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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #6 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Correspondance To Downing

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #6
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-The Dwarf Convolvulus
The Dwarf Convolvulus (Convolvulus minor) is a beautiful flower, with three distinct colors, blue, yellow, and white; the blue being of every shade from purple to a delicate azure blue. We have also t...
-Cooks And Cooking
Many is the good thing spoiled by the cook; it might almost be doubted in some parts of our country, whether we had any cooks, so awfully is everything overdone, underdone, or served by slovens. The g...
-A Cool Surface For Fruit-Trees
It is curious to see how rapidly really useful ideas spread; and also how strangely perverted they get to be, sometimes, in raw hands. It is the fashion, now-a-days, for every one to say that fruit tr...
-Coping To Prevent Mildew
A correspondent suggests that one feature of action, in working of shelter overhead as a preventive of grape mildew, has not been touched, and that is, radiation of heat. It is well known that a pla...
-Copy-Right And Copy-Wrong
The Villa Gardener, of London, England, and The Gardener's Magazine have both made response to our criticism in June Horticulturist. The burden of their reply is tu quo-que (you also). To which we res...
-Cordon Training
Although an old practice in France, we believe training trees en cordon has been but little practiced in this country. For the purposes of testing a great variety of fruits in a small compass - for co...
-The Cork Tree
About a hogshead of acorns of the Cork Oak have been introduced from the south of Europe and distributed in the Middle and Southern States for experiment, or to test their adaptation to the climate. T...
-Correction
We insert the following note as the best means of correcting the error alluded to: You will oblige me by making a few corrections and additions to my notice of the Stanwick Nectarine. YOur separatin...
-Correction (2)
In the note of explanation to your Frontispiece, in the July number, you state the plate to be taken from a plant in the collection of Mr. Humphrey, Brooklyn, who has the original stock; and as it ...
-Correspondance
Mr. Pkter B. Mbad : Dear Sir, - Being a subscriber to your (valuable to me) Horticulturist, you will pardon the liberty I take to ask you, through the columns of your paper, a few questions. I have e...
-Correspondance. Continued
He replied, If you had told me it was a Morning Glory, I should have known where to plant it. When I buy a choice seed or flower, I wish to know how to cultivate it. The florists' hiero-glyphios, h....
-Correspondence
THE renewal of my subscription to the Horticulturist prompts me to express my high appreciation of its merits. Having received it since its commencement, and read each number with interest and profit,...
-Correspondence (2)
Editors Horticulturist : - The model report of J. T. T. in last month's issue is the example for the following, except that I give my locality, which J. T. T. ought to have done. My vines are growing ...
-Correspondence (3)
Winnetka, III, Nov. 10th, 1862. P. B. Mead, Esq., - Dear Sir, - I wish to inquire if there is to be found in New York, glass especially designed for a cold grapery; and if not, what kind would you re...
-Correspondence (4)
New Rochelle, August 14, 1861. Mr. Editor. - Dear Sir: The cold snap of last winter destroyed, to a great extent, the fruit-buds of all the Blackberries, wild and cultivated, in this neighborhood. No...
-Correspondence (5)
Mat is a busy month in the vegetable garden. Peas want hoeing, and perhaps brushing; early beets, parsneps, carrots, etc., if sowed the last month, want weeding. If not sown, the sooner the task is do...
-Correspondence (6)
Oar Chicago Correspondence. Dear Horticulturist: - That remarkable individual Mr. Richard Swiveller, in his flippant manner, when he goes to ask after the health of an old gentleman, enquires after t...
-Correspondence (7)
Chestertown, Kent Co., Md., June 11,1867. Messrs. Editors: We have been haying a very cold, backward spring, and everything in the garden is behind its season. Speak a good word for McLean's Little Ge...
-Correspondence (8)
Ma. Editor : - Dear Sir : In the last number of the Horticulturist I notice your remarks, as well as those of your correspondent Foxnieadow, in praise of the Gishurst Compound for destroying insects a...
-Correspondence (9)
An Essay on Grades, Drainage, and Extension of the Public Grounds in the City of Washing-ion, as a system of general improvement. This luminous pamphlet has been sent to us in consequence of the remar...
-Correspondence (10)
The disasters to the farmer and gardener of the past month have been most distressing. A terrible gale in Iowa and Illinois has done much damage to life and property, and confirms fears respecting tha...
-Correspondence (11)
J. Jay Smith: - When I had the pleasure of seeing Mr. Saxton here, he requested me to present you with some statistics of fruit, and more particularly of the Strawberry in our vicinity and in our mark...
-Correspondence (12)
Mr. P. R. Mkad - Sir: - Will you please to state in the Horticulturist what is the legal postage thereof? What native grapes are worthy of cultivation where the European varieties will thrive? Which...
-Correspondence (13)
Mr. Horticulturist: - I have thought that some of your readers might be pleased to know that Tritonia Uvaria can be readily propagated from seed. In November, 1857, I received per mail, from Mr. Wm. T...
-Correspondence (14)
Mr. Editor. - The following I take from the newspapers, where it has been extensively published: The Agricultural Bureau of the United States Patent Office have received intelligence of the shipment...
-Correspondence (15)
Our readers have already been made aware of the change in the editorial department of the Horticulturist. Mr. Smith, in his Card, has said, and well said, about all that is necessary on this point H...
-Correspondence (16)
Mr. Editor:- Please allow me a small corner in which to make a proposition to the Doctors of Pomology; and said proposition is, that some one of them propose, at the next meeting of the Pomological So...
-Correspondence (17)
Editor of the Horticulturist: - In each number of your instructive journal I observe you are much troubled by novices for information as to the culture of fruits, and seem to take it all patiently; so...
-Correspondence (17). Continued
GRANDAEVUS. [Terms are frequently used with much looseness, particularly in their popular application The Persimmon and Medlar are certainly different, and yet the former has been called the American...
-Correspondence (18)
We have received from friends a number of new and choice plants and seeds for trial, and shall discuss their merits from time to time as they come into flower. To save time, we desire to make oar ackn...
-Correspondence (19)
Dear Horticulturist: - On Thursday last, the 7th inst, I enjoyed an opportunity of attending one of the monthly meetings of the Meramec Horticultural Society, held at the residence of L. D. Votaw, ...
-Correspondence (20)
Washington, D. C., February. Dear Horticulturist: - What would you like to hear about Washington? Doubtless not politics, but some information like the following: The improvements agreed upon with M...
-Correspondence (21)
Ochre Point, Newport, January, 1861. Mr, Editor:- In answer to your article headed A Second Barnum, I would wish to make a plain statement Your Close Observer, or Paul Pry, called late in the sea...
-Correspondence (22)
Editor Horticulturist: - I was raised in the parlor, and when I was married, a few years since, scarcely knew a lilac from a locust-tree. However, I married a farmer, and came to the country to live, ...
-Correspondence (23)
To the EDITORs of the Horticulturist : - As the propagation of the vine by grafting is attracting attention, I have concluded to read you a chapter of my own experience. There seems to be some difficu...
-Correspondence (24)
Mr. Editor:- Having read an article in your February number touching the Rose-slug, I am induced to communicate my own experience in exterminating the so-called pest. I have already made some stateme...
-Correspondence (25)
Peter B. Mead, Esq.: As we have passed through another winter, and a severe one for fruit trees and vines, it may not be uninteresting to you to know the result of the season on the fruits and vines i...
-Correspondence (26)
Mr. Editor, - I shall premise by saying, I have no practical knowledge of the management of green-houses. If but one kind of plants were in a house, and the proper amount of heat were not exceeded,'v...
-Correspondence (26). Part 2
The vine has not sprouted yet, (June 3d,) though other vines, not troubled by the beetle, have grown three inches. I never saw the insect before. Can you give its name and habits 1 Labrusca. New Bedf...
-Correspondence (26). Part 3
A tree without some fibrous roots that may be taken up with it, is certainly not worth much, but may sometimes be made a good tree by severe shortening in both the top and roots, and being planted in ...
-Correspondence (27)
The late Horticultural Exhibitions mark progress in almost every department At the New York Agricultural Fair, the Horticultural Society was on hand and made a fine display of fruits and flowers - Ell...
-Correspondence (28)
Editor of the Horticulturist:- Dear Sir: I was induced to write to you in regard to growing fruit trees and grape-vines in moss baskets, by several articles I read in your interesting paper, and as I ...
-Correspondence (29)
P. B. Mead, Esq. - Dear Sir, - I take the liberty to send you, pre-paid by Express, a few bunches of grapes, grown upon a vine found a few years since in the garden of the late Dr. Spofford of this pl...
-Correspondence (30)
Lockport, N. Y. Gentlemen: - We are sadly perplexed by the conflicting statements and opinions of nurserymen and dealers in fruit trees. We purchased, this fall, of one party, Grape roots, (Delawares...
-Correspondence (30). Continued
A writer in the October number, Mr. Woodward, says, The successful pursuit of landscape gardening, like all other liberal arts, depends upon a thorough understanding of results. Now, the cultivation...
-Correspondence (31)
[Our London Correspondence]. Mr. Editor: - There has been rather a tempest in a tea-pot at the Colchester Chrysanthemum show, that has got into the country papers, and will amuse some of your gardeni...
-Correspondence (31). Continued
A discussion of interest to agriculturists is being carried on regarding the course to be pursued with exhausted land, some of which has been tilled ever since the Roman occupation. Mr. Mechi, some t...
-Correspondence (32)
Peter B. Mead, Esq. :- Sir: In an article on inside detached and divided vine-borders, published in the May number of the Horticulturist, Mr. Bright states thatneither the' Book of the Garden by Mack...
-Correspondence (33)
Ens. Horticulturist: - Pear trees have winter killed in Southern Wisconsin to such an extent as to discourage setting. We are subject to extremes of very severe cold weather, the thermometer sinking u...
-Correspondence (34)
Ed. Horticulturist : - I send by express two varieties of Cherries, Conestoga and Late Amber, the latter a seedling brought to notice by Jacob Cocklin, of York County, Pa., (Shepherdstown P. O., Cumbe...
-Correspondence (35)
Editor Horticulturist : - Can you or any of your correspondents tell me how to destroy those large caterpillars on the Tomato plants? My tomatoes and those of my friends are infested with caterpillars...
-Correspondence (36)
Mr. Editor: - One of the chief difficulties with many who cultivate flowers is, that they so often fail to get what they order from nurserymen. I feel constrained to state a recent experience of mine ...
-Correspondence (36). Continued
The people responded, and upwards of fifty responsible persons came forward, and in writing, before witnesses, bound themselves to support him and make him useful, an ornament, and a blessing to this ...
-Correspondence (37)
P. B. Mead, Esq., - My Dear Sir: - In a garden here, with good aspect and under good cultivation, I have to make the following report on mildew on grapes, viz.; Isabellas, ... No mildew. ...
-Correspondence (37). Continued
Our Hints on Grape Culture will keep you thoroughly posted in regard to covering your trellis. Read them carefully from the beginning. The leaf of Isabella you sent is covered with mildew. The other l...
-Correspondence. Our London Correspondence
Mr. Editor. - The gardeners of America should be interested in what is transpiring here, as well as in their own country. True, the climate is somewhat different, and practice has to vary accordingly;...
-The Cost And Profits Of Grape Culture
Hearth and Home, in a late issue, gives an account of the cost of growing and selling the production of grapes from 2 73-100 acres of vineyard. The cultivator puts down the cost of cultivation from th...
-A Cottage For A Country Clergyman
[See Frontispiece.] We noticed with delight in Great Britain, that among the warmest devotees of horticulture and rural taste generally, are the country clergymen. Their homes are always pictures of ...
-Cottage Gardening
It can not but appear, to even the most ordinary observer, that there is an increasing and growing interest for that style of architecture in our cottage residences which our late highly valued and la...
-Cottage In The Rural Pointed Style
This cottage is suitable for a moderate sized farm house, or a residence in the suburbs of a city. Roof projects 3 feet, square columns, and a porch over the front door, supported by brackets. - The f...
-Cottagers' Kale
People may write as they like about this Kale. It is a most excellent vegetable, and when well grown, and used in its proper season, it is delicious. Mr. Turner has not said, neither has my friend D...
-Cotton (2)
We have lately received a curious pamphlet from the writer, a personal friend and correspondent, who himself accompanied us to Cuba, and visited the cotton districts, last year, to ascertain for himse...
-Cotton From India
Threats are constantly thrown out by Europeans, that India will supersede America in the growth of cotton. Funds have been abundantly wasted in the attempt; no mistake can be greater. India is not, as...
