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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #2 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Strawberries To Vases

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #2
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Strawberries
But we have passed the great strawberry department, and can only note the information given, that the proprietors of these nurseries consider the following the best twelve kinds: Wilson, Triomphe de G...
-Strawberries (1)
Question - What new varieties of the strawberry have been found to promise well in the experience of this Society? Dr. Sylvester thought Frost's Fillmore a valuable new sort. He thought the crop a fu...
-Strawberries (2)
WITH particular reference to strawberries, I would advise to make a first experiment on a small scale, as a thousand plants, carefully managed, will yield as much as an acre neglected. Plant on the hi...
-Strawberries (3)
I begin with the same old story, and name first the immortal Wilson's Albany, because you simply cannot do without it. Large, beautiful in color and shape, a great bearer in all kinds of soil, and g...
-Strawberries (4)
I have perused the notices of many varieties of strawberries in your journal for previous months, and in other periodicals, but have not seen any satisfactory and conclusive details, such as would imp...
-Strawberries (5)
At the discussions of the Illinois Horticultural Society, two cultivators of the strawberry pronounced the Wilson and Green Prolific as the two best and most productive sorts. Others objected to the G...
-Strawberries (6)
Hoveys Seedling, Burr's New Pine, Early Scarlet, bear large and fine berries, and are heavily loaded every year. No failure so far. Swainstone's Seedling, Ross's Phoenix, Keen's Seedling, Myatts Elua,...
-Strawberries (7)
New varieties of this favorite fruit are by far too numerous, both on the Continent and in England. With many of them, their name is the only distinguishing characteristic. The following are French an...
-Strawberries (8)
We have a note from Mr. William Stoms, of Cincinnati, on Strawberries, confirming what our friend Barry says respecting the success of Hooey's Seedling this season, which would have been inserted but ...
-Strawberries (9)
Of these, Keen's Seedling, Princess Alice Maud, British Queen, Old Pine, Comte de Paris, and Elton, are recommended as the best by Mr. Whiting: and Black Prince, Wilmot's Prince Arthur, Kitley's Golia...
-Strawberries (10)
The following recipe for keeping old strawberry beds in bearing, is from the Friend's Review, a Philadelphia publication. What proportion of its efficacy depends on the frequent and regular watering, ...
-Strawberries (11)
As the season is at hand when many persons will plant Strawberries, I hope I shall not be thought to offer unnecessary advice, if I make a few suggestions on Strawberry culture. On most horticultural ...
-Of Strawberries (12)
Hovey's Seedling, While Alpine and a few others were shown, the former taking the premium. Some four or five kinds of Rusael Apples were pre-tilled by Hon. J. Turrill, and J. W. Judstm, Esq., in soun...
-Strawberries (13)
Tour correspondent, C. Legg, M. D., has a note in your July number, in reference to Longworth's Prolific Strawberry, in which he hesitates whether or not to accuse nurserymen of dishonesty and stup...
-Strawberries (14)
What kind of Strawberry shall I plant ? is a question as often asked as it is answered by advising to use those sorts most in favor with the parties questioned. I have raised many thousand seedlings,...
-Strawberries (15)
This month ushers in our first, and to many, the most attractive fruit of this latitude. Discussions will be frequent as to the merits of the various kinds, and we hope to give next month a little exp...
-Strawberries (16)
The increasing popularity of the strawberry warrants the employment of every means to disseminate a knowledge of the best kinds. The cultivation is well understood; what we want is to know the best. A...
-Strawberries (17)
Mr. Prince moved to strike Early Scarlet from list for general cultivation. Mr. Lyons: Best in Michigan. Mr. Hooker: About the best in Western New York. Mr. Bateham: One of the best in Ohio. Strawber...
-Strawberries (18)
The discussion on Strawberries brought out some pretty severe remarks, and very contradictory in their tenor - showing more and more that this fruit is one of which varieties are specially suited to l...
-Strawberries - Planting
In our last two numbers we gave some extracts on Strawberry Culture from Dr. Grant's Landmarks. We now make an extract from Mr. Fuller's Strawberry Culturist) giving his views in regard to the time an...
-Strawberries - Soil, Culture, And Varieties
After so complete a record of Strawber-ries as Mr. Fuller has given in his Small Fruit Culturist, just published, it may be counted as presumption to write another word; but we have two reasons for...
-Strawberries Among Fruit Tress
Keep them out. We believe it is the general testimony of all growers that the practice of crowing small fruits among standard trees, is detrimental, if not ruinous, to both. The Strawberry is a moistu...
-Strawberries And Grapes In Missouri
I see in the August Dumber of the Horticulturist some account of the Strawberry crop of Cincinnati, Ohio, by Mr. Stoms. Permit me to give you an account of my own; - I have one and one-fourth of an ac...
-Strawberries And Peaches In South Illinois
Editor of ran Horticulturist, - The varieties of Strawberries fruited here this season are at follows: Wilson's Albany is grown more extensively here than any other, and fully sustains its reputation...
-Strawberries And Their Culture
THE discussion of the Strawberry question, which has occupied the pages of agricultural and horticultural journals so largely for a few years past, has been the means, directly and indirectly, of adva...
-Strawberries And Their Culture. Continued
In the fall, ox before the setting in of winter, & mulching of half-decayed leaves or manure should be placed between the rows, coming close around the plants, leaving the crown or beart uncovered. Th...
-Strawberries And Their Culture (2)
Within ten years past volumes have been written about strawberries, large numbers of new varieties have been introduced both of native and foreign origin, and multitudes of experiments have been made ...
-Strawberries And Their Culture (2). Continued
When is the proper time, or rather the best time, to plant strawberries? is a question we are often asked. We have no hesitation in recommending the spring - the month of April, or the beginning of ...
-Strawberries And Their Culture (3)
Having experimented during the past three years with more than fifty varieties of strawberries, the conclusions reached may possibly benefit neophytes who fancy this delicious fruit. The soil - a clay...
-Strawberries And Their Nutrition
Professor Emmons, in his Agriculture of New-York, makes this commentary: - The soil must possess all the inorganic substances, as well as organic, which are essential to the perfection of vegetable...
-Strawberries At The South
I resume my notes upon fruits with the strawberry - a fruit capable of being brought to great perfection in this climate. To make the most of a strawberry bed, it requires a suitable situation and soi...
-Strawberries For Family Use
It is customary for writers on small fruits to say that any good garden soil will grow strawberries. True to some extent; but if we want quantity it is useless to try sandy land. A cold, heavy clay be...
-Strawberries In October
Dear Sir: - On the 5th or 6th inst., Mr. Griswold, who resides a little over a mile from this city and who is an extensive grower of strawberries for our market, brought in a superb dish of Burr's New...
-Strawberries In Ohio
The varieties of strawberries named in your notes in the April number, with the exception of the Lady of the Lake, have yielded to me, personally, twice as much money, and in some instances considerab...
-Strawberries In Orchard Houses
Though Strawberries are but rarely among our forced luxuries, they may be turned to account in the orchard-house without interfering with other crops. Another writer in the same journal says: I have...
-Strawberries In The South
Dr. Swasey furnishes the following notes of how some of the newer varieties are succeeding with him: President Wilder It is said that burnt children dread the fire, and as we had been severely and r...
-Strawberries In Washington
THE following is an extract from a letter, dated July 25th, from Dr. John H. Bayne,*of Washington City, who grows Strawberries very extensively for market. We should be glad to have a list of such oth...
-Strawberries In Winter At The South
It has been published that strawberries can be had in December and other of the winter months with very little trouble. We very much doubt the fact. It is probable that with extra care, deep trenching...
-Strawberries On Bushes
The editor of the St. Paul Press still maintains the existence of bushes at Pembina, bearing strawberries thereon. It is not a raspberry, as some one suggested, but a genuine strawberry, The berry i...
-The Strawberries of The World, And Their Normal Scientific Character
I have long been desirous to express my views, and the facts in regard to the Strawberry Question, in order to set at rest the erroneous opinions so generally existing, and you may judge somewhat of m...
-The Strawberries of The World, And Their Normal Scientific Character. Part 2
It may here be cited as a singular fact, that of the eleven edible species of the Strawberry, there is but one which is positively known to combine all the three variations of staminate, hermaphrodite...
-The Strawberries of The World, And Their Normal Scientific Character. Part 3
If the observer who advanced such chaotic ideas of an equivocal creation had stated that men and women of those Alpine regions, when they emigrate to lower lands, transpose their sexuality, it would h...
-The Strawberries of The World, And Their Normal Scientific Character. Part 4
When in any of the Fragaria species the male organs of the hermaphrodite are imperfect, nature, ever provident, furnishes the male or staminate plant to supply the deficiency. And when in any species ...
-Strawberries. "Cultivator."
Yes; our plate of strawberries is not exaggerated as to their size. They were drawn from nature, neither the largest nor smallest were taken, but a fair average; the artist was to nothing exaggerate...
-Strawberries. An American In London
The North American Review tells the following good story: A countryman of ours, of somewhat rude appearance, walking in the Strand early in May saw his favorite dish of strawberries and cream blushing...
-Strawberries. How Many Quarts Per Acre?
Few persons are aware of the immense yield of the Strawberry plant under high culture. We have frequent reports of crops ranging from 4,000 to 6,000 quarts per acre, and we are informed that a Mr. G. ...
-The Strawberry (2)
In our article for July, we gave a list of those essential good qualities which are requisite to make up a first-rate strawberry. But it is to be regretted that we have no one variety in which all of ...
-The Strawberry " Sir Harry."
This new berry has received much attention of late in England and France. One of our correspondents says he has never eaten anything so delicious. It is equally well adapted to forcing as to open gro...
-Strawberry Bans
Sir: I followed your directions last year in making strawberry beds, and with such extraordinary success, that I am induced to recur to the subject for the benefit of those who like myself would tak...
-Strawberry Beds
THOSE beds which have done yielding their fruit should now be carefully overhauled and thoroughly cleaned out, old leaves should be clipped off, weeds pulled out, and the ground made clean, clear and ...
-Strawberry Cultivation
A determination to examine as thoroughly as possible for myself this spring the best strawberry grounds within my convenience, induced me to visit the fine gardens of Wm. R. Prince, Esq., of Flushing,...
-Strawberry Culture
The article of F. A. Simpkins, on strawberry culture, in the January No. of The Horticulturist, should be qualified in some of its statements. The object in mulching strawberries is fourfold: First ...
-Strawberry Culture In The Vicinity And In Rochester, N. T
Very much attention has been given by fruit growers in this vicinity to the culture of the fine fruit, the Strawberry, and our markets arc abundantly supplied with the best kinds. A careful comparison...
-Strawberry From The South
I received per steamer Georgia, last month, from New-Orleans, a box of strawberry plants, of a new and remarkable variety. My attention was first called to them about six months ago, by the editorial...
-Strawberry Hill - A Lesson In Taste
[ See Frontispiece. ] One of the most celebrated men of the last century, as every one familiar with English literature knows, was Horace Walpole. His literary talent, his love of art, his antiquaria...
-Strawberry Planting
I notice the remarks in your last number of the Genesee Farmer on the planting of strawberries. I have made trial of planting at all seasons, and of all other periods I prefer the month of August for ...
-Strawberry Question
Having learned through a friend that Mr. Prince, in the Pennsylvania Farm Journal, had challenged any person to produce a perfect fruit on a pistillate variety of strawberry, without staminate influen...
-The Strawberry Seedling
In the autumn of 1846, if memory serves me right, our clever Aunt Charlotte was at Paris, with her two youngest daughters, and while boarding at pleasant quarters in the great French capital (and ca...
-The Strawberry, By A. S. Fuller, Brooklyn, L. I
In all our exertions toward improving the Strawberry, we should aim to produce a plant combining as many good qualities as possible. In most, if not all, of the best now in cultivation, we find but fe...
-Strawberry, Floral, And Vegetable Exhibition
The New Jersey State Agricultural Society held their first exhibition of strawberries, flowers, and vegetables on their own grounds at Waverly, on Tuesday and Wednesday, June the 23d and 24th. Owing ...
-Strawberry-Growing
While we desire as great an increase of extent in fruitgrowing as the most enthusiastic, we also think injury rather than good is done to the cause by isolated and, we may almost say, exaggerated stat...
