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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #5 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



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TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #5
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Bohemia Olive
Dr. Valk, of Flushing, Long Island, informs us that the Oleagnus parviflorus, sometimes called the Bohemian Olive, proves to be a hardy shrub in his garden. The following extract from his letter will ...
-Books
Downing's Landscape Gardening and Country Houses. Books #1 A. N. (Louisville, Ky.) Gray's Botany of the Northern States. You will also find Eaton's Manual of Botany a useful handbook.- Walter, (Buff...
-Book Notices
Christian Ethics on the Science of Duty, by Joseph Alden, D.D., LL.D., author of uElements of Intellectual Philosophy, The Science of Government, etc. Whatever tends to promote the moral education...
-Book Notices (2)
Woodward's Record of Horticulture for 1866, edited by Andrew S. Fuller, author of The Grape Culturist, Strawberry Culturist, Forest Tree Culturist, and Small Fruit Culturist. 127 pages, bevel...
-Book Notices (3)
Rural Studies. By Donald G. Mitchell. New York: C. Scribner & Co., Publishers. Price $1 75. We have received a copy of the above book from the author. It is written in his usual pleasing style, and g...
-Book Notices (4)
An Elementary Treatise on American Grape Culture and Wine-Making. - By Peter B. Mead. Harper & Brothers. Price, $3. After a careful perusal of this book, we can not consider it Strictly an emanation...
-The Book Of Evergreens
A Practical Treatise on the Conifer, or Cone-bearing Plants. By Josiah Hoopes. Messrs. Orange Judd & Co., publishers, Broadway, New York, have just issued a book with the above title, which we t...
-Book On Forest Tree Culture
We have the pleasure of announcing the early publication, from the office of the Horticulturist, of a valuable new book, entitled, Forest Trees and Native Evergreens for Shelter, Ornament and Profit,...
-Books And Catalogues Received
A Practical Treatise on Grasses and Forage Plants. By Charles L. Flint, A.M. New York: Putnam & Co. Descriptive Catalogue of a choice collection of fruit and Ornamental Trees, Ac. Ac. For sale by D, ...
-Books And Catalogues Received (2)
Descriptive Catalogue of Southern and Acclimated Fruit Treea, Evergreens, Hoses, Grape-Vines, Bare Trees, Shrubs, etc., cultivated and for sale at the Pomaria Nurseries. Address Wm. Summer, Pomaria, S...
-Books And Catalogues Received (3)
Pomona Garden and Nursery Catalogue of Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Vines, and Plants, cultivated and for sale by William Parry, Cinnaminson, Burlington County, N. J. 1860 and 1861. Catalogue of Fruit...
-Books And Catalogues Received (4)
Descriptive Catalogue of Fruit and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Grape-vines, Evergreens, Roses, Dahlias, Verbenas, and other Bedding Plants, etc, for sale at the Columbus Nursery, by Bateham, Hanford ...
-Books Of Present Interest
I. Biography Of Baron Steuben The Life or Frederick William Yon Steuben, Major-General in the army of the Revolution. By Frederick Knapp. With an Introduction by George Bancroft. Crown 8vo, 715 pages...
-Books On Our Table
The Agriculture of Massachuertts as shown in return of the Agricultural Societies 1854: Edited by Charles L. Flint Sectretary of Board of Agriculture. We are indebted to the Hon. B. V. French of Brai...
-Books, Catalogues, Etc., Received
The Properties of Flowers and Plants, by George Glenny. - We are indebted to C. B. Miller, 634 Broadway, for a copy of the above work, which has for a long time been regarded as a standard work in Eng...
-Books. Horticultural Review (2)
How to Lay Out a Garden: Intended as a General Guide in choosing, forming, or improving an estate, from a quarter of an acre to a hundred acres in extent. By EdwarD Kemp, La ndscape Gardener* Second...
-Books. Horticultural Review (2). Continued
Under the head of Belts of Plantation, our author says: Narrow strips or lines of plantation are among the most tasteless forms which belts can assume, and are equally mean and undignified whereve...
-Books. Horticultural Review. Kemp's How To Lay Out A Garden - Second Notice
WE proceed to give three or four more illustrations from this book, and regret that space does not permit of more extracts from other portions of the volume; but as it will form a part of the librar...
-The Boot
The quantity of root is always observed to increase with the poverty of the soil in which it is growing. - Duhamel found the roots of some young oaks, in a poor soil, to be nearly four feet long, thou...
-Borders For Cold Graperies
Dr. Nichols, of the Boston Journal of Chemistry, made an analysis of the ash of home cuttings of a Black Hamburg Grape vine, with the following results: Potash, 29 parts in 100; phosphate of lime, 19 ...
-Borecole, Or Open-Headed Sorte. Brussels Sprouts
This variety is not exactly a Borecole, in the strict meaning of the term, but it may be ranked as such. The stem will rise, in good ground, to the height of four feet, on the top of which is a partia...
-Boston, Mass
It is not a little curious to see your correspondents come out right side up after all the pros and cons. Hovey's Magazine, for January, publishes the Report of the Committee on Fruits of the Massach...
-Botanical Affinity Of The Cedar Of Lebanon And The Deodar
The following article will be read.with interest by the many admirers of the famous Deodar Cedar. It has frequently struck us as an important quality of this tree to sport when raised from seed. The...
-Botanical Affinity Of The Cedar Of Lebanon And The Deodar. Continued
The Cedar of Lebanon is also well known to us from the accounts of travelers, who have observed it in its native forests, and from their descriptions we learn that it is there often a very different t...
-A Botanical Chapter On Grapes
We take great pleasure, says the Farmer and Planter, of South Carolina, in calling the attention of our readers to the botanical essay on the different varieties of native grapes, furnished by our ...
-Botanical Explorers
Fraser's name often occurs among the early botanical explorers of this country, and it is given to several plants, including a fine Rhododendron. The elder Fraser visited Newfoundland previous to the ...
-Botanical Society Of Canada
At a meeting held in the Chemistry class-room of Queen's College, Kingston, the Botanical Society Of Canada was duly inaugurated. Among those who took a leading part in the exercises were the Rev. Pri...
-Botany Of The Southern States. In Two Parts. Part I
Structural and Physiological Botany and Vegetable Products,, Part H.- Descriptions of Southern Plants. Arranged on the Natural System. Preceded by a Linnaen and a Dichotomous Analysis. By Prof. John D...
-Botany of The U. S. Exploring Expeditions
There are four official reports on the Botany of the United States Expeditions for the purpose of surveying a railroad route from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, prepared by order of the A...
-A Bottle Of Smoke
We had, says Chambers Journal, such an article placed in our hands not long since. It was an ordinary glass bottle, such as those into which expert packers force a quart of porter; but which never, by...
-The Boundary Line Between Horticulture And Agriculture
WHAT!exclaim our readers, a division between the two primal occupations of man, born of one parent, educated in the same school, with one common purpose, one destiny? Certainly. By common acceptan...
-Bourbon Roses
9. Bouquet Da Flore Bright carmine; opens freely, and blooms profusely from June to November; a strong vigorous grower, and admirably adapted for a mass. A very fine and striking Rose. 10. Comte D'E...
-Bouvardia Houtteana
The old Bouvardia triphylla is a well known favorite, bnt yet not near as common as it deserves to foe. Most cultivators are well aware of its beauty and interest as a pot plant for the greenhouse or ...
-Bow To Make Spawn
The next preparation is a quantity of good spawn, which may be made as follows: Take equal portions of unfermented horse and cow manure, and fresh earth from a pasture field; mix and work these togeth...
-The Bowood Muscat Grape
The new grapes having been somewhat extensively introduced into this country, our readers will be glad to obtain all possible reliable information in regard to them. The following remarks on the Bowoo...
-Boxwood In India
A writer, in Cassells Illustrated Travels, says: When staying for a day or two with the owner of the lately established Gwaldung plantation, I remarked that a great quantity of the commonest wooden ...
-Boydell's Traction Engine And Endless Railway
On Wednesday, May 27, we joined the company which went to Wimbish Hall Farm, to witness the trial of a machine that, beyond a doubt, is one of those inventions destined to supersede, to a certain exte...
-Bradshaw
This is a very large and beautiful Plum; a free, vigorous grower, and a most prolific bearer. Highly valuable. We received it from Wm. Kenrick, in 1839, under the name of Large Black Imperial; but it ...
-The Branch-Trimmer And Pruning-Knife
The instrument here represented is due to M. Marmuse, maker of horticultural implements. Its object is to obviate the necessity of using two instruments alternately, according to the parts needing at...
-Brandywine Grape
Several bunches of this luscious grape were sent to me by Dr. Henry F. Askew, of Wilmington, Delaware, in 1859. They were taken from the vine on the 14th of September. Berry rather large, one inch in...
-Breck's Book of Flowers, With Hints On Flower-Beds And Flower-Borders
Here Is A New Book, For Which We Desire Our Thanks To The Author on the delightful subject of horticulture and flowers. The brightest, the fairest, the sweetest, the loveliest members of the vegetabl...
-Brief Remarks On Culture Of The Lucullia Gratissima
In many gardens this precious species of the Rubiaceae is treated as a stove plant exclusively. The result of it, however, in most instances, is not satisfactory; the blossoms appear but scanty, and a...
-Brief Remarks On Plant-Houses
As the various plant-houses are in active operation at this time of year, a few genera] remarks regarding them may be of service. There are several kinds of structures required where artificial plant...
-Briggs Catalogue
Briggs & Bro., the famous Seedsmen and Florists, inform us that the January Number of their Illustrated Floral Work is now in press, and will be issued soon; that it will be the grandest work they eve...
-Bright's New Book On The Grape
William Bright of Philadelphia, having returned from England, respectfully informs Pomelogists and the Public at large, that his New Work on the Culture of the Grape is now ready for delivery. It is e...
-Brinckle's Orange Raspberry
By very general consent this fruit is coming rapidly to be considered one of the very best for cultivation; it is a great favorite with amateurs, and is one of those gifts to man, of hybridization, wh...
-British Queen
Last autumn I applied a mulch of tan-bark, span-roof form, up to the tops of the plants. Previously, poudrette and street sweepings were worked in freely on either side of the rows. In the spring the ...
-British Queen Strawberries
We are indebted to B. G. Pardee, Esq., of Geneva, for specimens of this famous variety, grown by Dr. Hull, of Newbugh. They were of fair size, but not much more than half as large as we have seen them...
-Broad-Leaved Evergreens - Their Winter Protection
Broad-leaved Evergreens, or others than Coniferae, are still the great want of ornamental gardening in the Northern and Middle States. And although, during the past few years, numbers of experimental ...
-Brockville Horticultural Society
We are indebted to some friend in Brockville (C. W.) for a nicely printed pamphlet; containing the officers, committees, premium list, etc, for the present year. The premium list is well arranged, and...
-Bromeliaecans Plants
In reply to a correspondent, and thinking it might also interest others of our readers, we give a few notes on the culture of these curious plants. First, it must be noted that all the finest plants o...
-Bronx Pear
This is claimed as a new seedling, originating with James P. Swain, of Bronxville, in 1850, and described as follows in the American Agriculturist: Tree, an upright grower, pyramidal; wood, reddish b...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society
While some Societies, organized for the promotion of Horticulture, are struggling with public apathy, others are springing into existence under auspicious circumstances, with an energy and enthusiasm...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (2)
This society held a Festival of Rosea on the 15th and 16th of June, in the spacious and elegant public hall known as the Athenaeum. We had the pleasure of making a hasty visit on the first day, bu...