-Cotton Seed Oil
Mr. Shephard, of Galveston, Texas, it is announced, is perfecting a valuable invention by which he can produce oil by compressure from cotton seed. One hundred pounds of seed yield from twelve to fift...
-The Countey In Autumn
A leaf from nature is never out of place, and having an ulterior object in view, we resume our woodland sketches, though a little after date. Trees have many a moral as well as economical lesson. Thi...
-The Country Gentleman
This is one of the magazines which we always keep on our table, and we allow none but the best there. In looking over the number for February 16th, just at band, we find a very fair notice of our own ...
-A Country House
The design of this house was made for the purpose of giving each room a sunny southern exposure, and out of ten rooms nine have at least one lookout to the southeast, and one, the small room over the ...
-Country Lady Housekeeper
Cook, we are out of yeast; I wish you would make some. Cook. I never makes yeast; I always buys it. Lady. Yes, but it is too far to send to town for a pennith of yeast! How do you make yeast? ...
-Country Life
How to awaken cariosity in the youthful mind should he one of the objects of those who endeavor to prepare them for a life of usefulness to themselves, their families, and their country. Occasionally ...
-Country Life. - Social Intercourse
IN former numbers, we have given oar space to generalities, and touched upon topics universal to all. If we take the country in its realities, we shall have to regret that, generally speaking, the num...
-Country Seals About Boston
De gustibus non disputandum. Why, gentlemen, each, all, and every one of the charming country seats you talk about, are fine places, in their way. No matter whether a residence and grounds occupy a si...
-Country Seats About Boston
Sir: My attention has been called to an article in the April number of your Journal, signed Hordeola, and to a commentary on the same in the May No., by a Subscriber, between whom there seems to ...
-Country Souses
I like irregular houses. To my mind they are not only more convenient, but also more beautiful than regular ones. They possess this important advantage, that you can lay out your ground plan with an e...
-Covering Grapevines In Winter
There are sections where covering the grapevine in winter is not an essential to retaining its complete vitality, and the maturing a good crop of fruit the ensuing season; but there are other sections...
-Covering Half-Hardy Plahts
For covering half-hardy plants, or screening from dry winds, various means are employed. In France, a basket is constructed, of two semicylinders, constructed in the mode of straw hives. To these are ...
-Coverings, Mats
It may be well to remember in the approaching cold weather, that whatever covering is used, whether straw mats, bast mats, cloth, or wood, they should be elevated above the surface to be covered, so a...
-The Crab-Apples
One of the most beautiful exhibitions at Ellwanger & Barry's, are the crab-apples on dwarf stocks. No lemon-tree could be more superb. The Large Yellow, of which we shall give a colored drawing, is of...
-Cracking Of Pears
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture at-tributes the cracking of pears to want of moisture. He says: A dry soil and hot sun combined, scorch, dry, harden the tender skin of the fruit...
-The Cracking Of The Pear
Dear Sir: - I am a great admirer of your excellent journal, and though but the possessor of what you, perhaps, would call a very small garden, I reap a rich harvest from the field of your pomological ...
-Craetbbjbs
In a cemetery in the country, where the population is limited, and where it will be necessary to depend mainly on beautifying and improving the natural advantages of the grounds, and not on extensive...
-Craft Mysteries
It is rather late in the day to attempt to preserve the above, and the disposition to do so manifested by some goes to prove what I have before ventured to hint, viz, that the gardeners, as a body, ar...
-Cranberries
My remarks on Profits of Small Fruits would not be complete without referring to the cultivation of cranberries, which is a very profitable branch of small fruit culture, where the soil is adapted t...
-Cranberries (2)
CRANBERRY culture for a few years past has been fully tested, and entered into with strong enthusiasm. In some places their cultivation has been quite a success, in others a complete failure, until, b...
-Cranberry
A correspondent of the N. Y. Tribune gives a severe chasting to the vender of the new Cape Cod Cranberry: I took up a circular the other day in which the vines of the famous Cape Cod cranberry, the be...
-The Cranberry Crop
The cash value of the cranberry crop, in the United States, according to statistics, has been estimated as follows: In 1870 Maine produced 1,000 barrels, Massachusetts 8,000, Connecticut 2,000, New J...
-Cranberry Culture
Can yon give something in the pages of your periodical, relative to the culture of the Gran-berry. Perhaps some of your numerous subscribers might be induced to relate their experience in this matter....
-Cranberry Culture. Continued
The Bell Cranberry is that which is mostly desired by cultivators, but even experienced men are often at a loss to distinguish the vine on which it grows from the Bugle or the Cherry. If found in the ...
-Creation
How wonderful, says Hugh Miller, has the coarse of creation been! How strange a procession! Never yet an Egyptian obelisk or Assyrian frieze - each charged with symbol and mystery - have our Layard...
-Credit To Whom Credit Is Due
We are always glad to see our Table matter items republished in our exchanges, because it satisfies us of their value; but we feel that we expend time and money in the preparation, printing, etc., and...
-Crime And Intemperance In Wine-Producing Countries
The increase of crime in France is, proportionally, six times greater than the increase of population, as appears from well-authenticated returns. From the year 1826 to 1843, the increase of populati...
-The Crimson Camellia-Flowered Peach
(See frontispiece). We present, this month, for a Frontispiece, a drawing of a comparatively new double-flowering Peach. The flower, it will be seen, is of much better form than the old kinds, and al...
-Criticism
The remark contained in your last issue respecting the necessity of truthful, candid, and open expression of opinion, in criticising horticultural works, deserves more than a passing attention. It sho...
-Criticisms On Horticulturist
In the April Horticulturist I notice some of your correspondents think you are ruining the work with Pears, Peaches, etc., etc . Now, having the Horticulturist from the commencement, and speaking for ...
-Critique On August Horticulturist. Pear Culture
Dr. Ward, in the sensible, practical articles he has written on this fruit, has kid every pear grower in the country under lasting obligation; and could they have been written six or eight years ago, ...
-Critique On The January Horticulturist
Mr. Editor - A long interregnum has passed since my pen laid aside its meddling with your pages. Bodily ailments, a gouty limb - I do confess to a twinge of the gout, now and then, with other infirmit...
-Critiscism
A friend sends us the following notice of Elliot's Fruit Boole, cut from The Independent, Dr. BeRECHER's popular newspaper, requesting its insertion in our columns, as it touches upon some points to w...
-Crmbteries
Mr. Philips who dates his letter from Edwards, Miss., says: - A. D. G. of Clinton. N. T. on Rural Cemeteries in a late Horticulturist, gives so much good sense and to my notion evinces so much true ...
-The Crops
The fruit crop in this neighborhood is highly satisfactory. Pears and cherries never promised better; of peaches, too, we shall probably have an average crop, both in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Del...
-Cropping Vines Under Glass
A. J. Downing, Esq. - Dear Sir: The letter of Mr. Chorlton, in the current number of the Horticulturist, suggests an inquiry of much interest to grape growers, and to which a reply can only be obtaine...
-The Croton Grape
LAST summer, in an article on grapes, I expressed an opinion on the Croton grape, and styled it a pure blooded Foreigner. After more mature growth I was convinced that I was in error, which I deem a d...
-Crown Imperial
These plants are well deserving of being extensively cultivated, for, being among the earliest tall flowers of spring, they make a fine appearance at a season when such flowers are much wanted to deco...
-Crvptomeria Japonic A - The Japan Cedar
What a beautiful tree is this! and how useful in our climate, where I have no doubt it will be as much at home as in the Provinces of Northern China; it is a very rapid, vigorous grower - I have known...
-A Crying Evil
A writer in the August number of your journal very good temperedly sets forth his grievances in having been imposed upon in the purchase of attenuated grape roots, which, after five summers' growth, o...
-Cryptomeria Japonica
Mr. Buist informs us that this tree, which has been twice noticed in our pages, as not being hardy about New-York, is perfectly hardy at Philadelphia, and has ripened seeds there. We have seen a speci...
-The Crystal Palace At Sydenham
As you requested some notes on interesting subjects on this side the water, I do not think I can better comply with your request than by sending you a few remarks on the present crystal palace at Syde...
-The Crystal Palace At Sydenham. Continued
This external sameness was much felt in the Hyde Park building; but now the interposition of low square towers at the junction of the nave and transepts, the open galleries toward the garden front, th...
-Crystal Palace Doings
It will interest our readers to peruse the following items from the Crystal Palace, London, where things are done on a magnificent scale: The forcing house for supplying the Crystal Palace is of th...
-Cuba
We have an eye to this paradise of an island, and make the following interesting extracts from a new work published in Boston, written by MatuRin M. Ballou, entitled History of Cuba, or Note of a Tra...
-The Cubculio Warfare - A Successful Battle
Dear Sir - In the September No. of the Horticulturist for 1851, you published an article over the signature of Thomas W. Ludlow, Jr., entitled The Curculio versus Lime and Sulphur. After reading Mr...
-The Cuboulio
At a meeting of the New York State Agricultural Society, at Albany, Feb. 7th, 1854, four gentlemen and myself were put on a committee to test a discovery of a remedy for the Curculio. Subsequently thi...
-Cucumbers
We have often seen cucumbers in England, that measured twenty .three or four inches, and the flower on them, which is a sine qua non for exhibition with English amateurs. There are Cucumber Societies...
-Cucumber Raising
Last spring my cucumbers in hotbeds were attacked by some vermin of the centipede tribe, which destroyed a great many vines. They were in the main Stalk,Immediately above and below the surface of the ...
-Culinary
The tender leaves in spring, used in compound salads, are equal to those of Endive or Succory. The fusiform roots are eaten raw as salad by the French, and boiled by the Germans like salsify or scorzo...
-Culrue Of Tomatoes
For several years I have taken special pains in the cultivation of a superior kind of tomatoes. They are very large and smooth, perfectly solid inside, and of the finest and richest flavor. Their repu...
-Cultivating Young Orchards
The following is the experience of the two most successful peach growers in the Delaware Peninsula: ' Mr. Cumtnings says: You may raise some crops on the vacant land till the trees and plants begin ...
-Cultivation
The principal feature in the growing of this kind of bulb in perfection is, the giving them a distinct season of rest and growth, the former by entirely withholding water for a time. We have now plant...
-Cultivation And Improvement Of The Water-Melon
By Edward Deeker, Gardener To J. Q. Jones, New Brighton, Staten Island, New York. The Water-Melon is unanimously considered the most delioiously cool and refreshing fruit we can boast of, and perhaps...
-Cultivation Of Camellias
Some extracts from an article on this subject by the Comte de Nancy, in the Flare des Serren,n may prove useful, more especially to beginners, in the cultivation of these plants. The choice of soil,...
-Cultivation Of Cape Heaths
Having procured some nice bushy plants of the sorts intended to be grown, which had better be done early in the spring, and having prepared sufficient good fibry peat, by breaking it to pieces and mix...
-The Cultivation Of Exotic Grapes Under Glass
A few practical remarks on the cultivation of exotic grapes under glass, will be interesting to some of the readers of the Agriculturist. Frequent attempts hare been made to cultivate this delicious f...
-Cultivation Of Gloxinias
If there exist now, among the rich collection of improved European greenhouse plants, any new ones which surpass old-fashioned kinds in beauty of foliage and flowers, the Gloxinias undoubtedly are con...
-Cultivation Of Grapes In City Yards
It seems to me, Mr. Editor, that your city readers are entitled occasionally to a chance to say something in your columns, and to receive some of the attention so freely given to the more favored port...
-Cultivation Of Licorice. Glyoyrrhiza glabra, Diadelphia decandria
The Licorice is one of the most important plants that are destined to be added to American agriculture, and it merits at our hands an early adoption on account of the facility of its culture, its grea...
-Cultivation Of Nut Trees
Little attention has thus far been given, says the Oneida Circular, in this country, to the cultivation of nut bearing trees. It is, however, said by some, that the yield of nut orchards in nuts and l...
-Cultivation Of Pears
3. Which offers the surest and greatest profit in extensive orcharding; autumn, or winter pears, or both? 4. How many and what varieties should be embraced in an orchard of 1,000 trees, to insure the...
-Cultivation Of Pears On The Quince
There are few modes of culture that have made more rapid progress in the United States, than that of the pear upon the quince stock. Ten years ago these dwarf pears, were found in very few gardens, an...
-Cultivation Of Sea Kale - Crambe Maritime
I HAVE often thought what a valuable acquisition this hardy perennial would form to our early vegetables in the spring, coming in perhaps a little later than asparagus, yielding its bounteous supplies...
-Cultivation Of The Almond
AT a meeting of the Sacramento (Cal.) Farmers' Club, a member said that, as regards soil, the almond will succeed on almost any soil we have. It will succeed on drier soil than any other tree, if it i...