-Stray Thoughts About Cultivation, & C. Etc
There is a well known story of a certain Duke, who, on seeing a man ploughing a light soil with four horses one before the other, got off his horse, unhooked the two leaders, harnessed the two others ...
-Strictures On Errors And Want Of Method Prevalent In Pomological Writings
I take the liberty to offer through the medium of the Horticulturist, a few words of criticism upon the want of unity of language and idea, and upon what I conceive to be the misemployment of terms on...
-A Strong Grapery
Last fall we built a grapery for John Cheney, Esq., of South Manchester, Conn. It is situated in a valley, exposed to all the winds sweeping down it The house is 20 by 70, with a continuous roof; and ...
-Stuartia Virginica
(W.) We are pleased that your attention has been drawn to this beautiful shrub. It flowers from July to September, when other bloom is scarce. It thrives best in a peat soil rather moist, but will als...
-Stuawbikriu
I gathered sixty-four boxes of Strawberries the past summer from three beds of vines, the beds being forty-five feet long and two feet wide, with an interval of two feet be tween the beds. The berries...
-Studies In Vegetable Physiology - The Boot
The third class of plants whose roots are perennial, or live an indefinite number of years, is the largest of the three grand divisions. It comprises all our forest and shade trees, and most of our be...
-Studies In Vegetable Physiology - The Root
Ik explaining the history of a plant, it is necessary to begin with the most important parts. The root is that organ which, in contradistinction to the stem, seeks to exclude itself from the light and...
-Study Of Botany
Why is not botany studied more! There is scarcely a school or college in the United States in which botany is taught, and very few in which thorough instruction in it is given. By thorough teaching, ...
-Study Of Nature
That there is a vast amount of thought bestowed upon horticultural and kindred pursuits, the pages of the various periodicals devoted to these subjects can fully testify. The study of nature, in all h...
-The Study Of Nature And Of Art Contrasted
The following passages from a recent lecture by the Hon. John Thompson, of Poughkeepsie, on the Beautiful in Nature and Art, are worthy of careful study. Our readers will unite with us in a high ap...
-Study Of Park Trees
[ See Frontispiece. ] There is as much difference between a wild forest tree and a park tree, as between a wild horse and the finest trained Arabian courser. Full, as our forests are, of native trees...
-Stump Fences
In Western New York stump fences are quite common. Haviug tried many means, ineffectually, to destroy these remnants of the primeval forest, the people at last devoted them to the useful purpose of in...
-Stump The World Peach
A native of New Jersey, well adapted to the South, where the tree grows vigorously and healthily, and produces the very finest crops. As I never had occasion to taste it in New Jersey, I can only give...
-The Stuyvesant Pear Tree
A sketch of New York could scarcely be complete without a notice of the oldest inhabitant, on the corner of Thirteenth street and Third Avenue. No royal Charles was ever concealed in its branches, n...
-The Styer Pear
Under this name, at the recent meeting of the American Pomological Society, Mr. Allan W. Corson, of Montgomery county, Penn., exhibited specimens of a fine pear, supposed to have originated in that co...
-On Style And Expression In Certain Trees And Shrubs - Their Adaptabilities, Ac
Landscape gardening in its strict sense has scarcely kept pace with what has been termed the Gardenesque of late years; and why! Simply, I suppose, from the fact that where there is one person who can...
-Stymer's Apple
A new promising late fall or early winter apple, originated on the farm of Jacob Stymers, in the village of Dobbs' Ferry, on the Hudson. Specimens were sent me by Dr. James Fountain, who informs me th...
-Sub-Rosa
The origin of this custom seems to date back as far as the 16th century, where it is mentioned by Newton in his Herball to the Bible in 1587, as follows: I will heere adde a common country custom t...
-Subject 1. The Best Method Of Gathering, Packing, And Transporting Pears To Market
Dr. Spence, of Yates County, thought the best way was simply to barrel them; when pretty full, shake the barrel gently, and frequently shake gently as you fill, so that the pears match one with anothe...
-Subject 2. The Best Method Of Preserving Fruits, So As In Every Way To Prolong The Period Of Consumption
Mr. Sharpe, of Niagara County, preserves fruit by canning. Some fruit now on exhibition by him was kept in his cellar. As soon as he had perfected the method, would give it to the public. Here were Ba...
-The Best Method Of Preserving Fruits, So As In Every Way To Prolong The Period Of Consumption. Continued
Mr. Sharpe agreed with the gentleman in considering this subject an important one, and hoped that fall and winter fruits could in some way be kept until the season for fresh ripening again. H. N. Lan...
-Subject 4. Which Is The Best Stock For The Cherry For General Purposes, The Mazzard Or The Mahaleb?
Mr. Townsend thinks the advantage of cultivating the cherry tree upon Mahaleb stock is that its wood becomes more dense and hardy. The growth of the tree is more vigorous, and not as subject to burst ...
-Subject 5. The Northern Spy Apple; What Is The Value Of It As An Orchard Fruit?
Mr. Beadle, of Canada. - The Northern Spy has for two years fruited with us in Canada, and seems to promise very well, bearing fine fruit and plenty of it It is all fine, largo, well-colored fruit, an...
-Substitute For Box-Edging
The following from the Gardener's Chronicle will interest some of our readers: The grass selected for trial was the common Sheep's Fescue Grass (Fes-tuca ovina). A patch of this was sown, and the youn...
-Subtropical Bed
A very effective bed was planted, this summer, in the gardens of the Luxembourg, Paris. It consisted simply of a bed of Papyrus plants, edged with Cype rus alternifolius. The bed was raised a little i...
-Subtropical Gardening
A FEW tender ferns introduced into the flower garden, or in the lawn near the house, prepare the way for masses of wild ferns in more distant parts of the grounds, where, with ferns, or amongst them, ...
-Subtropical Gardening (2)
MUCH has been written on this subject in Europe, and many plants tried for the purpose, with more or less success, which in a great measure depends on the season, which is proverbially uncertain, espe...
-Subtropicals Especially Valuable For Their Contrast Of Leaf And Form
HOW country places ought to be laid out, or whether it is best for men to do their own work, or employ artistio advice to guide their efforts, seems at first rather aside from the questions which sugg...
-Suburban Embellishments
We learn, with much pleasure, that an extensive and beautiful improvement is about to be carried out in up a part of the suburbs of that city so as to combine the greatest amount of comfort, health an...
-Suburban Gardening
The above phrase is intended to indicate gardening adapted to grounds in the vicinity of our large cities, and, according to my ideas, is a different thing from landscape gardening, of which latter th...
-A Suburban Or Country Residence
This cottage was designed by me for a suburban residence for a small family, and was erected near Philadelphia. It would be suitable as a country residence, or, with some small additions, as a farm-ho...
-Suburban Residences
THE present is eminently a time of improvement Go where we will - in the suburbs of all our cities, in our country villages, and far into the farming districts - we find the people busy constructing a...
-Suburban Residences. Continued
A very sensible English writer,* a professional landscape gardener of much experience, in speaking of laying out the grounds of a villa residence, says of seclusion: * Parts and Pleasure Grounds-by...
-Success In Small Fruit
We know of no branch of rural industry which requires so much capital and outlay for its space as the cultivation of strawberries, and we know of no business so risky or fruit so perishable. Still it ...
-Successful Cultivation Of Plums For Market
So much has been said and written of late upon the Grape question, that I begin to fear we may forget that other fruits can be successfully raised. I therefore propose to give you my experience in rai...
-Successful Culture Of Fine Foliaged Plants
A contributor to the Country Gentleman, lately saw some fine specimens of floral plants in Baltimore, Md. A plant of Begonia Marshallii, four feet across the front, two plants of Caladium esculentum ...
-Successful Culture Of Strawberries
In response to a question from an anxious small fruit grower how to manage his strawberries, the Western Rural gives him this byway, as a table of commandments: Set out in the spring good strong plan...
-Successful Curculio Practice
Mr. Downing - Dear Sir: I send you an account of the method I have successfully practiced during eight years, in protecting my plums from the depredations of the cur-culio. I will first mention some ...
-Successful Experiments In Mulching
Dear Sir - All facts tending to the improvement of practical results in the processes of gardening, are what are sought for by the readers of the Horticulturist, etc. And although much creeps into our...
-Successful Removal Of Fruit-Trees
Dear Sir - This last spring I had occasion to remove from one part of my garden to another, 36 fruit trees, the greater part plums. As soon as the ground would admit, it was done, and so successfully,...
-Sugar
The high price of sugar has had much to do with the present state of prosperity, as it is called, which induces extravagance and absurd luxury, evidenced by such things as the sale of fans ornamented ...
-Sugar Cane
Beside these, I saw on trees a large number of fruits, which are said to be excellent but I had no opportunity to taste them. But I must not, in speaking of fruits, omit to mention the sugar cane, whi...
-The Sugar Cantaloupe
Facility of cultivation, abundant production, and, above all, a most agreeable flavor, assign to the Cantaloupes the first rank among all the races of Melons. The markets - those of Paris, at least - ...
-The Sugar Maple
Perhaps there are few trees in the American forest of more value than the Maple. As an ornamental tree it is exceeded by few, and its cultivation in the lawn should be much extended; for avenues or th...
-Suggestions For for Next Meeting Of The American Pomological Society
The next meeting f the American Pomological Society is to be held at Boston, in the autumn of the present year. t is desirable that all who have the objects of the Society at heart, should remember it...
-Suggestions On The Cultivation Of The Gloxinia
Amongst the numerous plants which are highly deserving of more universal cultivation, and a greater degree of attention, than is usually bestowed upon them; the Gloxinia stands conspicuous in an emine...
-Suggestions To Amateur Florists
There are many who are investing in plants who have had little or no experience, and to such a few hints may not come amiss. 1. Plants taken from the warm, moist air of a propagating house should be ...
-Sulphate Or Ammonia
I was very much pleased with the recommendation of Sulphate of Ammonia as a fertiliser, by An Amateur, in your Magazine for June. The one pregnant assurance, nothing so good can be cheaper, and th...
-Sulphur
A correspondent calls attention to the subject of the use of sulphur for the cure of the European vine disease, and requests the publication of the following from the London Times, just received: The...
-Sulphur And Mildew
It seems to me, that the remarks on this subject, at page 335, should not pass without a word of qualification. With regard to the style of that communication, I would simply repeat the remarks of a c...
-Sulphur For Mildew
M. Frederich Seitz, of Easton, Pa., in a letter to a friend of his, which has been sent to our table, says, I see that the Horticulturist passes over the advice of Mr. Rivers, in the Orchard House es...
-The Sulphur Remedy
Much interest was excited at the late annual meeting of our State Horticultural Society, by reports of recent experiments with the use of sulphur on Catawba vineyards at the islands. It was stated by ...
-Sulphur Vs. Vine Mildew
As it appears that mildew on Grapes is still spreading through the country, I am anxious to bear testimony to the efficacy of sulphur as a preventive, and also a cure for this very troblesome disease....
-Sulphurating Machine
Among the many instruments essential to the proper management of a garden, this invention by Mr. Fry promises to be one of the most useful, alike indispensable to the cottager as to the manager of the...
-The Sumach
As a spirit seems now most appropriately awakening toward the development of the natural resources of our country, we may hope ere long to realize the noblest aspirations of the noblest man our countr...
-Summer Apple
We have received from Mr. Geo. Barry, of Alton, 111., a box of apples in very good condition. He informs us that they were taken from trees fifteen or twenty years old, the only ones he has any knowle...
-Summer Apples And Pears
A liberal display of early apples covers our table, two deep, at the moment we pen this, from the nurseries of Ellwanger & Barry; and certainly if such things can be in Rochester, they ought to be p...
-Summer Grape Pruning
F. W. Wood-ward, Esq.: Can you not tell us in the Horticulturist what to do with our grapevines ? Rules made for the East are utterly at fault in this soil and climate - which crowds them forward at s...
-A Summer House
The Horticulturist has, from time to time, ever since its first number, given occa. sional designs for ornamental rustic buildings. On looking over the past volumes we find a considerable amount of th...
-Summer Peaks
Jesse Colby, of Meriden, N. H., has forwarded us some fine looking specimens of a summer pear, which he regards as the best summer pear extant - appears to do much better than any foreign varieties, ...
-Summer Pruning
In growing plants into particular shapes and forms, the advantage and expediency of summer pinching or pruning of the young shoots is very apparent; as I have remarked before in these pages, many beau...
