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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #3 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Vegetables To Zonal Pelargoniums

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #3
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Vegetable
The Gardener's Chronicle says: In the current number of the Journal of Botany, Dr. Hance describes a Chinese Culinary Vegetable, consisting of the shoots of a grass, Hydropyrum latifolium, wild in N...
-Vegetable Gardes
The earliness of crops is much accelerated by the application of thoroughly decomposed manure at the time of sowing; the matters for absorption are thus presented in a highly concentrated form to the ...
-Vegetable Garden
One of the most important operations at this season, and one of great influence on the productive capabilities of the soil, is turning over the surface roughly, to expose it to the ameliorating and di...
-Vegetable Garden (2)
Thinning, hoeing, and cultivating the growing crops, are the principal routine operations. Fork the ground between the rows of onions, carrots, and, indeed, all crops that it is desirable to keep in a...
-Vegetable Garden (3)
All vacant ground should be turned over, and left in a rough state that it may be pulverized by frosts. Strong loamy soils cannot be profitably cultivated unless advantage is taken of the meliorating ...
-Vegetable Garden (4)
The terms subsoiling and trenching are frequently misunderstood as referring to the same operation. Subsoiling implies a mere stirring or loosening of the subsoil; whereas, trenching means a rever...
-Vegetable Garden (5)
There is every-reaBon to suppose that the potato disease which has been prevalent in many sections of the country, has been induced by the continued wet state of the soil during the early summer month...
-Vegetable Garden (6)
The natural anxiety which every right-minded man feels for his own accuracy in words written or spoken, and in justice to those of your readers who peruse the Calendar of Operations communicated by ...
-Vegetable Garden (6). Continued
Bare summer fallowing has in part been superseded by the culture of green crops, but is still extensively practised by intelligent and successful farmers in the best farmed districts of country. On th...
-Vegetable Garden (7)
If the suggestions of former Calendars, with reference to digging and trenching, have been acted upon, the soil will now be in the best condition for cropping; the ameliorating effects of winter wi...
-Vegetable Garden (8)
Among the essentials necessary to maintain high cultivation, a proper system of rotative cropping occupies a prominent place. Physiologists differ in opinion with regard to the principles upon which r...
-Vegetable Garden (9)
This is proverbially a busy month in gardens; much, however, depends upon the state of the weather and the soil. The principal crops should be put in as early as possible. A few days' delay at this ti...
-The Vegetable Garden. Potatoes - Brownell's Beauty
IN the fall of 1871 Mr.E. S. Brownell of Essex Junction, Vermont, sent me three varieties of seedling potatoes, to test on my soil, etc. The potatoes all came from seed of the Early Rose, fertilized b...
-Vegetable Gardening
Esesay by J). X. Hall, before the Kansas State Horticultural Society. OF the first importance in the cultivation of vegetables, either for market or home consumption, is a suitable Soil and Location....
-Vegetable Pathology. Venepicium (Poisoning)
Plants having only very limited powers of choice as regards the matter absorbed by the spongelets, whatever is really held in solution by the water they imbibe must pass with it into the cell cavities...
-Vegetable Physiology
Mr. Barry I believe to be right in principle, and I trust he will be able to introduce the general practice to accord with such principle. But he'll have a hard time of it. Take us Americans, by and...
-Vegetable Physiology (2)
Almost all vegetable physiologists, in describing the assimilation and growth of trees and plants, assume that the sap, being imbibed by the roots, and containing mineral and other matters necessary f...
-Vegetable Physiology - Theory Of Nutrition And Growth
When philosophers began to make observations on the operations of nature, and to form theories respecting its laws, they did so by observing but a few of the facts bearing upon the subject Thus their ...
-Vegetable Physiology - Theory Of Pruning Fruit-Trees
In tracing the history of the arts and sciences, we are not unfrequently surprised at the particular, and in some cases very remarkable events or circumstances that have given life and development to ...
-Vegetable Wax
Dear Sir: In the Moniteur, I see remarks about the Myrica Pennsylvania, to the point. We have millions of pounds of that vegetable wax, which would make our soirees a little cheaper. I translate it: -...
-Vegetation At Bethlehem
Cornfields and vineyards creep along the ancient terraces. In the spring, the hills and valleys are covered with thin grass, and the aromatic shrubs, which clothe, more or less, almost the whole of Sy...
-Vegetation Of Borneo: Ascent Of Kini-Balu
The following interesting remarks are from a letter received by a correspondent from Hugh Low, Esq., Colonial Secretary at Borneo. who hag been the first to aacend the loftiest mountain of that island...
-Ventilation
The public are by degrees waking up from the lethargy into which they have sunk, regarding the uses and necessity of a supply of pure air to breathe. The following true and straight forward article fr...
-Ventilation - Is It Necessary For The Healthy Growth Of Plants?
Dear Sir, - I wish to ask you the above question; pray do not dismiss it and me, as too stupid to be answered. I am but a novice, and merely ask for information. It is, I believe, usually insisted u...
-Ventilation Of Graperies
The necessity of more constant and perfect ventilation in houses devoted to the cultivation of the vine, has of late commanded the attention of some of our most skillful grape-growers, and has led to ...
-The Ventilation Of Horticultural Houses
In approaching this important horticultural subject, it may be well to examine the outward bearings of the case; and, in so doing, we must refer to the causes which govern the currents of air in the e...
-The Ventilation Of Horticultural Houses. Part 2
In the West Indies the mean average in the shade of different stations, extending from lat. 13 to 18, is about 80 55', and the difference between the hottest and coldest months is not m...
-The Ventilation Of Horticultural Houses. Part 3
In making the above remarks, I do not wish it to be understood that fresh air or copious ventilation is invariably an evil; far from it. Without a pure atmosphere no plant will flourish for any length...
-Ventilators
It is indispensable, to grow fine fruits in pots under glass, that in addition to an unclouded roof, there should be ample ventilation; and here it is that fruit houses differ from cold graperies. Whe...
-Verbena
Geo. C. Thorburn, of Newark, N. J., writes as follows: Inclosed you will find a flower and leaf of the greatest hit in verbenas since the early days of Defiance; from its unique foliage, being a real...
-The Verbena (2)
Are we dependent upon the Europeans for all of our. best Verbenas? I answer, emphatically, No.. Notwithstanding, it is a notorious fact that nothing will command a good price in our market, unless it ...
-The Verbena (3)
In the Horticulturist for January of the current year there is an article on the Verbena, by J. Pentland, Baltimore, which is worthy of attention by the lovers of that flower, as it contains some hint...
-The Verbena (4)
Mr. Editor:- I have neither the time, nor yet the inclination, to enter into a controversy with any one in a newspaper or magazine, believing that no real good ever comes from it, and people get tired...
-The Verbena (5)
In reply to Mr. Pentland's strictures on my article on the Verbena, it may be remarked at the outset that I do not quite agree with him regarding the consequences likely to arise from discussing quest...
-The Verbena (5). Continued
With these as a stock to work upon, they, by selecting seed from plants only which indicate the points they wish more fully to develop, and by letting patience have her perfect work, sometimes even...
-The Verbena (6)
The impression seems to be gaining ground that the growers of Verbenas do not sufficiently realize the importance of selecting the best varieties only in making up their stock, and that dealers do not...
-The Verbena (6). Continued
It is only necessary to mention the names of a few of those in the other section, which we believe comes the nearest to perfection, and which are general favorites, viz., Magnet, Crimson Perfection, B...
-Verbenas (7)
Tyro,(New-London,Ct.) If you find difficulty in wintering these in your cool house, keep them dry - just moist enough to maintain verdure during the cold weather. They will bear quite severe frost wit...
-Verbenas (8)
A Novice, (Bethlehem, Pa.) Your young plants damp off in your pit in winter, because they are not well rooted, and are too tender in the stalks. If you strike cuttings in July, instead of September, t...
-The Verbena - Honor To Whom Honor Is Due
Mr. Editor:- In your January number there is a communication from Mr. Pentland on the Verbena, in which he takes the ground that we are carried away from the demerits of the imported varieties by thei...
-Verbena Beds
Beds or borders where verbenas have been growing this season, if covered slightly with straw at the close of the season, and left until the spring vegetation is strong, will be found with qualities of...
-A Verbena Garden
The beautiful verbena has become of so much importance as to enlist the entire care of an extensive gardener. Dexter Snow, of Chicopee, Mass., devotes himself exclusively to the cultivation of this be...
-The Verbena. - Select List And Culture
The Verbena has become so general a favorite, that a description of some of the best new varieties sent out the present Spring, and their culture, will no doubt prove acceptable to many of your reader...
-Veronica Imperial Blue
This is a most useful plant for late autumn and winter decorations, and being of a very dwarf and compact habit, neat little specimens can be grown in six-inch pots. They may be propagated from cuttin...
-Very Hardy Varieties of The Apple
The apple is strictly the fruit of the nation. It is planted singly in small gardens, and by thousands in large orchards. While the grape and the pear are extensively planted, the apple is everywhere....
-A Very Palpable Error
A leading agricultural journal in the course of a recent article on Budding, says: Several sorts of stocks are used for the Cherry - the Doucian, Mahaleb, and Paradise are the most suitable. It is a...
-A Very Poor Practice
Under the head of Transplanting Evergreens,' the Horticulturist says: Unless our trees are small and removed with balls, we practice heading back of all the limbs, and even the leader, full one hal...
-Viburnum Nitidum
In our account of the April exhibition of the Brooklyn Horticultural Society, we spoke of a Viburnum nitidum, shown by Mr. Menand, as being a splendid plant. Our artist, Mr. Hochstein, being presen...
-Vicar Of Winkfield
C. M. Hovey, while he regarded the Winter Nelis as best to eat, found the Winkfleld best to sell - and although not of high quality, was very productive and showy - the tree was beautiful and ornament...
-Vice-Presidents
First district, W. T. Nelson, of Will county; Second district, Samuel Edwards, of Bureau; Third district, Dr. A. 0. Humphrey, of Knox -county; Fourth district, L. L. Francis, of Sangamon county; Fifth...