-Cultivation Of The Calceolaria
The cultivation of the Calceolaria from the seed, requires a little extra care in the early state of its culture. To insure success in the raising of seedlings, it is requisite to attend to the follow...
-Cultivation Of The Gooseberry
A general complaint exists in this vicinity in the cultivation of the Gooseberry, from mildew invariably appearing, when the berry is well formed; and the fruit afterwards mostly dropping of; what rem...
-Cultivation Of The Grape
The very unusual attention which is now being attracted to the cultivation of grapes throughout the United States will perhaps render acceptable to your readers the results of a ten days survey of som...
-Cultivation Of The Grape. Continued
The most approved method of preparing the ground for a vineyard is by trenching with the spade two to three feet in depth during the fall and winter previous to planting. Cuttings are mostly used and...
-Cultivation Of The Ground-Nut, Or Pea-Nut, By C
Thinking that a few hints on the cultivation of the Ground-Nut would not be alto-gether unacceptable to the readers of the Horticulturist, and might be of assistance to those wishing to grow them, I a...
-The Cultivation Of The Lettuce
The Lettuce being so common a vegetable, your readers may think any thing superfluous that may be said respecting-such an every day article, but as we are constantly filling the periodicals with all o...
-Cultivation Of The Pear-Tree
If one of your late correspondents had good reason for thinking enough had been written on the subject of planting pears, it would become me to shrink from a compliance with the requests that are made...
-Cultivation Of The Raspberry
From a given amount of money, the Raspberry will, I think, return a larger amount of enjoyment and profit than any other fruit - the grape even not excepted. The raspberry season is looked forward to ...
-Cultivation Of The Strawberry
Mr. Tucker - Although I have done but little as a contributor to your valuable periodical, I have been a constant reader of it for many a day, and I have been much amused with the papers upon the ...
-Cultivation Of The Tuberose
Deservedly a favorite as this flower is, it is seldom successfully cultivated in the north, both from want of proper care and from the shortness of our season of warmth. I have been very successful in...
-Cultivation Of The Willow
Last fall I set about two thousand of the Salix viminalis, or basket willow, in a light loamy soil (it will stand a drouth well) from which I had taken sixty bushels of shelled corn per acre. I set th...
-Cultivation Of Wild Flowers
In the August number of this Magazine we gave a short catalogue of wild plants which we deemed worthy of cultivation, and promised to extend the list at some future time. We now redeem that promise by...
-Cultivation Or The Aphelandra
All who are in the habit of growing stove plants can not fail to acknowledge the great beauty, as well as utility, of this genus, flowering as they do in the depth of winter, when a great scarcity gen...
-Cultivation of Moutans
Few flowers have been the victims of more extraordinary caprice than these most splendid ornaments of our gardens. Long known by report and Chinese drawings, their beauty was disbelieved, till at leng...
-Cultor
Live stock of no description should be permitted in a lawn where there are evergreens. Sheep, tethered, or kept from the plants by hurdles, are admissible; a wire fence will keep them from nibbling. I...
-Culture
The great objection that we meet with in urging our friends to plant evergreens to adorn the wintry landscape, is, That it is so hard to make evergreens live. As we were admiring, the other day, two...
-Culture (2)
The Pharbitis. rubro-coerulea should be sown in a warm bed, and under glass, redressed, and put into a warm greenhouse; or, simply sow it, soon after, in a warm greenhouse, in March or April. Its very...
-Culture (3)
The soil in which I have found the cineraria to thrive best, consists of two parts of good turfy loam, and an equal apart of good, old decomposed cow dung and leaf mould, with an admixture of pearl an...
-The Culture And Management Of Hyacinths, In Pots, Glasses, And Borders
The months of September, October, and November are usually regarded as the proper season for planting the majority of bulbous-rooted plants: a word or two as to the manner of doing it may therefore no...
-Culture And Manure Of Asparagus
The subject of asparagus was brought up for discussion before the Concord (Mass.) Farmer's Club, and Capt. Moore said: One hundred and fifty years ago some book-maker asserted that asparagus grew nat...
-Culture And Pruning Of Pear Trees
IN some of the late numbers of the Horticulturist, an extract is quoted to the effect that I have recently changed my views with regard to pruning pear trees. Let me answer these assertions by giving ...
-Culture In A Fernery
A sttuation for a fernery should be chosen in a retired spot, and should be formed by throwing up a mound of earth, and facing it on both sides with rocks and roots of trees; or two banks of earth, fa...
-Culture Of Achimenes
Now that we have so many beautiful summer-flowering exotica for the decoration of conservatories and greenhouses, there is no excuse for turning these structures into lumber rooms during summer; for, ...
-Culture Of Asparagus
Asparagus is one of the most generally esteemed esculents that our gardens produce, and in our climate very easily brought to the highest state of perfection. But how seldom do we see even a tolerably...
-Culture Of Asparagus. Continued
The Asparagus being brought to the requisite state of vigor, the next question is how to secure the necessary succulence, which it never has beyond two or three inches in an English market, and not o...
-Culture Of Carnations
Select the cuttings you desire to propagate from the parent plant, and cut it through with a sharp knife just below the third pair of leaves from the top of the cutting; this done, cut off half the le...
-The Culture Of Celery
Celery has become so generally admired a vegetable, that a large supply both for market and likewise in every private horticultural establishment, is now an indispensable necessity. This supply is to ...
-The Culture Of Celery. Continued
When the plants are well above ground, look out for weeds; keep all clean, and thin out if too close. Remember that nothing deteriorates the quality of Celery more than a check during growth. Do not b...
-The Culture Of Celery. Earthing
Where it may be required to have Celery early, the earthing must be commenced accordingly; but, generally speaking, too much hurry in this case is not good. One of the reasons why Celery is spongy and...
-Culture Of Dwarf Fruit-Trees
The attention given at the present time to the culture of dwarf fruit trees, both in the garden and orchard, in all parts of the country, renders the subject one of the most important in the whole ran...
-Culture Of Eranthemum Pulchellum
Among the many old and beautiful flowering plants, which from some cause are almost neglected, except by here and there a devoted lover of old as well as new plants, the Eranthemum pulchellum holds a ...
-Culture Of Foreign Grapes In Cold Vineries
[We commend the following article to the special attention of amateurs, as the plain, straight forward statement of an amateur cultivator who has been eminently successful in this branch of culture. W...
-Culture Of Foreign Grapes In Cold Vineries. Continued
December 15th Gut off the vine about six feet from the bottom, wash it with mild soap suds, wrap with straw, and lay it down in front of the house. Sprinkle some rat destroyer about, cover the border...
-Culture Of Ginger. Wine Drinkers Raising Mounds
ED. Western Horticulturist: - I was much amused over Storm Cliff's first attempt at sub-tropical gardening on a mound, as related in the Floral Cabinet for October, and presume such to be the expe...
-Culture Of Gladiolus
As a background or center to the flower border or bed, the various gladioli must not be forgotten, as they add a special enrichment to our gardens often when there is a dearth of other flowers. In pre...
-Culture Of Gloxinias
By this time the greater part of Gloxinias will be going to rest, and thus little remains to be done in their cultivation this year. The object of the grower will now be to pay such attention as their...
-Culture Of Grapes In Vineries
Mr. Tucker - In the Horticulturist of February last, I gave an account of the cold grapery at this place, in which was stated that there was ripened 262 bunches on 74 vines, the season after planting....
-Culture Of Pie Plant - Rheum
All who have had any experience in the matter, are fully convinced of the luxury and healthfulness of fresh and succulent substances for pies at all seasons of the year. Yet the idea has never suggest...
-Culture Of Poinsettia Pulcherrima
The following has been my mode of growing the Poinsettia Pulcherrima for the last two years, and, according to my opinion, with the best possible success. I have read in many publications of the day v...
-Culture Of Sea Kale
Although we have such a variety of vegetables, that it may seem superfluous to press upon the public the good qualities of one at present but little in use; yet seeing that it is only from want of its...
-Culture Of Sea Kale. Continued
Where expense and labor are not regarded, and it is wished to prolong the season for this delicious vegetable, some of the large plants in a bed, two. or three years old, may, before winter sets in, b...
-Culture Of Specimen Cinerarias
As the time for commencing the propagation of the cineraria for Specimen Plants for the ensuing winter and spring months, is just at hand, I beg to offer a few remarks with reference to growing them; ...
-Culture Of Succory As A Winter Salad. Chiccory, Wild Endive, Cichorium Intybus
While we see around us abundant evidence of the fostering care of Horticultural Societies in the improved appearance of our grounds, and the increasing attention to the cultivation of the finest kinds...
-Culture Of Sweet-Scented Violets
It may be of use to your readers, to detail the method which I pursue in the treatment of Sweet-Scented Violets, especially as I have not seen a paper on the subject from any of your contributors. I c...
-Culture Of The Apple
L. F. Allen, of Buffalo, regarded Western New York as the finest apple-growing region in the United States - -extending from Syracuse to Niagara River - and excepting the region about the eastern end ...
-Culture Of The Apple (2)
We hear from many portions of the country a general complaint of the failure of the apple orchards. Apple-trees are not growing and bearing as well as in former times. The climate, or something, has c...
-Culture Of The Apple In Pots
(Translated from the German of Dial). I must naturally suppose that persons ignorant of the art of fruit culture may wish to raise fruit trees in pots, and for such many an explanation is necessary, ...
-Culture Of The Apple In Pots. Continued
The annual summer shoots of this are of yellowish green, of the former variety of a reddish brown. Suckers are as abundant with the Dutch as with the French variety. In France this Dutch variety is c...
-Culture Of The Camellia Japonica
The vegetable kingdom has presented us with an inexhaustible richness of gratifying and inquiring meditations. Sometimes it is beautiful flowers that attract our attention; at other times, the variega...
-Culture Of The Camellia Japonica (2)
The Camellia is in habit a forest-tree, and the soil most suitable for it is one rich in vegetable matter; still it must neither be too clayey nor sandy. Garden, era differ somewhat regarding the best...
-The Culture Of The Carnation
I am glad to see, Mr. Editor, that you have lately taken hold of Florists' flowers in the pages of the Horticulturist. The articles of Mr. Richardson on the Dahlia, and of Mr. Barker on the Polyanthu...
-The Culture Of The Carnation (2)
It only remains to give some directions for the propagation of Carnations. Two modes are usually adopted, namely, by layering, and by cuttings, or (as they are always called in this family of plants)...
-Culture Of The Chinese Primrose
I generally sow my seeds about this time, or a little earlier, in shallow pans, in light sandy soil, without any manure. They are sown thinly and pressed down on the surface, so as just to be covered ...
-Culture Of The Cineraria
In order to produce strong blooming plauts in small pots early in February of this gem of the winter season, the offsets from stock-plants should be potted into 3-inch pots, or if seedlings they shoul...
-Culture Of The Dahlia
Dear Editor:- I wish that by a word of mine I could raise an army of amateurs that would infuse some additional vigor and emulation into the cultivation of the noblest of our autumnal glories, the Dah...
-Culture Of The Dahlia (2)
Before proceeding further I may as well dispose of all the duplicate plants, or those not required for planting out. As they root I repot them into two sizes larger, giving them good rich stuff; placi...
-Culture Of The Dahlia (2). Part 2
Let me here drop a caution or two. In pruning, as much as possible banish the knife; never allow superfluous shoots to get beyond the power of the finger and thumb, it being better management to stop ...
-Culture Of The Dahlia (2). Part 3
Keeping these few remarks in view, the blooming season will have advanced but a short way before the young amateur will have observed the various characters described, and with a few additional hints ...
-Culture Of The Gesneria Sellowii And Bulbosa
The two plants above mentioned may, perhaps, be considered too old, especially the last named, to require any writing about However this may be, I venture to send a few practical directions which may ...
-Culture Of The Grape In Cold Houses
Mr. L. Tucker - The late Mr. Downing, whose melancholy death we sincerely mourn, expressed himself much pleased with a statement made by Mr. Chorlion, describing his management of a vinery. It was in ...
-The Culture Of The Grape, And Wine-Making
The most complete and reliable publication we have yet seen, on the subject of Vineyard Culture, and Wine-Making, in America. It is the fruit of large experience, not only of the author himself, but o...
-Culture Of The Narcissus
Mr. Editor - The Narcissus is a flower the cultivation of which is neglected more tnan it ought to be, and I am desirous of calling the attention of your readers to some of the best species. With this...