-Summer Pruning As An Aid To Fruitfulness
In all well-managed orchards, an intelligently directed pruning-knife plays an important part while the trees are young. I am not an advocate of an indiscriminate slashing of large limbs of fruit tree...
-On Summer Pruning Hardy Grapes
Dear Sir - In the August number of the Horticulturist for 1846, you present Doctor Lindley's theory of pruning grape vines, and recommend as the result of your experience, the omission of summer pruni...
-Summer Pruning Of Hardy Grapes
You would oblige a subscriber by giving, in your journal, some instruction in the management of hardy grape vines: particularly summer pruning. In your Fruit Garden, you direct that the fruit branch...
-Summer Pruning Of The Grape
After the usual formalities of organization, subject No. 1 was read by the secretary: Does summer pruning of the grape hasten the maturity and improve the quality of the fruit, and does it increase t...
-Summer Pruning Of The Raspberry
CULTIVATORs too frequently allow raspberry bushes to run rampant the season through, and do the pruning the following spring, when much severe cutting is required in bringing the plants into shape. A ...
-Summer Pruning Small Fruits
Summer pruning does away with the necessity of staking and tying raspberries and blackberries. It does more than this; it increases the amount of fruit, makes it of better size and flavor, and gives t...
-Summer Pruning The Grape
WE think it safe to say, that, there is no horticultural operation upon which there is less correct knowledge and practice among the great mass of those who cultivate the grape, as may be found in sum...
-Summer Pruning The Vine
The summer pruning of grapevines commences with the first inch of growth, and if then performed, and carefully continued during the entire season, we should hear nothing of the injury attendant on its...
-Summer Pruning The Vine (2)
In perusing the American journals, I hare repeatedly noticed inquiries relative to summer pruning the vine. In the August number of the Horticulturist a correspondent remarks: I am getting a great qu...
-Summer Pruning The Vine (2). Continued
The leaves died, the roots followed for want of leaves; and at the present moment I can find but about one dozen microscopic specimens to illustrate the importance of quantum suff, of healthy foliage....
-Summer Root-Pruning
A correspondent says he has a large pear tree on pear roots standing in deep, loamy clay soil, and that while it grows freely, it does not set any fruit, and asks about root pruning it, how and wh...
-Summer Treatment Of Green-House Plants
A Lover of Flowers. In order to get a fine bloom from your plants in winter, you should not allow them to run into rank growth in summer. Do not plunge the pots in the borders, but choose a half shade...
-Sun-Screens For Evergreens
Newly planted Evergreens suffer more from the sun-scorching, to which they are usually subjected the first season, than from all other disadvantages. A valuable specimen is hastily planted out, fresh ...
-Sundries
As I not unfrequently meet with articles in the Horticulturist, concerning which I have a word or two to say, I propose to myself a sort of conglomerate paper, upon several subjects noticed in the p...
-Superphosphate Of Lime For Transplanting Trees
Prof. Undley.-In The Gardeners' Chronicle There are no doubt places in which all the skill of the planter will at first fail in getting trees to grow, but even in such cases he need not despair; the ...
-Supplemental Report
The committee, since making their report on the third branch of the subject giyen them in charge, have visited the principal vine districts of Switzerland and Germany, and deem some of the observation...
-Supplemental Report. Continued
Now, Johannesberger is the most delicate of wine, as it is indeed superlative in every respect. By the kind invitation of the Princess Metternich the committee were allowed to taste specimens of the b...
-Supporting Gladiolus Bulbs
A correspondent of the Country Gentleman prepares supports for his flowers as follows: I take inch boards and slit them up into strips 1 inch square and 30 inches long. These are planed and cornered ...
-On Supporting Plants By Stakes
Primary importance must be attached to the time at which support of any kind is to be afforded. The principal evils to be corrected in the methods at present pursued are staking plants at too late a p...
-Supports For Climbers
We have standing in flower beds on our lawn two rustic supports for flowering vines, roses and the like, that are so pretty, cheap, easily made and efficient, that I thought some of your many readers ...
-Supports For Flowers
A correspondent of The Journal of Horticulture, remarking that there are many gardens in or near cities, the cultivators of which have not the easy facilities of getting an abundance of serviceable st...
-The Susian Iris
(Translated from the Revue Horticole.) The genus Iris, of which the species are so numerous and so common in our gardens, contains nothing more curious than the subject of this brief notice - the ...
-Susquehannah And Chemung Valley Horticultural Society
We are indebted to the politeness of the officers of this Society for a complimentary ticket to attend their Summer Exhibition, which took place at Havana, N. Y., on the 20th and 21st of June. A previ...
-Susqueuanna And Cuemung Valley Horticultural Society
At a meeting of the Board of Officers of this Society, held pursuant to notice, at Elmira, on the 4th day of August, it was resolved to hold a Fall Exhibition at Ely's Hall, in Elmira, on the 15th day...
-Suzette De Bavay And Baron Out D'Hiver Nouveau Pears
You will very much oblige me, and doubtless many others of your readers, by giving in your next number your estimate of the quality of Susette D'Bovay, as also its time of ripening. Also Beurre Grit d...
-Sweet Apples
A VERY suggestive subject title to the appreciator of Apples and milk, waking up delicious memories of the simple good things enjoyed in younger years - perchance forgotten or neglected in later day...
-Sweet Bough - Color Of Apples
Does the Sweet Bough ever have a faint blush? Some specimens exhibited at our State Fair called the Bough, had a blush, but I can find no descriptions that mention it. J. A. D. The Sweet Bough, in c...
-Sweet Corn
To write anything on the cultivation of Indian Corn would appear, on first consideration, like a waste of words. However, as we so often see only an indifferent quality, and so seldom meet with a good...
-Sweet Potatoes
I notice, in the June number of the Horticulturist, an article from the pen of C. E. Goodrich, upon the culture of Sweet Potatoes. In that article I notice one error, which ought not to pass without c...
-Sweet Potatoe Culture
Sir: The sweet potato forms a very important article of provision on the southern plantations. It is so subject to rot - even by the 1st of January - that it is much less planted than would otherwise ...
-Sweet Violets
The Florist and Pomologist says: The sweet violets are among the most charming little gems of the spring garden, and they will grow almost anywhere, provided they get pure air; but what they most de...
-The Sweet William
This is a very sweet flower, and carries an immense truss of bloom; it is a favorite of mine, but I have sought in vain to obtain a plant, or even a pinch of -seed ot Mr. Hunt's far-famed varieties. S...
-Sweet-Seented Tulips
A writer in the English Journal of Horticulture, speaking of the sweet-scented Tulip, says: I last week had the pleasure of inspecting at Laurel Bank, the picturesque villa residence of A. Stirling, ...
-Swiss Chard Beet
I am much pleased with this for greens. It can be raised as Spinach is, or the spring sowing can be allowed to stand. Early in Fall cut off the summer growth, when it will shoot out new leaves, which ...
-Symbolic Devices
Symbols, in monumental sculpture, if happily conceived and well executed, are always gratifying. The rareness of success shows the difficulty of the undertaking. On the other hand, in no department of...
-A Symmetrical Cottage
Whoever loves symmetry and the simpler kINDSs of cottage Beauiy, including good proportion, tasteful forms, and chasteness of ornament, we think can not hut like this design, since it unites all these...
-Synonyms
As I desire to correct errors in the nomenclature of fruits, whenever in my power, I send you a few extracts taken from my memoranda of 1853, on Pears. Triomphe de Hasselt is the Grosse Calebasse of ...
-Synonyms Or Pears
The following statement relative to the synonyms of some well known pears, is an extract from a letter of Andre Leroy, dated Angers. Aug. 18,1852, and although furnishing information well known to our...
-System - Hills Or Rows
On this point we do not think cultivators or writers differ much in reality, although they occasionally write pretty strongly in favor of their own views; but after all, as the strawberry of all sorts...
-System Of Pot-Culture In Orchard-Houses
Although the cultivation of fruits in pots under glass has been to a limited extent practiced for very many years in the forcing houses of large establishments, (and for which the mode of potting that...
-System Of Pot-Culture In Orchard-Houses (2)
The Orchard-House has become an object of interest to many amateurs of late in this country, and to them some remarks on the cultivation of fruit-trees in pots, from an old cultivator, may not be devo...
-Table Corn
Rhode Island Sweet, Stowel's Evergreen, Hematell, Blore, Tuscarora, Early Burlington, Early Canada, Mandan. The second premium for vegetable roots for cattle was gained by Mr. J. A. Perry, whose coll...
-Table Decorations
The approach of the holidays suggests many a table loaded with edibles to please the palate, and in aid of those who have to decorate them to please the eye, we suggest the use of low grown bushy plan...
-Tacsonia Manicata
A plant was distributed a few years ago by the Horticultural Society under this name, but I do not hear of it as having flowered in many places, nor have I ever seen it except in my own greenhouse. It...
-Taking Care Of Gladiolus Bulbs
To make a good display of Gladiolus during the summer and autumn, the bulbs should be planted at intervels of two or three weeks. Those planted first will, of course, ripen first, and I have found tha...
-Taking Up And Storing Dahlias
In a treatise on this flower, recently published by Groom-beugk, the cutting down is recommended not to be performed until the first frosts have completely checked vegetation. For choice, good v...
-A Talk About Pigs
Pigs! And what, I should like to know, have pigs to do with horticulture? says an intelligent reader. Why a good deal to do with it, when a sharp^nosed street grunter of the Alligator tribe creeps u...
-A Talk About Porches
In his usual flowing and easy manner the writer has shown us in this article how we may beautify and embellish, without depending or calling upon the scroll-work of carpentry, and while he has put in ...
-A Talk About Porches By The Author Of "My Farm Of Edgewood."
A country house without a porch is like a man without an eyebrow; it gives expression, and gives expression where you most want it. The least office of a porch is that of affording protection against ...
-A Talk About Porches By The Author Of "My Farm Of Edgewood.". Continued
I do not, indeed, commend it for any beauty, per se, but as being an honest, well-intended shelter and resting-place, which could be grafted upon many an old-style farm-house, with bare door, and set ...
-A Talk From Iowa
I have observed an obstruction in the circulation of the Horticulturist this way, since the reception of the April number. I presume, without looking over my receipts, that the cause is non-payment, w...
-Tan On Strawberries
In answer to your correspondent T, in the June number of the Horticulturist, respecting tan-mulching for Strawberries, I think his error consisted in applying too much tan-bark immediately over and ...
-Tan-Bark For Mulching
Having been a constant reader for the last four years, of the best publication on horticulture in the U. S., the Horticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste, and having received more knowl...
-Tan-Bark Mulch
Mr. Downing, among others in this vicinity, has used the tan-bark as a mulch, and invariably with a marked benefit to their strawberries, over those ordinarily treated. Mr. Charles Downing informed me...
-Tannic Acid
Professor Mapes - on making personal application to him respecting this acid, courteously replied to me in substance: that tannic acid is contained in the cortical, or external surface of the fruit;...
-Tannic Acid For Strawberries
Mr. Downing - I do not understand how tannic acid can be a specific food for the strawberry. This has been asserted by Prof Mapes, at a meeting of the American Institute Farmers' Club, and your corres...
-Taste For Fine Foliaged Plants
It is stated that at Fuchsia Nursery, Woolwich, England, there is one of the largest beds of ornamental plants known. The bed is 34 feet long, 11 feet wide, and contains 2000 plants, costing $300. Her...
-Tax Augusta Rose
With respect to the Rose Augusta, although not so deep in color as I hoped and wished for, still I will honestly confess that I have been pleased with it It differs from Salfatare in having leaves nar...
-Taxus Lindliyana
Leaves two-ranked, linear, flat, of smaller size and narrower than in the common British Tew (T. baccata, L.) and the prickle at the end of the leaf is more developed. Berries exactly like those of t...
-The Taylor Grape
Editor of the Horticulturist: - In the October number of your valuable Journal, I notice that you acknowledge the receipt of a bunch of the Taylor Grape from Samuel Miller, Calmdale, Fa., who, it appe...
-Tea Rose
Hairing recently become a subscriber to the Horticulturist, and per-ceiving from its pages the uniform courtesy with which you respond to the communications of your correspondents, I have taken the ...
-Tea Rose Binqui
Prominent among the many acquisitions added to the rose family during 73, is the new white tea rose Binqui. Decidedly this is a novelty possessing those rare charms that makes the rose a favorite gem ...