-Vick's Catalogue, 1876
The new issue of Vick's Floral Guide, for 1875, judging from advance sheets, which we. have received, will be the very best literary work Mr. Vick has ever performed. It is a perfect glossary of garde...
-The Victoria Regia
It is a gratifying feature in American experiment, that where pains be taken, and a corresponding expense be indulged, our gardeners equal, if they do not excel, in the luxuriance of display, and the ...
-The Victoria Regia At Mr. Cope's
Mr. Cora's success with the culture of this most gigantic of water lillies is one of the most satisfactory triumphs of American horticulture. An aquatic whose leaves measure 6 feet across, and that de...
-The Victoria Regia In Open Ponds
Br the following account from the Illustrated News, it will be seen that this magnificent water lily has been grown in an open pond in England. An uniformly high temperature of the water has been secu...
-The Victoria Regia In The U. States
We copy the following interesting account of this superb water lily, and Mr. Cope's successful culture of it, from Dr. Emerson's admirable address before the Delaware Horticultural Society. The horti...
-The Vienna Exposition
The arrangements made and making seem to point to a success greater at Vienna than at the previous Exposition in Paris. Probably no pleasanter journey, next summer, can be taken by an American tourist...
-Views Of The Interior
That there are interior views of the great subject of horticulture needing painting on its ever-living canvas, as well as exterior views, you, Mr. Editor, know fully as well as your Very humble se...
-Villa At New Haven
The accompanying design, in the old English style, is for a villa to be erected at New Haven. The outside walls are of brick, 16 inches thick and laid hollow; the inside walls are 8 inches and laid so...
-Villa For A Rocky Hill Site
This design has more of architectural pretension than the Artist's Villa, given in the last number of the Horticulturist, and it will be recognized as partaking of the character seen in the castle...
-Villa Parks
The growing taste of our citizens generally for summer residences, country life, beautiful scenery and rural enjoyments, prompts me to make a few suggestions on a subject which I have earnestly desire...
-A Villa-Mansion
A villa-mansion was erected by me, a year ago, in the Italian style, which may serve to illustrate the class of house which, under certain requirements, would be fitting for erection elsewhere....
-A Villa-Mansion. Continued
The space below is occupied by a large kitchen under the dining-room provided with a range and boiler, an old-fashioned brick oven, and a large open fire-place for roasting. There is also a laundry be...
-Village Cemeteries
Away from the larger cities, the improvement of the quiet abodes of the dead is not keeping pace with the progress of cultivation and improvement in the living. Why the large cities - who must usually...
-Village Cemeteries. Continued
The railroad and the steamer, that every day bear home the proprietors to their comfort and luxury, should also, when this life is departed, be the medium to carry their remains to some rest less in c...
-Vine Boiders Again - Curculio Remedy
Mr. Meston has broken his lance upon me, but I believe I am not yet unhorsed, though my steed was only a dead one. I made no attempt to prove that good grapes could not be grown without animal manure,...
-Vine Borders
A controversy has arisen of late years relative to the use of slaughter-house manures, carcasses of animals, etc., as a material in the composition of vine borders. The practice has been violently ass...
-Vine Borders (2)
In the July number of the Horticulturist, page 311, Mr. Cleveland says: A controversy has arisen of late years relative to the use of slaughter-house manure, carcasses of animals, etc., as a material...
-Vine Disease
In Mr. Buchanan's valuable Calendar of last month, he gave a melancholy account of the loss of the crop of grapes at Cincinnati; the news from Portugal is also unfavorable. The Vine Disease #1 A g...
-The Vine In The Orient
THE sacred record does not state positively that grapes grew to perfection in the garden of Eden; but there is very strong extrinsic evidence that such must have been the case. The soil and the climat...
-Vinee
After some educational experiments in overtasking the capacities of his vinery with other plants or too many vines, the cultivator will probably come to the conclusion that seven vines on a side are e...
-The Vinegar Plant
For some time past, the vinegar plant has been used abroad as a substitute for cider vinegar, to advantage. Frequent applications have been made to us to know what it is, and whether introduced here. ...
-The Vineland Agricultural And Horticultural Fair
Vineland was founded seven years ago. It is now a place of twelve thousand inhabitants. Recognizing the advantage which follows the comparison of ideas and products, an agricultural and horticultural ...
-Vines For Verandas
A question very often asked, is, what are the best vines for verandas? Some of those usually employed for this purpose, are, though beautiful in themselves, very objectionable on account of insects. T...
-Vines In Grape Houses
Sir: I beg to claim your indulgence, while I trouble you with a few questions, an answer to which, either yourself or some of your able correspondents, will perhaps, kindly furnish through the Horticu...
-Vines Winter-Killed
The past winter has been peculiarly hard on Grape-vines. The older kinds, such as Isabella and Catawba, have been nearly killed in favorable localities, where we have never known them to be injured be...
-The Vineyard
You have requested me to furnish you with a Monthly Vineyard Calendar for your valuable magazine. I shall do so cheerfully, and with a hope that it may, in some measure, assist to extend the cultivati...
-The Vineyard (2)
This is a busy month for the vine dresser. If not done last month, the stakes have now to be driven firmly into the ground, and the vines tied to them. When the buds begin to swell, bind the vine roun...
-The Vineyard (3)
June is a busy month with the vine-dresser. Tying up, pinching in, keeping the weeds down, and watching insects, require prompt and careful attention. During the latter part of May, and in all this m...
-Vineyard Calendar
Ik moderate and dry weather, pruning the vines may be continued throughout this month. In the South, it should be finished. Here, we have nearly a month longer to prune, for the sap in the vine seldom...
-Vineyard Calendar For August
The work of the vine dresser this month will be light. Summer pruning is generally finished in July, and in August, tieing up straggling branches of the vine, and keeping the weeds down, by the hoe or...
-Vineyard Calendar For July
The duties of the vine-dresser this month are merely a continuation of those recommended for the last. Summer pruning; tying up the branches to the stakes; and keeping the weeds dowu by light hoeing o...
-Vineyard Calendar For November
After the gathering of the crop, and the fall of the leaf, the vineyard is unattractive in appearance. It has been stripped of its poetry, and presents a mere field of naked vines and dry stakes. But ...
-Vineyard Calendar For October
In this latitude, October is the month of the vintage. From the first to the second week the grapes will be ripe enough to gather. All hands are now turned out to the vineyard, men and women, boys and...
-Vineyard Calendar For September
But little work is required in the vineyard this month. Weeds may be kept down by the hoe, or a light plowing - which some vine-growers think useful to the ripening of the fruit I do not, however, and...
-Vineyard Culture Of The Grape - Spring And Summer Pruning
From this work we take the following article by Dr. Mosher, a distinguished horticulturist, and an experienced grape grower: As I think much experience and observation are required to arrive at the b...
-Violets
HAVING been asked to reply through your columns which is the best violet and our manner of growing the same, I respond as follows: We have grown them profitably for the past fifteen years for their b...
-The Violet Of Rouen
We have frequently pointed out the advantages which horticulture might derive from some of our indigenous plants. One of our friends, M. Viginien, a zealous botanist, has drawn our attention to the Vi...
-Violets As Window Plants
The Violet, says a correspondent of the Gardener's Monthly, has ever been one of my favorite window flowers. In former years, when brought into the house from the cold pits to flower, they were pla...
-Violets, For Winter Bloom, In Hot-Beds
I should be obliged by some information respecting the proper mode of cultivating Violets for winter bloom, in hot-beds; what time they should be planted in the beds to secure an early and constant bl...
-Virgalieu Versus Vergouleuse
I was some months since considerably puzzled, Mr. Editor, by a report in your journal, of a discussion said to have taken place at a meeting of the Fruit Growers' Society Of Western New York, in which...
-Virgin Loam - The Formation Of Soil
The choicest production of nature for gardening purposes, is the simple natural loam of a fertile pasture, which has not been cultivated for many years. A thick old sod, with a bit of turfy loam, whic...
-Virginia. The Season
Our correspondence this month extends over a large region of country, and much of it is occupied by accounts of the effects of last summer's drought and the extreme variations of the past winter's cli...
-A Visit To Sawbridgeworth, Herts, England
Mr. Rivers' pleasant home stands on the top of a bank sloping to the road, and that bank is like a cataract of flowers, covered with white Roses* as though a million of butterflies were resting there ...
-A Visit To The Buffalo Vineries
PERHAPs there is no feature in the routine of fruit culture, that marks its progress so distinctly to the passing gaze of the sojourner while strolling through the town, with an eye to its horticultur...
-A Visit To The House And Garden Of The Late A. J. Downing
To describe a dwelling and a garden like Mr. Downing's, is like analyzing a poem whose beauty has long ministered to our daily happiness, and whose melody has for many years sung unquestioned to our h...
-A Visit To The House And Garden Of The Late A. J. Downing. Part 2
To have done so would have added greatly to the beauty of the place, and there is no doubt that with his love for lawns he would hardly have been contented long with the small though beautiful one whi...
-A Visit To The House And Garden Of The Late A. J. Downing. Part 3
This vase, which is a cast of one in the gardens of the Villa Borghese, near Florence, is of bronze, and is covered with bacchanalian figures in very high relief. The artist Cranch has painted a lovel...
-A Visit To The New York Central Park
About twelve months ago I sent you some remarks upon the respective merits of the plans that were prepared for the laying out of the New York Central Park, and then stated that the one to which the fi...
-A Visit To The Shakers - Grape-Growing At New Lebanon
A tear ago last spring we made an engagement to visit this settlement in early autumn, and test the qualities of the produce of such of the fifteen hundred seedling vines raised by Philemon Stewart, a...
-Visits To Country Peaces
If the regulations regarding passports that are enforced in Italy, were adopted in America, probably fewer persons would be found behind our locomotives. In the town of Bologna, at this moment, says t...
-Visits To Country Places
Hyde Park, seventy-five miles above New York, was formerly the residence of Dr. Hosack, and well do we love to chronicle, late though it be, a visit there with that noble specimen of a high-minded cla...
-Visits To Country Places - No. 7. Around Boston
The neighborhood of Boston stands very high as a horticultural region; probably more exotic grapes are grown there, within a circuit of ten or fifteen miles, than within the same distance around both ...