-Culture Of The Olive In America
A recent number of the Charleston Mercury has the following correspondence and remarks in relation to this plant: It has long been the opinion of many observing men that the Olive may be successfully...
-Culture Of The Peach
As you were pleased, in a late number, to introduce sortie approbatory remarks upon my management of the peach, it may not be uninteresting to some of your readers to have a statement more in detail. ...
-Culture Of The Pear - An Englishman's Views
J. Jay Smith, Esq.: Sawbridgeworth, Herts, England. My Dear Sir, - I have just had prepared and packed for you some Roses - twenty-four standards, and twenty-four dwarf standards of Hybrid Perpetuate...
-Culture Of The Pelargonium
I have seen no really fine Geraniums in this country. The reason is obvious, and is this: The plants are not got into a fit state for blooming sufficiently early, and they are forced into bloom by the...
-Culture Of The Pine-Apple
Within the last twenty years there has been a great advance made in the successful cultivation of the Pine-apple; and although that may be attributed, in a considerable degree, to the improvement in t...
-Culture Of The Rose
The time approaches for planting Roses; with some of our readers it is at hand. A word as to their culture is, however, always in season. If the ground is light, it will be necessary to mix good stron...
-Culture Of The Stanwick Nectarine
[On a late visit to the country residence of H. H. Hunnewell, Esq., thirteen miles from Boston, on the 19th of July, we were handed a large plate of the most exquisite Stanwick Nectarines raised by hi...
-Culture Of The Tomato
It is very likely that many of your numerous readers will consider it very superfluous to be writing about so common a subject as the Tomato, - the more common and often more needed, - so, at the risk...
-Culture Of The Vine
It is generally considered that little which is new can now be advanced on this subject My desultory remarks may therefore appear to be superfluous; but I would ask to what causes are we to attribute ...
-Culture Of The Vine. Part 2
We have abundant and sufficient proof that the vine will grow strongly, and ripen its wood thoroughly, and produce fruit plenteously, when it is supplied with proper nutriment in a liquid state. I hav...
-Culture Of The Vine. Part 3
Having now planted the vines in the border, and brought the pots into the house to be placed in the most suitable situations according to the structure, I will proceed to take a review of the interior...
-Culture Of The Vine In Europe
The United States Commission at the Universal Exposition of Paris in 1867 appointed a committee, composed of Marshall P. Wilder, Alexander Thompson, William J. Flagg, and Patrick Barry, to report on t...
-Culture Of Tiie Pelargonium
I strike my cuttings, which are obtained as soon as the wood is thoroughly ripe, under hand-glasses in the open ground, watering them very slightly for a week or two, but exposing them to dews at nigh...
-Culture Of Tomatoes
I wish to say a few words about growing tomatoes, which I think would be worth publishing, if it has not appeared before this from some other source. We hear people talk about planting tomatoes in san...
-Culture Or Achimenes
What is the proper manner of wintering Achimenes? Last autumn, after the leaves had died down, I put my pots away on a back shelf of the greenhouse, in a warm part, out of the reach of frost, and gave...
-Culture of Lilium Lancifolium
Towards the end of November, 1854, I prepared a bed for planting the bulbs of this beautiful Lily; the bed was four feet wide and nine feet long, composed of common garden soil, well dug and broken up...
-Culture of The Achimenes
Nearly all the varieties of this lovely genus deserve to be ranked with the most beautiful and useful ornamental plants which our glass houses possess. Their flowers, of many delicate and pleasing sha...
-Culture of The Cineraria
As a winter and early spring-blooming plant, the Cineraria deserves special attention; for when properly treated it never fails to attract and to excite pleasure in the mind of every lover of flowers ...
-Culture of The Heliotrope For Winter Flowering
Although the Heliotropium corytnbosum, and Peruvianum, with many beautiful varieties of more recent introduction, have been known, in collections, for years, and are by no means difficult to manage, y...
-Culture of The Japan Lily In Pots
Lilicm lancifolium, with its many and beautiful varieties, is very easily cultivated, and no plant is better adapted to the amateur; and when well grown in pots, they are among the most beautiful of a...
-Culture of The Petunia From Seed
The improvement of the Petunia is now justly receiving marked attention, and no plant better merits it. For show, the Petunia, in our estimation, is one of the most valuable bedding plants we have. Th...
-Culture of The Yucca
[Translated from the Revue Horticale]. It is unnecessary to insist anew upon the beauty and ornamental merit of the yucca, but it may be useful to encourage its culture and make known the means by wh...
-Cunninghamia Sinenses. Cunninghamia Lanceolata
This tree is but sparingly planted by cultivators even in England. I tell why, as it is exceedingly distinct, and forms an admirable contrast with of onifers. In Britain there is none more hardy. Perh...
-Cuphba Eminens
Mr. Gk C. Thorburn has exhibited to us this new Cuphea, which promises to be useful as a bedding-out plant. The flowers are twice as long as our old favorite, and one-half is yellow. Mr; T. will intro...
-Cuphea Eminens
Ed. Horticulturist: In a recent number I notice a correspondent recommending the Cuphea eminens, as one of the most valuable winter blooming house plants ever introduced. In reading the report of the ...
-The Curcoulio
Mr. J. R. Gardener, of Sonny Side, Montgomery County, Virginia, informs us that he has been successful in destroying the curonlio, by piling small stones, to the height of eighteen inches and about th...
-The Curculio
I know of no one subject connected with fruit culture of more importance to us western people than this. There is no malady or cause existing here that would prevent our having a full crop of that del...
-The Curculio (2)
I trust your correspondent, James Matthews, Esq., will pardon me for applying the heading of his article in the February number of this volume to my own use, when he finds that which I write will help...
-Curculio (3)
My attention baa been attracted to Mr. Adair's article in the April number of your magazine, on the Gareullo and the mischief occasioned by the little Turk, and it occcurs to me to inquire of yon wh...
-The Curculio (4)
Editor of Horticulturist: In your paper of this month, Mr. Gardener writes that he saved his plums from the. ravages of the Coroulio, by piling small stones to the height of eighteen inches round the ...
-The Curculio (5)
Dear Sir: - have at length completed my series of observations on the insects and diseases of the Plum, Cherry and Peach-trees, a portion of which I now send for your most popular and valuable journal...
-The Curculio (5). Continued
Hoping that you will continue your interesting and important observations, I am Yours, sincerely, William A. Hammond. Fig.1. Flg.2 Fig. 8. Fig. 4. Several other* insects form their nes...
-The Curculio (6)
The past has been a season of fruit: all kinds have been in unusual abundance. Cherries, Pears, Apples, and Plums have been within the means of all classes in all parts of the country; and even Aprico...
-The Curculio (7)
The Cureulio is a hard, black, rough beetle. A handful of them, when at rest, with their legs and probosces folded under them, could be mistaken for a handful of hemp-seeds. Like other beetles, their ...
-The Curculio (7). Part 2
However strange and unnatural it may appear, that the same insect should resort to a nidus so different as a fruit and the bark of a tree, still the testimony is too strong to the fact, to leave it lo...
-The Curculio (7). Part 3
One Summer in my experience I escaped the curculio. I found here and there a few at first, but not one in a hundred of ordinary seasons, and I had a crop of fruit without trouble, and that was to me a...
-The Curculio (8)
Editor of Horticulturist, - I am surprised to discover in yours, and other Horticultural papers, that they can not prevent the destruction of their plums by the Curculio. I should not be surprised, if...
-Curculio - Plums
We have several letters inquiring if any thing has yet been heard from Mr. Matiisws' remedy. In reply we have to say, that we have not yet learned how or when the results of the experiments are to be ...
-The Curculio - Versus Lime And Sulphur
A. J. Downing, Esq As as it appears by a writer in the last number of the Horticulturist, that Mr. Longworth, of Cincinnati, has not as yet succeeded in preventing the attacks of the curculio, and th...
-Curculio Catching
DR. Hull, of Alton, Ills., is probably the most successful fruit grower of the West. From 1,930 trees this year, he captured not less than 153,000 curculios, and he tells the Alton Horticultural Socie...
-Curculio Extirpator
A. J. Downing, Esq.: It has been the study of a great many practical men and amateurs, of late years, to devise some means for the destruction of the curculio; but as yet, I believe, with no consider...
-The Curculio Mastered At Last
The following is one of the most sensible plans of killing the Curculio that we have yet seen, even better than the jarring process in some respects, being much easier; still that should not be omitte...
-The Curculio Or Plum "Wrevil
Much has been written about this destructive insect, and many plans have been adopted to prevent Us ravages on the Plum,and other smooth skinned fruits. Some prefer paving under the trees; others plan...
-Curculio Remedies
If we look around at the various remedies that have from time to time been proposed for the Curculio, we will find that they are almost as numerous as those found in the pharmacopoeia of the quack med...
-Curculio Remedy
I would ask you how soon we may look for the report of the committee, on Mathews' remedy for the Curculio's depredations on the Plum tree! I have seven or eight fine Plum trees, and cannot get as many...
-The Curculio Vs. Peach Rot
At the late winter meeting of the Fruit-Growers' Association of southern Illinois, held at Cobden, a long discussion was held, occupying nearly half a day, on the curculio, its ravages, and the best m...
-The Curculio. The Cause Of The Plum Warts
This theory, which I have thought fallacious, appears to be so distinctly proved by the observations of Miss Morris, that I feel almost compelled to give in my adhesion to her views. Perfectly aware o...
-Cure For Chicken Cholera
Mr. Editor : Chicken Cholera has prevailed to a greater or less extent for several years in many of the Western and Southwestern States, and thousands upon thousands of valuable birds have been carrie...
-Cure For The Peach Borer
M. B. Bateham says, that after two years trial of Carbolic Soap, he feels quite safe in recommending its use as the cheapest and best method yet found for the prevention of injury by the peach borer, ...
-Cure For The Potato Disease
Mr. John Kyle, to whom the French Government, in conjunction with the Agricultural Society Of France, lately awarded a gold medal, besides a handsome prize in money, for his discovery of the cure of t...
-Curiosities Of American Floriculture
Peter Henderson writes Hearth and Home that the Smilax seems almost entirely uncultivated among florists around London. Many readers will be surprised to learn the extent to which it is cultivated in ...
-Curiosities Of Mural Journalism
Almost every new comer in the field of rural literature echoes the stereotyped expression of one idea, - that their mission is to give sound and practical instruction - to avoid sharp personalities -...
-Curiosities Of Vegetation
Few circumstances excite the surprise of observers more than the production of one flower by the interior of another. And yet there is no preternatural phenomenon more easily explained when the true n...
-Curiosity Of Vegetation
The correspondent of a Rural paper lately declared that, The fact is this: upon a grape-vine growing in this town, and having for its support a hickory tree, was found, some weeks ago, a fruit of thi...
-Curious Fact In History Of The Potato
Almost every one knows the fact of the introduction of the potato into England, yet very few know the odd accident which prevented it from being totally lost to sight. It was not, as popularly suppose...
-Curious Habit Of "Plants
Some Orchids, whether wild ones, such as Ladies' Tresses, or those various and more gorgeous ones, mostly air plants of tropical regions, which adorn rich conservatories,-curiously resemble butterflie...
-Curious Habits Of Plants
Some Orchids, whether wild ones, such as Ladies Tresses, or those various and more gorgeous ones, mostly air plants of tropical regions, which adorn rich conservatories, curiously resemble butterflie...
-Curious Trees
Just beyond the Dar-bonne or Caleasieu river, in the parish of Caleasieu, is a white oak tree, about two-and-a-half feet in diameter. There are no branches for twenty-five or thirty feet up. About twe...
-The Curled Leaf On The Peach-Tree
In the culture of peaches here) an evil has been encountered for the last two years, which, so far as I have experience, is new. You are doubtless aware that the elevation of this part of the state, a...
-The Currant
WHEN we consider how largely the Currant contributes to good living, in the way of tarts, jams, jellies, wines, and how easily it is cultivated, how little space it requires, how patient it is und...
-Currants (2)
Were we to search through the whole catalogue of fruits, we could not find one possessed of so many sterling good qualities as this; and yet how much neglected. I was much pleased with the plate in th...
-Currants (3)
La Versaillaise, La Hative, and La Fertile, three varieties comparatively new, are well worthy of cultivation. The first is the largest Currant known - larger, even, than the Cherry Currant: its bunch...
-The Currant Worm (2)
It is impossible for me at this time to give you a detailed account of my fight with this new and most formidable enemy of the horticulturist; but according to promise will try to put some of your rea...
-The Currant Worm. Borers Rolla And The American Beauty
Ed. Western Horticulturist: - I send you outlines of a description of the above named apples. They have proved so hardy here that they may be an acquisition some degrees further north, where the numbe...