-Tea Rose, Souvenir D'Elize
This new tea rose, which is very correctly represented in our plate for this month, is a seedling raised by M. Marest, Nurseryman, of Paris, and was taken by our artist, Mr. Andrews, from a plant in t...
-Teaching In School-Houses
I have for some time contemplated a remonstrance against one feature of the excellent Plan for a School-house recently given in the Horticulturist,n and re-produced in the Cultivator. I refer to t...
-Tecoma Jasminoides Grafted On A Piece Of Root Of Tecoma (Bignonia) Radicans, The Common Trumpet Flower
It being a well-known fact, that the beautiful Tecoma jasminoides is, when cultivated in a pot, a very shy bloomer, I was very glad to learn that Mr. Bou-diart had, in the Jardin des Plantes at Paris,...
-Temperance And The Vine
To J. J. Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: In your May number, I observe that my friend, Jeffreys (may he live a thousand years, and his shadow never be less), in his Critique, has doubts about our native win...
-Temperature
Many house plants are destroyed by too much heat, which increases the dryness, and both these causes together are more than they can endure. A cool room, never as low as freezing, is best. From 60 to ...
-Temperature Of Greenhouses
There has been already a great deal said on this subject; some say 40, others 50 degrees, is the best temperature for greenhouses. With me this month I keep as close to the above as possible, at night...
-Ten Week Stock - Mathiola Annua
There are perhaps few species of which there are more varieties, ranging from pure white to the darkest and richest purple. These varieties can be bought at the seed stores; but we have found that see...
-Tenacity of Life In Succulents
About six months ago a branch was taken from a Sempervivum villosum and thrown aside as useless; but instead of withering like most branches that are treated in a similar manner, it continued its gree...
-Terms
Two Dollars per year - Four copies for Six Dollars. All payments to be made in advance. Specimen numbers furnished on application. All business letters and communications to be addressed to the Propr...
-Terms (2)
One copy of the Ohio Valley Farmer and Franklin Almanac, one year, $1.00; three copies of the Farmer and Almanac, $2.50, and an extra copy of the Almanac to the getter-up of the club; six copies of th...
-Terms Of Subscription
One copy for one year, payable in advance $l 00 Two copies 1 75 Five 4 00 Ten copies for one year, payable in advance, $7 00 Fifteen ' - 10 00 Twenty 12 00 The ...
-Terms To Clubs
The price of a single copy of each, to one person, to $2.25: two copies, $4; four copies, $7; eight copies, $13; and any larger numher at the same rate, which include the postage on the Register. Wher...
-Terra Cotta Ornaments
A most estimable lady has called our attention to an able artist in Terra Cotta, and we are anxious to make him better known to our readers. Mr. Terry, No. 1194 Broadway, New York, is an Italian, educ...
-Tetofsky Apple
A. G. Tuttle, of Baraboo, Wis., is mentioned by The Western Farmetr as possessing trees of this variety already bearing fruit, although not more than two years old. This early bearing quality tog...
-Tha-Scented Roses
22. Adam Rosy blush, very large and magnificent, with beautiful camellia-like petals, blooms freely, moderate grower, rather tender, and needs slight protection in winter. Suitable for a small mass. ...
-Their Influence Upon Cultivation And Taste
If the question was put to us - what, within the last seven years has contributed the most to the promotion of first-class cultivation among gardeners? - we could have no hesitation in answering, the ...
-Themarylandica Strawberry
One of the finest strawberries, if not the very finest, we have ever seen and tasted, comes from Samuel Feast & Sons, of Baltimore. It is the berry that took so many premiums in the hands of the late ...
-Theodore Van Mons
Size - large. Form - obovate, obtuse-pyriform. Calyx. - large, open; segments broad, expanded, set nearly on the apex of the fruit Stem - about one inch in length, inserted in slight depression. Color...
-Theory Of Grape Rot
In a late number of the New York Herald, we find an article from Mr. John F. Bennett, Pittsburgh, Pa., upon the rot in grapes. Mr. Bennett we know to be a close observer, and to have traveled widely, ...
-Theory Of Pruning
Dear Sir - Before closing these numbers by a few short comments upon the several processes of pruning, listed under the head of the second class, I have determined to make a few desultory remarks touc...
-Theory Of Pruning (3)
Dear Sir: I find that in the August number of the Horticulturist I am arraigned before a tribunal of very high authority in such matters upon a charge of having made innovation upon the doctrines whic...
-Theory Of Pruning Fruit-Trees
Trees and plants cultivated for profit, yield their returns for the most part in secretions of the leaf, or wood-bud system, as timbers, sugars, gums, Ac., or in products of the flowering system, in t...
-Theory Of Pruning Furit Trees
A. J. Downing, Esq I have heretofore suggested to yon my design of offering through the medium of your columns, to the pomological world, the outline of a rude theory which I have entertained for som...
-Theory, Practice, Science
Mr. Editor: The Gardener's Monthly has in its December number an extract from the London Gardener's Chronicle on pruning the grape. The deductions from that extract, and inference suggested with its...
-Theory, Practice, Science (2)
When a scientific mind announces a new discovery and affirms it a truth, it is generally because of results eliminated in accordance with laws that prove it to be so through the direct application of ...
-Theory, Practice, Science (2). Continued
Now, the greater the activity of the roots, the greater and quicker is the circulation of the fluids. Activity of root action is dependent on the leaves being largely and fully developed, and these a...
-There Is Progress
I was very much pleased with an article in the September number on the Progress of Horticulture, and the question Is there any? If you will allow a little time and space to a plain country farme...
-Thickness For Mulching Trees
AN amateur cultivator of fruits inquires the proper thickness for mulching, remarking, a large apple or pear will, I suppose, bear three or four inches; not so small fruits. I think half an inch is a...
-Thidly. Profits
Seventh year cut, 2,400 grape stakes, net value at 5 cents' each, 8120; 14th year, 4,000 fence posts, at 25 cents each, net value, $1,000; 21st year, 600 trees, at three dollars each, net value, $1,80...
-Thin The Fruit
If large and choice well-flavored fruit is wanted of any kind, it must be thinned out, removing a few at a time from every part of the tree, so as to leave the residue pretty evenly distributed. The w...
-Things Which Everybody Ought To Know
A quart of peas, sown in a shallow box fifteen inches wide by eighteen long, at any time of the year, and cut off when about four or five inches high, and boiled like spinach, with a little salt, make...
-Third Edition
3 Portien Noir. 1 Tottenham Park. 3 Syrian. 1 Black Damascus. 1 Black Prince. 1 Old Black St Peters. 1 Common Hall Muscat. 1 White Hamburg. 1 Common Hall Muscat. 1 Bordelairs. 1 Escholata Mu...
-Third Monthly Meeting, April 6
The meeting was held at the Society's rooms. The display of plants and flowers surpassed the utmost expectations of the committee. The exhibition-room was much too small for the articles deposited to ...
-A Third Winter On The New Evergreens
By Henry Winthrop Sargent, Wodenethe, Fishkill Landing, Dutchess Co., New York. I have, upon two previous occasions, through the pages of the Horticulturist, given my experience of the effect of our ...
-The Thomery System Applied To Graperies
Some time ago, on looking over an old work on Fruits, called the American Orchardist, by William Kenrick, I found therein a description of the management of the Grape-vine as practised at Thomery in...
-The Thorn-Apple
This rank and luxuriant weed, known as Jamestown Weed, or as it is improperly called, Jimson Weed, and vulgarly, Stinking Tom, presents many interesting features. The German name Stechapfel is...
-Thorough Draining The Soil
Mr. Downing: Having, since the commencement of your Horticulturist, derived from it many valuable hints for the culture of plants, I will hazard giving you a history of an experiment made by me in thi...
-Those Cherries
F. R. Elliott, Esq., in a private letter, gives us the following rap about our July plate: Don't, oh! pray don't give any more cherry engravings; or if you do, take even the cuts in Cox as models, ra...
-Those Foot Notes
The foot notes, referred to in our last issue, can be found in the last Report of American Pomological Society, for session of 1871, as follows: Page 80 - The Secretary would here remark, that condu...
-The Three Crop System
The Boston Transcript gives so intelligible an account of Mr. Simpson's mode of obtaining three crops of grapes in two years, that we copy it for the information of our readers. Mr. Simpson states, ...
-Thuja
At Mr. Buist's establishment, near Philadelphia, may be seen the new Thuja Borealis, which promises to be an important addition to our list, and is hardy. There has been some error in naming the Thuja...
-Thuja Aurea
We have just received a large and splendid specimen of this most beautiful of all the Arbor Vitas, and also plants of the Wizard of the North, Admiral, Malakoff, and La Constance strawberries. The Arb...
-Timber Culture For Profit
OUR farmers both East and West must soon awake to a realizing sense of an impending necessity. From 1860 to 1870, over 10,000,000 acres of wood land were cut down, and not one acre is found to replace...
-The Times
If anything were wanting to place the employments of country life in strong and favorable contrast with those of our great cities, it has been the crash of stocks, and pecuniary losses in the latter, ...
-Time Of Planting
There seems to be two seasons of the year in which the strawberry may be planted more successfully than any other, viz., Spring and Fall. When new beds are made in spring, they should not be made too ...
-Time To Cut Grafts
We have no doubt that the best time to make cuttings to be used for grafting the pear, cherry, apple, plum, or grape is just before severe frost of winter. The wood is then full of vitality, has lost ...
-Timely Hints On Transplanting
Notices in planting always think it quite sufficient to place the roots of the newly moved tree in the earth again; old planters take care to prepare deep and wide holes - throwing out all the clayey ...
-Timothy
This grass is also one of the best of our cultivated grasses, and it is, perhaps, in most cases, more largely grown by farmers than any other one kind. For horse hay it is thought to be far preferable...
-Tire Baker Apple
Mr. Rockwell has sent us fine specimens of this comparatively little known apple. We saw It at the last Fair of the American Institute, where, as one of the tasters/* we had a good opportunity of pro...
-How To A Ginny-Foul That Comes And Squawks Under His Winder Periodikly, And Makes Him Mad Exceedingly
You missuble, speckled critter, you. What'n thunder 're squawking' about? Does anything hurt you bad? Or do you squawk That way in Ginny, where you come from, And so squawks now from educational preju...
-How To Atticus
I could not be so ungenerous as to take advantage of a consent forced from you by a severe twinge of gout. I should surely expect as that biggest toe grows beautifully less, you would forget past pa...
-How To Atticus. Continued
I fear you underrate the comprehensiveness of Mrs. Atticus' talent. Circumstances have never sounded their depths. Women, I think, more than men possess a vast amount of undeveloped energy and capabil...
-How To Blossoms
Fan pledges of a fruitful tree, Why do ye fall so last? Your date is not so post But ye may stay yet here awhile, To blush, and sweetly smile, And go at last What were ye born to be? An hour or ...
-How To Ccontributiors And Exchanges Etc Etc
Communications, Letters, Catalogues, Periodicals, etc, etc, intended for the perusal of the Editor, should be uniformly directed to the Horticulturist, Germantown, (Philadelphia,) Pa. Packages by Expr...
-How To Cream Hill
Thanks for your chivalrous taking up the gauntlet in behalf of women's pens and tongues. Do we not need some able championship to parry the shafts of satire, sometimes ruthlessly winged by merciless...
-How To Destroy Worms On Grass Lawks
Of the many methods which have been recommended for destroying worms, corrosive sublimate is the most efficacious. By means of it, may be cleared a piece of grass from which it seemed almost impossibl...
-How To Elsie
That was a most ungenerous thrust of the Editor of the Horticulturist, which he makes about the length of your last letter. Ladies' pens or tongues should not be easily tired in any good work. While...
-How To Exclude Frost From A Cold Pit
I have been accustomed to exclude frost from my only erection, a cold pit or frame, for three winters, by a very simple and inexpensive piece of apparatus, an account of which may be useful to some on...
-How To Farmers And Others
We will furnish the whole set of the following works to any one who will send us fifteen new subscribers - with payment of $2.50 in advance on each for one year - viz.: American Farmer's Encyclopedia...
-How To Grape Growers In The United States
Gentlemen: Having provided myself with the Catawba and Isabella for natives, Black Hamburg, Golden Chaselas, Black Prince, Pitmaston, White Chester, and Early Black July, for foreign, all of which are...