-The Brooklyn Horticultural Society (3)
The Society met March 25th, President Degrauw in the chair. Among the flowers on the table were a beautiful Double White Flowering Almond from Mr. Dailledouze, a very fine Acacia Drummondii from Mr. ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (4)
The regular Conversational Meeting was held on Tuesday evening, Oct. 1, President Degrauw in the chair. The meeting was opened by a short lecture from Mr. P. B. Mead, on the flowers on the table. Dahl...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (5)
The fall exhibition of the Brooklyn Horti-cultural Society will be held at the Academy of Music on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, September 23d, 34th, and 25th. The audience room will be used on th...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (6)
We continue the proceedings of the Conversational Meeting from our last. They are somewhat lengthy, but their interest will fully repay perusal. We find, on looking at our account last month, that the...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (7)
The Conversational Meeting of June 10th was held in the new room of the Society, at the Academy of Music. The table was decorated with a fine collection of fruits and flowers, contributed by Messrs. B...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (8)
The Society met at the Academy of Music, on Tuesday evening, June 24th, President Degrauw in the chair. On the table were paintings of flowers by Mrs. Stirrup; Antirrhinums, Petunias, a very fine seed...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (8). Continued
At the same time the Common Council should pass an ordinance making it a severe penalty to molest or destroy either the birds or the bird-houses, and cause such an ordinance to be promptly and effectu...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (9)
The most delightful indications of approaching spring, after the terribly severe winter, we have yet seen, was the gay exhibition of the Brooklyn Horticultural Society, which closed last evening. the ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (10)
We are glad to learn that our Brooklyn friends are already in motion for 1861. The Spring Exhibition will be held at the new Academy of Music, on the 17th, 18th, and 19th of April. The prize list is v...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (11)
The members of this enterprising Society held their anniversary meeting at their room on Tuesday evening, January 3. Among those present we noticed John Maxwell, W. C. Langley, J. Hazlehurst, Esqrs., ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (12)
I regret you were unable to attend the spring exhibition of the above. I was expecting you would have a word to say about it, and therefore deferred this article. I noted at the time what struck me i...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (13)
The Spring Exhibition of this society was held at the Athenaeum on the 11th, 12th, and 13th of April. The exhibition will take its place among the best which the Society has held, and in a pecuniary p...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (14)
Just as we are putting our last form to press the Brooklyn Society is in the midst of its fall exhibition. Their new room at Montague Hall is not. in some respects, as good as their old one at the Ath...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (15)
There seems to be a feeling quite prevalent among our rural friends that our Horticultural Societies might be made productive of much more good than they now accomplish, and this feeling we share very...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (15). Part 2
The fact is, it is hard to keep clear of the public.Brooklyn next takes up the finance question. Standard works of reference which every gardener ought to have access to will certainly cost ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (15). Part 3
Fruits Best 2 bunches of Black Hot-house Grapes, E. & G. Marshall, Poughkeepsie. Second best, David Fowlis, gardener to E. Hoyt, Esq. Best 2 bunches of White Hot-house Grapes, James Bogie, gardener t...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (16)
We are indebted to Mr. Miller, the energetic Corresponding Secretary of this Society, for an account of its last exhibition, from which we condense as follows. In view of the times, it was deemed best...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (17)
At the meeting held October 29th, Mr. Pardee took the chair. [From this point to the January meeting we shall be compelled to condense very materially our reporter's copy. Our own remarks will not onl...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (17). Part 2
The subject selected for next meeting was. Cuttings and their Propagation. Adjourned for two weeks. The Society met again November 13th, Mr. Degrauw in the chair. Mr. Mead opened the meeting by po...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (17). Part 3
In layering evergreens we do different; some are twisted and some are tongued. As a general thing nurserymen and gardeners do not know how to make layers. With grape vines, leave every third eye on th...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (17). Part 4
Mr. Knox. - Mr. Fuller has placed me under embarrassing circumstances. Some friends bare injudiciously styled me the Strawberry King. I do not profess to be even a Prince. In my opinion A. Fuller...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (18)
The Brooklyn Society held its Second Conversational Meeting and Exhibition at the Atheneeum on Tuesday evening, July 16th, and we are glad to learn that it surpassed the first in point of interest and...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (19)
The following Address was delivered by President Degrauw at the First Conversational Meeting: Gentlemen of the Horticultural Society:- We have assembled this evening to discuss the subject announced ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (20)
Undismayed by the times, the Brooklyn Society has determined to hold its annual exhibition. The list of prizes is a very liberal one, embracing the usual collections,. and deserves, and will no doubt ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (21)
THE regular Conversational Meeting was held at the Athenaeum on Tuesday evening, August 20th. The attendance, especially of ladies, was large, and the display of flowers remarkably good. Mr. Bridgeman...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society (22)
We trust the members and friends of this Society will bear in mind that there is to be a spring exhibition at the Academy of Music, and prepare for it accordingly. The Society met at the Athenaeum, F...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society - Fall Exhibition
The unprecedented drouth of the past summer has not altogether destroyed vegetation. The Brooklyn horticulturists, and their enterprising friends of more distant localities, have proved that by skill ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society - Fall Exhibition (2)
This took place at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, on the 18th, 19th, and 20th of September. It was seriously thought, at one time, of suspending the fall exhibition; but we esteem it a fortunate circu...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society - Fall Exhibition (2). Continued
Mr. Jennison, superintendent for Mr. Mace, of Newburgh, exhibited the Delaware, Concord, and Hartford Prolific, the Delaware being in great perfection. Some of the bunches weighed half a pound, and be...
-The Brooklyn Horticultural Society - Officers, Etc., For 1862
The Society has elected the following officers and committees for 1862: President, John W. Degrauw; Vice-Presidents, S. J. Eastman, J. A. Wallace, Lyman Burnam, R. W. Ropes, H. M. Barnes; Treasurer, ...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society - Speech Of President Degrauw
The orators, the poets, and the philosophers of Rome, invite the student who would sympathize in their emotions. Such is the ancient history of Horticulture, and the first rosy light that beamed alter...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society - Speech Of President Degrauw (2)
Concluded from page 438. Another object, far more interesting, invites your care. It is the culture of plants indigenous to our soil; they are confided to our guardianship. But look around you; see t...
-Brooklyn Horticultural Society - Spring Exhibition
The spring exhibition was held at the Academy of Music. Having been unable to attend, we are not able to speak of the character of the exhibition personally, but it is represented as having been emine...
-Brooklyn, Jan. 21, 1861
Mr. Editor. - Dear Sir, - When a man is set upon by a crowd, it's but a small request that the on-lookers allow him room to defend himself) and as you and your readers have stood by and seen me con...
-Brooxlyn Horticultural Society - Conversational Meeting
The Society held its regular Conversational Meeting at the Athenaeum on Tuesday evening, April 23d, President Degrauw in the chair. The evening was occupied mainly by Dr. Trimble, of Newark, N. J., wi...
-The Brown Beurre Pear
Why it is that this delicious old pear is so little noticed of late, when so many new and as yet untried (thoroughly,) varieties are receiving the praises of our pomologists, is to me strange. I have ...
-Brown Dutch
Close head, leaves brownish green, good flavor, and very hardy for winter. When fancy leads that way, the Brown Bath, and Paris Cos, are about the two best of the class. The former is hardy and fine ...
-Brown Houses And Lightning Bods
A man travelling in Yankee land, or 'fork state, as he works into the suburbs of the cities, and through the villages, finds nothing more common than pretending snuff colored houses - not rappee, w...
-Brown Houses And Lightning Conductors
THERE fashions in all things, and so far from underrating the importance of imitation as a means of improvement, we are inclined to value it for all it is worth. Many a man who would never be led to m...
-Brugmansia Sanguinea
AT page 269, Vol. III., of the Horticulturist, will be found an engraving of the Double Brugmansia, cultivated by Downing. In the following article is described the B. sanguines, which must be one of ...
-Brugmansia Scaveoibns
Parties having large conservatories or entrance halls to decorate in the autumn, will find this one of the most useful plants, treated as under. If commencing with a young plant, it must be grown on a...
-Bt William Saunders. Vegetable Garden
Attend to the lifting of roots, as carrota, beets, etc.; such roots are best preserved in a cool cellar, secured from frost, packed in sand or dry earth. Parsnips may remain in the around as long as p...
-The Buckulnd Sweetwater Grape
Mr. Editor:- In the September number of the Horticulturist you have been kind enough to give your readers an extract of the Royal Horticultural Society, of London, all of which is very nice and ver...
-The Buckwheat-Tree. Cliftonia Mylocorium
This curious production has excited very little attention among us. It is a native; and, no doubt, partially hardy, if not entirely so, in this latitude. By turning to the second volume of Nattall's S...
-Budded Roses
Fashion is very capricious; - now it is on the verge of a precipice, engaging every eye - threatening, as it were, by its extravagance, to ruin its votaries, and end its very existence, - and now agai...
-Budding
If you have failed to prepare your Basswood bark for tying buds, perhaps you can get bass matte; these, if new, sound, and well soaked in water, will answer. If this cannot be had, try coarse, strong ...
-Budding And Grafting
THE modes of multiplying improved varieties of fruits so as to retain the same qualities as exist in the parent tree, are various. Those most usually resorted to are increasing by eyes or buds from cu...
-Budding Roses
Dear Sir: July is the month for budding roses, and I wish a little space among the Domestic Items to recommend this practice to rose amateurs. The common mode of budding rare roses on stocks near the ...
-Budding The Magnolias
In the December number, Reuben asks for information respecting budding the finer kinds of magnolias, Conspicua, Soulan-giana, etc. Having had some experience with these, 1 give my mode, first saying, ...
-Buddleia Colvilei
This is very unlike any other Asiatic species of Buddleia in its size and form of flower, color, and the locality it inhabits, its congeners being almost without exception tropical or subtropical pl...
-A Budget Of Queries
A. J. Downing, Esq: May I trespass on your kindness by soliciting answers to the following queries: 1st. What is the best way of composting the leaves of the forest for manure? [By treating them with ...
-Buffalo Horticultural Society
The Annual Meeting of this Society was quite spirited, evincing a desire, on the part of its members, to re-establish its former prosperity and usefulness. The following list comprises the officers el...
-Buffalo Horticultural Society (2)
The Society met at Lewis Eaton's - The President in the Chair. Fruits Exhibited By Mrs. Vandewater; two varieties for a name. The committee appointed to publish the Transactions of the Society for ...
-Buffum Pears
If, in the classification of fruits, we take in consideration not only the quality, but the vigor of the tree, its constant fertility, its fitness to succeed in almost all kinds of soils, and to yield...
-Bugs
Who can enumerate the expedients advised to extirpate these venomous pests! Snuff, tobacco water, soot, guano, lime, ashes, and the like have been essayed, and succeeded for the most part only when, t...
-Bugs In Peas
From the universal complaint of bugs in peas, I am led to infer that there is no known variety exempt Is this so! However this may be we have a red variety (whereof the enclosed is a sample) of good f...
-Building Greenhouses
WILL you please to advise me in regard to these enquiries: First My employer is building a new place, and quite a discussion has arisen in regard to the greenhouse. In making some improvements, we e...
-Bulbs
There have been remarkably fine importations of bulbous roots, this season, and in greater variety than usual. Those from the establishment of A. Bridgeman, 876 and 878 Broadway, New York, seem to us ...
-Bulbous Roots
Mr. A. Bridgeman, of New York, advertises a large stook of bulbous roots, including a number not generally kept for sale. His catalogue may be had on application to 876 Broadway. J. M. Thorburn & Co....
-Bulbs Produced By Old Bulb-Scales
Two ladies on a return from the south of Europe in 1656, placed specimens of dried leaves, seeds, mosses, etc, in a book with black sheets of paper. A bulb found on the rock of Gibraltar being too lar...
-The Bur-Oak, (Quercus Macrocarpa,) As An Ornamental Tree
It was among the earliest efforts of our much-loved Downing to awaken the attention of rural improvers to the peculiar and varied beauties, and the excellent adaptability, of our native forest trees i...
-Burr's New Pine
This is the finest flavored pistillate of our land. The fruit does not exceed the medium size, and. although prolific, does not equal Hovey's in productivesorts - which are adapted for grouping, and w...
-Burr's Old Seedling
Tannic acid - one gallon of tan-liquid to one hundred gallons of water. 3. Manure water - the manure liquid of the barn-yard. Spring water - water from an adjacent...
-Burying Plants During Winter
A writer in the London Florist and Pomologist gives an account of his experience in wintering geraniums by burying them in a trench under ground, below the reach of frost The result was quite successf...
-Button-Hole Bouquets And Coat Flowers
BUT few seem to understand that there is any difference between a button-hole bouquet and a coat flower; yet there is, and a very great difference too, the flower being, as the word signifies, a singl...
-Button-Hole Flowers
FERNs used for button-hole, or indeed for any kind of bouquets, should be cut off plants that have been grown in a cool house, or that have at' all events been well-hardened off, or otherwise, though ...
-The Buttonwood Tree Disease
Dear Sir - A Constant Reader in the July No., inquires for a little light on the subject of the Buttonwood disease. He shall have that light, alhough he may consider it by far, smaller than a rush-l...
-Buy The Best
It is hardly necessary for us to caution against, or repeat our advice in favor of, the purchase of any tree or vine simply because it is offered at a low price. The buyer should always remember that ...
-C. H. Miller
I can scarcely reconcile myself to the common practice of plowing in the manure to the depth that our farmers generally do. This course he had heard advocated for the past twenty years; he was now a b...