-Currants - Best Varieties And Culture
What are the best methods of cultivation, and which are the best varieties of the currant for cultivation? Mr. Barry's opinion being asked in regard to currants, said he had nothing to offer partic...
-Currants And Gooseberries
The only peculiarity we have seen in them, the past season, was the very novel one that they gave no blossoms above the line where they were protected by snow in that severest change in winter. The bl...
-Cuttings
D. R. K., (Roxboro', Pa.) To propagate the Arbor- vitea from cuttings, sink a square or oblong frame fitted with lights like a hot-bed, on the shady side of a fence or building. Take out the soil for ...
-Cutting Dawn A Palm-Tree
One morning, our party obtained permission from the owner of a coffee plantation to cut down a Royal Palm, in order to get the much esteemed cabbage. Taking a workman, we found a moderate-sized tree, ...
-Cutting Flowers In The Green-House
A few days since we were visiting a gentleman who has a fine green-house and conservatory, well stocked with plants in healthy condition, under the charge and owing to the skill of an intelligent gard...
-Cutting Off Strawberry Leaves
Still another champion appears in behalf of removing the old leaves of strawberry vines. A subscriber lately asked the Rural New Yorker if it was safe to cut off these leaves, and in general solicitin...
-Cutting Willows
In your February number I was very much pleased to see the communication of Mr. Saul on the Cutting of Willows. Last spring I procured of Dr. Grant and others, fifty thousand cuttings of three varie...
-Cuttings Of The Leaves
Cuttings of the leaves are seldom used in propagating hardy plants. They are sometimes employed merely for the purpose of showing what may be done, although there are usually other methods which are a...
-Cuyahoga Grape
An unintentional blunder was made last month in advertising Dr. Taylor's new Grape, which we regret, and desire to correct, since it may put him to no little inconvenience. The heading of one of Mr. R...
-The Cynthiana Grape
GEO. HUSMANN, of Hermann, Mo , in his Grape Notes in his journal, The Grape Culturist, stated recently that the Cynthiana Grape gives the best red wine yet produced on the American Continent. An opi...
-Cytisus Nubigenus
-One of the most agreeable works that has found its way to our table, from London of late, is C. Piazzi Smyth's Teneriffe, an Astronomer's Experiment; or Specialities of a Residence above the Clouds...
-Cytisuses
This family is well known as a most useful winter shrub, some kinds very fragrant, and being evergreens, they are particularly desirable. They are propagated with facility by cuttings in the spring. B...
-Dahlias
Plant the first and second week of this month, (we seldom plant our principal ter than old roots, for a fine show of perfect flowers. Give them plenty of room - at least four feet every way. Torn ont ...
-Dahlias (2)
Never have we enjoyed so fine a display of this queen of autumn flowers, as during the whole month of October last The summer was, as we all know, excessively dry, and remained so up to the early part...
-Dahlias (2). Continued
Dahlias #1 W. C. Wilson, Esq., of Baltimore, who has always one of the best private collections of Dahlias in America, writes us as follows: The following were the best Dahlias in this latitude las...
-Dahlia Imperialis
This is a strong growing plant, with somewhat the habit and appearance of the Dahlia, yet quite distinct, that has flowered in various collections the past season. The French description of it is, tha...
-Dahlia, Crystal Palace Scarlet (Dwarf Bedding)
The qualities of this new bedding Dahlia are such that henceforth no garden with but half a dozen flower-beds will be complete without it It fills up that void so long felt by many, namely, having a b...
-Daisy
[Greek, Leukos, white, and Anthemon, a flower; in reference to its white rays]. Heads many-flowered; rays pistillate, numerous. Involucre spreading, broad and nearly flat, - the scales imbricated, wi...
-The Daisy Chrysanthemums
Who has ever seen the beautiful Daisy Chrysanthemum, without admiring it, and desiring to add to his own callection a few plants so gemmed with bud and blossom in October, November, and December We ha...
-Damson Cheese
However much we may advocate fruit culture in our pages, we leave the cooking department toothers; but there is no general rule without an exception. There are many ways to do many things, but there i...
-Dandelion
Although a common weed, and therefore disliked, yet a mass of dandelions, when in bloom early in May, presents one of the most gay and rich golden shows possible to be created. With a little care, to ...
-Daphne Indica Odorata
This beautiful and highly odoriferous plant, is one of the most neglected subjects in cultivation: a good specimen is as scarce as a Queen Anne's farthing; and he is a lucky man who ever possessed one...
-Daphne Indica Rubea
Mr. Editor: I should like to see the true variety of this delightful plant more amongst us in this country. I was for several years engaged in business in England, where.I got bit by the Ftoricultu-...
-Darwin's Great Work
The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication. By Charles Darwin. Authorized edition, with a Preface to the American edition by the Author, and one by Professor Asa Gray, of Cambridge, Mass....
-A Dat At Kew Gardens, London
Leaving the Museum, our little party repaired to the Conservatory, sometimes called the architectural Greenhouse; it is filled with a rich collection of Australian trees and shrubs, chiefly Myrtacess,...
-On Dates Of Buildings
A cottage, or keeper's house, was deemed necessary at Apsley Wood, about three miles from Woburn Abbey. The Duke of Bedford (to whom I am indebted for numerous opportunities of displaying his good tas...
-Davis Pear
Specimens of this seedless native Pear were received from Mr. Samuel Davis, Haverford Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania - six miles from Philadelphia, on the Westchester Road. They were produced...
-A Day At Kew Gardens, London
Fortified with a letter of introduction to Sir William J. Hooker, who fixed the hour of one o'clock to conduct us round these wonderful gardens and museum, it may well be supposed punctuality was amon...
-A Day At New Gardens, London
We must move on; fatigue it will not do yet to listen to; we shall probably never have such another opportunity. As yet we have scarcely begun to see and hear. Sir William evidently enjoyed with a hi...
-A Day's Ride
Having some business up the river, and feeling the need of recreation, we planned with Mr. Downing a day's ride, and give the reader the result, in order that he may know how many beautiful things can...
-A Day's Ride. Continued
All were well grown, and the house was gay with flowers. The flower garden is a fine piece of work, but the arrangement of the bedding plants was faulty. The plants themselves, however, were mostly in...
-De Kalb Cherries
In Georgia, the De Kalb Cherry has been remarkable for the regularity with which it produces a crop. We remarked the circumstance of all the De Kalb varieties looking very healthy at Mr. Peter's garde...
-De Tongres Pear
This fine fruit originated in or about the very old city of Tongres, in Belgium, and was first described in the Album de Pomologie, Vol. 3, 1849-50. Fruit large, pyriform, or obovate-elongated, depre...
-Death Of Dr. John P. Barratt
Since our last issue, we have heard the melancholy tidings of the death of this devoted friend of horticulture, rural art, and the natural sciences. Dr. Barratt was a native of Great Britain, and emig...
-Death Of Henry A. Droer
With great regret, we announce the death of Henry A. Dreer, in Philadelphia. For a long time prominent as one of the oldest and most reliable seedsmen and dealers of that city, he also was equally pro...
-Death Of J, Knox
We regret to announce the death of Rev. J. Knox, of Pittsburg, Pa., which occurred in Pittsburg, 13th last November It was only a short time before his death when we met him, and had several personal ...
-Death Of Luther Tucker
The sad news respecting the death of Luther Tucker, at Albany, N. Y., recalls to mind one circumstance which the Press has failed to notice. Besides his connection with the Genesee Farmer, The Cultiva...
-Death Of Mark Miller
We regret to announce the death of Mark Miller, at his residence, in Des Moines, Iowa, on Thursday, April 16, 1874. Mr. Miller had been suffering severely, the past few months, from fever, peculiar t...
-Death Of Samuel Walkeb
We have been pained to learn the death of this eminent pomolo-gist, whom we have known intimately for many years. The following address, before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, by the Hon. Mar...
-Death Of Thomas Hancook, Of Bttbijiigton, New Jebsey
Mr. Hancook died at his residence, in Burlington, on the 21st of March last The announcement took as quite by surprise, as Mr. H. had attended the meeting of the National Agricultural Society, at Wash...
-Death Of Thomas Nuttall
This eminent botanist died in September last, at his residence near Liverpool, England, at the age (we believe) of 73. Mr. Nuttall rendered great service to American botany; being most eminently an en...
-Death of Mrs. Loudon
The widow of J. C. Loudon, the eminent botanical writer and landscape and architectural gardener, died in the second week of July last, leaving a place vacant in society and letters. Thirty years ago ...
-Deceased And Absent Members
Since our last biennial session, one of the founders of the Society, who held official positions from the organization of the Association, has been removed by death to another, and, we trust, happier ...
-Deceased Officers
Andrew H. Ernst, of Cincinnati, Ohio, one of the Vice-Presidents of this society, died at his residence in that city, February 13th, I860, aged sixty-four years. He was a gentleman of foreign birth, b...
-Deceptive Advertisements
There is a subject that calls for the special attention of all purchasers from nurseries, but which has hitherto received no notice whatever; it is the consummate humbuggery practiced by some nurserym...
-Deciduous Lawn Trees
Our correspondent, Col. Jacques, whose communication appears on another page, asks: What are the twelve best deciduous trees for lawns and streets, in our cold climates? We thought it necessary to d...
-Deciduous Shade Trees For Private Grounds
In our last December number we named some few varieties of trees that we consider eminently deserving to be planted for street shades. We now designate a few of the many beautiful trees that we regard...
-Deciduous Shade Trees for Private Grounds
To the improver of a new place, unacquainted with but few of our native trees, this will prove an article of interest. You will permit me to say that it would have added to its value had you designate...
-Decorating Public Dinner Tables
The English are far ahead of us in the liberal use of flowers at public gatherings although.in some of our private parties or wedding receptions, the Americans are often exceedingly lavish. At a rece...
-Decorative Arts
To those who know the power of art to educate and refine the taste, the social life and character of a people, it has always been a cause of regret that the appreciation and enjoyment of it should hav...
-Decortication Of Trees
Allow me to call attention to the following: - The system of stripping the bark off the trunks of trees, for the purpose of destroying the insects which infest them, has now been generally applied to...
-Decrepitude Of The Pear-Tree. Bt J. De Jonge, Brussels
Every individual being, whether of an animal or vegetable nature, has its average period of existence, during which it passes through all its stages, falls into decay, and, arrived at its limit, disap...
-Deep And Shallow Culture Of The Grape
A VINE grower, of Pleasant Valley, N. T., a locality famous for its fine vineyards, after some years experience, comes to the conclusion that shallow culture in the vineyard is followed by decidedly t...
-Deep Holes For Trees
Dear Sir: In your November number, under head of Domestic Notices, are to be found excellent directions for transplanting trees, the best in feet I have ever met with, subject however, I think, to one...
-Defence Of The Prairies
My Dear Editor:--You could not have visited the prairie country at a more unpropitious season, for a succession of heavy rains had submerged the country, and my own grounds being torn up for tree-plan...
-Degeneration Of Varieties of The Pear-Tree
Mr. De Jonghe, of Brussels, has been writing lately much about his favorite pear-tree, and comes to the following conclusions respecting the Regeneration of varieties, so much talked about. He says: -...
-Delaware Grape
I did not intend to obtrude my thoughts again on the pages of the Horticulturist, as I very well know the great majority of its readers care very little, be it native or foreign. All they care to know...
-Delaware Grape (2)
First I would notice the Delaware as that at least has been more fully tested than the others. When I first saw it (some five or six years since) I was so favorably impressed with its beauty and excel...
-The Delaware As A "Feeble" Grower
At one time an effort was made to produce the impression that the Delaware is a poor feeble grower; but it is now so generally distributed, that the impression, wherever made, must give way to facts. ...
-The Delaware Grape
About three years ago, Mr. Bateham, of the Ohio Cultivator, was kind enough to send us some bunches of this grape from an Ohio Fruit Growers' Convention. We were much pleased with it, and took note of...
-Delaware Grape (3)
The Delaware Grape #1 Mr. Thomas J. Myers, of Dundee, Yates county, N. Y., writes us that there is a Grape in Steuben county, where it has been cultivated for twenty years, that answers our descripti...
-The Delaware Grape (3)
A root of the Delaware Grape was sent me about ten years since, by an intelligent citizen of Delaware, in this State, who informed me that it was brought there several years before by an emigrant from...
-The Delaware Grape (4)
This grape has for a number of years occupied a prominent position before the horticultural world, and its merits, probable origin, and various collateral questions have been very thoroughly discussed...
