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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #7 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Drainage To Fountains

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #7
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Drainage
We have, from Albany, N. Y., a pamphlet setting forth the advantages and profits of thorough drainage. It emanates from the manufacturers of tile, C. and W. McCam-mon, and will convince the most incre...
-Draining
There is, undoubtedly, an advantage gained from perfect drainage in all soils, but those of a close, retentive character are the most benefited. Where the land is rolling, and surface-draining can be ...
-Drawings And Colorings Of Fruits And Flowers
We desire especially to commend to our fruit and flower growers an artist in the production of fruit and flower drawings and colorings whose works we have examined for years, and whose merits, owing t...
-Dried And Preserved Flowers
THE perishability of flowers is a great hindrance to their more general use as articles of personal adornment, or for home decorations. Many times are miserable counterfeits of silk, cambric and paper...
-Dried And Preserved Flowers. Continued
Then take them carefully with the paper knife or spatula to a clean sheet of stiff white paper, and keep from dust and moisture till they can be wrought into the intended design. The outline of the de...
-Dried Fruits
Let no man hesitate to plant out small fruits, as raspberries, blackberries, etc., in quantity, simply because he is not near to a market where they can be sold from day to day as they are gathered. T...
-Drncaena Formosa
This is remarkable for its fine spreading habit and gracefully curving leaves. It comes from the Feejee Islands. The leaves are numerous, narrowish oblong, or linear-ligulate, much elongated, about on...
-Drooping Deciduous Trees
Within a few years the popular taste has been largely turned to the introduction of drooping trees as objects of graceful beauty, harmonizing with the smoothness and verdure of a lawn, or the high kee...
-The Drought
Mr. Philips, writing from Edwards' Depot* Miss., says: 41 Have not bad rain on centre of plantation enough to wet bottom of furrow since 22d April. There has stood at 105 deg. in my piazza, and genera...
-The Drouth
The drouth mentioned in our last numher has continued up to the present time, (August 24th,) accompanied by excessive heat, except at intervals. Its effects on all kinds of vegetation may he well imag...
-Drowntng The Gctrculio
A friend of ours has deliberately laid a plan for drowning the Curculio! He says: I propose to lay out a Plum orchard on a dead level, as near as possible to a pond or spring, and inclose it with a...
-Drumming Out The Curoulio - Brandy And Sugar
A correspondent, writing from Indianapolis, gives us his latest experience with the Curculio. The means employed indicate an ingenious and practical mind, ever ready to appropriate the simplest applia...
-Drummond's Phlox - Phlox Drummondi
The Phlox Drummondi is one of the most beautiful annual flowers; and, indeed, we are not certain but we should be justified in calling it the finest of all. It is remarkable for the splendor and varie...
-Dryas Drummondii, Rich. Nat. Ord. Rrosacece. Native Of The Rocky Mountains, North America
A hardy perennial, of procumbent habit. Stems and branches woody. Leaves oval or obovate, crenate, dark green on the upper surface; covered below with pure white down. Petioles short, stipulate, downy...
-Drying Fruit
It has been observed that the amount of Peaches consumed in a single week in the city of New York, exceeds the total consumption of fruit in Great Britain throughout the entire year. The sales of peri...
-The Duane's Purple Plum. Duane's Purple French
Fruit and Fruit-Trees of America, Pomological Manual, and Kenrick's American Orchardist Bed Magnum Bonum, of some collections. Several fine fruits have been received in this country from abroad witho...
-Duc D'Orleans - Marechal (Or Conseiller) De La Cour
This truly distinguished fruit is one of Vau Mons' seedlings from the seventh generation. This generation, with the eighth, has been the most successful of all his seedlings. The tree is vigorous, py...
-Duchess D'Angouleme And Sheldon Pears
The annexed is the outline of a Duchess d'Angouleme Pear (Fig. 1) that grew last season in the garden of Thomas R. Thompson, in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, on a standard tree taken from the nursery of ...
-The Duchess Of Oldenburg Apple
IN the March number of the Horticulturist, Mr. Elliot, with great propriety, gives a prominent place to the Duchess of Oldenburg among the Very hardy varieties of the Apple. For upward of thirty yea...