-Cabbages
It may not be generally known that Cabbages readily grow and are easily propagated by slips, A stump may be put out in the spring, and the sprouts as they vegetate cut off, the cut allowed to dry, and...
-Cabbage Worms. The Fameuse Grape List For New York
A Correspondent of the Western Rural, writing from Hammondsport, a noted locality for the production of grapes and wine, says: The latest approved grape list for the practical vineyardist in this l...
-Cactae
Mr. Editor:- Will you allow an old subscriber, a true lover of Cactae, and not an unsuccessful cultivator of these plants, a corner in your valuable columns, for a few remarks called forth by an artic...
-Cacteae - Remarks On
The Cacteae are a very numerous and exceedingly interesting tribe of plants, which we think ought all perhaps to be included in one genus, divided into several sections. At the same time, it must be a...
-The Cacti
I feel very math inclined to take up the cudgels against yourceav respondent Working Gardener, in behalf of that exceedingly beautiful and much abused order of plants, the Cacti. I do not care for ...
-Cactuses
As soon as they are past blooming, give them a shift into good, turfy, rich soil, keep them in the house, and give abundance of water, both at roots and top, by syringing. When they have made good gro...
-The Calabash-Tree
Among the products of Cuba, alluded to in our hasty notes on that island, is the long-leaved Calabash-tree, Crescentia cujete. This species attains the ordinary height of a pear-tree, being twenty to ...
-Caladiums
Do not forget to prepare a good stock of Caladiums, both for growing in pots for furnishing the greenhouse in summer, and also for planting outside at the end of May. These latter should not be expose...
-Calandrinia
The ornamental species belonging to the genus Calandrinia are mostly natives of South America, and like the Mignonette are shrubby plants there, though with us, and also in Europe, they are treated as...
-The Calceolaria
The Calceolaria, - its name comes from the Latin for shoe - the blossom resembles an ancient Roman slipper, - singularly beautiful with its heavy clusters of golden, crimson, maroon, or rose-colored f...
-Calendar Of Operations. December. The Vineyard
PRUNING the vine, and preparing the cuttings for sale, may be done in any moderate weather this month. As directed in a former article, the two best canes or branches of the young wood are selected, a...
-Calendar Of Operations. January
It is proposed to offer to the readers of the Horticulturist a monthly calendar of operations, or hints of the work to be performed in the fruit, vegetable, and flower gardens, greenhouse, grapery, pl...
-Calendar Of Operations. July. The Vineyard
Much of the work of this mouth is but a continuation of that recommended for June: tying up, removing lateral shoots and suckers, keeping the weeds down, etc. etc. Some vine dressers recommend stirrin...
-The California Fair
California exhibits, at the present moment, the most marked difference between the Anglo-Saxon and the Spanish race and habits. A fair on a grand scale has been held at Sacramento, and the California ...
-California Farmer
This excellent paper is again upon our table after an absence of months, owing to being misdirected. It is redolent of fruits and flowers, agriculture, tree-planting, and all that relates to home. We ...
-California Flower Season
A correspondent at San Jose, California, writing early in January says: - In this balmy western land, we sit to write by open windows, inhaling the perfume of heliotrope and mignonette. Daisies spark...
-California Fruits
A correspondent of a daily paper gives the following interesting account of California fruits: The annual fairs of the Mechanics' Institute and the Horticultural Society, united, are now open at San ...
-California Fruit-Growers' Convention. From The California Farmer
Held at Stockton, Thursday Evening, October 1. Not the least important part of the programme of proceedings for the State Agricultural Fair, lately held at Stockton, was the Convention of Fruit Growe...
-California Fruit-Growers' Convention. From The California Farmer. Continued
Chairman. At the East, good fruit maintains a high price, though the production is great Winter fruit, when imported here, becomes fall fruit. We can get varieties from the Southern States to keep up ...
-The California Gbape
There has been an unusual interest for some time past, to learn something definite respecting a grape growing in California, of which almost every return traveller speaks in the most extravagant terms...
-The California Gbape. Part 2
It is not my intention to undervalue classical education. There are scholarly men to whom it is as the breath of life, and who, in sustaining its refining inliuences, take that share in the well-being...
-The California Gbape. Part 3
II. Sketches of European Capitals, by William Ware, Author of Letters from Palmyra, etc. Boston: Phillips, Sampson & Co.; 1851. 1 vol. 12 mo. One of the most delightfully instructive volumes for a lo...
-The California Gbape. Part 4
The great circle, four or five miles round, will be one unbroken line of carriages, of all sizes ed, will be gay with Its hundreds of ladies and gentlemen on horseback - the banks of the Serpentine wi...
-California Grand Agricultural And Horticultural Fair
We have received from Messrs. Warren & Son, of San Francisco, a circular containing a premium list amounting to about two thousand dollars ! The Fair was to be held at San Francisco, and continue one ...
-California Grapes
Mr. M. Walthall, Jr., of Stockton, Cal., writes us to know the name of a Grape which is almost the only one grown there. He says, The wood is vigorous, short-jointed, and light yellowish in color. Le...
-The California Grape; By T. A. S., Syracuse, N. Y
Dear Sir: - I notice in the Horticulturist for the current month, a communication from R. G. Pardee, Esq., on the California Grape, in which it is stated on the authority of Capt. H - , of the U. S. a...
-California Horticulture
Editor of the Horticulturist: - I was pleased to see in your late number an article relative to this extensive field of horticultural enterprise. The author evinces considerable interest and knowledge...
-California Seedling Pears
AT a meeting of the Western New York Horticultural Society, last winter, President Barry acknowledged the receipt of several varieties of seedling pears, originated in California, and of which he said...
-California Wine And Brandt
The San Francisco Price Current remarks on this production; (the Brandy spoken of is quoted at $3 per gallon): California Brandy, distilled from the native grape, can now be bought in the market, a...
-Callas
One of my lady correspondent? complain very much of her Calla Lily which grows vigorously but produces no flowers, and has not had any for two years. Without asking any questions, I venture the asse...
-Calycanthus Floridus
Allspice Flower, or Sweet-scented Shrub. This is a well-known plant, yet it is not seen nearly as often as it should be. This species is the best, as it is very fragrant, and not as strong a grower as...
-Calyptraria Haemantha, Planchon And Linden
This is by far the finest Melastomad which has ever been brought to Europe, not even excepting the Medinilla magnifica. The figure in the 'Fore des Serres' will enable the reader to judge of the meri...
-Camelia Japonica
The dark green, glossy foliage and glorious flowers of these plants commands the admiration of all. They are more easily cultivated than is generally supposed. They should be potted in a soil composed...
-Camelina Sativa
Packages of seed of the above plant having been distributed from the Patent Office, and having had numerous inquiries respecting its nature and use, we may state that it is cultivated for its seeds, w...
-Camellias
We cannot do better than refer you to a short article, on pages 131 and 132 of our last volume. It gives some excellent and reliable hints on soil, potting, shifting, temperature, pruning, watering, A...
-The Camellia (2)
Mr. Editor, - The length of my first article upon the Camellia forbade me to enter upon the merits of the different varieties. Since you, however, think it will make the subject more perfect, I will g...
-Camellia A. J. Downing
In our description of the Camellia Spiralis rubra we stated that we had a plate of another of Mr. Becar's seedlings/to which he had given the name of Mr. Down-ing. Mr. Becar's purpose was to sell the ...
-Camellia Reticulata
In a late English horticultural journal, we find the following: Among subjects of exhibition were some of unusual interest, and, considering the coldness of the weather, they were more numerous than ...
-Camellia Spiralis Rubra
We present for a frontispiece this month a remarkable Camellia raised by the late Noel J. Becar, in his day one of the first Camellia amateurs in the country. This is the Camellia which Mr. Becar firs...
-The Camellia, Hardy At Baltimore
Passing through Baltimore a few days since, we made a hasty visit to the country-seat of Dr. Ed-mundson, a mile from the city, to see Camellias growing and blooming in the open air, (see Horticultural...
-Camellias - American Seedlings
We gather from the newspapers that McKen-zib's seedling Camellia, named Victoria, has been sold to an English plant-grower for $1,000. We have heard nothing of its merits. Mr. H. A. Graef, of Brooklyn...
-Camellias In A Drawing-Room (Alice)
A drawing-room is about the worst room for a camellia to be in, when it is in blossom, or in blossom bud. The camellia is an evergreen, and the roots of evergreens are not so active or so excitable ...
-Campanula As A Window Plant
Barrelier's Bell Flower (Campanula Barrelieri) is considered by a correspondent of the Garden one of the finest of all dwarf-growing Bell flowers for window culture; and, after trying many others, inc...
-Campanula Rotundifolia, (Hair Bell.)
In similar localities, but more generally distributed throughout the state, we may find the hair bell. The round radical leaves of this species give rise to its botanical, and the slender hair-like le...
-Can Pears Be Grown Profitably For Market?
I had promised myself, ere this, to respond to the article in your May number under this caption, but time and circumstances have alike prevented. It requires very little confession on my part to admi...
-Can Pears Be Profitably Grown For Market?
After reading the glowing accounts which have been given in the many pomo-logical discussions of the fruit meetings and conventions which have been held in different sections of the United states for ...
-Can Pears Be Profitably Grown For Market?. Continued
Very well, may say my readers. But one swallow does not make a summer, and others may have done better. Let us see. I can now number up twenty or thirty of my friends and neighbors who commenced ...
-Can Pears Be Profitably Grown For Market? (2)
The article, under the above title, in the May number of the Horticulturist, will be readily remembered by those who take an interest in Pear culture and gave it the favor of their perusal. I supposed...
-Can Pears Be Profitably Grown For Market? (2). Part 2
Now, it would naturally be supposed, that amid all the sharp criticism which has been written on my article, some inkling of what I had called for, viz., statistical information to the point wo...
-Can Pears Be Profitably Grown For Market? (2). Part 3
There the bleak winds from the lakes, sweeping with almost tempest fury over exposed situations, gives such an inclination eastward to the very trees themselves, that could they speak you would hear t...
-Can We Afford To Live In It?
Occasionally some millionaire builds a mansion, which is the admiration of the town, or erects a country house, which, with its grounds, is the pride and boast of its neighborhood. In time the great m...
-Can't Do Without It
Hosts of our subscribers write us that they cannot do without The Horticulturist. This is exactly the point we have been aiming at for the last two years - to make the magazine so good that every one ...
-Canada
We have to acknowledge many favors in the way of subscriptions and good opinions from Canada, where there evidently exists a large class of tasteful lovers of Horticulture. We should be pleased to hea...
-Canada (2)
If our readers have been good enough to accompany us on a visit to Canada, they have doubtless discovered that there are many persons deeply interested in horticultural topics. They may also be intere...
-Canadian Chief Grape
The handsomest and largest bunch of grapes grown in the open air that we have seen, has been sent us by Mr. G. W. Fearman, of Hamilton, Canada West. It is a seedling white grape, somewhat resembling t...
-The Candy-Tuft - Iberis
The Purple Candy-Tuft, (I. umbellata,) an engraving of which we give, is an annual plant, growing to the height of about a foot, with spreading branches and large heads of purple flowers. This species...
-The Canna
Among the ornamental shrubs which are greatly sought after for the decoration of lawns is the Canna. It is a free growing plant, and its large and brilliantly marked leaves present a beautiful appea...
-Canna Seed
I noticed, some time ago, an inquiry by a lady as to the most successful mode of germinating canna seed. Having subsequently received seed of the new canna Marechal Valliant (it having the reputation ...
-Canned Fruits
For the largest and best collection of, giving full description of process and expenses. Premium, The Society's Silver Medal. Premiums are subject to the general rule of restriction, that where obje...
-Canning Fruit
The season of canning fruit having arrived, we give the following extracted directions as the best and most practical of the many writers on the subject The Farmers' Advertiser, by the way an extreme...
-Canning Strawberries
Strawberries are found by some difficult to can, but we have found it otherwise. Our wife has practiced canning this excellent fruit for, at least, fifteen years, and has met with no more failures in ...
-The Cannon Hall Muscat Grape
If this Grape could be managed so that a sufficient quantity of berries could be set on every part of the bunches, and the gangrenous spots prevented on each berry, it would be the finest grape in the...
-Cantua Dependens And Bicolor
Those elegant greenhouse plants Cantua dependant and bicolor, the former of recent introduction to our greenhouses, flowered here last May, and fully realized all that had been previously stated in th...
-Cape Jasmines
See that Cape Jasmines are free from insects, or the beauty of the plants is spoiled; this is one of the plants, that if there is a bug, scale, or red spider in the house it is sure to find it out. A ...