-Visits To Country Places -No. 6. Around New York
Among the improvements carried out, projected, or completed at the country seats Around New York, as well as elsewhere, we found many gentlemen giving a good account of the Portable Gas Works. Count...
-Visits To Country Places, No. 1. Around New York
The vicinity of New York, as might naturally be expected where commerce has left its most remarkable imprints, and has consigned to the industrious and successful an amount of spending money nowhere e...
-Visits To Country Places, No. 13. New Jersey
Woodlawn, the residence of Richard Stockton Field, Esq., near Princeton, N. J., presents many attractions, and in none more than in the character of its planting. Mr. Field is an enthusiastic lover of...
-Visits To Country Places, No. 3. About New York. The North River
As one must leave the concert and the ball to see the charm of domestic life and society, and to view the hallowing influence of woman's devotion at the bedside of the sick and the dying,.so we must d...
-Visits To Country Places, No. 3. About New York. The North River. Continued
Ornamental Garden Gate at Wodenethe, the residence of H. W. Sargent, Esq. A curious effect is produced by the mingling of variegated and particolored, trees, such as the variegated or silver~stripe...
-Visits To Country Places, No. 3. Around New York
Taking a carriage at New Brighton, we first called upon Mr. William Chorlton, an esteemed correspondent, gardener to John G. Greene, Esq. Mr. Chorlton has under his charge twelve acres, two acres of w...
-Visits To Country Places-No. 8. Around Newport, R. I
Though climate exercises less influence upon the life and health of animals than on plants, it is very desirable to the animal - man - neither to be roasted nor frozen; at Newport, by general consent,...
-Visits To Country Places-No. 8. Around Newport, R. I. Continued
Here is a surprising list for a Northern home; the beneficial effects of the proximity of the Gulf-Stream are clearly traced, and we cannot wonder that so many people are selecting Newport for both a ...
-Visits To Country Places. - No. 10. Around Baltimore, Md
Hampton, the seat of John Ridgley, Esq., some nine miles north of Baltimore, towards the Pennsylvania line, will strike the visitor, accustomed to the cottage ornee only, as expressing more grandeur t...
-Visits To Country Places. - No. 11. Around Baltimore, Md
Ik passing through Baltimore one morning, we stopped by invitation at the town garden of Thomas Winans, Esq., one of those extraordinary residences which seem to the passer as if the town had grown ar...
-Visits To Country Places. - No. 12. Around Baltimore
Dr. Thomas Edmondson, who has paid the debt of nature since we were there, possessed a collection of plants which had few (if any) competitors for variety and value in this country. His collection has...
-Visits To Country Places. - No. 9. Around Baltimore
How much or how little a traveller sees, depends upon two circumstances; the state of his own inquisitiveness, and the amount of intelligence he meets with from those whom he associates with on his to...
-Visits To Country Places. - No. XIV. Rear Princeton N.Y
OUR series of visits to Country Places has been postponed for the sake of variety, and in obedience to the demands of correspondents. Princeton neighborhood occupied our last notice, but was left inco...
-Vital Forces In Plants
For the following communication we are indebted to Mr. Cranch, Corresponding Secretary of the Cincinnati Horticultural Society, before which it was read. The paper is very interesting, and contains va...
-Vital Forges In Plants. (Continuedfrom Page 116)
Much has been said relative to the food of vegetation, while but little is thought and said about these silent means, or mechanical principles quietly at work in furnishing us food. If this matter is...
-Vitality Of Seeds
Long since, the British Association appointed an important committee on this subject. Dr. Daubeny read their report at the last meeting, held in Dublin, in September. They state that after planting ye...
-Vitality Or Seeds
Permit me to send you three seeds of some Coniferous plants, and also part of the cone, for your inspection. About a month back I ad seven seeds given me by a Mr. Brown, who has had the cone in his po...
-A Voice From Kansas
Every one must be wearied with the word Kansas; but not of her political troubles and strifes would I write; but of the woods and prairies as they present themselves to the emigrant's eye; and surely ...
-Volume 18th, 1863. The Horticulturist And Journal Of Rural Art And Taste
EDITOR: PETER B. MEAD. ASSOCIATE EDITOR: GEO. E. WOODWARD. Commences a New Volume with the New Year. Two Colored Plates and our regular monthly Frontispieces of Fruits, Flowers, and Architectural...
-Volume Of The Magazine Of Horticulture
A MONTHLY JOURNAL or Horticultural Science, Landscape Gardening and Rural Art. COMMENCEs ON THE FIRST OF JANUARY, 1862, THE THIRD VOLUME OF THE FOURTH SERIES. EDITED BY C. M. HOVEY, AUTHOR OF THH F...
-Wagener
First rate, and don't blight when top-budded. In my grounds this kind, root-grafted, is the worst top blighter I have. In the hard winters previously alluded to (1855, '6, and 1856, 7), Mr. Overton...
-Walks
Four feet from the sides of the vinery ladder walks should be laid down the whole length of it, except the end border and cross walks, connecting these at convenient distances. These walks may be made...
-Walks And Talks Or An American Farmer In England
To be a good traveler, a man need possess what is called versatility in an eminent degree. In other words, he must be of such varied attainments, and of such an inquiring, curious, investigating mind,...
-Walks On Hilly Ground
In a season like the present, when heavy drenching rains succeed each other in quick succession, the comforts of a good gravel walk can scarcely be over-rated. It is, therefore, a serious drawback whe...
-Walks Round My Garden
A man was once pointed out to me whom credulity had rendered absolutely mod. At first, a person had innocently said to him, pointing to a peasant with some flax-seed in his hand, There is a man sowi...
-Walsh's Cherry
I tested this cherry, and the fruit is identical with the Black Bigarreau of Savoy, and in the whole catalogue of cherries there is not one variety that bears any similitude to this, except the Tra...
-Walter Elder
I have had but one opinion on the various systems of heating, and my preference is for hot water. I would have the old system universally abandoned, of carrying the smoke through the house in brick fl...
-Walter Elder (2)
As this subject lies at the root of all good culture, you should have it fully discussed; every member should state the result of his practice and observation, and bring all the virtues of the differe...
-The Waltonian Propagating Case
THE application of hot water to the heating of horticultural structures, was a long step in the advance of progress. Since then, efforts have been constantly made to improve on and simplify the princi...
-The Waltonian Propagating Case. Continued
If too much vapor rises, cork the tube, Make the tube also to index the depth of water by a float - a piece of cork with a small stick fixed in. it, and rising through the tube; but it might be suppli...
-The Waltonian Propagating Case (2)
FREQUENT references to the Wardian case have made most readers familiar with its uses, but little has been urged in this country to a special form of a plant case known as the Waltonian, in which the ...
-Want Of Progress In Rural Taste
To the men or women brought up in cities, an apple is simply an apple; they have no other name for it, and scarcely appreciate, if they distinguish its good or bad qualities. To the same individuals o...
-Wanted
We wish to procure the following volumes of the Horticulturist: vols. 1 to 6, (1846 to 1851;) vol. 8, (1853;)* and vol. 13, (1858.) For any twelve numbers, we will send a copy of the magazine for 1862...
-Wanted - A Horticultural Society
Under the above heading the June number of the Agriculturist makes some very-just comments upon the fact of New York city, the great emporium to and from which nearly all items of progress flow, havin...
-Wanted A Working Horticultural Society
There is room for yet another; with due respect to the honorable name and object of the American Pomological Society, likewise to the officers of the temporarily organized Centennial Horticultural Soc...
-Wanting Roses
This should be done as early in the month as possible, to get the plants well started before the dry weather. We have felt surprised to find Roses grow and flower so well on our light sandy soil, but ...
-Wants Of Our Readers
Will you allow a subscriber to make a suggestion respecting the information wanted by a large class of the readers of the Horticulturist, who like himself, are at a loss for practical instruction on t...
-Wardian Cases
IN consequence of the vitiated atmosphere caused by the generation of gas in the combustion of coal, it is found very difficult to grow plants in rooms, and almost impossible to grow them with satisfa...
-Wardian Case And Aquarium Combined
NOT being aware that a fresh-water aquarium has before been connected with a Wardian Case, I beg to famish you with a sketch of a contrivance combining the two which I have had in operation for some t...
-Wardian Cases Just The Things
Mr. Editor, - I am so delighted with a new case, combining the Wardian and Waltonian plans, that I send you the result. The frame is about five feet long, by thirty-two inches wide; as wide as will en...
-Wardian Cases. Royal Institution, March 17
Dr. Stephen H. Ward delivered a lecture on this occasion, on Wardian Cases, of which the following is an abridged report Dr. Ward began by explaining the circumstances which had led his father to ad...
-The Wardian Or Fern Case
Read by Mrs H, M. Lewis, before the Madison Horticultural Society. HOW often we hear persons say: I know that I shall never succeed in growing fine healthy house plants. The leaves grow small and tu...
-The Warfare On The Curculio
Having been a diligent reader of the Horticulturist from its commencement (if not in point of time at least so far as the volumes themselves are concerned), I have watched with much interest the warfa...
-A Warm March
Spring fairly broke upon us in the middle of March, with the prospect of early work and beauty, - possibly too early for the fruit buds, - but let us always hope for the best. Mr. William Saunders ha...
-Warming A Forcing-House
In reference to the plan in the last number, we are enabled to present the following testimony from a distinguished source: Mr. Daniel Barker: - You ask my opinion of your plan for warming a forcing-...
-Warming And Ventilating Houses
I have read your various articles upon heating and ventilating houses, with much interest. And this, partly because of the great general importance of the subject, but especially, because of its conne...
-Washing And Scraping Trees
The author of the famous resolutions on Washing and Scraping Trees which we found in the newspapers credited to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and copied into our last number, with some co...
-The Washington Pear
I don't see what is the matter with our pomologists now-a-days, for it strikes me they are turning their backs on many of the good old-fashioned fruits, that some of us can recollect with such vivid s...
-Washington, A Horticulturist
We are apt, from all that has been published, to look upon Washington aa a farmer on a large scale, but, when we approach him nearly, we find him also a gardener and a horticulturist. In reading Irvin...