-How To Guard Trees Against Hares And Rabbits
All gardening amateurs know, by experience, that rabbits and hares are very fond of the bark of young apple trees of a year's growth, and especially of dwarf apple trees, of which the most vigorous an...
-How To Improve Stiff Clay Soils
Dear Sir: Among the many useful directions and hints for the improvement of soils, which I find in four volumes of your Magazine, I see nothing that fully answers my purpose, and not having the time t...
-How To Kalon Grape
For a description of the To Kalon, we resort to Mr. Charles Downing's revised edition: Raised by Dr. Spofford, of Lansingburgh, N. Y. This fine grape has been but little disseminated in conse...
-How To Make Currant Wine
We have lately had many inquiries in regard to making Currant wine. One who has tried it sends us the following, which we insert here, not being able to get it in its proper place. The receipt is a ...
-How To Make Skeleton Leaves
In your last Gossip, mention is made of a new process of painting on anatomized leaves. This is very beautiful work. For the benefit of your lady readers, I give the following, which I take from my ...
-How To Nurserymen
Attention is called to the advertisement of G. B. Cheyney, of an old established nursery for sale, which we are assured offers a good opportunity for an investment. Boston, l5th of December, 1856. J...
-How To Preserve Wooden Labels
We know enough of the confusion arising in collections through the loss of labels, when, from want of timely renewal, they decay at bottom. During the past year I set my wits to work to find out a bet...
-How To Produce Very Fine Celery
Hitherto I have only treated of this vegetable so as to produce an ordinarily good sample, and in a way that will pay the market-gardener; but if it be desirable to have extra quality and the largest ...
-How To Propagate The Scarlet Japan Quince
Being afflicted with deep horticultural propensities, I have, as a matter of course, been led to try all things, and prove all things, in the true horticultural sense of the quotation. I was exceedi...
-How To Protect Young Trees Against Mice
A correspondent of the Country Gentleman says he protects young trees from mice in the following manner: Every farmer has plenty of old tins - such as boilers, tin pails, tin pans, etc., - which can...
-How To Resuscitate Trees Long Out Of Ground
Hon. A. J. Downing - Sir: Permit me, through your estimable journal to make known a fact of the utmost importance to your countrymen, who import trees from Europe. And this communication is the more v...
-How To Set Off A Walk Perpendicular To The Line C D
From the center e on the line e d set off e g and e h, at equal distances. From the points h g draw two arcs of different radii; if, where these arcs bisect each other, a line be drawn, it will be per...
-How To The Editor Of The Horticulturist
Dear Sir: - I was happy to notice in the October number of the Horticulturist, the proceedings of the Pomological Convention, held in New York in September last; and that under the head of grapes, the...
-How To The Editor Or The Horticulturist
Dear Sir, - Having noticed an article in the December number headed More about Boilers I wish to state a few facts in reply. Having seen the boiler manufactured by Messrs. Weathered and Cherevoy in ...
-How To The Memory Of Thomas Nuttall
Born in England, 1786; died Sept 1,1869. Honor to him, the zealous and successful naturalist, the father of Western American botany, the worthy compeer of Barton, Michaux, Hooker, Torrey and Gray. W...
-How To The President And Members of The - Horticultural Society
Gentlemen: Yonr Society, and many similar ones in this country, has been now long enongh in existence to make it a suitable period to ask the question: Has the law of progress which governs other in...
-How To The Publisher
Since writing the foregoing, the sad intelligence of the untimely death of Mr. Downing, has reached us. To that portion of the public with whom he communed with his pen, or who enjoyed his personal in...
-How To The Readers Of The Horticulturist
THIs number of the Horticulturist will convey to its readers the intelligence of an important change in its affairs, and this change closes my engagement as Editor. I make this announcement with ming...
-How To The Victim Of Happy Contentment
Dear Atticus - And yon are too contented in a home where beauty and taste are so perfected as to leave little room for devising and improving? I do not wonder; for are we not all happiest when intelle...
-How To The Victim Of Happy Contentment. Continued
While I busied myself this eve, inserting ingenious patches in the knees and elbows of sundry uvenile garments, husband read me the Horticulturist; and among other things, your article. o absorbed was...
-How To The Victim Or Happy Contrntmsnt
Friend Attieus-Think you the recital of the hard things of your lot and the much work to be done, will cause me to swerve from the benevolent intentions by my kindly nature prompted Oh, no a western w...
-How To The Vine-Growers of The United States
The following circular- has been sent to us, with a request that we would give a synopsis of it. The subject is a very important one, and we hope will meet with the attention it deserves, especially f...
-How To The Wite Of On The Same Occasion
As some pert scribbler, doubtless vain of knowing Somewhat of digging, ploughing, harrowing, hoeing, Has deemed it proper in this way t'impart His wond'rous knowledge in the farming art; I, too, would...
-Tobacco
Respecting this popular article, and its manufacture of cigars, it may be expected, in our rambling notes, that we should say a few words. It is well known, that the tobacco plant is the product of bu...
-Toledo (O.) Horticultural Society
The first weekly meeting, for the season, of the Toledo Horticultural Society, was held on the 14th of June, and was well attended. The show of fruits was small, as was to have been expected so early ...
-Tomato
We are indebted to Mr. Bridgeman, New York, for a paper of tomato seed, labeled Algiers Red Mammoth, which we hope will prove good. Tomato #1 We are indebted to Messrs. Hovey & Co., Boston, Mass.,...
-Tomato For City Garden Plots
The old adage that, where there is a will, there is a way, experience has repeatedly convinced me admits of exemplification, in few pursuits to a greater extent, than in that of gardening. Being pa...
-Tomato Wine
I was presented by Wellington Rose, of the United Society, at Hancock with a specimen of wine manufactured from the juice of tomatoes, which so closely resembled old Madeira that it would have trouble...
-Tomatoes, A Commercial Staple
It must be evident, even to an ordinary observer of what is taking place in American agriculture, that some very remarkable revolutions are going on around us, and that within a few years past some ha...
-Tomatoes, A Commercial Staple. Continued
The tomato crop, only a few years ago, was subject to the most extraordinary market fluctuations ; good prices, during one week, were succeeded by others so low as not to pay for picking ; at other ti...
-Tompkins County King, Bed Canada And Steel's Red
ED. Western Horticulturist: - I find there is much confusion among people of this part of Michigan, relative to the identity of the Red Canada and Steel's Red Winter. Our best posted fruit growers con...
-Too Contented At Home 1
Can you understand and pity the state of a man too contented with his own home? I am that unhappy creature. I was so unfortunate as to be long in a very confining employment, but with plenty of time t...
-Too Happt At Home
To Elsie - The interest you have taken in my case, which you persis in thinking unfortunate, has laid me under great obligations. The inquirer after happiness often meets with unexpected rebuffs; his ...
-Too Happy At Home!
To Elsie, Woodside - So unexpected a prescription for my cure, as you have proposed in the May number of the Horticulturist, while it calls for my grateful acknowledgments, requires consideration. An ...
-Topiary Work
That satirical robber, the memorable Augustus Tomlinson, of Bulwer, says some where in Paul Clifford, One main reason why men who have been great are disappointed when they retire to private life, ...
-Topping Strawberries
A Chicago editor has taken particular pains to learn from commission men the use of topping out berries, with the following results. It does not pay to put selected berries on top of each box. It does...
-Torreya Myristica, Hooker In Bot Mag. . 4780; Alias T. Californica, Torrey In New York Journal Pharm
An excellent figure is here given of this fine evergreen coniferous tree, which has been raised by Messrs. Veitch. It is said by Mr. W. Lobb to grow 30 to 40 feet high, in the elevated regions of Sier...
-Torreya Taxifolia
Is perhaps the most satisfactory of the rarer Evergreens. My specimen is 12 feet high, and uninjured, except the leader is a little whitened. Of the Evergreen shrubs that stand here without protectio...
-Town And Country; Or,Which Is Best
THE increase of a taste for Rural Life among us Americans is one of the best features of the times in which we live. The enormous fortunes in Europe have had their uses in exhibiting examples of what ...
-Townsend Or Seager Apple
(See Frontispiece). Herewith I send you a drawing of an apple known in this neighborhood as the Seager, but Downing describes one, a native of Pennsylvania, which very nearly agrees with the characte...
-The Trailing Arbutus For Hanging Baskets
To those who may ever have experienced considerable difficulty in growing the Arbutus in hanging baskets, the following plan may prove a help, having been suggested by a reader of the Rural New Yorker...
-Training
The training of trees is in close connection with pruning; the one regulates the form of the tree - the other, the fruiting shoots and spurs. However plain the rules and directions for pruning may be ...
-Training And Pruning
Training and pruning are two important operations in horticulture, and closely connected together. In a previous page, we gave some examples of the former, and shall here present additional modes. The...
-On Training And Standard Honeysuckles
POSSESSED of such delightful fragrance and elegant climbing habit, this plant is universally admired. Possessed of sterling charms, it deserves to be cultivated in all gardens, and in every variety of...
-Training Gooseberries
To prevent the shoots of Gooseberries growing downwards, by which the fruit gets soiled, and is rendered unfit for use, I have adopted the following plan: I make hoops of hazel boughs, and place them ...
-Training Grapes
Is there any objection against the training of the long arms of grapevines (in the vineyard), pruned according to the annual renewal system, very low, say within one or two inches of the surface ? The...
-Training Grapes Horizontally Near The Ground
We have received from S. Oscar Cboss, of Sandy Hill, Washington County, N. Y., a drawing and description of a patent. Adjustable and Elevating Grape Frame, which we think may prove to be a valuable...
-Training Peach-Trees
PEACH trees should be, in our opinion, trained in the fan form, making the trunks not more than half boot-leg high. If trained in long trunks the fruit will, in a few years, be almost or quite out of ...
-Training Roses
A Correspondent of the Southern Cultivator recommends the following for training over arbors, etc.: Upon the arbor in the center is twined the splendid Cloth of Gold and the beautiful crimson Queen of...
-Training The Dog
Col, Hutchinson's new work on training the dog (respecting which, several gentlemen have written to us, in consequence of a former short notice), is an English work, and has never bean published in th...
-Training Trees And Shrubs
A good deal has been written and spoken about reformatory training in our social system; we should be none the worse off by a little reformation in the training of some of our trees and shrubs, whi...
-Training Vines Over Windows
A lady writer in the Rural New Yorker asks why the people, both in city and country, do not train vines over their windows. What is more beautiful than green leaves falling around the casement in gra...
-Transactions Illinois State Horticultural Society
WE have in hand a copy of the doings of the Illinois State Horticultural Society for 1872. It is the Seventeenth Annual Report of the Society, forming a handsome volume well filled with the usual repo...
-Transactions Illinois State Horticultural Society. Continued
One of the principal reasons of failure in keeping fruit is that care is not taken to keep it uniformly cool from the time of picking, and as near the freezing point as possible. This may be measurabl...
-Transactions Illinois State Horticultural Society, 187o
Contains upwards of 350 pages, and very neatly hound and printed. Besides reports of Committees and addresses of the President, there is a large fund of valuable information elicited from the discussi...
-Transactions Nebraska State Horticultural Society, 1871
John Saul, Washington, D. C. - Catalogue of New Plants, 1878. Wm. F. Porter, Warren 0. - Catalogue of New and Rare Plants, 1878. H. Cannell's Illustrated Floral Guide, Woolwich, England. E. G. Hend...
-Transactions Of The Connectingut State Agricultural Society, 1855
This well printed and well written volume of 850 pages, has been placed before us, by Henry A. Dyer, Esq., of Hartford, Corresponding Secretary. Connecticut deserves every honor for having been the f...
-Transactions Of The Essex (Mass.) Agricultural Society, for 1862
This document does great credit to Essex county. In addition to the comprehensive and excellent address of Henry K. Oliver, which abounds with wholesome truth and timely, tasteful suggestions, there a...
-Transactions Of The London Horticultural Society, Vol. II., 2d Series, Part IV
In considering the various circumstances alluded to in this paper, I was naturally led to inquire into the exact manner, in which the death of plants is caused by cold. Very little, however, is to b...
-Transactions Of The London Horticultural Society, Vol. II., Part IV. Part 2
I could not find the vesicles of cellular tissues separable from each other, even in the most succulent species submitted to experiment, and I conclde that this circumstance, to which Professor Morre...