-The Delaware Grape (4). Continued
This is the reason Mr. P. found matters as he did; and that he should attempt to present such a state of affairs to the prejudice of the Delaware, is to me matter of as great surprise as it possibly...
-The Delaware Grape (5)
THE close of the year we propose to signalize by putting upon record our estimate of the Delaware Grape, not ostentatiously, but in few and simple words, and where all may see it. Our opinion of the...
-The Delaware Grape (6)
We have just been shown a letter from J. Fisk Allen, Esq., Of Salem, Mass., in which he makes an allusion to our article on the Delaware Grape. He says: I am glad to Bee Mr. Mead, in December number ...
-The Delaware Grape - A Rejoinder To Mr. Prince
I reciprocate the expressions of personal regard with which Mr. Prince prefaces his reply to my article in the November number of the Horticulturist. My relations with him, since the date of our first...
-The Delaware Grape - A Rejoinder To Mr. Prince. Continued
But I shall not permit this point to be determined by a mere assertion, though the record proves its correctness. Mr. P. complains that I have not quoted from some of his letters. To maintain ray posi...
-The Delaware Grape In Missouri - Norton's Virginia
I notice in your valuable journal for November, that the war about the origin of this invaluable grape, its productiveness, and adaptability to vineyard culture, is not yet ended; and as you seem to w...
-The Delaware Grape-Reply To Mr. Thomson
I regret that my worthy friend, A. Thomson, Esq., of Delaware, Ohio, should feel aggrieved, as is indicated by his article in the Horticulturist of the present month, for assuredly it is without cause...
-The Delaware Grape. - Is It The Traminer
When the grape now known as the Delaware was first brought to the notice of horticulturists (some ten or twelve years since), it was supposed, from what could be learned of its history, that it was ...
-Delaware Horticultural Society
At a stated meeting of the Delaware Horticultural Society, held April 19th, 1853, on motion of E. Tatrall, Jr., the Secretary was requested to forward an abstract of the proceeding of each meeting to ...
-The Delaware In New Jersey
It is now too late to displace the Delaware grape from that exalted position which it has not undeservedly obtained;' the judgment of even a Prince can not supersede the voice of the people - and the...
-Delaware, Of Ohio
The head and front of all American grapes, when quality is brought into question. For a grape as large in bunch and berry, and productive, hardy, and free from mildew and rot, as the Concord, and as g...
-Delightful Winter Landscape
I saw, not long since, a country house where there was a novel feature that delighted me. This was a winter landscape, or scene, on one side of the house, upon which the two rooms occupied by the fami...
-Delights Of The Garden And Lawn
A valued correspondent writes thus of his enjoyments, and, we have no doubt, very truthfully expresses his pleasures: I and my man, Jeemes (the latter, especially), are at work, this fine spring mor...
-Delphinium Cardinale. Hoot. Ranunculaceae Helleborea
This is a plant about to make a sensation in the horticultural world. A scarlet larkspur! Rara avis, that is to say, the phoenix of the genus. Surely we need not despair of a blue rose. The Delphiniu...
-Demand For Sreads Of Famous Trees
The interest in tree planting in California is at fever heat, as appears from the following statements of the San Francisco Bulletin: The demand for the seeds of the Sequoia gigantea and the Eucalypt...
-Democrat - (Varick)
Origin uncertain; some claim it to be Trumansburg, and others say it was brought from Dutchess Co., N. Y., some forty years since, and was there called Varick Apple. It is considerably grown in Tompki...
-Dendrobium Transparens (Wall) - Orchidaceae
(BoL Mag) - A beautiful epiphytal species, hav. ing some resemblance to D. Pierardi, flowering in great profusion during summer, and the flowers are produced freely on the stem. It grows with stems so...
-Denwood The Residence Of John Jay Smith, Esq., Germantown, Pa., Neae Philadelphia
The private residence of which we give a drawing in the present number, presents some peculiarities of construction and interior division, which we have thought might prove a useful study to those who...
-Deodar Cedar
Remember some year or two since some inquiry was made through your journal in regard to the Deodar Cedar, which it was stated had been found too tender for a northern climate, and the question asked h...
-Departure Needed
Mutterings of discontent have reached us in various ways from many members of the American Pomological Society, respecting its Secretaryship. Probably at its coming session next fall, no question wil...
-Depth To Plant Grapevines
Messrs. Editors: I am about to plant a vineyard, and have been reading authorities for information as to the depth at which the roots should be planted, but can not find any definite instructions. Can...
-Des Nones Peak
Luther Tucker, Esq We send you by express to day, specimens of a pear, new to us, which has ripened on our grounds this season for the first time. We received the trees from M. Andre Leroy, of Angers...
-Des Nonnes - Not Des Nones
IN noticing a new Pear, in the Horticulturist, for November, 1852, which had then recently fruited in the Syracuse Nurseries, I gave the name as I found it in an invoice of fruit trees received from M...
-Description
A shrub, twelve or fourteen feet high. Branches opposite, obtusely tetragonal, the younger ones densely covered with tawny or ferruginous down. Leaves on wooly petioles, ovate or oblong, the lower one...
-Description And Culture Of European Strawberries
Having had considerable experience in the cultivation of all the leading varieties of strawberries in England, I have thought that a few remarks may be useful as well as interesting to the cultivators...
-Description And Culture Of European Strawberries. Part 2
The next, however, the stamens, having less time to form, acquire perhaps their yellow color, but are powerless for their allotted office; while the pistil, the most complicated of all the latest that...
-Description And Culture Of European Strawberries. Part 3
2. Black Prince, ( Cuthill's.) - Sent out by Cuthill of Camberwell, London, three years ago; he described it as a fruit of medium size, very dark colored, well flavored, and a first-rate sort for pre...
-Description And Culture Of European Strawberries. Part 4
Differs from the above in having globular fruit, of smaller size, and less productive; consequently not worth cultivating when better varieties can be had. 15. Hautboy, Prolific For a long time cons...
-Description And Culture Of European Strawberries. Part 5
29. Red Alpine This very old European strawberry, is of extremely easy culture, not being particular as to soil or locality, and invariably productive. They are best raised from seeds, which, if sown...
-Description Of A Country House. Designed By Frederick 0. Withers, Architect, Newburg, On The Hudson
We have .engraved for this month a country house, which is to be built on a site where a fine view of the Hudson River, with the Highlands and West Point, can be obtained from the windows of all the p...
-Description Of Ornamental Crabs And Apples
Mr. Downing - I take the liberty to forward you the following descriptions of our collections of apples for ornament. I beg you to give a place in your Journal to them, if you think them acceptable. I...
-A Description Of The Jenny Lind Seedling Strawberry
There are so many new things constantly brought up before the horticultural world, and so much humbug about a great majority of them, that it is with some diffidence I present to the public a descript...
-A Descriptive List Of A Few Of The Best Lantanas
This is a most beautiful genus, eminently worthy the attention of all who desire first-rate summer bedding plants; as such they are unsurpassed, and the day is not far distant when they will become gr...
-Descriptive Lists of The Best Cinerarias And Lantanas In Cultivation
As the collection at this establishment (Mr. Bliss's) is now in fine bloom, and being the best time to notice them, without trusting to memory, I will describe a few of the new with some of the older ...
-Design For A Beautiful Villa
The design illustrated in frontispiece was drawn by Henry Lamb, architect, 788 Broad street, Newark, N. J., and is one of unusual elegance and beauty. It is a combination of the Italian and the Swiss ...
-Design For A Cottage
This design is simple in its plan and of symmetrical proportions. It is in the Gothic style, and may be built of stone or of brick. If of brick, the buttresses should be capped with stone, and the cor...
-Design For A Cottage In The Swiss Style
This style of architecture is very convenient and suitable for this climate, and about the cheapest kind of building that can be erected. The beauty of this style of architecture is, that while it adm...
-Design For A Country House
This design is calculated to embrace convenient accommodations for a large family, combined with some elegance, without any great outlay for a high style of finish. The building is plain, with but few...
-Design For A District School-House
We present our readers, in the Frontispiece for this month, a design for a District School-house. It has at least the merit of simplicity in the plan, and as it is a paralellogram, of economy in const...
-Design For A Flower Table
As an appropriate accompaniment to the subject of Home Decorations in Winter, we introduce this charming design of a new flower table. It needs very little explanation. In all our large cities there a...
-Design For A Partially Inclosed Veranda
The work is very prettily embellished with vignettes and tail-pieces appropriate to the topics discussed. We do not know that we can select a better one than the following: - The vignette shows a de...
-Design For A Public School
[See Frontispiece.] Ik accordance with our wishes, to see an improvement in the architecture of our school-houses, as expressed in previous numbers of this Journal, we present this month a design by ...
-Design For A Range Of Grape-Houses
Among the many designs for horticultural structures which have appeared in your journal, I do not remember, Mr. Editor, to have seen one for a combined range of houses, intended to produce a successio...
-Design For A Small Cottage
This design is calculated to give convenient accommodations for a small family, without great expense. Two of the most costly features, usually, of a house, are avoided - the bay-window and veranda. T...
-Design For A Small Villa
This design is calculated to embrace some of the elegancies that are supposed to belong more appropriately to the villa, in a smaller edifice than usually obtains that name, but at the same time it is...
-Design For A Village Residence
We show here a design for a medium-sized cottage, such as one might build on a Tillage lot of sixty or a hundred feet in width. It is a framed building, filled in with brick (soft brick might be used...
-Design For An Italian Villa
This design of a villa suited to the accommodation of a family of liberal mode of living, has been recently erected at Norwich, Conn. Its situation is eminently adapted for the display of architectura...
-Design For Cottage
THE design for farm cottage, illustrated in frontispiece for Nov., is made entirely of brick, with slated roof, and built on somewhat inclined ground, so that the cellar in the rear is mostly out of g...
-Design For Dwelling-House, Italian Style
I like this all through; there is a continuity and character in the design that is pleasing to the eye, depicting comfort and taste, with no straining or intermingling of orders. The only objection I ...
-Design for A Marine Villa
This design, prepared for a gentleman residing in New York daring the greater part of the year, is now being erected and is approaching completion at Newport, Rhode Island. The site it occupies is sev...
-Designs For Improving Country Residences
To lay out a rural residence satisfactorily, it is necessary to study the form and location of the ground, as well as to consult with, and ascertain the particular requirements of the family. It would...
-Designs In Rural Architecture
This design was built about two years ago, and is now owned and occupied by P. K. Paulding, Esq., of Cold Spring. It is built of wood, filled in with brick, and roofed with slate. It has a fine cella...
-Designs In Rural Architecture (2)
Geo. B. Harney, Architect, Cold Spring, N. Y The square, or nearly square, house, with the French or Mansard roof, seems to be especially appropriate for the narrow lots in the suburbs and in larger ...
-Designs In Rural Architecture - No. 5. Rural Out-Buildings
There is nothing which serves so well to give an air of finish to a country place - be it large or small - as the introduction here and there, wherever a suitable place offers itself - either in some ...
-Designs In Rural Architecture - No. 6. Rural Outbuildings
In continuation of our last, we herewith present two more designs of outbuildings, an Observatory and a Pump House. The first represents an Observatory or look-out Tower, suitable for a situation on ...
-Designs In Rural Architecture - No. II. An Ornamental Elizabethan Cottage
A person fond of poetry and old legendary associations, would naturally look with some degree of pleasure upon an architectural design, in the composition of which those sentiments were embodied and c...
-Designs In Rural Architecture - No. VII. A New England Village Residence
There is a style of building which seems to be peculiar to New England, or, at least, which seems to have been more generally adopted here than in the other States; for one can hardly pass through a t...
-Designs In Rural Architecture - No. VIII. - A Cottage Stable
ThE subject of proper stabling and grooming for horses is one that has been wofully neglected in this country until within a very few years. In former times a stable, and more especially a country st...
-Designs In Rural Architecture, No. 3 - Design For A Suburban Cottage
We offer the readers of the Horticulturist this month another design for a rural dwelling. It is smaller and less expensive than those we have before presented, and on this account we are confident t...
-Designs In Rural Architecture, No. 4. - A Suburban Residence
The design which we here offer, was made for a gentleman in the vicinity of a neighboring city, and, we think, will be found adapted to the wants of many of our suburban builders; combining, as it doe...
-Designs In Rural Architecture, No. IX. An Open Pavilion
We offer at the present time another of the series of designs for simple outbuildings for the adornment of country places. Our series thus far has included two summer-houses for shady corners of the ...
-Designs In Rural Architecture, No. X. Rural Outbuildings
We have a few words more to offer at this time with regard to these structures. Although in those designs which we have thus far presented we have confined ourselves entirely to structures for ornamen...
