some time ago, I now hand you the design for the improvement of the Hunting Park, of Philadelphia, submitted by me in the fall of 1856. In ...
-Plan of An Orchideous House
There are few tribes of plants so deserving the attention of amateurs as the Epiphytal species of Orchideae ; they are rich in every variety of color; some replete with aromatic perfumes, others emitt...
-Plans For Green-Houses
In giving my plans for an improvement in green-houses, I will first remark that the object is to improve the interior of such buildings, by doing away, in some instances, with the long and heavy-looki...
-Plans For Laying Out Gardens
There is not enough attention paid to this subject in our horticultural literature; and yet, the people are delighted with any plan or suggestion, showing how to arrange their floral borders and ornam...
-Plants
The most important of these was the beautiful Ceratostema longiflorum, from Messrs. Veitch. The same nurserymen also sent Philesia buxifolia and a pretty hybrid Veronica called variegata. It was in th...
-Plants (2)
We have to thank Mr. Robert Buist for a contribution of fine plants which are in season for bedding. Among them the following verbenas: Sir Joseph Paxton, Lady Palmerston, Evening Star, (especially be...
-A Plant Cabinet
A plant cabinet, while it scarcely aspires to the dignity of a conservatory, possesses the attractions of one, and gives the family of the possessor as much pleasure as a more expensive arrangement....
-Plant Fruit Seeds
Every cultivator of fruit can plant a few seeds yearly, and cultivate them as they grow, without even feeling the loss of time. Were each one to do so, what a multiplicity of seedlings we should soon ...
-Adventures Among The Himalaya Mountains. The Plant Hunters In America
Happy in its title, happy in its recitals, so far as the young are concerned, this book has somewhat of the spirited details of Robinson Crusoe. The incidents of intercourse among the natives, the con...
-Adventures Among The Himalaya Mountains. The Plant Hunters In America. Continued
Here we may digress to say, McMahon was in his way a plant-hunter and patron of science, so much so as to induce Nuttall to name the genus Mahonia in his honor. I was pleased to hear, Mr. Editor, that...
-The Plant Is Saprelogenia Ferox
A very fine new radish has been introduced into France from China. It swells at the bottom, where its diameter is about two inches; it is from three and a half to four and a half inches in length, and...
-Plant More Standard Pears, And Less Dwarf
A correspondent of the N. E. Homestead writes as follows: I was told that Louise Bonne and Duchess were better on quince, with some others, as Napoleon, d'Amalis, Belle Lucrative, etc. I purchased th...
-Plant Trees
Mr. Editor: More than forty years ago a family of children visited their grand-parents, then living a great way out of the city, on the old post-road to Albany, or Bloomingdale road; and from the g...
-Plant-Forcing Economics
SOON after we engaged in horticultural pursuits in Iowa, some thirty years ago, there occurred at this place a violent hailstorm - countless numbers of hailstones falling of an oblong form, about one ...
-Plant-Stages In Green-Houses
Mr. Meston's communication, which will be found on another page, directs our attention to some points of importance on this subject It is very well known that plants on ordinary stages, whether the ho...
-Plantain As Food
Among the starch-producing plants extensively cultivated for food in tropical countries, and which are destined to add immensely to the food-supply of colder climates, are yams, bread-fruit and banana...
-Plantihg Orchards
The following on the subject of orchard planting, should you deem it of any importance to your readers, may be inserted in your valuable paper. The growing of fruit should be a source of pleasure t...
-Planting
It is pleasing to reflect that the great and good of all ages have been patrons of arboriculture. One redeeming feature of the monkish orders was their charity to the poor wayfarer: another, and of wh...
-Planting (2)
In sheltered situations, trees may yet be planted; do not, however, plant in a hurry, but let the ground be thoroughly prepared, and in good condition. It is a commendable practice to prepare the hole...
-Planting (3)
The rules for the planting of fruits are simple and of almost universal applicability, from the herbaceous strawberry to the strong wood of the Apple-tree; and yet more loss by death occurs from negli...
-Planting (3). Continued
At the end of the season the remainder of the soil, or that which was first thrown out, is put back, and from this depth the vine will not receive any apparent check to its growth, and its roots will ...