-Carbolate Of Lime For Currant Worms
A correspondent writes us that this is entirely ineffective in his experience. At a meeting of a Farmers' Club in this vicinity, held this past year, the subject of diseases of vegetation came up for...
-Carbolic Soap Far Insects
Mr. Fuller has also experimented a little with this article in killing insects upon greenhouse plants, particularly the green fly (Aphis), which, as everybody knows, is a great pest, and one not readi...
-The Carbou Stiffener
Reading in the February number of the Horticulturist the article on Stretching Wires, by Horticola, reminded me that in a former number, speaking of dwarf apple-trees grown as edging, I promised to ...
-A Card
With the present issue of the Horticulturist my connection with it as its Editor ceases. Undertaken at a time of great physical depression, it has been to me for four years and a half a source of amus...
-Care Of Calla Lillies
A friend, whose lilies are the wonder and admiration of the village, writes The Laws of Life as follows: 1 keep my lilies growing all summer, set out on the ground near my dining-room door, in somew...
-Care Of Shrubs In Lawn And Door-Yard
ROSEs and shrubs are bow much grown in suitably arranged masses or natural groups, and that is the best way of keeping up a varied and varying show of all their beauties, with least trouble. When the...
-Care Of Trees
In Prussia, Denmark, and the South of Sweden, says Mr. Westwood, great care is taken of the trees in the public places, and in order to ensure the free action of the rain on the roots, the earth ro...
-Care Of Young Fruit-Trees
ED. WESTERN Horticulturist: - The great complaint of want of success in the cultivation of fruit trees, can in a great majority of cases be attributed to a lack of proper care. Not only after they are...
-Carinas
A few of the most distinct kinds should be treated the same way for the same purpose. The variety called Tricolor is one of the best for that purpose, it being a dwarf grower, and the foliage beautifu...
-Carlisle, Kt
Dear Sir: I received your Horticulturist, and I am so highly pleased with its contents, beauty, and value, that I feel disposed to exert my influence in its favor. This locality is proverbially the mo...
-The Carnation Teen Through A Microscope
It is well known that the examination of flowers, and vegetables of every description, by the microscope, opens a new and interesting field of wonders to the inquiring naturalist. Sir John Hill has gi...
-A Carniverous Plant
A remarkable plant was exhibited to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, by Dr. Hooker, who gave the inaugural address as president of the biology section. The address was upon the ...
-The Carob Tree, Or St. John's Bread
Among the recent importations from Alicant, Spain, were some seeds of the Carob tree, the pods of which, when ripe, contain a few drops of a substance resembling honey, and on that account supposed to...
-Carolina
This is no doubt Nickajack, which is an old apple, and has many synonyms, which arc given below, Mr. Kennedy says: The Carolina matures for use in March, April, and May, according to season, -and is ...
-The Carolina June Apple
Of this apple, we have had from private growers, more especially at the South, very favorable accounts; and we append the several opinions of well known cultivators at a late Pomological Convention: -...
-The Caroline De Sansal Rose
In looking over half an acre of Hybrid Perpetual or Remontant Roses in bloom, last summer, with a view to selecting a couple of varieties for illustration, the Geant des Batailles (Giant of Battles), ...
-The Carpenter Apple
This is a new variety, originating with Mr. Charles Carpenter, of Kelly Island. The tree is a strong, healthy grower, producing annually and abundantly. It is not above second-rate as an eatin...
-Carpenters White
Mr. Hogg had seen six which weighed three pounds, very large, white stone, juicy. Last of September and to 5th October. Added as promising well Mr. Berck-man's proposed the Chinese Cling or Shanghai a...
-Carpocapsa Pomonella, Or Apple Moth
This is the insect which disfigures so many of our apples, and causes such numbers of them to fall prematurely from the tree. Mr. Ewens, a member of our Society, in passing through his orchard, pulled...
-Carriage House And Stable For A Small Cottage
A subscriber requests as to give a plan and elevation of a cheap carriage-house and stable, to have a neat exterior expression, and, at the same time, not infringe on the convenience and space within;...
-Carrying Bees To The Moors
An apiarian, in Scotland, has given in the Cottage Gar-dener a narrative of his journey, in carrying four hives of bees to the moon. The first place they made application for liberty to leave them wit...
-Castle Of Indolence
All these are items in the description of a winter evening, which must surely be familiar to everybody born in a cold latitude; and it is evident that most of these delicacies cannot be ripened with...
-Catalogues
Descriptive Catalogue of Foreign and Native Evergreen and Deciduous Trees and Shrubbery, for shade and ornamental planting, by David J. Griscom, Proprietor of the Evergreen Nursery, Woodbury, N. J. D...
-Catalogue Of Choice Verbenas Cultivated And Sold By Dexter Snow, Chicopee, Mass. 1855
Mr. Snow's catalogue of Verbenas is the first devoted exclusively to that flower we have seen, and is well worthy the attention of the cultivators of this popular bedding plant. R. Buist's Catalogue ...
-Catalogue, Etc, Received
Trade List of Parsons & Co., Flushing, near New York, fox Autumn of 1856. Catalogue of Fruit and Ornamental Trees, 1856-57. By Verry Aldrich, Arispe, Burcen County, Illinois. Catalogue of Fruit and ...
-Catalogues And Books Received
Illinois State Fair for 1860. Premiums and Regulations for the Eighth Annual Exhibition of the Illinois State Agricultural Society, to be held at the City of Jacksonville, on the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13t...
-Catalogues And Pamphlets Received
Catalogue of a fine collection of Floricultural, Vegetable, and Agricultural Seeds, comprising assortments of the most approved varieties in cultivation, to be had of Curtis & Lincoln, Horticultural E...
-Catalogues Of Florists And Nursery Men
Prince's Special Supplementary Catalogue of Bulbous and Tuberous Roots, and of other new and rare species, comprising the most choice and splendid varieties. Linnaen Botanic Garden and Nurseries, Flus...
-Catalogues Of Mm. Blondeau-Dejussieu And Masson
In France, where the vineyard and its products have for many years been considered of primary importance, we would naturally expect to find not only the details of every branch of the business general...
-Catalogues Received
Catalogue of Fruits and Ornamental Trees, Evergreen, Flowering Plants, Bases, etc., cultivated and for sale at the Hopewell Nurseries, near Fredricks-burg, Va. Henry R. Robey, Proprietor. Twelfth ed...
-Catalogues Received (2)
Descriptive Catalogue of Fruit and ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Roses, etc, cultivated and for sale at the Coverdale Nurseries, Dr. Edward Taylor, proprietor, Cleveland, Ohio. A well considered list. Jo...
-Catalogues Received (3)
Catalogue of Vegetable, Agricultural, and Grass Seeds, and a choice collection of Flower Seeds, comprising in all upward of six hundred species and varieties. Also, one hundred varieties of French Hyb...
-Catalogues Received (4)
C. B. Murray, Foster's Crossings, Warren Co., Ohio. - The Nansemond Sweet Potato: Directions for Propagation, Culture, and Preservation; also, Experience of Growers in different parts of the Country. ...
-Catalogues Received (4). Continued
J. J. Mapes, New York. - Nitrogenized Super-phosphate of Lime. William Elliot, 31 John St, New York. - Descriptive Catalogue of Vegetable and Flower Seeds, etc. J. M. Mattison, Jacksonville, Tompkin...
-Catalogues Received (5)
Isaac Pullen, Hightstown, N. J. Fruit-Trees in Pots. Peach, Apricot, and Nectarine Trees. Hoopes & Brother, Cherry Hill Nurseries, West Chester, Pa. Supplementary Catalogue of the Ornamental Departme...
-Catalogues Received (6)
Descriptive Catalogue of a selection of Boses, cultivated and for sale by John Saul, Washington, D. C.; excellent. The Covington Nursery, Covington, Ga. Catalogue of 1859-60, by Henry Camp & Seas. C...
-Catalogues Received (7)
Catalogue des Cultures de l'Etablissement Horticole de Claude Bahut, a Montpelier, France, 1856-57. Mr. Sahut is extensively engaged in arboriculture and the seed business, and would be pleased to inc...
-Catalogues Received (8)
Premiums and Regulations for the Eighth Annual Fair of the Ohio State Board of Agriculture, to be held at Cincinnati the 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th days of September, 1857. Competition open to other S...
-Catalogues Received (9)
Descriptive Catalogue of Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Roses, and Bedding-out Plants, cultivated and for sale by W. T. & E. Smith, Geneva, N. Y., 1857. Catalogue des Onions, de Fleurs, et Frais...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received
New and Choice Bedding Plants, imported and cultivated by Daniel Barker & Co., Florists, Forest Hill, Utica, N. Y., 1857. Catalogues, Etc, Received #1 Catalogue of Fruit and Ornamental Trees, and Pl...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (2)
Annual Report of the Managers of the Chester County, Pennsylvania, Agricultural Society, for 1858, West Chester. A stately pamphlet and full of interest. This county takes rank in its intelligence no ...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (3)
Butler & McCulloch's Spring Catalogue of Choice Flower, Shrub, and Tree Seeds, Covent Garden Market, London. E. Buist's Catalogue of Select Roses; Rosedale Nurseries, and 922 Market St., Philadelphia...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (4)
Seventh National Exhibition of the United States Agri cultural Society, to be held in Chicago Sept 12th to 17th, 1859; with the huge and wonderful poster, showing that something valuable is to be acco...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (5)
The Gardener's Monthly for December is at hand, as sprightly and as fresh as ever. We wish Mr. Meehan all the success he deserves. The Michigan Farmer, (weekly,) edited by R. F. Johnstone, and publis...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (6)
Descriptive Catalogue of Fruit and Ornamental 'trees, Flowering Shrubs, Greenhouse Plants, Roses, also, Vines, Garden Fruits, etc, cultivated at the East New London Nurseries, New London, Conn. Wm...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (7)
Bridgeman's Descriptive List of French Hybrid Gladiolus, and other Summer and Autumn Blooming Bulbs, supplementary to Catalogue No. 6. 878 Broadway, New York. - A very full list of these increasingly ...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (8)
Catalogue of (Dahlias and Bedding Plants, for spring of 1860 - John Wilson, Nurseryman and Florist, Albany Nursery, Albany, N. Y. - Embraces a choice collection of Dahlias, Fuchsias, Yerbenas, Phloxes...
-Catalogues, Etc, Received (9)
Cherry Hill Nursery, Westchester, Pa., spring of 1858. This circular embraces a long list of the best strawberry plants, priced, and trees, Osage Orange, Silver Maples, etc. etc. Joshua Hoopes, propri...
-The Catalpa
IT has always been a wonder to me, in reading lists of trees given for ornamental, for street, for timber, and western prairie planting, that the Catalpa is so seldom mentioned and planted - it certai...
-The Catawba Grape
A total failure, except where they are trained against the east and south side of my house (brick wall); about one-half rotted; this balance were as fine as could be, and would have eclipsed by far an...
-Catawissa Grapes
Messrs. Editors: - I was greatly surprised, when overlooking the proceedings of the Fruit Growers' Society Of Western New York, to find the Hartford Prolific, Rebecca, Concord, Perkins, Diana, and som...
-The Catawissa Raspberry
THE Catawissa Raspberry is a native variety, entirely new and distinct in its characteristics, in respect to the manner of bearing, and the periods of maturing its fruit, which promise to render it an...
-A Caterpillar Plague
The following is taken from the Free Press of Loo-don, Canada West: Allow me to note that Tuesday and Wednesday of this week was a continuation of heavy rains and murky weather, impeding the importan...
-Catuga County. Horticultural Soctety
The September exhibition of this Society was held at Stanford Hall, in the city of Auburn, on the 20th. The following is a list of the premiums awarded: Fruits Applet- Best twenty varieties, S. 8. G...
-Cauliflowers
This desirable vegetable does not attain to great perfection while the weather is dry and hot; cool, moist climates being most favorable to its growth. Very good crops may be obtained by sowing seed i...
-The Cause Of The Curled Leaf
It has been charged to insects, but my microscope, (which is the kind called a cloth prover,) and is of one inch focal distance, detects none There are insects seen in the later stages of the evil, ...
-The Cause Of The Curled Leaf. Continued
5. In a few cases the points of the shoots , and at other times the side and base leaves, were found diseased with the curl in mid-summer. In all such cases there was a clear connection between these ...
-Caution
The following Caution, which we extract from the London Gardener's Chronicle, shows that all the fools are not on this side the Atlantic. Viotims may gather consolation from this, if they can: So...
-Cayuga County Horticultural Society
The exhibition of the Cayuga County Horticultural Society took place yesterday (Sept 20th) afternoon and evening in Stanford HalL The arrangements of the exhibition were such as to give a good display...