-Washingtonia Gigantea
We are assured by letters from California, that a new locality for these gigantic trees has been discovered, and thus the fears of the public lest the few known would be destroyed, and the most extrao...
-Waste Steam
The waste steam lost to useful purposes may be said to be beyond calculation. Well-regulated bottom-heat having been shown to be of immense importance in gardening, it is surprising that more attent...
-Water Cress
This salad is easily raised wherever there is a well or pump. Take seven flooring boards, and make a tank four feet wide.and one deep; pitch the seams, and sink in the earth; fill with good soil, and ...
-Water-Melons
These melons mature very freely in this locality, under ordinary culture, while the maskmelons, similarly treated, fail entirely. My plantations, however, have been subjected to the same discipline as...
-Watering And Syringing
Next to the soil, the water is of the greatest importance to secure a perfect development in the different organs of plants. Wo will as briefly as possible investigate its influence on vegetation. The...
-Watering Flowers In Pots
Many who have the care of window plants seem to think that the operation of watering is one of the simplest items incident to their care, and will hardly thank us for advice on this point, and yet we ...
-Watering Newly Set Trees
Care should be taken not to water too much A fruit grower once to our knowl-edge, when planting a row of trees, used water too freely - by the buckets full. During the night the temperature changed, t...
-Watering Of Plants In Pots
Many of my friends, who are commencing floricultural persuits as an amusement for their leisure hours, are continually applying to me, as an old amateur, to know how and when to give water to plants c...
-Watering Of Plants In Pots. Continued
The only chance of saving a plant that has partially become black and mouldy in the leaf from over-watering, is to place it in a warm room for a week, where the air is dry, so that the water contained...
-Watering Pot For Artificial Manure
This watering pot was invented by Dr. We-denbuch, of Wurtemberg. By the use of this, one part of manure to twenty parts of water, or charcoal powder at the same rate, is easily mixed by means of turni...
-Watering Specimen Plants
I do not know that any thing new can be said upon watering plants; but as it is a subject of quite as much importance as some which engage the attention of horticulturists, it may not be amiss to stat...
-Watering Transplanted Trees
IT is very customary with many horticultural magazines, to sum up at the end of the season all the improvements which may have been made in gardening during the preceding year. This enables us to see ...
-Watermelons
The Mountain Sweet Watermelon has, for many years, been universally conceded to be the best market variety cultivated in the Middle States. Of late, however, it has lost some of the qualities that r...
-A Waterproofing Composition
The following may be useful and is, I believe, not generally known. Take three pints of linseed oil well boiled and mix in it one ounce of soft soap. This may be brushed over calico when stretched on ...
-Watsonia Iridifolia - Var. Fulgens. Iridese. From The Flore Des Serres
If the great number of floral colors was not an acknowledged fact among many of the Irideases, the plant here represented could hardly be considered a simple variety of Gladiolus iridifolius of Jacqui...
-Waukesha, Wisconsin, Jan., 1857. Wisconsin Fruit Growers' Association
The annual meeting of this Association was held, at Waukesha, on the 14th Jan. The attendance was good, though not large. Some interesting discussions were held. Among resolutions passed, was one in f...
-The Way They Talk In California
The American, go lately the possessor of California, seems to have wakened up a new scene in its fine valleys, and already we have records more pleasing and humanizing than those of the gold hunter th...
-Wayne County - The Orchard Of New-York
Byr.O. Pardee, Palmyra, N. Y Nothing has attracted more attention lately in the markets of New-York, than the superb fruits of Wayne county. The pears especially - the fairest and most delicious Doye...
-The Weather
The Horticulturist, like the honest angler, is a great weather watcher. It may therefore be interesting to compare the present hard winter, and its effects, with similar seasons in former years. Thi...
-The Weather (2)
A mild winter, thus far (contrasting most remarkably with the last two), has given opportunity for out-door employments that will greatly facilitate operations in the spring. December was almost unpre...
-Weather Gossip
We have had a most delightful autumn in Western New Tors. The dry summer shortened the growing season, and ripened the wood quite early. Transplanting was perfectly safe in the latter part of Septembe...
-The Weather On Statee Island
We have at last got a break-up of the late severe and protracted winter. To-day (April 5th), for the first time, we have been enabled to use the spade. Euonymus japonica, which has stood, without inju...
-Weather, Crops
The spring opened unusually late over a great portion of the country. At Rochester the ground remained frozen till about the 3d or 4th of April; and in some parts of Western New York, much later. Snow...
-Weeds
We must repeat our caution against letting weeds go to seed, because not only do some of our old readers forget its importance, but many new readers know not the great amount of labor and trouble they...
-The Weed And Insect Destroyer Association; Or, Feed The Birds
Mr. Editor, - When we go to Europe, especially to western Germany, we are surprised at the multitude of birds there, in comparison with those of our own land; and the cause of this scarcity with us is...
-Weeds And Weeding
Now is the time that good gardening tells on the whole succeeding season, and it will be useful to read and reflect on the following from Burgess's Amateur Gardener. If you don't mow your lawn frequ...
-The Weekly New Yorker
A FIRST-CLASs NEW YORK WEEKLY FAMILY PAPER, eight pages, illustrated, beau-tifnlly printed on the best paper, with contributions and articles, stories, poems, anecdotes, etc., etc., by Washington Irvi...
-Weeping Kinds
First, the old Salix Babylonica, or Weeping Willow, which may stand as the type of this class of trees; albeit we have such graceful things as the Cupressus funebris, the Deodar, the Hemlock Spruce, e...
-The Weeping Larch
An English gardener, writing to The Garden, thinks it is one of the most elegant of all our hardy deciduous trees, and very rare as a large tree. The specimen growing in my gardens, densely covers a...
-Weeping Trees
With a fine, well kept and velvety, green lawn, tastefully planted with ornamental trees and shrubs, such as we have already named, the grounds around the dwelling may be rendered very charming, but t...
-The Weeping Willow. Salix Baby-Lonica
When a new plant is brought forward, it is proper that some history of it should be given, for the satisfaction of the public The Salix caprea pendula, or Kilmarnock Weeping Willow, was procured by mo...
-Weeping, Or Drooping Trees
There is something so attractive and so graceful in the character of drooping trees, that they arrest the attention of persons who would scarcely bestow a glance upon the noblest and rarest trees of t...
-Weigela Amabilis. Wrinkle-Leaved Weigela
Nat. Ord. Caprifoliaceae - Pentandria Monogyhia. Weigela amabilis. Planch. Fl. det Serves, v. 8, p. 855. At our Tab. 4396, under Wetgela rosea, we expressed our doubts as to the propriety of separ...
-Weigela, Gooseberry
Messrs. Editors: Last year, and the year before, that very good man Charles Downing sent me several Weigelas. Last year they flowered; and again, now, as I write, the dark red one is in flower - a bea...
-Weigelia Middendorfiana
I hold the Weigelias in great regard, and while I have readily admitted that the Roseas and Coraensis, or Amabalis are perfect, in their way, 1 have still longed for the Middendorf, or Yellow. During ...
-A Well Dbsserved Tribute
The New York State Agricultural Society has, by its steady devotion to the interest of the farmer, by the solid sense and intelligence of its officers, by its liberal premiums and its great annual fai...
-Wellingtonia Gigantea. Gigantic Wellingtonia
Of late, says Curtis' Botanical Magazine, the curiosity of the public, as well as of the Botanist, has been excited by a discovery of Mr. William Lobb, of a coniferous tree in the interior of Californ...
-Were The Fruits Made For Man, Or Did Man Make The Fruits
THESE need not be taken as mutually exclusive propositions; for as God helps those who help themselves, andman's work in this respect is mainly, if not wholly in directing the course or tendency of ...
-The West
A correspondent says: The Horticulturut is a great favorite of mine; in travelling through some sections yon can easily tell its subscribers by the appearance of their farms; you can see the beautif...
-West Town, Mass
Dear Sir: I should like to send you some of my seedling potatoes in the spring. They are from the caster variety. They are very productive - the parent yielding more than two hundred and seventy-fiv...
-Western Fruit Culture
The Ohio Pomological Society holds its sixth session at Cleveland Dec 5th, and they are making an effort there to bring out a valuable class of facts on Western Fruit Culture. They ask each member to ...
-Western Horticultural Review. Johh A. Warder, Editor. Clacinnati, Ohio
The Working Farmer, edited by Prof. Mapes, one of our best monthly agricultural journals, gives our Cincinnati contemporary the following well merited notice: This is one of the few Horticultural Rev...
-Western Horticultural Societies
We notice that throughout all the Western States numerous Horticultural Societies are being formed, while the attendance and discussions at the meetings of the older associations are such as to exhibi...
-The Western Horticulturist - Grapes - Varieties, Culture, Etc Essay
Grape-Growing, in most parts of our country, is at present in a state of extreme depression and neglect; and the time is probably not distant, if it does not already exist, when there will be a scarci...
-The Western Horticulturist - Grapes - Varieties, Culture, Etc Essay. Continued
The one point which I consider as important, above all others, in this pursuit, is the fact, which I regard as fully established, that a hybrid or cross between a hardy native and a tender exotic grap...
-Western Michigan - A Favored Fruit Region
AT a meeting of the Michigan State Pomological Society, not long since, Mr. J. S. Linderman, of South Haven, presented a most valuable and interesting paper upon the climatic influence of large bodies...
-Western New York Fruit Growers
Mr. P. Barry has kindly furnished a report of this Society's meeting, which was designed for the February number, but was not received in time. The Rural New Yorker contains the very ahle and interest...
-Western New York Horticultural Society
THE Annual Meeting was held at Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 18 and 19, at which interesting discussions took place. We are able to present condensed reports of the most interesting topics brought up and dis...
-Western Prairies
Why are they not forests I have not seen as much of the prairies, as appears to have been the case with the correspondent in your August number. But I have drawn certain conclusions from my limited kn...
-The Western Triumph Blackberry
Three years ago we saw advertised in a Western paper a new blackberry under the above name, and we ordered a dozen plants which came duly to hand, with a modest bill for the same, amounting to $5, whi...