-Planting And Pr$Paration
As this is a crop of a somewhat permanent character, it becomes necessary to make a good beginning, as such will be cheapest in the end. The fall is the best time to commence preparing the compost. Ch...
-Planting And Pruning
J. Jay Smith: If we could only properly recollect in the right time what has been written on some subjects, as, for instance, on horticulture, we should not have to run over volumes to have a question...
-Planting And Pruning. Continued
Now comes the question, Shall we take off a few or many branches or limbs, or leave all those which are not injured 1 In Paris, of late, a system has been eagerly advocated, which was founded on the t...
-Planting Fruit-Trees Near The Line
The courts, it appears, have decided that a man has no legal claim to a part of the fruit of a tree growing near the division line, and drawing largely upon his soil for its growth and productions; no...
-Planting Orchards
When an orchard is to be planted, or where there are many rows?, the quincunx arrangement is always the best, because by that mode, each tree is eqai-distant from its neighbors, and each has an equal ...
-Planting Ornamental Trees For Their Colors
AVERY interesting address on the subject of choosing trees for parks and gardens, as well for their colors, in spring and autumn, as their shape and vigor of growth, was delivered by Mr. W. Paul befor...
-Planting Roses
The beauty and interest which a garden affords depend greatly upon the disposition of its individual parts, even the arranging and planting of a single bed require experienced taste, in order to produ...
-Planting Shade Trees
WhEn the poet Keats was lying on his death-bed in Rome, he requested that the epitaph on his tombstone might be, Here lies one whose name was writ in water. From his earliest years he was an ardent ...
-Planting Shrubs
A MISTAKEN opinion seems to be entertained by many, that any manure will do for trees and shrubs, and the amateur planter, thinking that wood mould, chip manure, and decaying sods from some cesspool w...
-Planting Shrubberies
To arrange the improvements of a country residence judiciously and economically, is an interesting question to all who anticipate building. It is evident from the many extravagant expenditures of freq...
-Planting Strawberries
A writer in the Cottage Gardener describes a method by which he obtains early results from planting strawberries. He first allowed the runners to form a mass of rooted plants; these he took up with a ...
-Planting Trees
Those who intend to plant in the fall should immediately attend both to the preparation of the ground and selecting the trees. With regard to the latter, a better estimate can be made of the general h...
-Planting Trees For Wood
The article on this topic in the Horticulturist for July has left a very strong impression on the mind of the writer, and he would be glad to learn that the same effect has been produced on those best...
-Planting Trees In Anticipation Of A Demand For The Wood
WITH a liberality, if not a recklessness, which, while it was natural in a country originally well wooded, may hereafter be considered culpable, we Americans have omitted a simple and pleasing duty, t...
-Planting for Posterity
There, said a gentleman to us the other day, pointing to a fine group of pine and other trees, my brother is about to build himself a house; those trees were planted for him by my father upwards o...
-Planting, Training
Choose for all purposes healthy vines of one or (at most) two years' growth from the cutting or bud. For outside, make a hole three inches deep, and level on the bottom; spread out the roots carefully...
-Planting: - A Theort For America
When a gardener first arrives in this country he is told that in a great measure he has his business to learn over again. This is a matter of surprise to him. Are not, he inquires, the principles of g...
-Plants And Fruits Of Messrs. Martin
Whatever jealousy we may have had of the extension of French dominion on the Mediterranean some years ago, there can be no doubt that the conquest of Algeria, and the gradual occupation of the distric...
-Plants Designed For Winter-Flowering
It is to be remembered that winter is naturally the season of rest for plants. All plants require to lie dormant during some portion of the year. You cannot cheat them out of it. If they are pushed th...
-Plants For A Poultry Garden
There are many persons who are so partial to poultry as to make their fowls the first and the garden the second consideration, letting their young chickens have free range amongst their plants; and ot...
-Plants For Hanging Baskets
Why will writers persist in recommending the Coleus for hanging baskets? We think it very unsuitable, yet we see it almost invariably spoken of. It is too tall, requires a hot place, while most of the...
-Plants For Hanging Baskets, And Stove Climbers
A correspondent says that the Messrs. Henderson, near London, grow extensively the following plants, in hanging baskets: Hanging baskets were first introduced here, I believe, and now they find it a ...