-Cayuga Horticultural Society
The first annual meeting of this Society was held at the Court House in the city of Auburn, on the 9th of February, and the following officers were chosen for the ensuing year: President H. T. DICKI...
-The Cbesoent Seedling Once More
So many readers of the Horticulturist have expressed a wish to be more particularly informed respecting the Crescent Seedling strawberry, that I have written to Mr. Lawrence, of New Orleans, and learn...
-The Cedron Tree Of Panama
A tree, which has attained great celebrity, is that called Cedron (Simaba Cedron, Planch.) The most ancient record of it which I can find is in the History of the Buccaneers, an old work published i...
-Celery
It is a good plan to blanch a portion of your celery in the following manner. Take hollow tiles, such as are used for drains, or two halves tied together if you can procure them more easily, and pull ...
-Celery - To Grow And Preserve Through Winter
Mr. Editor: I have often found it difficult to preserve this vegetable through the winter, and have no doubt that others have too. We have often grown it very fine in trenches or single rows, and then...
-Cement Cisterns
In household matters in the country, the use of rain water in almost every family is a necessity, because the well water is rarely soft enough for washing purposes. To secure rain water, cisterns are ...
-Cenathem
A charming novelty has been introduced in Ireland, which in the opinion of the Irish Farmer's Gazette, has strong claims to be regarded as A 1, among the charms of hardy flowering plants. We allude t...
-The Centennial
Only four million dollars wanted to complete the Centennial, Philadelphia's greatest pride. Congress refuses its appropriation; likewise New York, and only Massachusetts and New Jersey mean to do anyt...
-The Centennial Horticultural Society
The purposes for which this society was organized, was to take such preliminary steps as might be necessary for the management of the Horticultural Department of the Centennial Exposition, and also fo...
-The Central Park
N our former article on the Central Park, we presented some objections to the crowded planting of the trees, and closed with the remark that we should have something more to say to the same purpose....
-The Central Park - No 3
IN former articles we have criticised the close planting of the trees etc.; in the present we propose to say something about the manner and character of the grouping. We had been led to conclude, from...
-The Central Park - No.1
WE have hitherto remained silent in regard to the great work progressing in our midst, not from indifference or want of interest, but for want of time to make such personal examinations on the groun...
-Central Park Conservatory
We give in this number an engraving of the new flower house and conservatory to be erected the last of next year in the Central Park. In one sense it may be regarded as an accomplished fact. Knowing t...
-The Central Park Illustrated
FEW of those who visit the Central Park are really aware of the many gems of scenery and architectural ornament contained within it. They pass through it too hastily, and go over only the broader and ...
-Champlain Valley Horticultural Society
The doors of the Court House were thrown open to the members of the Horticultural Society Of the Valley of Lake Champlain, and to the public, at 2 o'clock, Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 5. and we hazard not...
-Champlain Valley Horticultural Society. Continued
Island, and carrying it through its first season in such a brilliant manner; may their successors emulate their spirit, though for the success of the Society, we trust that no change will take place i...
-The Chancellor Pear. Green's Germantown - Early St. Germain
This truly delicious pear, probably an accidental seedling of the St. Germain, originated at the country residence of Wharton Chancellor, Esq., on Schoolhouse Lane, Germantown, now within the limits o...
-Change In Size
OUR readers have noticed, perhaps, a slight change in size. We found, soon after our enlargement, two years ago, that our size was then one half inch too long, and one half inch too wide for previous ...
-Chap. III. Of The Quantitie
I would be remembered what a benefit riseth, not onely to every particular owner of an Orchard, but also to the common wealth, by fruit, as shall be shewed in the 16. chapter (God willing) whereupon m...
-A Chapter For Ladies On Gathering And Arranging Flowers
The reason that people so often fail in arranging flowers is, that they put all the brilliancy together, and perhaps relieve it but slightly, or not at all, with that verdure which abounds everywhere ...
-Chapter II. Purchases A " Place."
The matter settled, I began to prepare myself for my new occupation, by purchasing such books and papers as would be likely to render assistance. I soon added to my library Downing's Landscape Gardeni...
-A Chapter Of Gardening Experience
Your Hints to Beginners, in the June number of the Horticulturist, induces me to state a few facts in my experience in the cultivation of flowers, etc. Some three years since, I was totally ignoran...
-Charcoal As A Manure
Manures may be beneficial to plants by affording carbonic acid gas to their roots. Animal and vegetable matters evolve this gas while putrify-ing; but we are not aware of any manure that absorbs it fr...
-Charcoal. A Deodorizer Of Animal Matter, And Not A Preservative Or Antiseptic
I am induced to make some remarks upon this subject, in consequence of a discussion which took place at a meeting of the Polytechnic Club of the American Institute, in reference to a quality attribute...
-The Chardon Potato
For some years past a new variety of the potato, extraordinarily productive, has been cultivated on many farms in the environs of Mans. It is known under the name of the Chardon Potato, because it w...
-A Chat From Kentucky
I inclose a stem, with leaves attached, of the vine I mentioned in my note. Since I wrote you, I believe I have found out the vine. In Volume VI., page 141, of the Horticulturist, Mr. Downing speaks o...
-A Chat With My Neighbors
I have around me some very good neighbors, and all more or less imbued with a taste for horticultural pursuits. Some of them are readers of the Horticulturist, and, as a consequence, advanced in their...
-Cheap Advice To Nurserymen
I have had many inquiries concerning the treatment of pear seed, several complaining that notwithstanding the good quality of our seed, it did not come up the first year, necessitating two years' care...
-Cheap Cold Vinery, Built By Or. Geo. Pepper Norris, Near Wilmington, Del
The house is a lean-to, 40 feet long by 13 wide, 8 feet high at the back and 3 feet in the front, with a walk 2 feet wide and 18 inches deep in the centre, and a door in each end. The house points sou...
-Cheap Covering For Greek-Houses
I have a few words to say about a cheap and effectual covering for green-houses, pits, etc., which will answer for the American climate, as it has answered for our severe winters in the northern parts...
-A Cheap Glass Structure
I send you a plan of a small cold grapery, built about a year since, which I think combines neatness and cheapness. It need not cost, all finished, over $120. I cannot tell precisely what this cost, a...
-Cheap Glass Structures, And Grapes
There are thousands in our extended country who are deterred from using much glass on their grounds, through fear of the cost. They can enjoy strawberries in February, figs in March, grapes in April, ...
-Cheap Glass Strucures
The ensuing number will contain some illustrations of a cheap glass structure which has been built in Belgium for sixty cents a running foot, the most economical we have ever heard of. It is a subject...
-Cheap Greenhouses
Probably no question has been asked bo often of our leading florists, within the past three years, by gentlemen, as this: How can I build and beat a Cheap Green-hotae. And for a long time none coul...
-A Cheap Pit For Green-House Plants
Dear Sir - I take it lor granted that there are a good many among your readers, who, like myself, love gardens, and are too poor to have all the luxuries that belong to them. Among these luxuries I co...
-Cheap Plants
We have all along contended that it was better and really cheaper for the purchaser to pay double price for the best plants than to take those rated as cheap, as a gift. The following experience of a ...
-A Cheap Ventilator
Bear Sir - In your Dec. No. you mention that Dr. Arnott's chimney valve is the best cheap ventilating apparatus. I wish to describe a cheaper and more simple one, invented by my friend Peter Taylor, E...
-Cheap Vineries
To build a cheap vinery, use posts at back 5 feet apart, 5 inches by 2 1/2, 8 feet out, and 2 feet in the ground; posts in front 5 feet apart, of same dimensions as those at back, 3 feet out of the gr...
-Cheap Vineries And Green-Houses
Not a few of those who dabble in horticulture in various parts of the country, would be glad to borrow the assistance of a little glass in raising a good crop of foreign grapes, a few green-house plan...
-Cheap Vineries And Green-Houses. Continued
Of course there is a flue running back into a small chimney in the back wall to carry off the smoke - just as in our common stoves. This brick-stove, in its common form, is merely covered with a thic...
-Cheap Vineries And Vine Bordres
Having read with much satisfaction, your article upon the construction of cheap houses for horticultural purposes, and their perfect adaptation to the cultivation of choice fruits, and that being a su...
-The Chehango Strawberry Apple
Under this name we have received specimens of a large, oblong, handsome, striped Apple, of very good quality, from Mr. W. Collins, Jr., Smyrna, N. Y. He says the tree is a vigorous, upright grower, a...
-Chemical Farming
Mr. Bird, farmer, at Burton, near Bamburgh, England, has just sustained a heavy loss in a singular manner. He had a flock of 867 sheep, which were recently dipped in a chemical solution used for de...
-Chemistry Of Horticulture
Gardeners generally prepare their soils, so far as my observation has extended, in a very practical way, with little or no attention to the chemical principles involved in the operation. 'They have le...
-The Chenango Strawberry Apple
WE herewith present an illustration of the Chenango Strawberry Apple. Our attention was called to this apple in the summer of 1869, by Mr. J. H. Giving, whose orchard is near this city, for recognitio...
-Cherries
The Cherry is a highly popular fruit in this country - planted much more extensively, we think, than it is elsewhere. One reason for this is, that the Heart and Bigarreau varieties are generally rapid...
-Cherries (2)
There is no better guide to the trimming and pinching of cherry-trees than Barry's fruit Book, and, generally, we may say with a neighbor: It is about the only book that can be generally understood....
-Cherries (2). Continued
Cherries #5 As the present season has given a good cherry crop in most parts of the country, and as most persons are under a mistake concerning this superb fruit, I propose to give my experience in i...
-Cherries (3)
We received of James Hyde & Son, nurserymen, Newtown Centre, a lot of fine cherries on the first day of August, which from its lateness and superior quality, we think will be a valuable acquisition. I...
-Cherries - Pear Blight
At a sale of French fruit trees, in New-York, April, 1841, I purchased with others, over fifty cherry trees, under the names of White Bigarreau, Red Bi-garrcau, Guine of Turkey, Bigarreau de Lyon, Roy...
-Cherries - The Knight's Early Black
In all parts of the United States where the free growing sorts of cherries, classed under the heads of Hearts, and Biganreans, succeed well, the Early Black of Knight proves to be one of the very ...
-Cherries For The West, And For Profit
Throughout most sections of our Western and Southwestern States the cultivation of sweet cherries, like Black Tartarian, Rockport, Elton, etc., is attended with so many vicissitudes and so much uncert...
-Cherries In Michigan
AT the June meeting of the Michigan State Pomological Society, Mr. H. S. Chubb read a paper on cherries, in which we find the following items of interest to Michigan fruit growers: Of the twenty vari...
-Cherries, Marketing
CHERRIEs are one of the most perishable fruits that grow in our country, so much so, that many persons have relinquished the growing of them for marketing purposes. While others, thinking they can suc...
-Cherry
At the same time, Mr. Rivers brought specimens of Belle Agathe Cherry - a variety about the size of a Merry, and heart-shaped, with a firm, Bigarreau flesh, and of excellent flavor. The color is dark ...
-A Cherry Festival
On the 22d of June last Mr. F. R. Elliot, of Cleveland, Ohio, invited his pomological friends to a Cherry Festival, on which occasion the famous seedling varieties raised by Dr. J. P. Kirtland were to...
-Cherry Gossip
Notwithstanding the frosts of June, which materially injured some varieties, the cherry crop, in this vicinity, so far as I have observed, has been a fair one. I have had an opportunity of examining n...
-The Cherry Tree
In several forms it has been announced that the cherry does not succeed in many western localities, and we have been looking out for some experienced person to give the proper directions and informati...
-Cherry Trees Destroyed By Insects
An injury made by Mr. JOHN Waters, of New-Milford, respecting an insect which destroyed his young grafts, reminds roe of something that I should have made public before this. For several years back I...
-Cherry Trees In Grass
As a rule, it is not best to cultivate cherry trees, by which we mean stir the soil around the trunk and roots, the same as we are accustomed to do with other orchard crops. The reason is very simple....
-A Cherry, Peak, And Nectarine
At the last meeting of the British Pomological Society, Mr. Rivers, of Sawbridgeworth, produced fruit of Lemercier Cherry, which were large and very beautiful. This is a distinct variety of Reine Hort...
-Chester Co. Horticultural Society
The June exhibition of this Society was held at their Hall in Westchester, last week. The efficient officers and managers of the institution had spared no pains to fit up the building in the most tast...
-Chester Co. Horticultural Society. Continued
Looking at the present government of the city as about to provide, in the Peoples' Park, a breathing zone, and healthful place for exercise for a city of half a million of souls, we trust they will no...