-The Duchesse D'Angouleme Pear
(See Frontispiece). We have lately received a number of letters, asking why we do not figure some of the old and better known fruits, within the reach of all, instead of new ones, which only the few ...
-The Duchesse D'Orleans Pear. Beurre St. Nicholas
The Duchesse d'Orleans is ranked unanimously, as far as we are informed by those who have tested it in this country, as one of the best new varieties from abroad. It was first introducd by Mr. Kenrick...
-Ducks
Why is it that our farmers, and fanciers, too, almost ignore the good qualities of the duck? They are no more difficult to rear than chickens, if proper care is taken the first few weeks, and they ma...
-The Dueberry Or Trailing Blackberry
A CORRESPONDENT in a P. S. to a business letter wishes to know if the above named fruit is indigenous to Iowa, or whether its culture is known in the State. The trailing or ground Blackberry, as it is...
-Dunn's Solid Marking-Ink Pencils
We consider this the most effective invention that has yet been offered to the gardener for marking his plant-labels. The writing is black and indelible, the labels requiring no other preparation than...
-Durable Wash For Brick Walls
W. Riley, (Alma,0.) The best wash for brickwalls is the following. Take a barrel, and slake in it Design for a Cottage tor a Country Clergymar. Hort: July, 1861. A few words on fruit culture. BY...
-Durable Wash For Brick Walls. Continued
But the horticultural societies in ail parts of the country, are gradually raising the criterion of excellence among amateurs, and the double and treble prices paid lately by confectioners for finely-...
-Duration Of The Germinating Power Of Seeds
A correspondent of the Revue Horticole, who has had ample opportunity to make observations, says the following are trustworthy estimates, as ascertained from his own experience. They represent the per...
-Duration Of Timber
Much has been said and writen upon the age of trees, both living and alter they have been reduced to the use of man. That under favorable conditions the vegetable fibre is well calculated to resist th...
-Dwarf Affles
Are dwarf Apple trees on Paradise stocks healthy and hardy as the same kinds grafted on common seedlings? I refer to blight, winter killing, bursting at the collar, etc. (1) The old fashioned Quince ...
-Dwarf Apples
The Genesee Farmer states, that a dwarf apple tree, seven years planted, and ten years old, the tree not over three feet high, growing on the grounds of Aaron Erick-son of Rochester, produced a Fall P...
-Dwarf Cherries And Pears
We have found great pleasure in the cultivation of dwarf cherry-trees, and observe others are planting them. Cherries, as bushes on the mahaleb stock, root pruned, should be planted four feet apart. T...
-The Dwarf Crimson Chinese Azalea (Azalea Amosna)
This Dwarf Crimson Azalea must be a beautiful plant, and will, we think, prove hardy in a large portion of this country. It is described as follows in Paxton's Flower Garden: This is a dwarf evergre...
-Dwarf June Berry
Our attention has been called to this fruit by Mr. B. A Matthews, of Knoxville. The plants came from Michigan on an order for Blueberry plants, through a Davenport man, and the mistake, or rather impo...
-The Dwarf June-Berry
The Agriculturist commends to better notice this interesting shrub: The Dwarf June-berry is a shrub that ought to be better known. Almost every one knows the common June-berry or Shad-flower, a shrub ...
-Dwarf Magnolia Conspicua
A few days since (June 8), visiting Prof. J. P. Kirt-land, I saw in his grounds a seedling magnolia from the conspicua. In habit of growth it was about with purpurea, a little more upright, and with f...
-Dwarf Or Bush Beans (Phaseolus Vulgaris)
Some of the varieties are only fit to be used while the pods are in a young and crisp state, cut into small pieces and boiled; others are allowed to ripen, and the seeds only cooked; while a few are a...
-Dwarf Pears
We never saw finer bearing dwarf Pears than the present season on the grounds of BissEll & Hooker and of Ellwand & BarRY, of Rochester, & Y. The former showed us several Bartletts in a row, six or sev...
-Dwarf Pears (2)
With many it appears to be an unsettled question whether the propagation of pears on the quince is to meet with sufficient success to warrant increasing attention. In settling the matter to our satisf...
-Dwarf Pears (3)
If experiments are successful, they give great pleasure; if they fail, the mind rarely likes to dwell upon them. Such have been my experiments with dwarf pears. In 1848, 1 planted an orchard of somew...