-The Wet Spring Had Injured The Crop
M. Millon, an Algerian colonist, according to a report by M. Payen to the Central Agricultural Society Of France, has round in the thornless species of Cactus a valuable food for cattle in Algeria, be...
-What And Where, For Eight Months In The Year, Is The Plum Curculio?
I suppose you were present at the meeting of the American Institute Farmer's Club, New York, July 16, when Mr. Solon Robinson severely castigated an inquirer at Dobbs's Ferry, for ignorance regarding ...
-What Apples To Grows For Market
Dr. Hull, of the Prairie Farmer, visited the Chicago markets last fall, to ascertain the relative value of the different varieties of apples. Here is the results of his tour: One house visited by us...
-What Are The Twelve Best Varieties Of Azalea Indica?
The varieties of Indian or Chinese Azaleas are now so numerous, that to select twelve only, doctors will disagree, yet I do unceremoniously say, that for all decorative purposes, the dozen is ample....
-What Fruits Will Keep Best In The Nyce Fruit-House
Under the patent of Professor Nyce, a number of houses for keeping fruits have been erected, and arrangements made for the erection of more. We have given this patent plan some little attention, and h...
-What Grapes To Plant
We have been asked to name the best varieties of grapes to plant. We should be glad to make a satisfactory reply by furnishing a satisfactory list; and were we younger, perhaps should attempt; but our...
-What Has Been Learned
From an attentive perusal of the foregoing communications (and many more in the office of the State Board of Agriculture), we draw the following inferences: - 1. That very great loss of fruit trees...
-What Is A Fox Grape?
The terms Fox, Foxy, Foxiness, as applied to the aroma of all native grapes, is a misnomer, and, therefore, should be discontinued. It has been given to nearly every species of native grape. Le Conte,...
-What Is An Arboretum!
Considered vaguely it is simply a collection of indigenous and exotic trees, disposed according to the proprietor's taste, and congregated upon a small superficies of ground, or scattered over an esta...
-What Is Cultivation! By Wm. W. Valk, M. D., Flushing
We like to see a garden well laid out and cultivated. There is something in the contemplation of its design, the harmony of its parts, and the neatness and skill with which it is kept up, that affords...
-What Is It
Mr. Editor:- It has been a source of much reflection to me, what the cause may be that, in all the vast tract of country from, the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic coast, the true wine grape ( Vitis vi...
-What Is The "Renewal" System Of Pruning The Grapevine?
Clear ideas about matters of practice are of vital importance. On looking over the literature of grape culture, we are led to believe that there is a great deal of confusion amongst horticultural writ...
-What Is The Matter With The Grapes?
Some ten years ago, the rapid increase of an affection in our choice pears, which caused the fruit to become cracked and spotted, attracted the attention of cultivators to the probable cause of the de...
-What Is The Pest Manner Of Preparing And Planting Trees?
Mr. Yeomans. Before the tree is planted, cut off all the branches to restore balance between roots and plant; the winds will sway it less, and new branches will be thrown out in abundance. Apples shou...
-What Kindt To Plant
There is probably no variety that has yielded more profit to the growers generally than Wilson's Albany. We have grown over 200 bushels per acre of them, or six thousand and four hundred quarts, which...
-What Makes A Desert
IN a late number of the Southern Planter is an article, credited to Hovey's Magazine, by Wilson Flagg, on trees - their general character and advantages. The object of the writer appears to have bee...
-What Makes The Best Farm Hedge
By. A. D., New-York Dear Sir - The subject of live hedges is an interesting one to the farmer in some parts of the country, especially in sections where both stone and timber are comparatively scarce...
-What May Be Learned From A Tree
Mr. Harland Coultas has brought this highly curious and interesting treatise to the third number; the fourth is in press, and we cannot recommend the expenditure of a dollar more agreeably and usefull...
-What Of My Soil?
ED. Western Horticulturist:I wish to plant an orchard of one thousand apple trees, besides other fruits, such as the pear, cherry, etc. As my situation and soil are peculiar, I should like your opinio...
-What Peach-Trees Shall We Plant?
Mr. Editor: - Hero in the Great West - on the banks of the Upper Mississippi - I am happy to say, the subject of Fruit-Culture is yearly meeting with more attention. The fact is beginning to be made m...
-What Shall Be Done With Old Apple Trees
EDITOR Western Horticulturist: In all of the older portions of our country are to be seen many old orchards of apple trees, that are in a dilapidated condition, and hence the question naturally arises...
-What The Government Is Doing
It cannot any longer be said that our Government is indifferent to the progress of fruit culture and arboriculture. Great quantities of Prune scions (it is not said what sort) have been imported and a...
-What To Plant, And How To Plant
Spring is almost upon us; the dreariness of winter is all but passed away; and the lover of gardens and out-door work may already take up his spade to prepare for the coming season. To many the questi...
-Of What Use Is Rural Taste
Strang*, but not lees true, are the inconsistencies of human nature! While most of us are ready to admit the limited extent of our knowledge, how different is our practice from our theory. In the face...
-What Will The Edifice C0st
The question, What will it cost? was selected as the title of this paper in order briefly to indicate the scope of the following remarks, which are entirely of a practical nature* What will it cos...
-What Will The Edifice C0st. Continued
But without referring to recent works, the parish churches of the last century may be safely quoted as illustrating the miserable result of giving pre-eminence to the question of cost. What huge monst...
-What Will The Edifice Cost?
A very pertinent question, to which I never yet knew an architect, or a builder, to give a correct answer. No one can read this extract without a conviction that Mr. Cousin understands what he is writ...
-What varieties of strawberries are best for a private garden or family?
[Our first reply to this inquiry would be Hovey's Seedling, Triomphe de Gand, and Wilson's Albany, because all are good, all are hardy, strong vines, and the latter always sure to give a crop, althoug...
-What's In A Name
Shaket-pear. Beurre de Kuckingheim! Brown Beurre! Tis a wonderful jargonj yes sir-ree! Fits to utter, and cramps to spell, Dutch, English and French in a Jargonelle! Doyenne d'Alencon d'Hiver gris....
-Whats In A Name
Men of science have conceded the privilege to the first discoverer, propagator, producer or describer, of a tree or plant to give it a name, which shall take pre-cedence of any that may ever after be ...
-When And How To Plant Trees
PERHAPs some of your readers may think that enough has been written upon this subject, especially those that are aware of the amount of valuable information that has of late years been given through t...
-When And How To Plant Trees (2)
When planting is anticipated, the formation of a good compost heap should meet immediate attention. Sides of old fences, where grass and weeds have remained for years undisturbed, or old meadow bottom...
-When To Prune
A correspondent has furnished us with the following text: At what times in the year should the different kinds of pruning be performed, in the cold latitudes of the north and in the milder climates o...
-Where Are The Quinces
I have the back volumes of the Horticulturist, at least several of them, bound; and I have a little boy by the name of Frank, just three years old to-day. I love to show Frank the plates of fruits, et...
-Where To Feed Fruit-Trees
The stones of the field and trees of the forest are teachers, and what is more beautiful, they teach the truth. We planted a white oak, some years since, not in honor of any warrior or political race ...
-Where To Plant Peaches
THERE are two classes of people who plant peaches: the great number of farmers, gardeners, and amateur pomologists who grow them for private use only, and who should be governed in their planting by q...
-Which Are The Best Roses
Mr, Editor: The above question is very frequently proposed, and is much more concise than any reply that can be given. We would say that there are none supremely beautiful, if they are not abundantly ...
-Which Are The Best Wine And Market Grapes For The South?
A QUESTION of this kind was brought under discussions few days ago, by a particular friend of ours, and one who ought to have known better, insisting that the inevitable Scuppernong is the best and mo...
-The While Maple
From the Red Maple, with which it is sometimes confounded, it may be easily, distinguished by the silvery whiteness of the under surface of the leaves, and by the color of the spray. The flowers come ...
-Whisperings At Our Horticultural Society
How beautiful and pleasant are the thoughts of the past, when the latter has been properly directed in our walks and labors through life. The reminiscences of good invariably yield consolation, and th...
-White And Red Wines
Our wine-makers in America understand very well the principles to be observed in the manufacture of white wine, and many of them, as regards care and nicety, are as good models as need be desired. Bu...
-White Blackberries
They were first grown in the garden of Mr. J. S. Needham, West Danvers, and seem to possess some remarkable characteristics which eminently entitle them to general cultivation. The first specimens of ...
-White Doyenne
This old and exquisite pear continues to fail with me. For the past four years, some forty fine and to all appearance healthy trees, both standard and dwarf, have hardly yielded a perfect specimen, - ...
-White Doyenne - St. Michael's
Now five years in bearing; the first year gave fair fruit, entirely free from cracks or specks upon its surface. Since then, no tree out of about a dozen has borne a crop of fair fruit. While, on one ...
-The White Doyenne Pear And Its Enemy
Under the above caption I detailed in your eleventh volume, Mr. Editor, my experience with, and views upon, the disease which attacks this variety, upon which you briefly commented, and suggested that...
-The White Doyenne Pear. Virgalieu, St Michael, Butter Pear, Large Yellow Butter Pear, White Beurré Beurré blanc Doyenné, Doyenne blanc
This is one of the oldest, most widely known, and extensively cultivated Pears. Its importance in this country far exceeds that of any other variety, the largest Pear orchards in this State, and perha...
-White Fox Grape
A correspondent in the May number of the Horticulturist, page 246, supposes he has the white fox grape alluded to by Major Le Conte, in the Patent Office Report fo 1857. How, if the gentleman alluded ...
-White Grape
Specimens of a new and promising white grape have been forwarded to us, from S. J. Parker, of Ithaca, N. Y., which seem to possess very desirable characteristics. The berry is pare white - with little...
-The White Grape Currant
Never, in this country, has the cultivation of the currant received so much attention as it does at the present moment. We have it upon reliable authority, that all the skill and industry of our nurs...
-The White Grub
Question - The White Grub? What are its habits? What are the most effectual means for its destruction? L. B. Langworthy. - The white grub is the larva of the May-bug. It is four years in completing i...