-Chester Countty Horticultural Society
The stated meeting for March was held in the Hall, on the 8th inst., at the usual hour, Vice-President, J. H. Bull, presiding. The display of Apples, on the present occasion, has probably never been ...
-Chester County Horticultural Society
At a late meeting of the Chester County Horticultural Society the following named persons were elected officers for the ensuing year: JOHN RUTTER, Esq., President JaMEs H. Ball, Esq., and Dr. Geo. ...
-Chicago Exibition
The Illinois State Fair held at Chicago last month has been one of those events which the Horticulturist should not pass over. The pulse of Young America beats so strongly in that direction that an...
-Chicago, Illinois
Mr. Editor: - In June, 1857,1 built a small vinery for the Hon. J. N. Arnold of this place. It being the 28th of May when we commenced, there were doubts as to the canes ripening so as to withstand ou...
-Chiccory - Its Cultivation. And Its Uses
Chtccory, Succory, or wild Endive, (Chicorium intybus,) is a perennial plant, with a large, very long, simple tap-root. The first year it produces only numerous radical leaves, six to eighteen inches ...
-Child's Superb Grape
Mr. Prince thinks this similar to Dayton's Superb, a white grape. Mr. Wilder: Mine lived the first winter, died the second. Grapes added for cultivation under glass: Cannon Ball, Red Chasselas, Zinfi...
-The China Aster - Aster Chinensis
China Asters were first sent from China to Paris in 1730, and have since been carried to all civilized countries. At their first introduction they were single, and of only two colors, red and white. T...
-The Chinese Chrysanthemum
Mr. Editor, - One of the greatest secrets in gardening is, to do the right thing at the right time. And it is because they now require attention, that 1 send you at this season some remarks upon the c...
-A Chinese Garden
Mr. Fortune gives a 'curious description of a Chinese Garden in a recent letter, from which we make the following extracts: The plants consist of good specimens of southern Chinese things, all well ...
-Chinese Mode Of Taking Honey
During my sojourn in this place, I had an opportunity of witnessing a novel mode of taking honey from bee-hives. The Chinese hive is a very rude affair, and looks very different to what we are accusto...
-Chinese Peach
In the spring of 1850 I received, as a present from my friend, Mr. Charles Downing, of Newburgh, a peach tree imported from China direct, and as Mr. D. informs me it has not yet fruited with him, I pr...
-Chinese Pinks
Among the annuals recently introduced, the new Chinese Pinks promise to be among the most popular. We present our readers with a drawing of one of the new varieties, named Dianthus Chinensis Heddewigi...
-Chinese Plants
At last the mystery of the Yellow Camellia is solved, and wc may finally make up our minds that De Candolle's theory of colors is valueless. It was an ingenious idea to divide all plants between one o...
-Chinese Potato, Or Yam
Continued from page 509. The flowers are dioecious, that is, the sexes growing on different plants, disposed in speci-form branches at the junction of the leaves. The corolla of the males is composed...
-Chinese Potato, Or Yam (2)
We have all of us our favorite theories on particular subjects; and there are few people who have not cherished one of their own concerning that precious esculent, the potato, and its mysterious dis...
-Chinese Potato, Or Yam (2). Continued
Still a few genera are found in temperate climates. Our black bryony, of the English hedge-rows (Tamus communis), is one, though, to be sure, it is no great bargain; for though its fruit is red and su...
-Chinese Primroses For In-Door Culture
For a neat, flowering plant in the window, there is nothing which will repay so well for the space occupied, as one or two of the Chinese Primroses. They are natives of China, and are not adapted to o...
-A Choice List Of Azaleas And Rhododendrons
THE finest collection of Azaleas in America can be found at the nurseries and greenhouses of Parsons & Co., Flushing. Those kept in the greenhouses were in full bloom in April, displaying a most gorge...
-Choice New Books
Suburban Parks and Gardens of Paris - drawn to a scale, 50 Colored Plates. Country Houses, Villas, Out-buildings, etc, near Paris, l00 City and Country Gardens of England - several hundred plates. La...
-Choice New Books For City And Country
Town and Villa Gardens, bow to lay out and Manage with Plans, etc, illustrated with several hundred Engravings - City and Suburban Gardens Of Paris; 50 Plates, beautifully colored - Rustic Adornments ...
-Choosing Cuttings
So far as the simple production of a plant is concerned, it matters but little from what part the shoots for cuttings are chosen. Those, however, that are taken from the extreme points of plants are m...
-Chorozemas
This tribe is generally considered by amateurs difficult to cultivate; but they can be grown well by pursuing the following method: The soil should be a sandy peat, well broken with the spade, but not...
-Christian Advocate And Journal
Edited by Abel Stevens D. D. Carlton & Porter, publishers, New York. - The original of the Advocate family, now a pretty large one. It always has some choice things for the farmer and gardener. It is ...
-Christiana Apple, (R. 9, T. 10)
This beautiful apple originated near Wilmington, Delaware, on the premises of Mr. John R. Brinckle, and fruited in 1855, for the first time. Size, medium, Sty inches in length by three in breadth. Fo...
-The Chrtsanthemum
In the following remarks respecting Chrysanthemums I shall chiefly confine myself to the mode of cultivating them in pots. As soon as the plants have done flowering, I cut them down, and place them in...
-The Chrysanthemum
The Chrysanthemum (it gets its name from the Greek words for gold and flower - many species bear yellow.flowers), though commonly classed with out-of-door plants, should be made to lend its beauty to ...
-Church In The Lombard Style
[See Frontispiece.] - The great change, and no leas striking improvement, which have taken place in the church architecture of our principal cities, within ten years past, are beginning to exert an in...
-Church In The Romanesque Style
[See Frontispiece.] - Next to the Gothic style, the Romanesque (or Lombard,) appears better adapted than any other to religious edifices. Though there is, in its lines, less of religious aspiration th...
-Church Pear
The Church Pear is believed to be a seedling raised by an old Huguenot settler at New Rochelle. The original tree stands on the premises of L. P. Miller, Esq., and is presumed to be nearly a hundred y...
-Cicero On Country Life
Mr. Editor: I send you a translated extract from Cicero's well-known essay De Senectute. If you print it, I shall be justified in announcing the first of Roman orators as one of your occasional cont...
-Cider
Under this name a variety of mixtures are sold and drank in large quantities - many of which are quite unwholesome, and soon show their ill effects upon the digestive organs. A good and pure article o...
-Cinchona Bark
The cultivation of this important medicinal substance has interested the English government; and where tested, in some of her colonies, it has proved a marked success. Under cultivation, the bushes wi...
-Cincinnati Horticultural Society
Since the Spring Exhibition, this Society has held many very interesting meetings. Fruits of various sorts hare made their appearance, and elicited discussion. Among these, we may notice the Gooseberr...
-The Cineraria
This flower, in its present improved condition, is indispensable in every collection of greenhouse plants. Its season of flowering, which is the winter and early spring months, when there is a great s...
-The Cineraria (2)
Flowering from Christmas to June, and forming handsome specimens for decorative purposes at a comparatively small expense, both as regards attention and accommodation, and also furnishing a profusion ...
-The Cineraria (3)
In the estimation of many the Cineraria holds an important place as a green-house plant; and when the brilliancy and variety of their colors are considered, their fresh and luxuriant appearance, the e...
-The Cineraria - Its Propagation And Cultivation
Of all the winter and spring-flowering plants, the Cineraria deserves to be placed in the foremost rank, whether we consider it as the adopted inhabitant of the conservatory of the wealthy citizen, or...
-Cinnerarias
Select the best shaped and most distinct colored flowers for seed. These beautiful plants are indispensable for spring flowers. To get good seed, choose one or two strong trusses and cut out all the o...
-Circular
The Eighth Session of this institution will be held in the city of Philadelphia, commencing on the 11th of September next, at 10 o'clock A. M., and will be continued for several days. This Society, t...
-Circular - America Pomological Society
At the last meeting of the American Pomological Society, held in Philadelphia on the 11th, 12th, and 13th of September, 1860, the following resolutions were Offered by P. Barry, and unanimously adopte...
-The Circular Curve
I accept with pleasure your kind invitation to put in writing the verbal criticisms which I made in conversation with you, upon Mr. Woodward's articles upon curved lines. On page 15s (April Number) M...
-The Circular Curve. Continued
I do not think Mr. Woodward himself would endeavor to lay out a pure Ionic volute, or a beautiful winding stairway, by any such application of circular carves as he recommends to garden artists. That ...
-The Circular Curve (2)
By Geo. E. Woodward, Civil Engineer And Architect, No. 87 Park Bow, New York. It would appear, on carefully reading the article in the August number, page 367, by Mr. James Hogg, that he condemns the...
-A Circular, Thawing Briefly The Necessity, Effects, Practice And Profit Of Land Drainage
Wilmington, Del. Agricultural papers have long labored to disseminate the true theory of drainage among us, and probably they have convinced many farmers of its great importance. Another step is nece...
-Circulation Of The Sap
The last number of the Gardener's Monthly contains a very interesting article from Yardley Taylor on the Circulation of the Sap, from which we make the following extract: The theory of a downward ...
-Citizens New To The Country
Dear Mr. Editor; I live in an old village which has suddenly become the vogue. A perfect rush of city merchants, and others, has destroyed all my old nooks and solitary rambling grounds. The springs o...
-Citizens Retiring Into The Country
You probably recollect the story in Salmagundi, told by the meditative Launcelot Langstaff, of his Uncle John, when on a visit to him, then in his country retirement, enjoying a cheerful and merry...
-Citizens Retiring To The Country
IN a former volume we offered a few words to our readers on the subject of choosing a country seat. As the subject was only slightly touched upon, we propose to say something more regarding it now. T...
-Citizens Retiring To The Country. Continued
To cut a long story short, the larger part of our citizens who retire upon a farm to make it a country residence, are not aware of the fact, that capital cannot be profitably employed on land in the A...
-City Life Compared To That In The Country
Edward Everett lately delivered an Address before the New York State Agricultural Society, at Buffalo, from which we make the following too true extract. It deserves to be carefully read and preserved...
-City Of Inland Seas
Buffalo - most like New York in all its commercial movements, has been so accustomed to consider every foot of ground precious, that it has forgotten that there is a time to breath and rest, as well a...
-The Claims Of Horticultural Societies
Recently, the propriety of taking some steps toward the organization of a horticultural society in the Empire City was suggested in your pages. It appears that the want of some such society was felt b...
-Clapp Favorite Pear
IT would appear from the many flattering reports, that this pear is likely to become a general favorite. Reports from all quarters speak highly of it; we have, this season, seen it upon the tree in ou...
-Clapp's Favorite
Our opinion of this pear is two-sided. As a tree it is superb - cannot possibly ask for anything more vigorous or perfect in form. As a market fruit we dislike it. It ripens and rots too quickly. The ...
-Clara Grape
This valuable seedling of Mr. P. Raabe, Philadelphia, has already been mentioned in the ad-interim report of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 1853, and is described by Dr. Brinckle as: Bunch m...
-The Clarke Raspberry
Last spring we received a seedling Raspberry from Mr. Clarke, of New Haven. It has fruited, and afforded us much satisfaction. It is a stout grower, and has borne abundantly. The berry is large, red, ...
-Class II
Debilitants to be applied as preventives against over-luxuriance in bearing trees or plants disposed to excessive wood growth, or as remedies where the trees or plants are unfruitful by reason of the ...
-Clay Soil For Grapes
The Country Gentleman, writing of a visit to F. C. Brehin's vineyard, states that bunches of Delawares were quite green on the sand, but many of them had attained nearly their full color on t...
-Clean Pots
We have seen people surprised that some tender plants made slow progress after potting where soil not much above freezing had been used, and, perhaps, also watered with cold water; it would be more su...
-Cleft Grafting
This method is principally used upon large stocks or on the branches of old trees. The stock is first cut off at a point where it is desirable to insert the cion; it is then split with a large knife o...
-The Clemantis Cur A Garden Flower
In a little volume, just published in England, bearing the above title, there is an elaborate plea for the freer use of the Clematis in garden scenery. An inappropriate position can scarcely be foun...
-Clematis
No garden can be said to be even partially complete without one or more of the clematis family. All are free growers, twining and climbing upon anything near them which offers a support. The flowers a...
-The Clematis (3)
Every homestead has some particular location where vines would form an added beauty to the surroundings, if such have not been already planted, and in this direction we desire to introduce to a more e...