-Transactions Of The London Horticultural Society, Vol. II., Part IV. Part 3
I am inclined to refer to this cause the well-known fact, of which many cases occurred this winter, that the sudden exposure of frozen plants to warmth will kill them; though they may not suffer if w...
-Transactions Of The New York State Agricultural Society, Vol. XVIII
The new volume, kindly sent us by B. P. Johnson, Secretary, is a new evidence of the value and importance of this Society; it is filled with valuable knowledge from the brains and pens of men who take...
-Transactions Of The North Western Fruit Growers' Association, At Their Second Annual Meeting, Held At Dixon, III., Sept 29 And 80, 1852
This pamphlet furnishes very gratifying evidence that the Association from which it emanates has fairly entered upon a career of great usefulness. The nurserymen and fruit growers of the west stand in...
-Transactions Of The Ohio Pomological Society
The eighth session of this society includes two meetings, one at Cincinnati in September last, and one at Columbus in December. The official report makes a pamphlet of sixty-four pages, filled with ma...
-Transactions Of The Woroester (Mass.) Horticultural Society For The Ybar L854
Containing Annual Reports of the Committees, list of Premiums awarded, List of Officers for 1854, and a list of the new members. The transactions show a most prosperous and efficient state of the Soc...
-Transformed Pears. Burlintgton, Iowa
J. Jay Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: I send you, by mail, a specimen of a nodule or transformed pear, which grew in a garden in this place. Have you ever seen anything like it? Truly yours, J. F. TALLANT, M...
-Transplanters
Dibbers and trowels are well-known instruments for the removal of plants of various kinds. In using the pointed or semicircular trowel, the young plants may be taken up with a considerable ball of ear...
-Transplanting
H. H. Coit, (East Cleve-latjl, O.) We are not aware that any of our nurserymen grow evergreens for sale by the thousand. Traders in native evergreens are in the habit of supplying large quantities of ...
-Transplanting Kalmias And Rhododendrons
It is universally acknowledged that there are not two more beautiful evergreen hardy shrubs than our native Rhododendrons and Kalmias. It is equally a matter of fact, that although they form a princip...
-Transplanting Large Trees
There are many places which would be benefited by the presence of a few large trees; whose onwers would gladly spend some money to see trees growing near their dwellings, which should give, not only s...
-Transplanting Trees In Winter
Dear Sir - Several subjects touched upon in your January number, seem to deserve further agitation, before they are allowed to go off the list as settled; and as the old Granite State is snugly enscon...
-Transplanting Trees In Winter (2)
Right opposite the window by which I am writing, are four trees, two of the elm, and two of the red oak, averaging twenty-five inches in circumference, and thirty feet in height, which have taken thei...
-Transplanting Trees Is The Autumn
Do you approve of fall planting? is a question asked us every day. Our answer is, yes, under these circumstances: 1st. When the ground is of such nature and in such condition that water will not lo...
-Transplanting Wild Evergreens
Thinking that a few remarks might be acceptable to some readers, on planting evergreen trees obtained from the forest, I venture to give some of my experience. During the last few years I have devoted...
-Transplating
We write line upon line relative to the subject of transplanting, because at this season it is a labor of almost daily occurrence with every horticulturist, and we feel that he can not too well consid...
-Transportation Of Fruit-Trees
The time is near at hand when orders will go forward for Fruit and Ornamental Trees, for fall planting, and fall sales. And as this is a subject so little treated upon by Horticultural writers, and on...
-The Transportation Of Trees And Plants
As one of the craft, and having considerable to do with shipments of trees and plants, I wish to know whether there are on record any legal decisions with regard to cases of neglect or delay in forwar...
-Transportation Protector
This cut of a valuable invention appeared some months since in the American Agriculturist, and has been furnished by our request by Mr*. Henry B. Osgood, the inventor. At the suggestion of fruit growe...
-Travel And Health. The Virginia Springs
If one of the great pleasures of travel is novelty, and observing changes in modes of life and modes of thought, the Southerner should undoubtedly come Northwards, and the Northerner visit the South. ...
-Travellers
The Gardener's Chronicle regrets, with many others, that the missionary, Livingstone, who has spent sixteen weary years in exploring Africa, should have been totally ignorant of botany and gardening. ...
-Travels Curiosities Of Horticulture In Southern Franca
A Correspondent of the Journal of . Horticulture, from Nice, furnishes some interesting notes of observation as to plants, flowers and horticultural occupations. One of the most valuable introductio...
-Travels. A Remarkable Collection Of New Hybrid Grapes
IT was the writer's fortune this fall to examine a collection of new hybrid grapes, of such remarkable characteristics and superior excellence, that one may be justified in calling it the choicest now...
-Travels. Orange Culture In Florida
[Concluded.] Mr R. 0. refers to the application of muck as being injurious because it is a powerful absorbent of ammonia. In the name of common sense, where does it obtain such an excess of ammonia...
-Travels. The Royal Botanic Gardens At Edinburgh
IT is difficult to conceive of a system that would be better adapted to impart information to the botanical student, than the one adopted by the above named society in its very beautiful grounds. A s...
-The Treasurer's Report
The detailed items show of receipts of total of. . . . . $732 25 Of expenditure . . . . . 466 32 Balance . . . . . . . . $265 93 Mr. Thomas Meehan, editor...
-Treatment
All my bushes are trained on a stem six or eight inches from the gronnd, before they branch off, and trimmed so they have a uniform shape. The trimming should be performed in February, or as early in ...
-Treatment Of A Rose Bush
I hare possessed for many years a very fine grafted Rose bush of the kind called Cloth of Gold; these possess the peculiarity of blooming finely and freely, with very large flowers, when in the green-...
-Treatment Of Cherry Trees
We remember, some years ago, a neighbor bought a hundred cherry trees, and set them out in an orchard, and began to manure and treat them in every respect as he had done bis apple orchard, which was i...
-Treatment Of House-Plants Designed Simply To Stand Over
Tender roses, Azaleas, Cape Jessamines, Crape Myrtles, Oranges, Lemons, Figs, Oleanders, may be kept in a light cellar if frost never penetrates it. If kept in parlors, the following are the most ess...
-Treatment Of Hyacinths, With Re. Marks On Their Culture By The Dutch
Having bad some experience in the treatment of this bulb, and a good knowledge of the Dutch system of culture, I forward you a few hasty remarks. The mode in nse in Holland has been pretty clearly lai...
-Treatment Of The Achimenes
I would offer a few remarks on the cultivation of this most beautiful plant (the Achimenes), of which there are many sorts, viz: Patens coccinea, Rosea grandiflora, Longiflora, etc. To grow them to pe...
-Treatment Of The Hemlock
Ik a former number we promised to give the results of some experience in treating that most beautiful of our native evergreens, the hemlock. Its value and importance is attracting much attention, both...
-Treatment Of Woods
No branch of agricultural industry is of greater importance than the forest in all its appliances. In most of the States the question now is not how the woodlands shall be most speedily cleared of the...
-Treatment Of Woods. Continued
Thorough draining will much improve a forest, not only in the increased growth of the trees, but in the greater comfort of getting about in it. All, or nearly all woods are closer and firmer on a dry ...
-Treatment of Winter Pears
It is now generally conceded, I believe, that the pear world does move. Seeing is believing, so far as it goes; eating, is proof positive. - Delicious winter pears are raised; hot merely as tasters...
-A Treatre of Insects Injurious To Vegetation: By Thaddeue William Harris, M. D. Second Edition. Boston, 1858
It would appear that insects injurious to vegetation are every year increasing in numbers, and this, with a greatly increased attention given to cultivation of late, has awakened, on the subject of en...
-The Trees
Of the shade trees, the Lime or Basswood suffers most, but the Elm, Weeping Willow, some varieties of the Maple, the Horse Chestnut, and some other kinds, are also more or less involved. And although ...
-Tree And Plants Of Florida
In the Horticulturist for August I notice that a Louisiana correspondent takes me to task for certain alledged errors of statement (in the April number) concerning the trees of Florida As a resident o...
-A Tree Is To Be Formed
Let us have the base right. We want four or five good branches and a leader; then we cut back to just as many buds, and we take care at the same time to have the bud that is intended to form the leade...
-Tree Labels
I am of opinion that nothing equals thin sheet lead for this purpose; it is very pliable and durable; the letters should be stamped on it, and the labels soldered to small iron stakes, or nailed to th...
-Tree PaeOny Gardens In China
Leaving the south garden described in my last letter, I walked onwards to the Moutan Nurseries. They are situated near the village of Fa-who, about five or six miles west of Shanghae, and in the midst...
-Tree Planters And Nurserymen
We have been requested to publish the following article, written for the Genesee Farmer and we cheerfully comply, as it is a matter of importance both to sellers and purchasers of trees: There is on...
-Tree Planting For Our Western Prairies
ON my first visit to the prairies, in 1841, this was adopted as a golden text in material things for residents : Screens from bleak winds, the great need of The Prairies. A residence here since then ...
-Tree-Boring Insects
If the assertion here made that insects attack unhealthy trees only be true, how wonderfully at fault have been cultivators, who were and are accustomed to consider the insect as the cause of the enfe...
-A Treeless Forest
IF it is possible for any country to bear the above anomalous title, one need only read the following items to appreciate the possibility of its existence: In Dalmatia, Europe, there existed formerly...
-Trees And Plants In The New Chrystal Palace At Sydenham, England
With regard to the plants in the interior of the palace, concerning which we hare hitherto been silent, we have now to State that when we last saw them they gave great promise of a fine effect, and th...
-Trees And Pleasure Grounds Of Pennsylvania
The oak now stately grown, beneath whose boughs Have children' children played, his care had reared And a deep grove he sees that when a youth Was bat a thicket, now with him grown old. The grounds...
-On Trees And Tree-Boring Insects
It is commonly believed that insects eat through the bark of healthy trees, and then enter the wood itself. I have already stated that this is not my belief. The workings of boring insects would not s...
-Trees As Arches
In addition to our illustrations of landscape in connection with tree planting, there is a very simple mode of making a rapid natural arch in garden or shrubbery walks, which will be appropriate in al...
-Trees For Rural Cemeteries
IN the course of our last volume we offered a few suggestions on the laying out and arrangement of cemetery grounds, and promised to follow up the subject with remarks on trees suitable for their embe...
-Trees For Rural Cemeteries. Continued
Very grave errors are committed in planting too many trees, as well as in plantin unsuitable kinds. People allow themselves to be deceived by the small size of the trees when they plant. Norway Spruce...
-Trees For Streets
I am much pleased with the Horticulturist, and particularly the suggestions in relation to water for ornamental purposes, and the planting of ornamental trees. In regard to both, we as a nation are in...
-Trees For Streets And Avenues
We are asked: What are the twelve best deciduous trees for lawns and streets, in our cold climates? In the first place, we conceive it necessary to draw a distinction between street and lawn trees...
-Trees For Streets, And Their Protection
In your January number of the Horticulturist, you make some very appropriate remarks on the proper varieties of trees for street culture. As this is a subject in which every lover of rural improvement...
-Trees For Streets, And Their Protection. Continued
Now it is a fact in nature, that forest trees will succeed better, especially after the first year, (which they may live through under adverse circumstances,) when removed from a moist or wet soil to ...
-Trees Growing In, Or Overshadowing A Garden
Thxrk are few things on which the owners of property look with moro respect than old trees. Like old friends, they cannot well be discarded without a just and urgent reason: and even then the act of c...
-The Trees Of America
An arboricultural friend has sent us the following notice of a new edition of Michaux's splendid work on American Forest Trees, and Nuttall's continuation of the same, which we commend to all our read...
-The Trees Of Oregon
In the August number of the Horticulturist you have given the dimensions of several trees in Western New York, with an invitation to correspondents in various parts of the Union to furnish accounts of...
-Trees On New Soils
The question was discussed whether trees grown on soils which had been previously occupied with trees, and enriched by manuring, was as good as those on new soils, or those previously occupied with fa...
-Trees Suited To Grounds Of One To Three Acres
In the February number of the Horticulturist, page 62, I read with pleasure your remarks on the fitness and variety of trees, - that their size should be so proportioned to the size of the lawn as to ...
-Trees and Flowers Near Smoky Towns
We are sometimes asked to give a list of trees, shrubs, and flowers, that will grow in or near smoky towns and cities. The following contains such a catalogue, and may be usefully consulted even for p...