-Dwarf Pear Culture
Mr. Allen's recent article on this subject, it is to be expected, will create an awakening among the advocates of the quince stock. I observe, indeed, that one of the Oincinnatians is already aroused ...
-Dwarf Pear Trees
As, at the present time, there are many (some of them extraordinary) accounts relative to dwarf pear trees - their produce and its market value - and as my experience in their cultivation does not acc...
-Dwarf Pears - Deep Planting
WE purpose giving our readers an occasional article on the culture of Dwarf Pears, a subject of primary interest to the pomologist who grows fruit for the market, and scarcely less so to the consume...
-Dwarf Pears - Deep Planting (2)
The article under this caption, Mr. Editor, in your February number, would, at first sight, appear to inculcate a doctrine greatly at variance with the practice of the most scientific and successful c...
-Dwarf Pears - Deep Planting (3)
Mr. Editor: - Your leader, p. 57,58, I have carefully read, and the second time ran over it to have it fresh in my mind. Being one of the earliest Dwarf Pear growers in Mississippi, and an advocate of...
-Dwarf Pears - More About Deep Planting
WE did not intend to recur so soon again to the subject of Dwarf Pears, but are moved to do so at the urgent request of some of our readers, who desire further information in regard to some points a...
-Dwarf Pears At The South
Br request I willingly give you the information concerning my pear-trees, so far as I am able. The pears I sent you were grown upon dwarf trees seven years old, that have now produced full crops for ...
-Dwarf Pears For Market
Will the editor of the Horticulturist, or some of its correspondents, please answer the following questions? 1. Can dwarf pears be grown profitably for market? 2. If so, what are the best six variet...
-Dwarf Pears For Marketing
A correspondent inquires if it would be profitable to set out a thousand dwarf pear trees, with a view to marketing purposes. The answer must be - If such sorts are selected as have been found durable...
-Dwarf Pears For Orchard Culture
Many interesting statements were made on this subject Several very striking proofs were furnished of the profits of dwarf orchards. T. G. Yeomans, of Walworth, Wayne County, had large plantations of d...
-Dwarf Trees
There are many miniature trees, which typify their more gigan-tic brethren of the forest, that may be introduced with advantage to grounds of limited extent, and which, after many years' growth, arriv...
-Dwarfing Evergreens
To further illustrate the principle of dwarfing evergreens, I will refer to the notable evergreen garden of Warner Bundy, in Hillsdale county, Mich. This park is in front of his residence, facing the ...
-Dwary Pinks Or Vbrviers
Liege and Verviers are the only two towns in Belgium in which the Pink, including all the different kinds and classes, is held in honor; and there are in these towns extensive and influential societie...
-Earliest Primium For Grape-Culture In New York
I received the following from Dr. F. B. Houoh, of the State Department, and as it is probably the earliest record we have of a premium for Grape-culture, I doubt not it will be interesting to your rea...
-Earlt Fruit-Planting
The following, written by W. C. Flagg, Esq., Alton, Illinois, well known as one of the most intelligent fruit-growers at the West, and Secretary of the State Horticultural Society, we take from the Pr...
-Early Blooming Acacias
Many plants, of which the natural season of blossoming under glass is in the winter or early spring months, acquire additional value from that circumstance, because their intrinsic beauty is then heig...
-Early Fruiting Young Vines
I have frequently done this from necessity, but never without greatly repenting it. The system with vineries is penny wise and pound foolish. It invariably cripples the vine for after years. I once sa...
-Early Grape Crops
Dear Sir: I feel grati-tied that my article on the grapevine, in the Horticulturist of last month, has aroused at least one of your numerous subscribers. I was not aware that it amounted to such param...
-Early May Cherry
A writer in the Rural New Yorker, reporting the transactions of the Illinois Horticultural Society, says: What is known as the May Cherry of the West, or sometimes called Early Richmond, was decided...
-Early Peas
As digging with me commenced almost with my life, and I think will only end with me in death, therefore it is natural I should have a fellow feeling for your correspondent, An old Digger; I have rea...