-Designs In Rural Architecture, No. XI. - A Summer House Or Tea Arbor
After quite a lengthy vacation, we once more greet our friends the readers of the Horticulturist, and offer them a continuation of our designs for rural outbuildings. We give at this time a suggestio...
-Designs In Rural Architecture-An Italian Villa
The villa, or country house proper, is the most refined home of America, the home of its most leisurely and educated class of citizens. Nature and art both lend it their happiest influence. Amid the ...
-Designs, Baskets And Bouquets
By J. J. Habermehl, gardener to John Lambert - Basket and a pair of hand Bouquets. By Jerome Graff, gardener to C. Cope - a basket and two hand Bouquets. By H. A. Dreer - A table design and pair of Bo...
-A Desirable Apple
EARLY in September, we received specimens of an apple from Mr. E. E. Brown, Onslow, this state, which he calls the Summer Harvey. The fruit was past its prime, bat so far as we could judge, may be cla...
-Dessert Pears
The following are now in season, (last week of February): St. Germain, Old With me this variety has been very much better than I have had it before. My specimens are of a beautiful yellow color, wi...
-Destroying The Coddling Moth Worm
Dr. LeBaron says, in the Prairie Farmer, that half and probably more than half the apple worms have escaped from the apples before the apples fall; hence he thinks the importance of picking up these a...
-Destruction Of Ants
To an infusion of one ounce and a half of sliced quasia woods, or shavings, in one quart of boiling water, add, when cold, about half a pound of honey or molasses. Place small fiat saucers, half fille...
-Destruction Of Insects
Who can estimate the vast extent of insect life, especially in cities ? None but the careful cultivator, who takes an honest pride in the health and, of course, the cleanliness of his plants, can at a...
-A Destructive Insect
We find in all the eastern journals accounts of a caterpillar, or worm, that has rarely before made its appearance. It is much more destructive and difficult to destroy than the common caterpillar. A ...
-Detailed Culture Of The Grape In Vineries
Dear Sir - I respond with pleasure to your wishes respecting the description and management of the cold vinery, erected two years ago, at this place, by my employer J. C. Green, Esq. The house is 74 ...
-The Detroit Grape
In the November number of the Horticulturist, a notice appeared of the above-named grape, as shown at the Lake Shore Grape-Growers' meeting in Cleveland. From the same source, we have received the acc...
-Detroit Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of the Detroit Horticultural Society just held, the following persons were elected officers for the present year: President - A. C. Hubbard. Vice Presidents - Thos. Lock wood a...
-The Detroit River Pear Trees
In the summer of 1819, thirty-one years ago, then but a boy, I first saw these remarkable trees, lofty, venerable and flourishing. Being at Detroit last September, I paid many of them a visit in detai...
-Deutzia Gracilis
Among the numerous introductions of late years, few have found more admirers than this charming Deutzia, and possibly none of our early flowering plants are more especially deserving of notice. It is ...
-The Development And Ripening Of Fruit
To gain a philosophical conception of this all-important topic, requires an acquaintance with the structure of the plants we have to deal with, and limiting ourselves, for the present, to fruits, we f...
-Dexter Show's Verbenas
We have the following note from Mr. Snow, and are pleased to record such success. The idea of taking up a simple popular plant, and devoting exclusive attention to it, was new, and deserved to succeed...
-The Dhoora, Or Indian Millet
This plant bears a small kind of grain, much cultivated and extensively consumed in India and Egypt, and the interior of Africa; it is quite equal in nutritive value to the average of English wheats, ...
-Diacarpometer, Or Instrument For Measuring The Diameter Of Fruits
This instrument resembles, to a certain degree, that known in the mechanical arts under the name of callipers, but it differs from it materially in other particulars, which render it more adapted to t...
-Diana
A dozen or two bunches on a young vine; beautiful, compact bunches, and of excellent quality; will become one of my standard varieties. Diana #1 Of the Diana it would seem superfluous to speak; stil...
-The Diana Grape
(R.G. C, Wellington, C. W.) The Diana is an excellent Grape, resembling the Catawba, not so large, but ripening full two weeks sooner. It can be had in most of the nurseries, and especially around Bo...
-Diana Grape-Fruits At The South
A. J. Downing, Esq The Diana Grape fruited with me this year, and is cer- tainly the best grape I ever tasted. The vine is a strong grower and good bearer, and will suit this climate as well as we co...
-Dianthus Caryophyllus - The Carnation
Dianthus Caryophyllus - The Carnation - with its enormous blossoms of rose-color, scarlet, yellow, white, either in plain colors, flecked, blotched, or banded, makes always a fine appearance, while it...
-Dianthus Diodemetus Plenisimus
Foreign journals are giving favorable notices to this new garden flower, describing it as an exceedingly beautiful and very useful hardy annual, growing from twelve inches to fifteen inches high, and ...
-Dianthus Verschaffettii
This remarkable and beautiful plant is now unfolding its lovely flowers for the first time, not only at this establishment, but in this country. It originated at the establishment of H. Hirschback, in...
-The Dielytra Spectabilis
This charming plant proves to be such an acquisition, both to the garden and green-house, that we have thought it fully entitled to a place among our colored plates, and therefore present it as our fr...
-Dielytra Spectabilis (Now Dieriila)
Although the Dielytra is properly classed as a spring flowering plant, yet, if propagated by cuttings of the young shoots in the spring, and planted out in Jane in a sheltered situation, it will conti...
-Dielytra Spectabilis. (A Constant Reader)
It can be lifted out of the borders into pots of suitable size at any time after the stems of the plants have died down naturally, or in the spring, just as the crowns are beginning to appear again, w...
-The Dielytra Spectabills
This charming plant is now (May 20th) in full bloom here in the open ground. Young plants - last spring's cuttings - have come through the winter safe, without the slightest protection of any kind. We...
-Dielytra Speotabilis As A Greenhouse Plant
This Chinese production is worthy a place in every greenhouse, its singular and pecu liar shaped flower being quite distinct from anything out at the same time - a point of considerable importance in ...
-Diervilla Japonica, Dc
Dear Sir : - In compliance with your request to be furnished with some account of the history, synonyma, etc, of the pretty flowering Shrub, known among our Florists by the name of Weigelia rosea (or ...
-Digestibility And Profit Of Native Grapes
In the Horticulturist for January, 1 presented some remarks on the value of native grapes, in which I asserted that common, ill-ripened native grapes are highly indigestible, and that violent deaths...
-Digestibility And Profit Of Native Grapes. Continued
Now the usual product of an acre of the small fruits, (strawberries being the most profitable,) is only about $300 to $500, generally less than $200. At and near Philadelphia, native grapes, for the l...
-The Diller Pear
I regret that I am obliged, in justice to myself, to address a few lines to you, Mr. Editor, for publication in your journal, in reply to some remarks that Mr. C M Hovey has thought proper to make, on...
-The Dioscorea
The following is an extract of a letter to the Committee of Patents from W. D. Brackenridge, late public gardener in Washington, and formerly of the U. S. Exploring Expedition, residing at present at ...
-The Dioscorea Batatas
From several quarters we have favorable accounts of this new yam, but sufficient time has not yet elapsed to pronounce authoritatively on its merits for this country. At a late meeting of the London H...
-Dioscorea Batata (2)
As I gave you last year an account of my experiments with the new roots, and as I have since experimented further, I thought you and your readers might be pleased to know the results. This last sprin...
-Dioscorea Batatas (3)
In reply to Mr. Fall's invitation to others to communicate their experience of this vegetable, we have several communications, favorable and unfavorable, and shall endeavor to give a summary next mont...
-Dioscorea Batatas (4)
A call made by Mr. W. F. Fall in this journal, 185?, p. 564, has produced several replies of interest to the public; the whole would embrace a larger space than we have at command, and we propose, the...
-Dioscorea Batatas (4). Part 2
The six grew above ground very slowly and weakly, except the two first, and these were three feet long by the end of June. They all continued to grow till frost, when the average length of the four we...
-Dioscorea Batatas (4). Part 3
Now, Mr. Editor, here is the result of one small experiment. Let us have all the light we can, for I cannot but think the subject is worthy of thorough in-vestigation. I should particularly like to k...
-Directions For Making Bouquets And Floral Ornaments
In fulfillment of the promise made to you, I proceed to offer a few practical directions, intended principally for the amateur florist, for making bouquets and floral ornaments. But before commencing...
-Directions For Making Bouquets And Floral Ornaments. It D. R. K, Roxboro, Pa
Having considered, in my last communication, the preliminaries which should be observed by those who expect success in the art of making floral ornaments, I now come to the more practical part of the ...
-Directors
Essex, Stephen H. Condict, John Boylan, W. A. Brintzinghoffer, Geo. R. Dunn, Jno. H. Meeker, Nehemiah Perry; Union, Amos Clark, Jr., Josiah O. Stearns, Jno. M. Pru-den, David D. Buchanan; Sussex, Jno....
-Disa Grandiflora
Among the many striking instances of horticultural skill, exhibited at the last meeting at Chiswiek, nothing attracted more attention than a terrestrial Orchid, well known to amateurs under the title ...
-Discovered Remedy For Rot In The Grape
Wm. Sumner, one of our occasional correspondents from South Carolina, writes of a remedy for rot in the grape, as follows: I have in my possession a most important discovery which I propose to furni...
-Discursive Poultry Paper
Did any of our readers ever notice the beautiful, active little dogs, carried or led by strange looking men, half grooms, half keepers, in the Quadrant. Smart, clean, active little animals. When put o...
-Discussion About Strawberries
THIs new rural organization, of which Horace Greeley is president, held its quarterly session June 24th, and Bat down to an ample collation, after which straw-berries were discussed, and many excellen...
-Discussion On Apples
In the February number, page 92, we gave some account of the proceedings of this Association. We now proceed to notice the discussion on qualities of fruits: The Autumn Strawberry was recommended for...
-Discussion On Fruits
On the list of Pears proposed for rejection were the following sorts which were retained at the suggestion of Mr. HovEY: Beurre Adam, Dumortier of Manning, Duchesse Dumas, Figue de Naples, Flemish Bo...
-Disease In Evergreens
A valued correspondent says: I wrote you some year or so ago about large Norway Spruces, and even Scotch Firs being badly affected by the red and small white spider. I have now three trees nearly for...
-Disease In Plants
A very singular case, illustrative of the effects of the mycelium of Fungi arising from dead wood upon neighboring plants, occurred a few years ago in Northamptonshire, England. A Golden Rose, remarka...
-Disease Of The Grape In Eureope
The accompanying accounts are translations from the French, which describe a new disease of the Vine in Europe, and gives the remedies which have been successfully employed in arresting its progress. ...
-Diseases Of Evergreens
I inclose you a few leaves of the white pine, covered more or less, as you will perceive, with eggs of what I take to be the uAmerican Blight, as they call it in England. If not this, it is an insect...
-Diseases Of Fruit-Trees
Believing your valuable periodical is extensively circulated through the Southern States, I desire making it the medium through which to give some hints upon fruit-culture that I deem of importance in...
-Diseases Of The Peach-Tree
I have been for a few years a slight observer of the disease, as it is manifested in this region, and which your correspondent, C. E. Goodrich, Utica, designates the curled leaf on the peach tree...
-Dishonest Tree Agents
THE following article is communicated to the Massachusetts Ploughman, by a correspondent who is evidently posted in the secrets of the Nursery Trade. It contains some facts of a startling nature, enou...
-Display At Exhibitions
A late visitor at the London Crystal Palace, says: One thing must have been evident to every one who took an interest in the exhibition, that to stage fruit is by no means the best way of showing it...
-Display Of Fruits
The display of fruits was exceedingly extensive in varieties, and noticeable for very large single collections. Much of the fruit was small in size, and not as highly colored nor as ripe as we have wi...
-Distance Apart For Orchard Trees
We are gradually progressing and yearly learning to better and better understand our climates and soils, our trees and vines; and as we progress and come to know our own, we throw away much of the ear...
-Distribute Your Plants And Seeds
Plants or seeds received from friends serve as monuments of friendship. Each day throughout the season of vegetation, as one goes or comes, these living specimens bring forward kind remembrances, and ...
-Do Apples Reproduce Their Like?
ED. Western Horticulturist: Do apples ever reproduce the identical same fruit from seeds,' is a question often asked, some asserting they do, others denying. That they do occasionally reproduce the sa...
-Do We Care For Grape-Vines Too Much
I notice in a late Dumber of the Horticulturist, some remarks from a correspondent, whose argument seems to be, that to have fine grapes we should not deeply trench and enrich the ground; the vines sh...