-The White Lobelia
The English florists are enthusiastic in their praises of the new white Lobelia, named While Perfection. A correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture writes as follows: A really good white-flowerin...
-White Muscat of Alexandria Grape
I was pleased to see the question raised concerning the White Muscat of Alexandria, in your last number, (page 08.) I hope some of your correspondents who hare had a long and satisfactory experience, ...
-The White Pine. Pinus Strobus
The White or Weymouth Pine is common in various parts of the Union, and deserving of a first place in every collection. It is of rapid growth, beautiful in every stage, from a small plant of one foot ...
-White Transparent Garrot
The permanence of certain types of plants, commonly classed among esculents, is too generally believed. This exaggerated, not to say erroneous, opinion has been prejudicial to all attempts to improve ...
-The White Water Lily
Flower lovers might grow this lily very easily if they will follow these directions of a correspondent of The Gardener's Monthly: I will describe the' method I saw practiced for several years by a la...
-A White Weigela
The use of ornamental flowering shrubs in our home door-yards is one of the easiest and cheapest means of decoration. Among the largest and best of these shrubs is the Weigela, usually growing six fee...
-The White Wood Or Tulip Tree
This tree, the only one of its genus, is found in great abundance in the Middle States, where, on the rich woodlands in the al-luvials bordering on large streams, it attains a growth which makes it th...
-The White-Leaved Weeping Linden. Tilia Alba Pendula
Although a tree of slender drooping shoots, it is not a weeper after the style of the Weeping Willow; but, like the Birch, as it increases in years, it exhibits a drooping habit, that combined with th...
-Whitlavia Grandiflora. Harvey In London Journal Of Botany, Vol. V. T 11. Bot. Mag., T. 4813
A specimen of this fine plant was exhibited last summer at Chadwick, by Messrs. VEITCH, and it is certainly the gem of the season in the class of hardy annuals. It will no doubt be as hardy as a Phace...
-Who Buys All The Grapes
I HAVE frequently been asked the question - Who buys all the grapes that come to the New York market? and I am induced to give your readers some information on this point, in order to explain many o...
-The Whortleberry
The whortleberry, or huckleberry as commonly called, like the blackberry, is fast passing away from among us as a wild fruit; and unless some exertions are made toward its cultivation, not many years ...
-Why Do Plants Deteriorate
This question has been often asked, and occasionally we have been favored with an answer; each respondent proposing his own theory, and sustaining it by such facts and arguments as appeared to him bot...
-Why Do Plants Deteriorate. Continued
Many gardeners do things because they have seen others do them, but they often cannot tell us why or wherefore. Here, then, we have a few facts, and although they may not establish the opinions herei...
-Why Have We No Tutor Farmers
Why have we no tutor farmers? No thoroughly practical and efficient instructors for our sons in the noble science of agriculture? We find as we pass along the highways of life, hundreds of lawyers and...
-Why Is Horticulture Not One Of The Branches Taught In Our Colleges, Academies, And Common Schools?
These institutions claim an age in the history of our country, cotemporary with that of its settlement The common schools, it seems, from authentic records, were designed for the common people, - farm...
-Why Is It: And Why It Is
THE difference between the knowledge, and conse-quently the enjoyment of a true admirer of flowers, and the senseless being whose only pleasure consists in dusting a prima donna with them on the stage...
-Why Is Not Horticulture One Of The Branches Taught In Our Common Schools?
This has long been a query in our own and probably in the minds of many others, and we are very glad that some are beginning to speak out on the subject, in the hope that speaking will arouse action, ...
-Why Not Have A Greenhouse?
ED. Western Horticulturist: To a large majority of people a greenhouse is a charming place; at least so we may judge from the admiring exclamations that escape their lips on entering one. There is som...
-Widely Extended Country
To hear the Reports of the various State Fruit Committees, and from a comparison of results, to learn what fruits are adapted to general cultivation; what varieties are suitable for particular localit...
-Wild Delaware Grapes
I discovered, Mr. Editor, upon opening your September number, that my incidental remarks upon this subject had really waked up the opposing party, in the persons of both Dr. Garber and Mr. Prince. ...
-Wild Delaware Grapes - Not Hard To Take
Although a subscriber, and a reader too, of the Horticulturist, for many years, I have rarely intruded on its pages with any of my thoughts, well knowing that others could furnish matter of more inter...
-Wild Flowers - Their Cultivation
The cultivation of flowers affords the most innocent and refined pleasure. It is a gratification, a pleasure cheaply purchased, and within the reach of all - alike accessible to the rich and the poor....
-Wild Or Natural Stocks For Fruit Ttees
It is probably not for the interest of nurserymen to believe it, but I have no doubt whatever that natural stocks, up as high at the branching point, are the best for the finer fruits. Let the graftin...
-The Wild Orange Groves
Millions of acres of the best land in Florida are covered with groves of the wild orange. How these groves originated is a mooted question. Some suppose that the tree is indigenous on the peninsula; b...
-The Wild Orange Or Carolina Laurel
Dear Sir: I send you a parcel of seed of a beautiful evergreen, known among us as the wild or mock Orange. I infer that it is a stranger to you, from having never seen it noticed in your journal. Perh...
-The Wilder And Other Strawberries
ED. Western Horticulturist: I see the Wilder Strawberry favorably spoken of, in a late number of the Horticulturist, as coming from the South. Let me state that, here, it is just going to be what was ...
-Will It Pay To Grow Pears?
THE put year's experience in growing pears as a source of profit, differs widely in many respects, from that of any other season, since I have been engaged in the business, and some of the facts devel...
-Will Pear Culture Be Successful
This much controverted question seems to have little chance of being settled in the present general state of deficient and rough cultivation. All that the author of these remarks has seen of pear cult...
-William Coxe, The Pomologist
William Coxe, Esq., of Burlington, New Jersey, was the pioneer pomologist of America. His work is entitled: A View of the Cultivation of Fruit-Trees, and the Management of Orchards and Cider, with ac...
-William Saunders
Copper pipes had their advantages. They become heated rapidly, but part with the heat as rapidly. A house can be heated in a comparatively short time by copper pipes. Tanks had been in use, but the di...
-The Williamson Pear
A. J. Downing, Esq I send you by express, two specimens of a seedling pear, which sprung up wild in a piece of woodland on the south side of Long-Island, belonging to Nicholas Williamson, Esq. The tr...
-Willow
In answer to your correspondent, C. W. P., Newton, Mass., in the May number of the HorticuUurirt, respecting the new Willow, all I can any of ok, that it came originally from Gloucestershire, (Engla...
-Willows And Willow Culture
When we consider the variety of profitable uses to which Willow may be applied, and the extent to which it is cultivated in other countries, the question is suggested, Why has so little of it been gro...
-Willows And Willow Culture. Part 2
Its rods are very slender, comparatively, and vary less in size from butt to tip than any other with which I am acquainted. In early spring, before other flowers appear, excepting the Magnolia cons...
-Willows And Willow Culture. Part 3
I have drawn my illustrations extensively from English culture, because there the thing is systematically done up. The best and most cultivated minds have given it their long-continued and careful a...
-Wilmington Pear (1847, E. 1)
The Wilmington is a seedling of the Passe Colmar, raised from seed planted by the undersigned in 1847, and grafted on quince in 1850. This grafted tree fruited for the first time in 1855, and bore onl...
-Wilmington White
Why is not this grape more noticed? It is hardy in this vicinity, at all events, and that is more than we can say for some of the strangers; a good grape, and should be more generally known and cultiv...
-Wilson's Albany Seedling Strawberry
The strawberry season being past, it is well to compare notes, and give our experience with the new varieties. Here is mine with the Wilson's Albany. In August, 1856, the plants were put about twelve ...
-Wind-Engines For Raising Water
We regard nothing, connected with the cultivation of gardens, with more interest than a cheap, simple, and efficient means of raising water. It is plain enough that, with a scanty and uncertain supply...
-Wind-Mill Pumps
Br reference to Vol. Ill (new series) of the Horticulturist, page 227, an article will be found on the Application of Wind as a Power for raising Water. It was written for the sole purpose of attrac...
-Window Flowers
It is much to be regretted that window flowers are not so often seen as they once were. It cannot be that the taste for beauty is declining. It is rather that the arrangements of modern housekeeping m...
-The Window Gardener
Several journals have already taken notice of this curious piece of book making. Out of 132 pages, 118 are old matter, being merely the plates of an old volume (Flowers for the Parlor and Garden, by E...
-Window Gardening
It it only in Paris we can see window-gardening properly carried out In the first place, the houses are remarkable for their strength and solidity, and they all take a sloping direction towards the to...
-Window Gardening (2)
There is no doubt that the mass of the English people enjoy and cultivate flowers more generally than the Americans. This fact is demonstrated in the extent that Window Gardening is practiced in a...
-Window Gardening And Plant Cases
For several months we have had numerous inquiries respecting Wardian Cases waiting an answer. The following article, with illustrations, which we select from Mcintosh's Book of the Garden, is very c...
-Window Gardening And Plant Cases. Part 2
There are, however, some practical difficulties in the way of growing plants in close moist cases, which amateurs unacquainted with the nature of plants are unable to overcome. Among these difficultie...
-Window Gardening And Plant Cases. Part 3
Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4 is the same kind of case adapted to a single window; the ventilation, although shown in front, may be better if placed in the ends. Again, where double windows are used, ...
-Window Gardening And Plant Cases (2)
The Hopean apparatus is thus described in the Gardener's Chronicle: - 'A flat dish of porcelain had water poured into it; in the water a vase of flowers was set; over the whole a bell-glass was place...
-Window Gardening. An Air-Tight Fern Case
Our village parson is fond of gardening, and especially of Ferns, of which he has a vaseful worth a moment's attention. This vase or pan is made of thin glass, somewhat over a foot in diameter. It was...
-Window Gardening. Ferneries. How To Make Them And What To Put In Them
An Address By John Robinson, Before Essex Institute. Salem, Mass Fern cases, or ferneries, as most of us call them, were originally called Wardian cases, in honor of their inventor, Dr. B. N. Ward, of...