-Early Peas (2)
Last year our experience with early peas was given in favor of Carter's First Crop. This year again we planted Carter's First Crop, McLean's Advancer, and Tom Thumb, all the same day, and covered them...
-Early Potatoes
Almost one of, if not the very first out-door seed planted in spring is the potato. Even before the frost was well out of the ground we have seen planters at work on land that had been roughly but dee...
-Early Richmond
Not early. Desirable only for variety. Besides, I have the De Planchary, Late Duke, Latest Duke, Royal Duke, Archduke, Ramsey's Late Duke, which are desirable only for variety. Several of my varieti...
-Early Tying Up Of Grapevines On The Trellis
If there is anything in the theory, that great injury is often caused by extraction of moisture and evaporation when in contact with continual cold, then it is advisable to leave the vines lying upon ...
-An Earnest Follower Of Horticulture
We. should be glad to receive specimens of the white worm, though we strongly suspect your plants are infested by the red spider, which is often more destructive to verbenas in the open air than man...
-Earth Worms
Do they really do any damage? Are they not consequent and attendant upon disease, rather than the cause thereof? They are made a great bugbear in many books, and much stress is laid upon how to avoid ...
-The Earth-Worm - Its Use
(From the Scottish Farmer). Reaumer calculated that the number of worms in the earth exceeds the grains of all kinds of corn used by man, and as, perhaps, there is no other animal so preyed upon with...
-East Bethlehem, Penn., May 5th, 1868 F. W. Woodward, Esq
Dear Sir: Have you any experience in covering strawberries during winter with sorghum bagasse as winter protection? Or have you any letters from correspondents who have used it for this purpose ? Ther...
-Easter Beurre Pears
Some of our Boston friends have united to send us a box of admirably kept Easter Beurres, which, on the 22d May, are as unshrivelled and fair as could be wished. Mr. Eben Wright, Corresponding Secreta...
-The Easter Beurre Pear. Doyenne d'hiver, the popular French name
The culture of winter Pears has hitherto been much neglected. We are surprised that some enterprising cultivators do not plant extensively. Our large cities would consume immense quantities, and they ...
-Eastern Experience Is Of Little Avail To Us
This remark from the report of the annual meeting of the Iowa State Horticultural Society is made the text for an editorial article in the March number of the Horticulturist. The article dissents en...
-Eastern Vs. California Fruit
Calfornia Horticulturists are very anxious to have some of our Eastern fruit-growers send specimens of their fruit to the Pacific Coast, where it can be placed in fair competition with some of Califor...
-Eating Native Grapes
An issue having been made on this point, testimony is now in order. The following is from Mr. Mottier, of Cincinnati, whose large experience gives a direct value to his testimony: I was quite surpr...
-Eccentric Dinner
A paragraph is quoted in Notes and Queries from the Inventor's Advo-cate, dated nine years ago, describing a dinner given at the baths of Lucca by a certain Lord B-----. The meat, fish, and vegetables...
-Echeveria Nuda
Efoliis in caulem strictum altum spareis obovatls aplcnlatis glabris obsolete carinatis, spica longa nuda tenninali. This addition to the pretty genus Echeveria has been received by the Horticultural...
-Economy And Simplicity Of Hot Water For Heating Greenhouses
We have used hot water in our establishment the past twenty-three years for heating our greenhouse erections, - at first, with great caution and some small fear; and we consider it economy wherever th...
-Ed. Horticulturist
Sir, - I have noticed with interest the several communications upon heating, and have felt a strong desire to put in a word; but have been deterred by the fact that I was only an amateur. Mr. Park's ...
-Ed. Note
We have the same vine growing for three years in open air, on light, sandy soil, at Dover, Del., exposed without protection to severest suns and freezing cold, and not a leaf has ever been injured. We...
-Ed. Western Horticulturist
I would like to have information on a few subjects which I think would be valuable to a number of your readers, else I would not ask the space in your journal. First It is the general belief in this...
-Edgings
There are few plants that make a better edging, where box is not used, than the Sea pink. The common garden thyme makes a pretty edging, the lemon-scented species especially so. The small periwinkle (...
-Edgings For Garden Walks
Some capital suggestions on this topic are made in the last issue of Briggs & Bros. Quarterly. It is generally desirable that we should preserve the shape of our flower beds and borders from ...