-Plants For Hanging Vases
WHILE our architects and citizens are debating the propriety of originating a perfectly new style of American Architecture, - necessity - the mother of invention - is leading our villas and country re...
-Plants For Hanging Vases. No. II. - The Greenhouse
In the September number of the Horticulturist, I offered its readers an article on hanging vases, in so far as they were capable of affording a floral interest to the comforts and pleasures our verand...
-Plants For Ribbon Gardening
We need more low-growing shrubby plants of unique and distinct foliage, to be used for ribbon gardening. It is not necessary that they be flowering plants, although everything that bears flowers is we...
-Plants For Window Gardens
The Country Gentleman recommends the following: There are some few plants which will grow and blossom with but little care or attention - but with others constant care is needful. Among the former cla...
-Plants From A Commercial Grower
For the best twenty plants, at least one-half of them to be in bloom, from commercial growers only, a Silver cup of fifteen dollars. Competition for premiums before this Society is free and open to a...
-Plants In Garden Vases
An Agave, or a Yucca planted in a garden vase is always suitable, and requires no special care or management. Harper's Bazar recommends that the space between it and the vines be filled in with Echeve...
-Plants In Rooms. How To Plant; When To Transplant
Mr. Robinson's new horticultural journal, The Garden* in discussing lately the best season for transplanting house plants, says, it is when the plants are about to pass from a state of rest into a co...
-Plants In Sleeping-Rooms. Are They Unhealthy?
THIs long agitated question is now definitely set at rest by the experiments of Prof. It. C. Kedsie, of the Michigan Agricultural College, and are thus related in a letter of his to Governor Holt: No...
-Plants Of 1854
WE take from the National Garden Almanac, (London,) the following concise descriptions of the more important new plants introduced into England in 1854, some of which have already been noticed in prev...
-Plants Of 1854. Part 2
Coelogyne Pandurata A fine epiphyte, flowers large, pale green, the lip yelowish green, with broad black veins, and stains. Borneo. Stove epiphyte. Messrs. Low. Coutarea Diertilloides Showy; flower...
-Plants Of 1854. Part 3
Lycaste Cosstata A large-flowered Orchid; green, with a yellowish-white lip. Peru Stove epiphyte. B. Hanbury, Esq. Lysimachia Leschenaulti A pretty and useful plant for the flower garden and for po...
-Plants Of 1857
The year which has passed away has been, as usual, prolific of novelties amongst plants cultivated as ornamental objects. It was, however, specially recorded, that two classes of plants, which appeal ...
-Plants Of 1858
[From Turner's London Florist]. We offer with the new year our usual summary of the novelties of the past season. In doing this we wish it to be understood that it is the most prominent of those whic...
-Plants Received
From Mr. Barker, of Hartford, Gazania spiendens, Dianthus Ver-Bchaffeltii, Pansies, Phlox, and Fuchsias, for which we return our best thanks. Also, some flowers of a new Polyanthus, Golden Circle, wel...
-Plants With Variegated Foliage
QUITE a good deal can be done with variegated foliage plants to help give character and tone to a, place, even when flowers are not very plenty. This is particularly the case with plants in a greenhou...
-Plants, Shrubs, Etc., For Cemeteries
It is a difficult task to advise as to what plants, etc., shall be planted in our rural cemeteries, so varied are the circumstances; yet one thing we must plead against, that is, planting large growin...
-Plaster Of Paris As A Manure For Vines
A correspondent of The Garden says he had a large quantity of grape vines planted in the open ground, and trained on poles and wires along the gravel walks. In planting these, I had the holes dug ab...
-A Plate Of Strawberries
We present as a frontispiece this month a plate of Strawberries, old and rather late. Of most of those figured little need be said; some have already found their place among the rejected. Prince's Imp...
-A Plate of Cherries
See Frontispiece. Our Frontispiece for the present month represents a group of Cherries, some of which are so well known as hardly to need further illustration. Some of the names we should have prefe...
-A Plea For The Ailanthus
W. D. Brackenridge, of Maryland, thinks it worth while to put in a few words in favor of that badly abused tree, the Ailanthus glandulosa, but more commonly known as the Paradise tree, or tree of Heav...
-Please Notice The Advertisements
Onr readers are indebted to our extensive advertising patronage for the many excellent illustrations we are giving the public this year. We spend yearly upon the Magazine $2,000 more than we receive f...