-Window Gardening. Ferneries. How To Make Them And What To Put In Them. Continued
The dormant fernery can be made very interesting, the plants in it keeping about the same all the winter, but growing toward spring; and, as many like the pleasure of filling their case every fall, th...
-Window Gardening. Parlor Plants
The greatest difficulty in the management of plants in dwellings, is the absence of sufficient moisture in the atmosphere; uniformity of temperature may also be mentioned, and want of fresh air. Large...
-Window Gardening. Plants In Hanging Baskets
IN my trips among my horticultural friends, I have often been surprised at the striking similarity in the selection and arrangement of plants in hanging baskets; and now wish to enter a plea for some ...
-Window Plants
The cactus tribe are well adapted for window plants; among their advantages over other house plants, they require but little attention while out of flower, make no litter or leaves, and are not very a...
-Wine
In a letter from Naples, the writer assures us that there will be a very productive wine year in Italy, the vines not having presented so healthy an appearance for many years. The people decline to us...
-Wine - A Mode Of Making It
I do not profess to be posted in the methods of wine manufacture - not even with any method. But I have lately become acquainted with a mode adopted by one of my neighbors, which I propose to report t...
-Wine And Temperance
Much has been said on this subject, in most of the Horticultural Journals, and all, or nearly all, in favor of the general use of wine, as a prevention of intemperance. I fear sufficient caution has n...
-Wine And Temperance (2)
I am glad to observe that this subject is likely to receive some consideration from horticulturists. All I ask is, that the truth may be met, and duly weighed. So far, we have had nearly every thing o...
-A Wine Cellar
Some cleverly particular people may be glad to learn the best way of having their wine cellar, so that, while it is convenient, and at hand, it is always under the eye of the owner, when opened. To th...
-The Wine Country
The wine country proper is along the Lower Douro - a stream called the Corgo separating the Lower from the Upper Douro. Along each bank, for the distance of nearly thirty miles, and varying from six t...
-Wine Exhibition
At the May meeting of the Mississippi Valley Grape-Growers' Association, it was determined to hold an exhibition of wines in this city (St. Louis) at the same time as the approaching meeting of the Am...
-The Wine Press
The presses are constructed in buildings and vary in size; they are tanks about twenty feet square, and two to three feet deep, built of massive stone work, and raised considerably from the ground. Th...
-Wine-Making
A friend of the Horticulturist remarks, that we have repeatedly given in our pages the view, that the domestic manufacture of wine is favorable to temperance, and requests us to insert the other side ...
-Winter Bear
The subject of Winter Pears we think will bear much fuller discussions in our horticultural meetings than it has done. We are not perfectly satisfied that the ne plus ultra has yet been discovered, al...
-Winter Damage To Fruits And Trees In Iowa
SINGULAR, indeed, are the freaks of Nature. No two seasons are alike in degree of cold. If the thermometer measures the extreme of two winters alike at 25 below 0, yet the number and severity of ...
-The Winter Etc. In Virginia
My Dear Sir. - The last winter was remarkable for its unusual severity here, as in other sections of the country, December was an intensely cold month, and there being but little snow upon the ground,...
-Winter Fears
Gentlemen present being called upon to name the best winter pears, P. Barry expressed his preference for the Lawrence, Winter Nelis, and Easter Beurre. The Lawrence and Winter Nelis would ripen well i...
-Winter Flowers - The Oxalis
THIs beautiful tribe of plants, deserve more attention than they generally receive. As winter flowering green-house plants we value them very highly; and they bloom most profusely even where the tempe...
-Winter Forcing And Propagating House
Agreeably to your request I forward a plan of my Winter Forcing and Propagating House, hoping it-may prove useful to the class for whom it is designed, viz., the amateur and market gardener. Although...
-Winter Fruits Grown In Western New-York
The production of apples in Western New-York, for 1851, was not as large as usual; and the scarcity both east and west of us, at Rochester, created a demand more than equal to what could be well spare...
-Winter Garden Of Messrs. Weeks & Co., Chelsea
Messrs. Weeks, the eminent horticultural architects,, of King's Road, Chelsea, having recently completed the erection of a bouse, termed a Winter Gardeu, we were invited to inspect the same, and fee...
-The Winter In Canada
Bloomington nursery, Illinois, Oct. 11,1856. J. J. Smith, Esq., Ed. Horticulturist. - Dear Sir: Some weeks since, I addressed a letter to Messrs. Cockburn and Brown, nurserymen, of Montreal, with som...
-The Winter In England
The past winter has been one of great severity in England. Somerset in Turner's Florist, thus describes its effect: This, the most memorable season which has occurred for many years, has in many pla...
-The Winter In Georgia
As you desire accounts of the effects of the last extreme cold winter, from all sections of the country, I will briefly report what injuries we have sustained. In the coldest day of an ordinary winte...
-The Winter In Northern New-York
In compliance with your request, in the April number of the Horticulturist, I send an account of the effects of the past winter on our fruit buds. The winter although long and cold, was exceeded by th...
-Winter Management of Violets And Lilt of The Valley
The first thing to be secured is an immunity from frosts. It does not signify their being subjected to a low temperature at night - such is, indeed, desirable - but they will not endure frost as to th...
-Winter Meeting of The Iowa State Horticultural Society
From the record sent us, the meeting of this young State Society, held early in January, was numerously attended and the show of fruits quite large, numbering over two hundred plates of apples alone, ...
-The Winter Of 1860-61
Whin summer is waning into the paleness of autumn, and the beauties of the season have passed away, it seems unnatural to go back and dwell upon the peculiar phases and effects of a winter gone by. Ev...
-The Winter Of 1860-61 On Evergreens
Disastrous as our winters usually have been the past few years, yet we are not wholly alone in our misfortunes the past season. In England, on the 24th and 25th of December, the mercury fell in two pl...
-Winter Of 1862-3 On The New Evergreens
In reply to your request for some statement of the effects of the past winter upon the New Evergreens, I can only repeat more or less of my former experience. Though the winter generally was much les...
-Winter Ornament
The possible effect of trees in winter possessing some characteristics of ornamental value, also is alluded to, by Mr. Ellwanger. In winter, if we would have an eye to the picturesque in color, we mus...
-Winter Parsley
Oar neighbor Mr. Wm. Saunders offers the following valuable hint on winter Parsley. This useful herb is much in demand in the culinary department, especially is it so during winter when everything gre...
-Winter Protection
It is a common practice to go through the vines with a plow every fall, and throw up a good ridge of earth against the stalks. The Hungarians have a more effectual way of guaranteeing against the col...
-Winter Protection Of Grape-Vines
What degree of cold Grape vines can endure without injury, is an interesting question to cultivators in an inclement climate. Where I am located, we may expect the thermometer to sink to 20 below...
-Winter Ruralities Of Boston
A reliable Boston correspondent gives us a curious and amusing account of the newest winter fashions of the people in that city. It appears they were all crazy on the subject of skating. All the young...
-Winter Show Of Fruit At Albany
The display of fruit at the Winter Meeeting of the New York State Agricultural Society was not large, but very fine. The committee of arrangements had made ample and comfortable preparations both for ...
-Winter Treatment And Propagation Or Epaorists
These will have now (Oct 22) completed their growth and formed their fLower-buda. See, therefore, that they are in a proper condition for wintering - their pots clean and the drainage complete; for to...
-The Winter of 1858-9, On Evergreens
The public have been so recently informed (at least that portion of them who may have seen the new edition of Downing's Landscape Gardening) respecting the comparative hardihood of evergreens, that ...
-The Winter, And Its Effects On Vegetation
The winter through which we have just passed will not soon be forgotten. It seems to have been altogether remarkable in almost every part of the country. In many of the Southern and Western States the...
-Winter, Or Frozen Sap Blight
The diseases of the Pear, known by Pomologists as Leaf-Blight, Summer-Blight, Winter-Blight, Insect-Blight, and Frozen-Sap-Blight, are generally, at present, recognized under the two latter terms, tho...
-Winter, Or Late Fall
P. Doyenne* d'Alencon. Q. p. Niles. P. Lawrence. Q. Glont moroeau. P. Beurre d'Aremberg. Q. Vicar of Winkfleld. P. Dix. P. Colmar Nelis, or Winter Nelis. Q. Bergamotte Esperen. Q. B. Baohelie...
-Wintering Tea Roses In The Open Air
Every body fond of flowers knows that there is nothing in the wide floral world comparable for refined beauty and loveliness to a fine tea rose, in fact to tea-roses altogether. South -of Pennsy...
-Wintering Verbenas
Having succeeded in keeping the different sorts of Verbenas in small pots through the winter, when my neighbors have failed, I beg to state the method I adopt In the first or second week in July, I st...
-Wire Plant Supports
The demand for ornamental stands for halls, passages, and parlors, has caused inventors to exert their ingenuity to produce articles of luxury such as we exhibit in the present engraving, and in great...
-A Wire Trellis Beat For Ruspberries
For raspberry vines that require support there is no contrivance more simple, durable, and cheap, than a single wire stretched along the line of the row, and fastened to posts driven into the ground e...
-Wisconsin Fruit Growers' Association
The following is a list of officers of the Wisconsin Fruit Growers' Association for 1858: President - A. G. Hanford, Waukesha. Vice-Presidents - Col. H. Crocker, Milwaukee; D. I. Powers, Madison; D. ...
-Wisconsin State Horticultural Society Exhibition
WITHOUT very great anticipations for a fine show at our annual exhibition, we went forth to duty. We were constantly reminded that this had been a precarious season, - the oldest inhabitant never sa...
-Wisconsin Strawberries
We are indebted to our friend A. O. Babcock, Esq., of East Troy, Walworth Co., for a very acceptable mees of ripe Strawberries, the first we have seen this season, They were mostly Burr's New Pine, wi...
-Wisoonsin Fruit Growers' Association
This Association held a convention at Janesville, Rock county, 26th and 27th December. The object of the meeting was the election of officers for the ensuing year, the exhibition of fruits, and discus...
-Wistaria Chinkenses
This beautiful vine may be made to flower several times in the year, by the following simple treatment: After the first flowering is over, strip off all the leaves, and cut off all young and superfluo...