-Trees, And Their Uses
That dear old periodical, the North American Review, astonishes the world, every three or four months, with news of an extraordinary kind, in which all that is known is ignored. We beg to place side b...
-Trees, Etc., For The Banks Or Railroads
A gentleman who has passed much time in America, communicates to the London Gardener's Chronicle some remarks on the maclura aurantiaca as a hedge plant, and recommends it strongly for the defence of ...
-Trellis Work
In small gardens where intricacy and variety are desired, but where the limited space prevents the planting of trees and shrubbery in sufficient quantities to effect this purpose, an expedient may be ...
-Trellises
Small trellises over walks may be introduced with effect, by judicious taste. As to summer-houses and arbors generally, too much insipidity is scattered about the world in suburban gardens, under the ...
-The Trentham Black Grape
The difficulty of keeping grapes with a good bloom on the berries, and free from shrivelling, through January, February, and March, is well known. The common Black Hamburgh, under particular circumsta...
-Tri-Color Geraniums
In growing these favorite plants, amateurs will need to remember a few hints suggested by experience. Professional gardeners have this as their creed: 1. A good, warm greenhouse. 2. Plenty of light....
-Trial Of Reapers And Mowers
The great trial of reapers and mowers took place at Hamilton, Ohio, early in July. After a thorough examination, the Committee made the following awards: - Mower - first premium .............
-Tributes To The Memory Of Mr.Downing. Ode Of The Death Of A. J. Downing
Mourn, all ye mountain nils, whose crystal flow ' By pebbly merging soothes the summer gale! Mourn all ye hills, Where cedars wave and tall pines darkly throw, From the grey rocks, their shadows down...
-The Triguera Ambrosiaca
The Triguera ambrosiaca is an annual plant, with a slender, smooth stem, presenting four angles, two more striking than the others. Its alternate leaves, regularly oval and jagged, recall those of the...
-Trimming
All the hedges we have named above should be trimmed twice every year to produce the finest results, viz: in June and the middle of August; with the exception of the Osage Orange, which may be left ti...
-Trimming Evergreens
I am often asked the question: Can evergreens be trimmed, and if so, when is the best time ? After quite a number of years' experience, I have found the best time for trimming pines is after they have...
-A Trip To Canada
SO much has the intercourse between Canada and the United States increased of late years, that we might naturally suppose a knowledge of what such near neighbors as the British across the line are doi...
-A Trip To Canada. Part 2
Toronto, still the capital, presents few attractive features to the traveller, except the Government Library, in which are collected many treasures that have not found their way across the border. The...
-A Trip To Canada. Part 3
Seat of J. B. Greenshields, Esq.; John Hele, gardener. Raywood, the name of this place, is finely managed, both in its laying out and keeping. It is situated on a steeper slope than most we have menti...
-A Trip To Canada. Part 4
With Mr. Ferrier, Jr's., taste and knowledge of horticulture, and a liberal expenditure, we wish to see nothing more attractive. The difficulties which are surrounding us in the States, and the coldn...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States
DECIDEDLY it is a pleasant tiling to leave the wintry North, and speed away to the land of the orange and the myrtle Man has just made himself wings, and, like the birds, he can change his climate at ...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States. Continued
All agreed, wherever the old topic of the weather was talked over daily, that it was an unusually cold spring, and we concluded we had done as unwisely as most do, by leaving Cuba too early. *...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (2)
It is a goodly sight to see What Heaven hath done for this delicious land 1 What fruits of fragrance blush on every tree! What goodly prospects o'er the hills expand 1 RARELY did we meet with an Am...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (2). Continued
Palm of the low grounds near Trinidad, with the flower stalks. The Cupidon, a glorious hybiscus with rosy red blossoms, makes a great show in the Plaza. The Mango-Tree, which greatly resembles in f...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (3)
Blossoms and fruits at once of golden hue Appear'd, with gay enamell'd colors mix'd. THE Bishop's garden has been abandoned to take care of itself, the Cubans having cut down his salary from one hu...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (3). Continued
Mr. S. has no view of publishing, at least for the present, and when we urged upon him the importance and utility of such a step, he thought it would be delegated to his sons. Their great and growing ...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (4)
ALLUSION has already been made to an American boarding-house in the country. A few days passed there, realized to our party the blessings of the English language; most of us were lamentably deficient ...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (4). Continued
On this small estate there are some very fine shady avenues of fruit and other trees which we saw nowhere else. The crow of the game-cock may be heard at all the Havana hotels and the plantations; se...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (5)
A pleasing land of drowsy-head it was, Of dreams that wave before the half shut eye; And of gay castles in the clonds that pass, For ever flashing round a summer sky. Cattle of Indolence. THE despo...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (5). Continued
It is for her very loyal subjects - the people of Cuba - that the Queen of Spain makes all this warlike show. The means of education are limited in Cuba. There is Royal University, a medical and law...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (6)
LEAVING Havana near the close of March, our American party found good accommodations on the steamer Empire City; on board were about one hundred of Walker's men then returning as the forlorn hope from...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States (7)
Mr. Henry Lawrance, a cotton merchant, is the horticulturist of New Orleans. Mr. L. originated the Crescent Seedling Strawberry, which has not succeeded at the North, but, he assures us, retains all t...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States, N0. 4
Another Flora here, of bolder hues And richer sweets. CONTINUING our notes as they present themselves for extract, the reader will find them to partake of the rambling character of our visit, darin...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States, No. 11. Conclusion
TIME began to be valuable, and leaving the hospitalities of Natchez, we descended the Mississippi, to join the remnant of our large party, and make our way homewards. The Princess, with another and an...
-A Trip To Cuba And The Southern States. No. 10. Natchez, Mississippi
Natchez is pre-eminently the Persia of roses. In no part of the Union have we ever seen them attain such perfection and beauty. It so happened that we were in this Paradise at exactly the happy mo...
-Tritoma Uvaria Grandiflora. Kniphofia
W. C. Townsend, Esq., of Bay Ridge, has just placed on our table a noble stalk of this superb flower. The stalk is over four .feet high, the flowers occupying a foot of it. This variety is much finer ...
-Tropaeolums
The compactum section comprises some eminently useful varieties, far in advance of all others as bedders. The best are Compactum Luteum improved, yellow, with numerous spots: King of Scarlets, Scarl...
-The Trophy Tomato
George W. Wilson, of Ohio, writes to The Rural New Yorker: Last spring I received a package of the Trophy Tomato seed, which were planted in a hot-bed, and the plants grew vigorously. The fruit ripe...
-The Tropical Orchard House
An orchard house for tropical fruits has long been with me a favorite idea, and recently, from my having had a daughter return from a nearly two years' residence in the West Indies, it has received a ...
-Tropiolum Lobbianum As A Greenhouse Climber
The insignificance of this plant under bad treatment, may cause many to question its great beauty as a decorative plant In my mind, as a greenhouse climber for winter flowering it has few equals, comm...
-The Trot
In trotting, the horse moves its legs in pairs, diagonally. Thus, if the legs a d (Fig. 5) be raised, and advanced first, the legs b e will be raised the instant those designated by a d reach the grou...
-True Soldat Laboureur
Color, yellow, but covered with grey and rusnet spots and dots, a little greener about the stem. Texture - skin tine; flesh coarse, white, melting; water abundant; sweet, vinous and perfumed; ripens e...
-The True Theory Of Grafts
It has long been known, says D'Albert, that, in order to preserve grafts, especially for transportation, they ought to be separated from the parent tree before they have begun to grow. They ought then...
-A True Variegated Rose
The Hudson, N. Y., Republican notices the production of a new variegated rose by a florist of that city, and says that this is the second one allowed to come into bloom of the cuttings from which he i...
-Truly, Our Heavenly Father And The Blessed Angels
With all reverence be it said, must be lovers of flowers; for they are scattered by the divine bounty, with lavish hand, over field and meadow, on mountain and in valley. They nod to us from the tall ...
-The Trumpet Creeper
IN your Portfolio in the June number you refer among other things to the Trumpet Creeper and Morning Glory. Both favorites of mine from my youth; but which can be viewed here from very different stand...
-Tschuody's Graft, Or Herbaceous Grafting
This mode of grafting (the greffe herbacie of the French) was known and practiced in the time of the renaisance; it was then forgotten or lost, and after. ward, in the beginning of the present century...
-Tschuody's Herbaceous Grafting (Greffe Herbacee)
Many readers of the Horticulturist will be very thankful to Mr. Charles More for having called their attention to a mode of grafting so easy to perform, and so certain of success. Having had an opport...
-Tucker's Illustrated Annual Register
The Annual Register for 1862 presents more than its usual claims. The matter is very judiciously selected and condensed, every thing superfluous being pruned off. Besides the Almanac proper, there are...
-Tulips And Hyacinths
Mr. Editor, - Some twenty-five years ago, it was the custom of a neighbor of our's, to throw open his garden gates on a certain Sunday in each year, when multitudes from town and country, would flock ...
-Tulips Do Not Need Manure
The California Horticulturist quotes the following experience in illustration of the above statement: Two years since a gentleman residing in this city, imported a parcel of Holland Bulbs, consisting...
-The Turk's Turban
AVERY striking example of the effectiveness of ribbon gardening was seen last year on the grounds of Peter Henderson, at Bergen, N. J. A circle of nine feet in diameter was laid out, upon the outer li...
-Turnip-Rooted Borecole
The stems of this variety have the peculiar property of swelling out laterally, and forming somewhat the shape of a turnip. All parts of the plant are good as food, excepting the underground roots. It...
-Twelve Best Camellias
So varied and beautiful are the floral characters of this plant, that I fear all tastes will not unite on a dozen; very few, comparatively, of the new and imaginary beautiful kinds, are placed among w...
-The Twelve Best Evergreen Trees
The question has been asked me, what twelve evergreen trees would you recommend as best adapted to general purposes? It is rather a difficult question to answer satisfactorily, as, under some circum...
-Twelve Good Roses
J. D. the following list combines colors, vigor of growth, etc., that can but please almost any rose fancier: General Jacqueminot, scarlet crimson; Baron Prevost, rose; Madame Louise Carique, rosy c...
-Twelve Pelargoniums Show Kinds
The Pelargonium is now subdivided by florists into several branches, such as Fancies, Fragrant Sorts, Spotted or French Sorts, etc.; good collections consist of sorts that bloom nearly the whole year....
-Two New Spiraeas
The following new species have bloomed repeatedly with us this season, and we are therefore encouraged to speak of them as valuable additions to our list of hardy flowering shrubs: Spiraea Fortunei, ...
-Two Secrets
Mr. Editor:- We don't know whether you are as good a hand in keeping secrets as the ladies are; but we suppose that we can trust, in confidence, all secrets on horticultural subjects very safely in yo...
-Two Secrets. Continued
We place tar more dependence on the kind of vine for planting than we do in the formation of the border. If we could get nothing better than some vines said to be grown for two years in pot, before we...
-Two Ways Of Growing Asparagus
Among our many asparagus-growing acquaintance there are two who are side-by-side neighbors, and who both grow large and succulent asparagus of the very finest appearance, and yet whose practices are s...
-Tye's Hyacinth Glasses
It would be difficult to point out a more formal, inelegant form than that of the common Hyacinth glass. It compels the flower to be grown singly, and precludes by its shape all attempts at grouping t...
-The Tyson And Other Summer Pears
Ik looking over the list of Summer Pears now in cultivation in this country, we find the native sorts occupying a prominent position. Confining our present view to those pretty well known and ranking ...
-Ugenia Ugni
We regret to learn, from Mr. Buist, that the Ugenia Ugni, a fruit bearing shrub, mentioned several times lately in this work, and recommended lately by Mr. Sargent, is not likely to be hardy here. It ...
-Ulmus Campestris (The English Elm)
This tree ripens its seeds in June, giving the cultivator time to sow them and get the plants up the same season. The ripening of the seed is easily known by its falling from the trees. It may then ei...
-The Umbraculum, For Garden Or Lawn Decoration
A VERY curious yet simple structure is illustrated in these two engravings. Set firmly in the ground a rustic pole of say ten feet high, and on the top of this place a tasteful bird-cage. Around the b...
-Union Of Embryos. From The Gardeners' Chronicle
It will have been seen by a communication in our last number, that experimentalists are puzzled to understand how it is possible to make two embryos grow together by grafting. It seems to be considere...