-A Pleasing Scene
Did it strike you, Mr. Editor, when you were tracing so truthfully the pictures on the side of our beautiful mountain, what fine opportunities the declivities below some of our best houses presented f...
-Pleasure From Planting Trees
CAPTAIN Basil Hail, many years ago, while on a visit to Abbotsford, wrote: People accustomed to the planting of trees are well aware how grateful the rising generations of the forest are to the hand ...
-Pleasure Grounds
In the arrangement of the grounds about country houses, a frequent cause of dissatisfaction is the want of connection between the building and surrounding scenery. A sloping lawn, running directly to ...
-Pleasure Ground And Shrubbery Plantations
The repeated failures that have attended the introduction of many new evergreen trees and shrubs is a matter of much discouragement to those who are anxious to give variety to their ornamental grounds...
-Pleasure Ground And Shruberry
Planting deciduous trees should be proceeded with by the middle of the month, or as soon as possible after the fall of the leaves. Evergreens should be left until April. It is too late for them to mak...
-The Pleasure Ground Weeping Trees
There is no other class of arborescent vegetation that is so well marked in character, and consequently so well calculated to produce beautiful effects in the landscape art, than that which embraces t...
-Pleasure Ground. Planting Trees
Those who intend planting this fall, should attend to it early this month. The relative advantage of fall and spring planting is open to much discussion. So much depends upon local circumstances, that...
-Pleasure Grounds And Shrubbery
Contemplated improvements should be fully matured and studied before commencing active practical operations. Most of our rural places evince this want. It may safely be asserted that no permanent impr...
-Pleasure-Ground
The time has again arrived when alterations of all kinds connected with ground-work are to be effected with the greatest advantage. If improvements are contemplated, the present is the proper time to ...
-The Pleasures Of Gardening
We know not one fancy, one recreation, so unalloyed in all its points as the cultivation of a garden. It seems to afford,in common with all the rest of the fancies, the full enjoyment common to all, a...
-The Pleasures Of Gardening By Wm. W. Valk, M. D., Flushing
We are disposed to cull a flower from every field of the literature of gardening. Therefore, we pluck this from a rich soil, and offer it to the readers of the Horticulturist, for their admiration or ...
-Pleasures Of Planting
Where shall we find so pleasing an appreciation of the pleasures that attest the lover of a garden, as in the following extract of a letter from the venerable Dr. Fothergill: Planting and gardening...
-Plow Up To The Roots Of Trees And Vines
All young orchard trees, grapevines, raspberries, blackberries, gooseberries, etc., should now have the earth either plowed or shoveled up toward them, leaving the center line between rows as a surfac...
-Plowing Machines. Mrs. Loudon
The Philadelphia Agricultural Society has heard favorable accounts of a Plowing Machine invented in Lancaster county, which they are anxious to have tried. At the late meeting of the Royal Agricultura...
-Plums
I do not think that the good qualities of this fruit are as yet half appreciated. It is in season from July to November; it is excellent for preserves and for compotes. And then how delicious are many...
-Plums (2)
I have had a full crop of all the leading kinds for the last eight years, such as the Jefferson, Washington, G. Cage, Hiding's Superb, Smith's Orleans, Lawrence's Favorite, and so on; also, Nectarines...
-The Plum As A Pyramidal Tree
For some few years I have amused myself by forming my Plum trees into pyramids, feeling convinced that no other mode of cultivating our hardy fruits is so eligible for small gardens. I was induced to ...
-The Plum Curculio
P. S. Bush, Covington, Ky., sent a letter to the Cincinnati Horticultural Society stating how he destroyed the curculio and saved his plums. He covered the ground under the trees with gravel screened ...
-Plum On The Peach
IT appears, from observation and trial, that some varieties of the plum do better worked upon the peach than upon its own stock. Mr. J. S. Downer, of Kentucky, writes us, in a note upon the Wild Goose...
-Plumb's Cider Apple
After no little research for some months past, we have at length obtained a single specimen of this apple, and from a source, we suppose, that leaves no question of its being a true specimen of the ap...
-Plums At The South
A. J. Downing, Esq. - As the plum has ripened this year some three weeks earlier than usual, and the season is nearly over for taking notes upon it, we propose to continue our notices of southern frui...