-The Clematis For Decorative Purposes
VERY little has been done in American gardens with the Clematis for extensive ornamental purposes. It has been used either in our green houses, or trained over a few small stakes and arbors in our flo...
-Clematis In Conservatories
The London Journal of Horticulture calls attention to the exquisitely beautiful appearance of Clematis present when grown together on pillars in conservatories and similar positions. As a rule, it is ...
-Clematis Patens Tar. Amalia And Louisa
Two varieties of the Clematis patens of Decaisne (C. carulea, Lindley?), introduced, with others, from Japan by Dr. Yon Siebold. Like other varieties of the same species, they are hardy, and are culti...
-Clerodendron Splendens
There is hardly a more beautiful or useful plant in cultivation than this Clerodendron; for, under good management, its large clusters of brilliant scarlet blossoms are produced in great profusion, an...
-Cleveland Horticultural Society
This Society held its first meeting:or the season on Wcd'y, May 14, 1851. J. Gallup in the chair. On motion, A. Mcintosh - Resolved, That we now proceed to the election of officers for the ensuing ye...
-The Cleveland Horticultural Society's Exhibition
The June .exhibition of the Cleveland Horticltural Society, which took place on Thursday and Friday, the 16th and 17th, was a success in the fullest sense of the word. The late frosts and heavy rains ...
-The Climate
We were fortunate in obtaining a record of the thermometer, carefully kept oh a plantation very nearly in the latitude of Havana, and fifty miles from it. This record is for twelve months, excepting A...
-Climate And Products Of California
Dr. Wm. B. OsboRN, one of our subscribers, and the agent of the Horticulturut in Los Angelos, California, thus writes to Col. B. P. Johnson, Secretary of the New York State Agricultural Society. Mr. O...
-The Climate Of San Francisco
From a valuable scientific account of the climate of San Francisco by Dr. Gibbous, we extract the following, as giving more precise information than any usually obtained, and as calculated to explain ...
-Climate, Etc, Of The South Shore Of Lake Erik
[The following article appeared in the American Journal of Science and Art, March, 1852. We reprint it for several reasons: - 1st, It furnishes some very instructive and interesting items in relation ...
-Climatology
The contributions of this country towards the science of climatology and physical geography are matters of which we Americans may justly be proud. The Espyan theory of rain is the only one which posse...
-Climatology (2)
A valued correspondent, in a previous page, has given our readers a very interesting paper on Climate, a subject of the greatest importance to all of us. We would caution the farmer, no less than the ...
-Climatology (3)
A careful examination of the highly interesting Army Meteorological Register, shows that the mean temperature of the spring months is an important element in the characteristics of climate. We subjoin...
-Climatology (5)
The summer climate of the United States is remarkable in many respects. The mean temperature of its southern portion exceeds that of the tropical region to the south of it. The Isotheral line, or Isot...
-Climatology (6)
In the United States and British America, the migratory masses have now reached the limits of known climates, and are ready to advance over the immense areas of the interior of the West. The climate o...
-Climatology, Grape Culture
Not being a Doctor of Horticulture, with any specialty to advocate, I will have to ask indulgence if my present article is a little promiscuous in its character. To begin with that very trite subject...
-Climbers
A. P., (Northampton, Mass.) The difference between the Virginia Creeper, (or Ampilopsis.) a harmless plant, and the poi son sumac, or Mercury vine, (Rhus toxicodendron,) which somewhat resemble each o...
-Climbers (3)
IF unprovided with climbers for roof of greenhouse, do not omit to plant a few; a moderate amount of shade is an advantage to the plants grown below, if utility as well as ornament is required. There ...
-Climbing Plants - Golden Trumpet Flower
I do not agree entirely with your friend the English Landscape Gardener, that we are an ungrateful people - ungrateful for our rich gifts of native trees and plants. We do not plead guilty to ingratit...
-Climbing Plants For In-Door Decorations
A very happy hit upon this subject which we appreciate, is made by a horticultural correspondent of The Journal of the Farm: In-Door Climbers There is nothing which will do more to beautify and give...
-The Clinton Grape
I have now before me (January 25th) a bunch of the above desirable, long-keeping variety, as fresh and perfect as it came from the vine. It has been cultivated in the vicinity of Rochester for the las...
-Close Of The Volume
We presume that there are few who look over the nature of our Table of Contents, its list of illustrations, and the varied nature of the horticultural information collected during the year, but will a...
-Close Of The Volume (2)
We close the twelfth volume of the Horticulturist with some feelings of satisfaction at its success, with others of regret. It has pursued its way, the past year, with the usual endeavor on the part ...
-Closing Remarks On The Theory Of Pruning
Dear Sir - I shall close the crude and desultory remarks upon the subject at the head of this article, which were at first proposed by a few comments upon certain of the processes in the arts of pruni...
-The Cloth Of Gold Rose
Andrew S. Fuller, of the Rural New Yorker, expresses doubt whether any of the newly famous yellow roses are at all superior to the old and well-known Cloth of Gold, and speaks thus of his experienc...
-Clover
Clover grass is one of the best grasses for enriching a soil that is cultivated in our country. It also makes good hay, if well cured; yet there is always a good deal of uncertainty about making it in...
-Clovernook, Or Recollections Of Our Neighborhood In The West
New-York. Redfield, publisher. If any of our town readers, sated with the artificial perfumes of town civilization, have ever strolled into the country some soft, warm morning in June, when the wild g...
-Clovernook, Or Recollections Of Our Neighborhood In The West. Part 2
Night broods over the world, deep and solemn; away above us the still constellations go on their way, and throwing earthward wildering beams tike golden ladders, whereon our thoughts may climb to heav...
-Clovernook, Or Recollections Of Our Neighborhood In The West. Part 3
Mrs. Hill was a woman of a short, plethoric habit; one that might be supposed to move about with little agility, and to find excessive warmth rather inconvenient; but she was Of a happy, cheerful temp...
-Club-Root In Cabbage
It is just as much the province of a horticultural journal to disabuse the popular mind of an error, as it is for it to advance a new or improved system of culture. One of the most general and deep-se...
-Clusia
One of the plants noticed in the trip to Cuba as the emblem of ingratitude, is the Clusia. As we remarked elsewhere, the botany of the Island is a terra incognita to Northern men, and their knowledge ...
-The Cocoa-Nut Palm
Of all the gifts which bountiful nature has bestowed on the inhabitants of the tropics, this, perhaps, is the most valuable, and cer-tainly the one most fitting them for a paradisiacal state of idlene...
-Coffee
Between Cards Point and Gape Sable, at the southern portion of the peninsula, there exists a section containing about 400,000 acres of land, on which we are satisfied coffee could be produced to advan...
-Coiling of Tendrils
As much as twenty years ago, Mohl suggested that the coiling of tendrils resulted from an irritability excited by contact. In 1850 he remarked that this view has had no particular approval to boast ...
-Col. Wilder's Eulogy On Mr. Downing
The annual return of the 28th of July will moisten the eyes and agonize the hearts of many American citizens. On the morning of that disastrous day two steamers, the Armenia and the Henry Clay, with ...
-Col. Wilder's Eulogy On Mr. Downing. Part 2
The fruits of his labor are also gathered in thousands of gardens and conservatories. The numerous cottages and villas which have lately sprung up in the towns and villages about our commercial cities...
-Col. Wilder's Eulogy On Mr. Downing. Part 3
This description, for beauty, power of diction, and for fullness of nature, not only harmonizes with the pictures, but even rivals the finest touches of the pencils of Claude, Poussin, Salvator Rosa, ...
-Col. Wilder's Eulogy On Mr. Downing. Part 4
The increasing extent of his business would have employed several common men; his correspondence alone would have occupied a private secretary; yet the number and urgency of his duties never depressed...
-Col. Wilder's Eulogy On Mr. Downing. Part 5
Closely allied to this science is the subject of Architecture, to which our author next turns his attention; and in the following year he publishes his Cottage Residences. Of this work Mr. Loudon a...
-The Cold
At Warsaw, Indiana, on the 8th of January, the thermometer was 19 below zero at 6 P. M., and on the 9th 27 below 0 at 6 A. M., the coldest morning ever known in Northern Indiana. Peaches and...
-The Cold Grapery
When we began our Hints on Grape Culture, it was feared by some of our friends that so much prominence given to the vineyard would have the effect of checking the increase of graperies; but we had see...
-Cold Spring In England
Up to the 18th of this Month, March, there had been for many years no spring so late and cold as this. In these respects it was even more striking than that of 1845, Continually frosty nights, little ...
-Cold That Destroys Peach Buds
I have of late been perusing the horticulturist, which to me is very interesting. Among other things that particularly attracted my attention, was a notice of fruit buds being destroyed by the extreme...
-Cold Vineries
Since the introduction more prominently before the public of the Delaware grape, I notice several cultivators are beginning to make calculations of the relative expense of in and out-door culture of t...
-A Cold Vinery And Some Visits
The cold vinery under the care of James Matheson, whose name has become familiar to the horticultural public by means of his various essays on grape growing, deserves more than a passing notice. This ...
-The Cold Winter In Arkansas
A. J. Downing, Esq - Dear Sir: As you expressed in the Horticulturist a wish to hear from different parts of the country, respecting the effect of the last extraordinary winter on trees and plants, I...
-Coleus
Now is a good time to propagate Coleus for bedding; the cuttings will root in a few days and make good plants by the time they are required for bedding. We have a very numerous list of these plants to...
-The Collateral Hives
The tare of boxes, boards, etc, being deducted, the net weights are as follow: - August 12. October 5. No. 1. Collateral 20 lbs. 48 lbs. ...
-Colo Water In Wells During Summer
In the March number of the Cultivator for 1851, (page 117,) I described the well from which we draw our daily supplies of water. It is pro-tected by trees and buildings so that the sun never shines in...
-Colombian Guano
The Philadelphia Guano Company have introduced, this spring, the Colombian guano from the Venezuelan islands in the Caribbean Sea, and, from the analysis of the article, it is pronounced the best fert...
-Colonel Wilder's Address
Before the American Pomologies! Society, at its fourth session at Rochester, in September, is an example of how much may be said in a few words. An early copy enables us to make extracts from the more...
-Colonel Wilder's Address. Continued
If any facta seem to oppose this doctrine, they may be regarded either as exceptions' to the general law, or as the results of locality and cultivation. The physiological principle of the Vegetable ...
-Color And Odor Of Plants
MM. Fremy and Cloez have extracted and isolated the blue coloring matter of flowers - a highly delicate operation. It is not indigo, as was supposed; they call it cyanine. It is turned red by acid veg...
-Color In Nature And Art
Nature is no mere utilitarian. That so-called utility which regards only the lower half of human nature, - which cares for bodily wants and pecuniary profits, but which ignores the higher emotions fro...
-Color In Nature And Art. Continued
* Lord Jeffrey held that mankind liked blue and green simply because we tee them everywhere in nature, instead of pereiving the great truth, that it is because these colors are agreeable to man's natu...
-Color In Nature And Art (2)
In point of richness and gorgeousness of color, flowers are unrivalled. If we may be allowed the simile, the ethereal phenomenon of color in them gains as much by a union with earthly substance, as th...
-Color In Nature And Art (2). Continued
Under the full blaze of the sunlight, the earth throbs as with a million pulses Those substances which are most ethereal in their atomic structure, such as glass and crystals, vibrate most readily and...
-Color In Nature And Art (3)
We do not generally make a sufficient use of color as a beautifier of our dwellings. This is partly owing to the fact that the physical organization of northern nations is not so susceptible to the im...
-Color In Nature And Art (3). Part 2
The effect then produced recalls all the illusion of the diorama. In the case of not a few pictures, taste is best shown in knowing how little frame is necessary. The color of the wall, and nature of ...
-Color In Nature And Art (3). Part 3
Of hangings - and our remarks are almost equally applicable to the general tone of a room - we may say that in consequence of an apartment never being too light, since we can dimmish the day-light by ...
-The Color Of Buildings In Rural Scenery
[All our readers know our doctrine regarding the fancy of our countrymen for white paint. We are glad to find the subject so well touched upon in the right spirit, by the late Mr. Coopkr, in the follo...
-The Color Of Flowers
Mr. Dowing: - There are some peculiarities belonging to blue flowers which I have not noticed to have been observed by others, or if observed, I do not recollect to have seen them published. Should yo...
-Color Of Fruit
The pears exhibited by Dr. Boynton, of Syracuse, at the last meeting of the American Pomological Society, attracted much attention from the unusually waxy and glossy appearance of the skin, and the ex...
-Colored Glass For Hot Beds, Forcing Bouses And Conservatories
One of the most successful cold graperies near Philadelphia, is said to have every third section of lights made entirely of blue glass. It is an important fact worthy of the special notice of our flor...