-Union Springs Shade Tree Association
The beauty of a village, as every person of taste is aware, does not depend on its showy buildings so much as on its trees. Any place properly ornamented with trees is handsome; without them the most ...
-Union Village
Where Isabella fails this will succeed; does well south of the north line of Pa.; Mr. Cabot has grown it in Salem, Mass., unprotected: hardy as Isabella, and ripens as well; wood is strong; grows best...
-Union Village (2)
Introduced by the Shakers from seeds of the Isabella; best adapted to the central and northern states; growing vigorously and producing, very large berries in large, compact bunches; is pulpy, juicy, ...
-The Union Village Grape
(See Frontispiece). Our Frontispiece this month is a very fine bunch of the Union Village Grape, from a specimen grown by R. S. Skeel, Esq., of Newburgh. This grape is a seedling of the Isabella, and...
-United States Agricultural Society
The Second Annual Meeting of the United States Agricultural Society, will be held at Washington, D. C, on Wednesday, February 22d, 1854. The United States Agricultural Society #1 The last meeting of...
-United States Agricultural Society (2)
The journal of the fourth annual meeting of the United States Agricultural Society for 1856, has been edited by the Secretary, W. S. King, and Part I. is published. It forms an important contribution,...
-United States Agricultural Society (3)
Albany, May 30,1857. In pursuance of previous appointment, the Executive Committee of the National Society met in this city last evening. The use of the rooms of the New York State Agricultural Socie...
-An Unmitigated Abuse
There is a journal published in England, known as the Villa Gardener, which constantly appropriates matter from The Horticulturist and other journals without a word of credit. And if the name of the a...
-Unnoticed Characteristics
Among the peculiarities of well known plants which we do not remember to have seen noticed in any of the books, are the following: The flowers of the Bignonia capreolala, (buff or tawny flowered trum...
-Up The River
By F. W. ShELTON, Author of Rector of St. Bardolphs, and Salandar the Dragon. With Illustrations from Original Designs. New York: Charles Scribner, 1853. Man made the City - God made the Country, i...
-The Upas Tree
I WAs glad to see in that article, fertile of thought and facts, the visit to Kew Gardens that you had a favorable word for the Upas tree (Antiaris toxicaria). It has had fearful qualities attached to...
-Upright Quince
We do not consider it a good stock for the pear. It may do for a few very strong growers. Will you oblige me by answering the following inquiry, in the Horticulturist, if convenient. My house stands ...
-Use For Apples
The following, from the London Times, may be of interest to some of our readers: We are threatened with a cider famine, not from the failure of the apples, although a partial crop, but because they a...
-Use For Guano
Some time last summer, while budding some young Peaches, I found that ants had taken possession of some ten feet in one row. They very earnestly resisted my attempts to innoculate the trees, inflictin...
-Use Of American Evergreen Shrubs, And On Rockwork
Since my residence in the United States, in the numerous beautiful gardens which I have visited, many of which scarcely admit of improvement, I have not yet seen a very judicious application, nor a ve...
-The Use Of Charcoal In Growing Roses
From various observations I have made on the use of charcoal in growing Roses, I am disposed to consider it of advantage, whether mixed with the soil in which the plants are grown, or used as a top-dr...
-Use Of Collodion In Propagating Plants
We breathe an atmosphere of marvels. A few ears since the world was astonished by the announcement that so harmless a substance as cot-on wool could be made to serve the purposes of gunpowder; and gun...
-The Use Of Fruit
Because bowel complaints usually prevail most during the hot season of the year - the latter end of summer and autumn, when fruit is most abundant, and in tropical climates where fruits are met with i...
-Use Of Gypsum In Wine
Some months since a friend presented me with a copy of Husmann on the Vine; and after a careful perusal I am convinced that it is a reliable teacher, and based upon actual experience. In the prepara...
-The Useful And The Beautiful, In Gardening
It is not always easy rightly to adjust the claims of use and beauty. Tastes differ, and circumstances alter cases. Most men, however, are utilitarian in their views and feelings. Must we not eat and ...
-Useful Hints To Fruit Growers
The following hints are given in the Country Gentleman by J. D. Jones, Jr.: 1. To Prevent The Dropping Off Of Grapes Make a circular incision in the wood, cutting away a ring of bark about the bread...
-Useful Hints To Improvers
Sir Uvedale Price has the following Judicious remarks: In all that relates to cottages, hamlets, and villages, to the grouping of them, and their mixture with trees and climbing plants, the best inst...
-Useful Trees For Shade And Ornament
It has been suggested that in the efforts that have been made to ornament the more costly country seats of the United States, the landscape gardener has lost sight of the largest class of planters; th...
-The Usefulness Or Birds
The New Haven Palladium has the following striking article: It takes mankind a great while to learn the ways of Providence, and to understand that things are better contrived for him than he can cont...
-Uses Of The Potato
In France, the farina is largely used for culinary purposes. The famed gravies, sauces, and soups of France are largely indebted for their excellence to that source, and its bread and pastry equally s...
-Vicar Of Winkfield Pear
Vicar Of Winkfield We are indebted to P. R. Freas, Esq., for specimens of this pear, called by the French Monsieur le Cure. They are very fine, but to our taste, not equal to a well ripened Duchesse,...
-Vaccinium Salignum And Serpens
The genus Vaceinium, which is mostly represented in northern climates by deciduous-leaved shrubs with small flowers, assumes a very different habit and appearance in the tropical mountains of both th...
-A Valuable Seedling Apple
AT the late meeting of the Illinois State Horticultural Society, Mr. J. C. Hammond, of Warsaw, 111., handed us a seedling apple, from which the accompanying illustration was copied: Description Size...
-The Value Of Carrots
Very few persons are aware of the fact, that young carrots are among the most wholesome of vegetables, and greatly assist digestion. French cooks, in many of their stewed dishes, introduce small slice...
-The Value Of Green-Houses To Invalids
We ask the especial attention of readers interested in the subject, to the following remarks, by one of the most distinguished physicians in the country, on the sanitary effects of green-houses. At a ...
-Value Of Liquid Manure
Notwithstanding the repeated recommendations of practical men in favor of liquid manure, but little attention is paid to the subject If it bo of the vast importance which it is said to be, why is it s...
-Value Of Native Grapes By Dr. J. S. Houghton, Philadelphia
My remarks upon the value of native Grapes, at a meeting of the Brooklyn Horticultural Society, have been made the subject of comments in various journals, which may seem to call upon me for some repl...
-Value Of Native Grapes By Dr. J. S. Houghton, Philadelphia. Continued
4th. There is much talk of using native Grapes for making wine. The fact is, that the Isabella and other Grapes which will ripen fairly, will not make wine (true wine) at all, and the common domestic ...
-The Value Of Planting Ornamental Trees
It is really encouraging to behold our State Horticultural and Pomological Societies actually leaving the dry and profitless discussion of fruits, and taking up more time with the search for informati...
-Value Of Planting Ornamental Trees And Shrubs In Home Grounds
THE question of actual profit in dollars and cents, in planting ornamental trees and shrubbery, is not to be so exactly shown as it has been with fruit trees, yet there is a vast profit herein, not li...
-Value Of Poultry Manure
There is no manure made on a farm so valuable as that of poultry. One ounce of it properly diffused in a half pound of soil, and placed . in a hill of corn when planted, will be as powerful a fertiliz...
-Value Of Stable Manure
Large quantities of coarse manure are obtained from the city by railroad, which is dropped from the railroad cars about half a mile from the farm. The manure costs, delivered at the station, over $1.5...
-Value Of Super-Phosphate Of Lime And Other Special Manures For Fruit-Trees And Vines
Several gentlemen spoke, but all inclined to the opinion that the same money spent in stable manure produced as good effect as any of the special manures. The Percentage of Years that the Peach-Tree ...
-Value Of The Earth-Worm
The ground is almost alive with the common earth-worm. Wherever mould is turned up, there these sappers and miners are turned up with it. They are nature's ploughmen. They bore the stubborn soil in ev...
-Van Assche
Mr. Berckinane saw it weighing fourteen ounces in Georgia; very fine. Mr. Field moved that the Hull Pear be added to the list. Mr. Hovey: It is so fine it must be claimed as one of the very best we h...
-The Van Assche Pear. Van Aaene, Vanacssc, Van Asshe
Within the past ten or fifteen years an immense number of foreign varieties of pears have been imported. Although much is said against the multiplication of sorts, and long catalogues, yet it can not ...
-Vanda Suavis (Fragrant Vanda)
(See Frontispiece). We present as a frontispiece this month a very fine engraving of the Vanda suavis, copied from Curtis's Botanical Magazine. It was introduced from Java in 1847, and is one of the ...
-Variegated Abutilons
Allow me to recommend to the notice of your readers a variegated form of the Due de Malakoff Abu-tilon which is in every way superior to Thom -sonii. The former has a much larger leaf than that of the...
-Variegated Geraniums
Among the many varieties of plants with beautiful foliage, grown for the adornment of our dwellings and green-houses, none are more attractive than the Variegated Zonal Geraniums. In England much atte...
-Variegated Plants
At the Crystal Palace Exhibition near London, a Mr. Salter, among other variegated plants, showed a strawberry and a lily of the valley. Variegated Plants #1 Aspidistra lurid a variegata; Ananassa s...
-Variegated Zonal Pelargoniums
At the June show of the Royal Horticultural Society, the Cottage Gardener says: The subscription prizes for Variegated Zonal Pelargoniums excited much interest among exhibitors, and they brought a mu...
-Varieties
The following list comprises a beautiful and distinct selection, one that will not fail to please the cultivator, especially if they have good taste: Prince of Wales - bright ruby crimson, large lemo...
-Varieties. Continued
Nature, or rather a kind Providence, has sent these industrious insects to thin the fruit. Sometimes they do it well, but oftener to excess. Were it not for this insect, we have good reason to believe...
-Varieties And Management Of The Grape
P. Barry regarded the Isabella as the only one of established reputation that he would be willing to plant extensively in Western New York. L. F. Allen thought the Isabella would not ripen well in mos...
-Varieties Of Currants
Andrew S. Fuller thus writes, in one of his numerous papers, about currants: Persons unacquainted with the different varieties are frequently puzzled to determine which to purchase. The Cherry is the...
-Varieties Of Ferns To Be Used
Our woods in this neighborhood are but poorly furnished with ferns - three species being all I have been able to find, so far. One of them, the Maiden-hair Fern - Adiantum pedatum - is very pretty in ...
-Varieties Of Fruit
As the period for planting fruit trees will soon be here, a few words on the subject of varieties might be proper at this time; for no matter how well the ground may be prepared, how well the planting...
-Varieties Of Melon
Of all our summer fruits, none are more rich and delicious, more grateful to the palate, than a well-grown and ripened green -fieshed or nutmeg melon. There is, however, a vast difference in the quali...
-Varieties Of Strawberries
81. Globose Scarlet Very large, rounded, beautiful light scarlet, very productive, valuable, plant hardy and very vigorous. p.* 82. Crimson Aromatic Dark green foliage, fruit very large, rounded or...
-Variety And Properties Of Manures
The manures in general use in gardens are numerous, but I shall only notice those which I consider the most useful; and of these, the dung of horses. Next to the dang of horses, that of oxen and catt...
-A Variety Of Cypress
From the starting point of what is called species to the last form which this may take, in order to constitute varieties, the limits which are extremely variable cannot be fixed; in truth, every day t...
-Variety Of Portulacca
Dear Sir - The varieties now cultivated of the Portulacca splendens, are four in number, viz: the crimson, the scarlet, the whit?, and the yellow. The white is subject to the freak, not uncommon in fl...
-Varnish For Iron-Work
Locksmiths and others, says the Home Companion, working at the forge are accustomed to blacken the articles intended for railroads by making them red-hot, and burning on them some linseed oil. This pl...
-Vase, Or En Gobelet Mode Of Training Fruit-Trees
In the gardens of the Luxembourg, at Paris, all the quarters containing fruit-trees are surrounded with borders, planted with cherry, plum, and apricot trees, as standards; and some with excellent eff...
-Vases And Baskets
Mr. Vick, in his Floral Guide, expresses himself strongly in favor of garden vases. Of all the adornments of the lawn, nothing is more effective than a well filled and a well kept vase. Of course it i...









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