-Plums At The South. Continued
It never fails of a crop with us. 2. Sua Or Early Purple? Ripens the 8th of June, and is with us the earliest of cultivated plums. Fruit - small roundish; skin - brownish purple, (color of the Colum...
-Plunging Plants
In setting pots of plants outside the green-house for the summer, we have found that when embedded in sand, fine charcoal, or even tan-bark, their health and vigor were greater than when the pots were...
-The Plunging System
Although plunging pot plants is an old practice, yet in our wanderings we frequently find amateurs, and even professional gardeners, who permit their pots of plants to stand out exposed to the dry hot...
-Plymouth Colony Apple
This is generally known as Golden Sweeting in Central New York. It is more of a greenish yellow than golden yellow. It is so old that it is attributed to the old Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts. Its ...
-Pocahontas
Size - medium. Form - variable, obovate-pyriform inclining to ovate. Calix - small, closed, moderately sunk. Stem - short, about three-fourths of an inch long, inserted without depression. Color - lem...
-Podophyllum Peltatum - Mandrake Or May Apple
This was the first indigenous fruit that I saw in Canada; it attracted my attention on my first journey through the woods. I noticed, growing by the side of the road at the edge of the forest, a plant...
-The Poet Cowper Hot Beds
In this go-ahead world of ours, who reads that poet of nature, COWPER He is, I fear, voted a little old fashioned, which he never can be to the calm and contemplative lover of the country. To such as ...
-Poet-In-Bay, Nov. 25th, '67. F. R. Elliott, Esq
Dear Sir: The Hine grape is a seedling raised by me in 1852, the fruit of which was exhibited at the State Fair by Mr. Richmond. Mr.C. Carpenter, of Kelley's Island, tells me it took the first premium...
-Poetic Effusions Vs. Botanical Facts
The practical man of the N. Y. Independent thus criticises a communication from a poetical contributor whose botanical education had been neglected: When you drew a picture of a forest haunt in summe...
-Poetry Of The Flowers
In a Sunday morning sermon by Rev. W. C. Gannett of Boston, there are some very beautiful thoughts about the pleasure of the love of flowers. Referring to the oft repeated question, which is the faire...
-The Poetry Of Trees
Said Nathaniel Hawthorne: The trees, as living existences, form a peculiar link between the dead and us. My fancy has always found something very interesting in an orchard. Apple trees and all fruit...
-The Poetry Of Witting - The Rev
JohN PiERpoNt, fit a clever and witty poem, delivered at the centennial celebration at Litch field, Conn thus admirably sketches the uni-venal New-England juvenile habit of whittling, and its signific...
-Poets As Gardeners
Most poets have a painter's eye for the disposition of forms and colors. Kent's practice as a painter no doubt helped to make him what he was as a landscape-gardener. When an architect was consulted ...
-Poinsettia Pulcherrima Roseo-Car-Minata
This fine variety of one of the most useful of winter decorative plants resembles the type form of P. pulcherrima, so far as regards growth of foliage, the difference consisting in the color of the fi...
-Poire Andouille
The tree is vigorous, and a great and constant bearer, suitable for a standard or a pyramid. Fruit - three and a half to four inches in length, and about two inches in diameter at the widest part, nea...
-Poire Peche (Esperen)
We have, been favored with specimens of this Pear by M. de Jonghe, of Brussels. The variety was raised from seed by Major Espe-ren in 1835 or 1836, and bore for the first time in 1845. The accompanyin...
-The Poke-Weed
The genus to which our common Poke belongs, was named Phytolacca, by Tournefort, a barbarous combination of the Greek, plant, and lacca, a coloring substance like Lake or Laque, or, as Dr. Gray states...
-A Polished Nursery
The most neatly kept nursery of fruit and ornamental trees that we have ever seen in this country, by all odds, is that of Wm. Reid, of Elizabethtown, N. J. It occupies about thirty acres; and every p...
-A Polsonous Plant
A few years ago there was in the Royal Botanical Gardens, at Kew, a specimen of probably the most poisonous plant ever introduced into England. It was the Jatropha urens, the properties of which are s...