-Columbia
The white, melting, buttery flesh, not Wanting in richness, and of delicious flavor, combined with the thin, smooth skin of a lemon yellow; with great luxuriance of growth in the tree, bearing uniform...
-Columbia Peach
This luscious fruit forms quite a distinct group among the family of the peaches. Its color and peculiar flavor are well-known in the South, where it is a general favorite. The original tree, althoug...
-Columbia Pear
This variety is considered, by the Country Gentleman as worthy of more attention, not having received as much in the past few years as it deserves. The common objection that it blows off easily, may b...
-Columbus
Tannic acid - tan-bark liquid, diluted as before described. 4 Poudrette water. Spring water. June 22d. The tannic acid bed produced the greatest quantity. T...
-Columbus (Ohio) Horticultural Society
Whereas, news has been received of the loss of the steamer Henry Clay, by fire, on the Hudson, and among the lost we find the name of A. J. Downing, of Newburgh, the editor of the Horticulturist; ther...
-Columbus Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of the Society, held March 5th, 1853, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President - BENJAMIN BLAKE. 1st Vice President. - Alex. E. Glenn. 2d Vice Preside...
-Commemorative Trees
In England there yet exists trees that point back to the manners of our ancestors - such as the Gospel Oaks, under whose shade our fore-fathers were accustomed to assemble to hear sermons; in the same...
-Commerce And Packing Of Table Fruits
Before the establishment of railroads in France, the culture and commerce of table fruits had only importance in the immediate neighborhood of the large centres of population. Everywhere else, these p...
-The Commercial A8pect Of Horticulture
The pleasing idea entertained by many of the uninitiated that this beautiful and agreeable pursuit is without its asperities may soon be dispelled by a casual glance at our periodical or serial litera...
-Commercial Gardens
There are very few of these; we could hear of but two, one kept by a Frenchman, on the Paseo, who has but little to show, the owner being in poor health. Pedrigal's, however, exhibits a good, appearan...
-Commitees
On F, wife - T. M. Cooley, B. F. Strong, S. Lathrop, B. J. Harvey. On Flowers - Mies C. Orensby, Mrs. W. H. Scott, Mrs. S. Lathrop, B. W. Steer, W. H. Scott. On Vegetables - E. H. Pllcber, A. G. Eastm...
-Committees
P. Barry, J. J. Thomas, H. E. Hooker, John Donellan, J. W. Seward, E. S. Hayward, L. A. Ward, J. W. Bissell, H. N. Langworthy, L. B. Langworthy, Geo. Ellwanger, Alonzo Frost, Committee on Fruits. Jose...
-Common Leucanthemum. Daisy. Ox-Eye Daisy. White-Weed
Fr. L'oeil de Beuf. Germ. Die Wucher-blume. Span. Margarita mayor. Stem 1 to near 2 feet high, erect or subde-cumbent, angular and striate, somewhat hairy, simple or sparingly branched, but often sev...
-Common Vs. Fancy Fowls
Probably every farmer who has had the chance of observing, as well as others whose attention has been called to the matter, will acknowledge the superiority of Southdown mutton over a common mongrel ...
-A Communication From A. II
Ernst, president of the Cincinnati Horticultural Society, was read, desiring that the great exhibition* of the prominent horticultural societies should be held at such times as would give the members ...
-Comparative Value Of The Pear And Other Fruit Culture
Dear Editor: Your repeated inquiries about the possibility of having pear orchards/' hare suggested some reflections which I will submit to you io all humility and with more impartiality than you are...
-A Complete Suburban Residence
One of the most complete, tastefully-arranged, and well-kept suburban residences in the fashionable quarter of our city, (East Avenue), is that of Selah Mathews, Esq. The front lawn is spacious in pro...
-A Compliment
We are indebted to the Rural Messenger for the following handsome expression of good will for The Horticulturist : The Horticulturist. - Among the journals specially devoted to the promotion of rura...
-On Composts Suitable for Growing Florists' Flowers
Having often experienced the inconvenience of being obliged to refer from one book to another for a description of the composts suitable for different flowers, I have collected some of the most approv...
-Comstock's "Terra-Culture."
At the Annual Meeting of the State Agricultural Society in 1851, the subject of Comstoox's alleged discovery was brought before the Society, and the following Committee was appointed to confer with Mr...
-Comstock's Rotary Digger
We were lately present at a trial of Cora-stock's Rotary Digger, at Flatbush, L. I. There were a number of gentlemen present, not the least interested of whom was Mr. Howe, famous as the inventor of t...
-Conclusion
I appear in the foregoing pages to have employed a great number of words in the endeavor to make plain this simple, agreeable and novel mode of cultivating fruit* trees. Judging from my own feelings, ...
-The Concord Grape
I wish to invite your attention to a new seedling Grape, which has been raised in this vicinity, and which, I think, will be a valuable acquisition to the country. It was originated by E. W. Bull, of ...
-The Concord Grape (2)
This famous new Grape is one of the leading topics of the times in the horticultural world. We find various opinions in regard to it, even among the Boston gentlemen who have seen it from its first ap...
-The Concord Grape (3)
Numerous correspondents write as that they were disappointed at not finding an expression of our opinion of this fruit, in the October number. We will give it now. It was presented, in large quantitie...
-The Concord Grape (4)
Mr. Hovey, in the December number of his Magazine says, It is with some hesitation that we again notice this fine Grape, and he goes on and covers six entire pages in his usual captious style. This...
-The Concord Grape (5)
In answer to your inquiry, relative to the Concord Grape, I would state that it is not in my collection, consequently can not give you the result of my experience in its cultivation. When exhibited, i...
-Condition And Prospects of Gardeners In The U. States
I have often been struck, Mr. Editor, by the accuracy and truthfulness with which the predictions of the late J. C. Loudon, with regard to the progress of horticulture in America, are daily becoming v...
-Condition And Prospects of Gardeners In The U. States. Continued
It was asserted that employers already knew enough, and that if such things were encouraged, the gentry would soon know as much as themselves. A few gardeners, with more judgment, knew that th...
-Condition Of Our Western Trees For Winter
IN August I very much feared that our trees would. make a late fall growth, as they did last year, and be in bad condition for winter; but although September was a very growing month, October was very...
-Conditions Required For The Growth Of Parasitic Fungi
IN this age of inquiry and progress, it is surprising that so little attention has been paid to the habits of parasitic fungi, and that so little is really known respecting the conditions which favor ...
-Conditions Required For The Growth Of Parasitic Fungi. Part 2
An interesting instance of the predisposing influence of an excess of manure, is mentioned in the Agricultural Gazette. Wheat which had been top-dressed with guano, was a good crop, and free from sy...
-Conditions Required For The Growth Of Parasitic Fungi. Part 3
And it is equally vain to expect, as many have done, that the vigor of the plant can be restored by one generation of seedlings. The progeny of unhealthy and degenerate parents cannot reasonably be ex...
-The Cone Boiler
One of the most primitive boilers was in form like a cone, and was in use thirty years since. This apparatus gave satisfaction at the time. It was simply a double-cased cone, with the water between, a...
-Cone Of Abies Nobilis
We present this month the portrait of the cone of Abies nobilig, or noble silver fir. This magnificent tree was introduced to Britain by the lamented Douglas, in 1831, who discovered it on the mountai...
-Confessions Of An Amateur
I am confident that my own experiences have their counterparts, and am willing to expose myself for the amusement of your readers. Not that I am utterly a Know-nothing n now, but I have bought what l...
-Coniferae
Some three years since, I think, at the request of Mr. Downing, I sent him for publication in the Horticulturist some memoranda respecting the effect of our northern winters upon the new evergreens. I...
-Conoliniem Lanthenum
The fine foliage, excellent habit, and large loose spreading heads of light blue flowers, which terminate every shoot of this plant, make it exceedingly attractive; and its season of blooming, winter ...
-Conover's Colossal Asparagus
Wm. Parry, of Ginnameinson, N. J., who has experimented with it for two years, says: Previous to growing the Colossal, we doubted there being any variety better than the one generally cultivated, and...
-Conquering The Curculio
Mr. W. N. White writes from Augusta, Georgia, that he has succeeded this season in conquering the great enemy of the plum. He says: Forces employed against him - one man, one little girl, three two ...
-Conservatories
The erection of conservatories may be considered the highest grade in horticultural architecture; in them elegance of design must be blended with cultural utility - architecture becomes the associate ...
-Conservatories. Continued
A further use to which these might be put, in the case of a tropical conservatory, might be to use each alternate column for taking away the rain water, and to make the others the means of heating the...
-Conservatory
This is distinguished from a greenhouse more from its proximity to the dwelling than anything else, and is a place for the display of plants in flower, rather than for growing them. It therefore requi...
-Conservatory Climbers
Beaumontia grandiflora, one of the most magnificent climbing plants in cultivation. It is a native of the East Indies, and is frequently treated as a stove plant. Indeed, I have had it myself in a sto...
-Conservatory Climbers. - The Dipla-Denia
Dipladenia is one of the- modern favorites in the list of conservatory climbers. The Gardener's Record thinks too much prominence cannot be given to it; for, like many climbing plants, it blooms best...
-Constant Bearing Strawberbies
In the December number of the Horticulturist the opinion is expressed that there is in the extract from the Cincinnati Gazette a mistake in regard to Hovey's Seedling bearing from the 10th March unti...
-Constitution. Article 1
This Society is organized as the Horticultural Society Of St. Paul and vicinity. Art. 2. The officers shall be a President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary, Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of fiv...
-Construction
Foundation walls of stone, 16 inches thick, built up even with the principal floor joist Superstruction to be framed work, 4 by 4 inch studs, and can be covered with weather boards, or ceiled with pla...
-Construction Of Fruit Rooms - Keeping Pears
The time has now arrived when intelligent cultivators are no longer satisfied with a supply of the best fruit during the few weeks when it may be plucked fresh from the tree. The best artificial meth...
-Construction Of Roads And Walks
THE proper introduction of walks and carriage roads is a matter of great importance in the general arrangement of rural residences, and although few subjects in this connection have been more frequent...
-Construction Of The Vinery
Instead of the common practice of building the front wall of the house on pillars, I would advise that a solid wall from the foundation be made, as I consider an inside border to be more injurious tha...
-Construction Of Vineries
The increase of glass structures for growing the foreign grape, has been very great within the last three years - especially in the suburbs of our three largest cities. Now that it is prettey well set...
-Construction of Glass-Houses
The construction of glass houses has undergone much improvement during the last twenty years. The change from the angular to the curvilinear shape, introduced a simple and superior method of forming g...
-A Consumer's View Of The "Which Is The Best Grape?" Question
This seems to be a leading topic now-a-days. 1 beg to protest against the style that has been adopted by some of our zealous cultivators. I do not object to their saying all they think of their own pe...
-Cont Flower
These I like associated with fronds of Maiden-hair Ferns, that is if the Fern is an indoor one; as what, for instance, looks so elegant with a Gardenia as a bit of Fern, the bright green spray of whic...
-Contents Of The December Number
ART. FAGS I. - Hints on Grape Culture - No. XXI. By The Editor................................ 537 II. - Orchard Culture. - By Wm. Bacon, Richmond, Mass.................................539 III. - I...
-A Continuation Of A Few Select Kinds Which Require The Temperature Of The Greenhouse
Adiantum capilius venerus; A. Mortzianum; A. pedatum. This last is one of our most beautiful native ferns, and one of the most graceful when under a good state of cultivation, either in the temperatur...
-Contorted Trees
From the extension of the woody fibre being greater and longer continued on one ride of a stem or branch than on its opposite side, it frequently becomes contorted. Gardeners usually endeavor to remed...
-The Contrast - Thirty Years Ago And Now
The year 1860 opens a new decade in the history of human progress and improvement; and, if we may judge from the results of its early dawnings, we come to the agreeable conclusion, that more advanceme...
-Contrasts Or Colors
Allow me to suggest to those of your readers who contemplate laying out, planting, or altering, their ornamental or pleasure grounds, the importance of so arranging and classifying the Plants and Shru...
-Conversation Over A Dish Of Pears On New Year's Day
Gentlemen, here is a dish of pears of which I should be glad to hear your opinion. A. With pleasure sir; but be kind enough to inform us, in the first place, how they have been kept in such fine orde...
-Conversational Meetings Of Horticultural Societies
A gentleman connected with the New York Horticultural Society writes: I regard our conversational meetings as more important than our public exhibitions; indeed no Horticultural Society, in my opini...









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