-Dodge In The Pot Culture Of Grapes To Gain A Prize
-Draw a fine strong stem through, the bottom hole of a pot, fill the pot with good mould, let the latter hang or otherwise. When the grapes are ripe and just before the show, cut off the vine; it will...
-Does Cold Kill The Privet?
The Privet has been a favorite hedge plant, in Buffalo, for many years, and previous to the extremely cold winter of 1854-5, there were many hedges of it which had attained a large size, some of which...
-Dogs
We condense from a capital English review of M. Blazs's work on Dogs, the following chapter - which we are certain will be read with great pleasure by all our readers in the country]. The dog alone, ...
-Dogs. Part 2
As a carrier of merchandize, the most delicate task which a dog has to perform is in the inland smuggling trade of the Continent. In this arduous service, which is constantly fatal to him, he shows a ...
-Dogs. Part 3
On this watch-tower in which he placed his security, he was at last shot. The true house-dog is more amiable, and equally efficient. It has been absurdly affirmed that his value is proportioned to hi...
-Dogs. Part 4
An affecting story has frequently been told of a dog who persevered in leaping upon the horse of a traveller, to call his attention to his money, which he had left on a bank where he halted to rest. H...
-Dogs. Part 5
M. Blaze having one day lost his road, a peasant offered him his dog to escort him to a certain honse. 'Take the gentleman,' he said, turning to the animal, to such a place, but don't go in, m...
-Dogs. Part 6
In our observation of the dog, we seldom attach sufficient importance to the fineness of bis senses. They are so acute that a sleeping dog knows whether he is touched by his master or a stranger, rema...
-Dogs (2)
F. W. Woodward, Esq. : Dear Sir - In glancing through the pages of the London Cottage Gardener to-day, my attention was arrested by an article from a writer styling himself Wiltshire Rector, entitle...
-Doing Too Much
WE were much struck on reading recently some remarks attributed to Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton. It is well known that he has been a hard student, a busy politician, and a voluminous writer, and it has ...
-Doings In California
All accounts agree in ascribing a most genial horticultural climate to the settled portions of California. A correspondent, dating from San Jose, May 3, 1856, says: - Having made this valley my perm...
-Domestic Animals
A Pocket Manual of Horse, Cattle, and Sheep Husbandry ; or How to Breed, Bear, and Use all the Common Domestic Animals. Embracing Descriptions of the various Breeds of Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Swine, Po...
-Domestic Animals For Parks And Pleasure Grounds
[The following article, on the same subject as the leader in our March number. - was written before our correspondent had seen that number - though it is an excellent continuation of the same idea. We...
-Domestic Animals For Parks And Pleasure Grounds. Continued
* We cannot qui e agree with our correspondent about the deer - unless his remarks apply to our wild deer. The deer of the English parks are perfectly tame, and as easily kept within bounds as any of ...
-Domestic Life In Germany
There is certainly a kind of simplicity about these Germans, which one does not see in America, I thought to myself, as I sat in ray friend's parlor, in a comfortable house, looking out over the Alt...
-Domestic Life In Germany. Continued
Here I have passed through streets of high, handsome houses, where they had all the advantage which ours have - and undoubtedly it is an advantage - of a succession of similar lines on the front, one ...
-Domestic Notices
New York, Feb. 18,1856. Dear Sir: Cannot you say a word in favor of the Agrostis Stolonifera for Lawns? From its extreme dwarf habits (rendering frequent mowing unnecessary), combined with its resis...
-Domestic Wine-Making
There are many grape-growers' in the United States who are now able to make a few gallons, or a barrel or two of domestic wine, and who are interested in knowing how to make it, so that it shall be go...
-Don'T Be In A Hurry
A correspondent at Clinton, N. Y., says:I see the Abies Manziesii is marked tender about New York, I have wintered a specimen two feet high, which has survived two seasons. The first winter, I gave i...
-Don'T Mistake The Causes
Many young gardeners and amateurs flounder befogged, attributing failure of crops in the garden, or want of health of plants in the green-house, to. bad seeds, uncongenial soil, or fertilizers, when i...
-Don'T Mulch Yet
We believe in mulching as much as we believe in good cultivation, for it is a part of it; but there is a time for benefit to be derived in the greatest degree from both. Light, heat, air, and moistur...
-Dont Understand
The Germantown Telegraph misinterprets our correspondent's idea, when it says Mr. Josiah Hoopes deplores the mania for new sorts of fruits, and neglecting the good, long-cultivated and profitable ol...
-Dorchester
Next in point of profit to the Wilson's Early is the Dorchester, which has an upright, strong growing hush, tall, erect and perfectly hardy. For twelve years past they have done well with me, never be...
-Double Balsams
I had such splendid success with my balsams this year that I must record my experience for the benefit of others. I started seeds in a cigar box placed in a south window ; when the seedlings had forme...
-Double Geraniums
The following new varieties are brought out this spring, and are the property of M. Alge -taire of Mont Plairie, Lyons, France: Aline Sisley (Jean Sisley) - Dwarf and compact growth; foliage small, z...
-Double Poinsettia
OF the new Poinsettia, which has made its appearance in our American greenhouses, Mr. Robert Buist thus writes the Gardener's Chronicle: I call your attention to a new Double Poinsettia. It is a tow...
-Double Purple Wistaria
Francis Parkman says, in The Journal of Horticulture: Several years ago we received from Japan a small plant in a pot. It was without name, but was evidently some species of Wistaria. It grew with th...
-Double Pyrethrums
Our readers will remember that during the past year we noticed a fine show of Double Pyrethrums, in colors, which we saw at Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry's, Rochester, New York; and if they have been wise...
-Double Yellow; Various Shades
Bouquet d'Orange, bright orange ; early, low, very superior. Jaune Supreme, fine yellow; early, tall, fine. La Grandeur, canary yellow; late, low, new. Louis d'Or, bright yellow; late, tall, ...
-Double Zinnias
The French have at last succeeded in producing double flowers of the Zinnia, of various colors, which are pronounced by Dr. Lindley to be large, and very double and beautiful. Some of our enterprising...
-Douglas's Fir
On page 252 will be found a representation of this noble tree, Abies Douglasii, which has become a great favorite in England, and is gradually creeping into our Atlantic coast plantations, where it ma...
-Dove Flower, Or Flower Of, The Holy Spirit
This singular flower, (of which our frontispiece is a faithful representation, drawn (one-third size) from nature by Mrs. Stirrup,) is the Peruteria data of botanists. It belongs to the class Gynandri...
-Downer's Prolific Seedling Strawberry
At the request of J. S. Downer, proprietor of Forest Nursery, near Elkton, Ky., we, the undersigned, met at his house on the 29th day of May, 1858, to examine a seedling strawberry raised by him, and ...
-Downer's Prolific Strawberry
It will doubtless be recollected by many, that some of us made out a report and description last year of a seedling strawberry raised by J. S. Downer, proprietor of Forest Nursery, near Elkton, Ky., w...
-The Downing Camellia
An inquiry respecting this Camellia has elicited the following from the President of the Brooklyn Horticultural Society: - J. Jay Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: In relation to the Downing Camellia, I have b...
-The Downing Monument
We have been informed that the fund now collected for this monument amounts to about one thousand dollars. The design is a vase of pure white marble, on a pedestal of five feet in height, the whole to...
-Downing's Cottage Residences
Everything bearing the name of Downing, both Andrew J. and his brother Charles, is welcomed by the public with interest. It is with pleasure, then, that we read the announcement of the issue of a new ...
-Downing's Ever-Bearing Mulberry
This truly distinguished fruit, so different from the other American Mulberries by its rich, subacid taste, was obtained from the seed of the Multicaulis by our worthy and experienced pomologist, Chas...
-Downing's Familiar Letters
A little playful suggestion that he had grown in favor with newer friends, brought the following reply: - Newburgh, March 17,1850. My Dear Friend: If it were not for this horrible storm, I think I sh...
-Downing's Familiar Notes And Letters (2)
An early acquaintance with the founder of the Horticulturist gave us an assurance of his merits. Before he had written a line for the public, several letters passed between us which revealed a mind in...
-Downing's Familiar Notes And Letters (3)
A publication in two quarto volumes of our own, entitled American Literary and Historical Curiosities, had attracted Downing's attention, and he immediately commenced with considerable success the new...
-Downing's Landscape Gardening. A Letter From Mr. Downing
READERs of the Horticulturist, and especially the numerous admirers of Mr. Downing, must have rejoiced to see an advertisement in the late numbers, announcing a new edition, under the auspices of his ...
-Downing's Place, At Newburgh
During one of our delightful mornings at Wodenethe, we crossed the river to Newburgh, to inspect the site laid out by Downing, and to visit the poet of Idlewild. As is known to most of our readers, t...
-Downing, Esq
I noticed some time ago, in your book on Fruits and Fruit-Trees of America, an article on the subject of planting fruit trees, in which you advise that the trees should be so set in the ground as to b...
-Doyenne Boussock
J. Cabot had fruited it for some years, and thought it lacks flavor, but is so large and handsome that he regarded it valuable. Many others corroborated this opinion, and it was placed on the list for...
-Doyenne D'Alencon Pear
Among the European winter or late pears, perhaps we have no better than the Doyenne* D'Alencon (or new Easter Beurje, Doyenne D'Hiver Nouveau). Its qualities have been fully tested in many States, and...
-Doyenne D'Ete Pear
This variety, of which we give a portrait in the present number, is undoubtedly one of the best, if not the best, early pear we have. We consider it quite superior to the Madelains, which ripens at th...
-Dr. Brinckle's New Raspberries
Your favor is received, and I cheerfully respond to your request As you suppose, I had the gratification to examine, last season, while in fruit, some of the seedling raspberries, raised by our mutual...
-Dr. Gray's New Book
Dr. Asa Gray has issued through his publishers an Introduction to Structural and Systematic Botany and Vegetable Physiology, being a fifth and revised edition of the Botanical Text-Book, illustrated...
-Dr. Hexamer's Address
Which is the best strawberry? This is a question every fruit grower is asked a thousand times, and it is a question that is as difficult to answer as it would be difficult to answer which is the bes...
-Dr. Houghton And Native Grapes
P. B. Mead, Esq. : - l am opposed to any thing like personal controversies, considering them usually unpleasant and useless; but do not like to lie under an unjust accusation. 1 deny that my article a...
-Dr. Houghton And Native Grapes. Continued
Anthophilus. P. S. - I ought to add, that, in regard to the rest of B.'s remarks, as well as your comments on Committees, etc., I fully agree with you both; as you say, Mr. Editor, committees are adm...
-Dr. Hull's Fruit Orchard
An account of this beautiful fruit farm is given in the Country Gentleman: It is 180 acres in extent, of which over 150 are in fruit. The peach crop is very good; Hale's Early had already been harves...
-Dr. Hull's Paper On Strawberries And Their Nutrition
The agricultural and horticultural publications of the present day, are teeming with the applications of science to the processes of husbandry and gardening. This is a fact of happy significance, and ...
-Dr. Hull's Paper On Strawberries And Their Nutrition. Continued
Reference is next made to a recipe for keeping old strawberry beds in bearing, from the Friend's Review. The application, attended with remarkable results, was as follows: Of nitre, of potash, of gl...
-Dr. John Lindley. From The London Cottage Gardener
Very recently we recorded a living example of a country gardener's son deservedly elevated for his deeds of noble daring and honorable conduct, to be the associate and the admired of our country's n...
-Dr. Robert Brown, D.C.L., F.R.S., Foreign Member Of The Academy Of Sciences Of The Institute Of France
Last week it was our melancholy duty to announce the decease of one who throughout the long period of nearly half a century has been universally recognized as the first of living botanists; one, moreo...
-Dr. Talk's Seedling Grape
The August number of the Horticulturist, contains a reply to what is termed my strictures. On what? Very much to my surprise, and certainly to my regret, the few remarks made by roe in the June n...
-Dr. Thompson's Recipe For Making The Domestic Catawba And Isabella Wars
Dr. Thompson, of Wilmington, Del., has furnished the editor of the American Farmer with the following receipt for making domestic champagne, pronounced equal to any imported: - The Catawba is, I thin...
-Dr. Valk's Native Grape
A reference to page 444 of the Horticulturist for October last, will remind your readers that I had something to say about the grape. My remarks amounted to this - that I had raised in 1646, several s...
-Dr. Ward On Pear Culture
The second valuable article from Br. J. M. Ward on Pear Culture will appear in the April number of the Horticulturist. Dr. Ward On Pear Culture #1 Reply from Dr. Ward to the severe remark made in th...









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