-Wistaria Frutescens, Var Magnifica
More than a hundred years before the introduction of the Chinese, Europe possessed the North American Glycina, now called Wistaria Frutescens. However, as frequently happens in such cases, the new com...
-Wistaria Sinensis. Climbers For Poles
The following query and answer, cut from the London Cottage Gardener, applies with equal force to this country: - Would you hare the kindness to inform me, through your' Answers to Correspondents,' w...
-Wistaria Violacra
This new Wistaria bloomed, for the first time, in this country the present season (June 28), on Mr. Buist's piazza, Mr. B. obtained it in France, a few years ago. It is later in blooming than the othe...
-Wistaria, Wisteria
The engraver, in the frontispiece to the last number, printed Wisteria on the plate instead of Wistaria. The plant was named after Dr. Caspar Wistar, and it should always be spelled with an a instead ...
-Within Doors
All here written is to the point; and I must say that, in reading, I had to repeat, Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's goods; for I have just that love of all quaint old furniture, etc, that I cann...
-Wodenethe
In describing, or, rather, attempting to describe Wodenethe in a former page, we found it impossible, in a limited space, to give an idea of half its beautiess There was one little matter, however, th...
-Women In Horticulture
Is Horticulture a suitable occupation for women ? Is there anything degrading in the cultivation of fruits and flowers ? We are told in sacred history that the first gardener had a woman given him for...
-Wood-Producing Force And The Seed-Bearing Force, In Vegetable Life
According to the received doctrines in Botany, in the case of exogens, a wood or leaf bud in development, forms an axis or branch with its appropriate leaves, arranged in an order peculiar to each gen...
-Worcester (Mass.) Horticultural Exhibition
The Horticultural Exhibition this year, has been eminently successful, in every point of view. The long continued summer drouth, extending even into the autumn, had created serious fears of a partial ...
-Worcester Co. Horticultural Society
The annual meeting of this flourishing Society was held on the first of January. The report of the Committee on Building was so favorably received, that the Association, after some little discussion, ...
-Worcester Count (Mass.) Horticultural Society
The annual meeting of this Society was holden at the Horticultural Hall on Wednesday, January 5, 1858, when the following officers were elected for the current year, viz: President - STEPHEN SALISBUR...
-A Word On Dahlias
A friend was expressing his surprise, a few days ago, that a choice collection of dahlias which he imported from Europe in the spring of 1866 and that had bloomed splendidly that year, have many of th...
-A Word Or Two More On Lawns
Dear Sir - I agree with you fully in your preference of blue grass and white clover for a lawn; they undoubtedly make the finest and softest turf of any of the grasses grown 50 bushels per acre, once...
-A Word Or Two With Oub Contemporabies
Several horticultural editors have lately taken great pains to inform the public that they are not pecuniarily interested in nurseries of trees, seed stores, or other horticultural commodities. What i...
-A Word To Our Readers
This is the last number of the present volume, and it becomes necessary for our readers to renew their subscriptions; and we trust they will all do so, and send us some new names with their own. We ha...
-A Word To The Trade
WE usually and appropriately set apart the beginning of the year as a time for good resolutions; though, in our opinion, any time is a good one for such a purpose. As a new period of time, how-ever, i...
-Working The Earth Around The Roots Of Trees
In the last October number of your paper, I gave a word or two on mulching orchard trees. Those trees stood in a grass meadow which was mowed for hay - of course unploughed, and the mulching was subst...
-Worms In Lawns
During the past season, we have noticed a number of lawns injured by worms. In ordinary cases it has been checked by watering once or twice with weak lime water, say a quart of lime to ten gallons of ...
-Worthy Of Encouragement
A somewhat novel yet benevolent project, for the amelioration of the condition of poor orphan girls, is now under consideration. It is proposed by Mrs. T. W. Phelps, of Irving Place, who has generousl...
-Yale Agricultural Lectures
It will be remembered with how much interest and satisfaction the Lectures at Tale College were received last winter. The beneficial results that they were universally acknowledged to have accomplishe...
-Yale College Lectures
We had thought at one time of giving our readers a report of these Lectures, but to do so would require several numbers of our magazine; we must therefore be content to give hereafter such a synopsis ...
-Yam
The following scrap is from, the Cottage Gardener, and signed by a man of multifarious accomplishments: - The most perfect indifference is shown by the new Yam to the most rigorous seasons; it is...
-Yards, Etc. Native Of Asia Minor. Fl March. Fr. Sept
Obs. The Filbert, or Hazle-nut of the old world is now becoming known among us, - and not unfrequently cultivated. The bushes were originally imported into Italy from Pontus, and (the fruit) known a...
-Ye Little Tree
Take it up tenderly, Plant it with care; It's but a little tree, Nothing to spare! Scant are the limbs on't, Fibres but few, Take care, or it won't Take care of you! Mangle the bark of it, Man w...
-The Yellows
Dear Sir: I have been in the Horticulturist, many speculations and suggestions as to the cause of the Yellows of the peach tree, but none of them have been satisfactory to my mind, and I wish to sugge...
-Yellow Ladies' Slipper - Cypripedium
Large Yellow Ladies' Slipper - Cypripedium Pubescent This much-admired flower is found in moist, shady woods. There are three varieties of this species - some rather rare. The root of this plant co...
-Yellow Nelumbo, Or Water Chinquapin (Nelumbium Luteum)
The Nelumbium, and, indeed, all kinds of water plants, have received increased attention since the introduction of the Victoria regia. The N. speciosum, a finer species than the N. luteum, but much mo...
-The Yellow Pine
The Yellow Pine, by some called Pitch Pine, has neither grace nor elegance to recommend it; though it is allied to the pyramidal trees, it approaches the shape of the round-headed trees. There is a si...
-Yellow Roses
You will oblige one of your constant readers, by giving in the next number of the Horticulturist, a description of the Persian yellow rose, and stating what are the points of difference between that a...
-The Yellows In Peach-Trees
The communication of Mr. Reid in your March number, reviewing the proceedings of the Western New York Fruit Growers' Society at its late annual meeting in Rochester, has directed my attention to the r...
-The Yellows In Peach-Trees (2)
Having read in the Country Gentleman, page 46, Jan. 17th, a report of the discussions of the Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York, held at Rochester, January 9th, I find, in article 3, The Yell...
-The Yellows In Peach-Trees (2). Continued
We will now leave Mr. Sharp to make use of our advice to the extent he may think proper. Let us now turn to H. E. Hooker's remarks. He says he has seen orchards planted with trees from the Jerseys wh...
-The Yellows In The Peach
The investigation of the nature of this disase appears to be quite overlooked or neglected. It seems indeed a remarkable circumstance that a malady which annually destroys many thousand trees, and whi...
-The Yews
The English and Irish Yews would undoubtedly make fine hedges in our climate. Mr. Reid has commenced his experiments with these, and sees no reason why they should not succeed as well here as in Europ...
-Yew Tree - Toxus
All of the yew family are beautiful plants, and of great value in making up a place. When fully exposed to the sun, they sometimes burn and brown in winter; but wherever they are shaded by having a po...
-Yield And Profit
There are so many circumstances connected with strawberry growing, such as varieties, soil, climate, location, markets, and the skill and management of the grower, that the results of a few cases cann...
-Yonkers Horticultural Society
This young and enterprising Society held its first exhibition at Farrington's Hall on the 14th and 15th of June. The exhibition proved an auspicious beginning, and was a source of great satisfaction t...
-The Young Farmer's Manual
Messrs. Saxton, Barker, & Co. have in press a large 12mo volume, with this title. It details, in a plain and intelligible manner, those operations most essential to the success of the young farmer, gi...
-The Young Farmer's Manual And Farmer's Workshop
Containing Two Hundred Illustrations. By S. Edwards Todd. We here have a Book which details the manipulations of the Farm in a plain and intelligible manner, with practical directions for Laying-out...
-The Young Gardener's Assistant
THIs is an original work, by the late Mr. Bridgeman, which has long kept its place as a standard book in the gardening world, and, with McMabon's (published in Philadelphia), continues to be the guide...
-Young's Germantown
Read's Block Pine, and a number of other new varieties have not been sufficiently tested for me to express an opinion. The Foreign varieties which I have tried, and which were procured from an Englis...
-Young's New Golden Chinese Juniper, Juniperui Chinensis Aurea
This novelty, lately originated in England, is an almost exact counterpart of its parent, the Chinese Juniper, except in color. The Garden considers this color equal in richness of hue, to that of any...
-Yucca Flexilis
The Yucca flexilis, Nobis; Y. stenophylla, Y. acuminata, Y. angustifolia, Y. longifolia, of the gardens, is an herbaceous plant mostly with a short stem, and leaves of twenty-two inches, sometimes twe...
-Yucca Gloriosa
This fine, tropical-looking plant is not half so much patronized, as it deserves to be; for, independent of the rigid, uniform appearance its foliage always presents, no flowering plant, that we are a...
-Yucca Propagation
In removing old plants of yuccas, an ample supply of young plants can be obtained by taking roots of the size of a finger and cutting them in lengths of three or four inches. If slightly covered by so...
-The Yuccas - As Hardy Ornamental Plants
There are few plants so ornamental as several of the Yuccas, and yet we seldom see them employed in any conspicuous way, in our pleasure grounds or flower gardens. Here and there, perhaps, in the gard...
-Zante Currants
The Patent Office is in receipt of a lengthy and interesting communltion from Samuel B. Parsons, an experienced nurseryman, of Flushing, N. Y.,who is now travelling in Europe, concerning the Zante cur...
-Zauschnebia Californica. [From The London Horticultural Magazine]
Zauschneria California, Presl (Californian Zauschneria) - Onagraceae Epilobeae. To the indifferent observer, there is not much resemblance between the Evening Primrose and the Fuchsia; and yet...
-Zonal Pelargoniums
The exhibit for the best twelve Zonal Pelargoniums at the Royal Horticultural Show, on the 16th of June, resulted as follows: The Best Twelve Zonal Pelargoniums Variegated, Gold and Bronze, or Golde...









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