-Polutry Department Conducted By A. M. Hal8ted. The Fennsylva2tca Poultry Show
This exhibition, held at Philadelphia, Dec. 30th to Jan. 4th, was a most successful one. both financially and otherwise. Although got up with but little time for preparation, the collection of fowls w...
-The Polyanthus
It must be admitted that the Polyanthus, if not one of the most popular at present, is at least one of the most beautiful of our Spring flowering plants. There are but few that can boast of a greater ...
-The Pomological Congress At Cincinnati
Dear Sir - The American Pomological Congress met at Cincinnati in the month of October last, and I am aware that much disappointment has already been expressed at the non-appearance of its proceedings...
-The Pomological Department At County And State Fairs
Bt Thomas M. Cooley, Toledo, Ohio. A considerable number of our cities and villages boast Horticultural Societies, whose efforts in behalf of pomology are traceable in an increased knowledge of that ...
-Pomological Formula
The Pennsylvania Fruit - Growers' Society have recently issued, through their Committee on Nomenclature, a Pomological formula of description, for the classification, description, and identifying of...
-Pomological Gossip
As I am confined to the house by a rainy day, and on taking up the Horticulturist saw your solicitation for rough notes, Ac., thought aroused me to give a few, and to let them go for what they may see...
-Pomological Literature
With no disposition to criticise, or presumption to knowledge, I unhesitatingly pronounce the whole of pomological literature, at this present time, completely incomplete, or, in other and more common...
-Pomological Notes
I send you the following notes on Pears we are now using, Dec. 10. I have just eaten my last specimen of Beurre Diet and Beurre Anjou. It is not generally known, I think, that these two noble Pears, i...
-The Pomological Report
At a late meeting of the Hartford Horticultural Society, Dr. Russell presiding, the fact was brought to the notice of the Society that the Report of the proceedings of the American Pomological Society...
-Pomological Societies And Their Influence
N the month of September, 1848, the first general meeting of fruit growers was held at Buffalo, in connection with and under the auspices of the New York State Agricultural Society, of which Lewis F...
-Pomological Society Of Georgia
The Annual Meeting of the above named Society was held at Athens, on Tuesday, August 3d. The officers chosen for the ensuing year were as follows : L. E. Berckmans, President; Richard Peters, Vice-Pre...
-The Pomology Of The West
How great the subject! How vast the country! What multitudes are daily rushing to fill up its vast plains, its prairies, and its forests! And what a field is presented for the labors of the agricultur...
-The Pompone Or Daisy Chrysanthemums
The introduction of the Pompone Crysanthemum, or Chusan Daisy, from China, by Mr. Fortune, some seven years ago, gave quite a new impulse to the culture of this flower, and completely re-established i...
-Pop Corn
The horny or flinty portions of corn, when viewed in their sections under a good microscope, will be found to consist of a great number of six-sided cells, filled with a fixed oil, which has been succ...
-Popular Evergreen Trees
The use of evergreens is becoming yearly more and more appreciated, both as effective in ornamental planting and as an item of practical economy in the matter of hedges and screens for protection of h...
-Popular Evergreen Trees, Continued
As I said in my notes of April, this is a timely article and shows that the editors and publishers of the Horticulturist intend and do keep up with the wants of the people and the labors of the season...
-Popular Flowering Shrubs
WE believe there lingers in the mind of every dweller in the country, although infinitesimally small in some, a desire for rural adornment - some little natural landmark, as it were, to break the othe...
-Popular Flowering Shrubs (2)
[Concluded.] Our native White Dogwood, when branched from the ground, forms a lovely sight, both in spring and autumn. The Double Althaeas, almost as common as the Sunflower and Hollyhock, are yet ve...
-Popular Pears - The Lawrence
ANOTHER noble fruit of American origin, too, worthy of special note. The Lawrence is a native of Flashing, Long Island, but we have no statistics or facts to guide us, when, where, or by whom. It is a...
-Portable Heaters
A few days since we saw at a friend's a contrivance which we think admirably adapted to supplying heat temporarily to a cold pit, and it may be used by the gardener under a variety of circumstances wh...
-Portable Poultry House
Almost every one is desirous of keeping a few fowls, and while they desire to give them fresh food, earth, etc., it is often difficult so to do, when kept in any stationary coop. The accompanying cut...









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