-Editor Of The Horticulturist
In Jeffreys' pleasant critique on the Horticulturist for January, there occurs the following remarks on the design forming its frontispiece; I don't fancy the round window perked up into the eaves ...
-Editor Of The Horticulturist (2)
Dear Sir: The first horticultural exhibition over held in this county, came on the 31st ult., and I take great pleasure In communicating to you that it was successful entirely beyond the anticipations...
-Editor Of The Horticulturist (3)
Dear Sir: - During the early part of the past summer I had a very fine bed of Wilson's Albany Strawberries, containing about six square rods of ground, which produced nearly seven bushels of berries, ...
-Editor's Drawer
We shall try to keep the Drawer filled with choice scraps from the foreign and domestic press. If, hereafter, any thing not very useful or interesting finds its way here, the reader may take it for ...
-Editor's Table
October is one of the most active months in the year with the gardener, orchardist, and nurseryman. A multitude of labors demand simultaneous attention, and it requires the most untiring energy and in...
-Editor's Table (2)
The old Book on Orchards and Gardening, of which we have already spoken, and given specimens, and which is the greatest curiosity in its way that we have seen, goes far to prove that all knowledge i...
-Editor's Table (3)
As we approach the close of the year, it may not be out of place to give our readers some intimation of our plans for the future. The recent addition to the editorial and business departments of the m...
-Editor's Table (4)
We send out this the first number of our new volume, anticipating for it a generous welcome, not only from our old friends, but from many new ones. To the extent of our time and means, we have toiled ...
-Editor's Table (5)
A Word For Ourselves As we approach the close of the Seventeenth Volume of the Horticulturist, it appears proper to say some thing respecting our plans for the coming year, January, 1863, being the i...
-Editor's Table (6)
Mrs. Pinch's Black Muscat Grape has been the subject of anxious inquiry among grape-growers, and the result is that the whole of its history is now before the public. That it should excite curiosity s...
-Editor's Table (7)
Messrs. Editors: Our first snow is falling out of doors; but within, the fire is cheery; and while the snow covers the garden with its blanket, I have thought it would probably not be uninteresting to...
-Editor's Table (8)
In an editorial note, on page 29 of this number, we stated that we had engaged a well-known and competent gentleman to aid us in our Architectural Department, and that we had hoped to receive a beauti...
-Editor's Table (9)
Twenty-First day of March, and we are still ice-bound here in Western New York. The greater part of our February snows have disappeared from open places, but on the east side of the fences, and in all...
-Editor's Table (9). Continued
The ravages of the past winter have been very severe. The damage cannot, as yet, be ascertained; but one feels sad enough in passing along the garden walks, and looking at the destruction wrought amon...
-Editor's Table. Letters From The Editor
Red Sulphur Springs, Virginia. August, 1855. My Dear Horticulturist. - I little expected when our fortunes were linked together some few weeks ago, that I so soon should have found myself five hund...
-Editor's Table. Letters From The Editor. Continued
All these things we will talk over together when I get well, and we have a quiet evening over a basket of Pears together. I must leave them now to tell you how I got here, and what sort of a place and...
-Editor's Table. Letters From The Editor (2)
Rockbridge Alum Springs, Aug., 1855. Mr Dear Horticulturist : - A great wit said once, in a letter to a lady, Correspondences are like small clothes before the invention of suspenders, it is imposs...
-Editor's Table. Letters From The Editor (2). Continued
Maple sugar constitutes a considerable article of manufacture and traffic, in Western Virginia; a sugar orchard is still a valued possession, and the beautiful tree assumes hereaway its most beauti...
-Editorial Associate
We have the pleasure of announcing that Mr. Andrew S. Fuller, the well-known author and horticulturist, will hereafter be identified with The Horticulturist as one of its regular associate editors and...
-Editorial Gravels. Shaw's Gardens, St. Louis
OF the various enterprises of the West, identified with ornamental gardening, the most prominent which we have seen in our travels is that of Shaw's Gardens, St. Louis. As a botanical garden it is per...
-Editorial Note
Dwarf Pears in the Middle and Southern States are a great success, and very profitable. In the Eastern States, we have no doubt, standards are far more satisfactory than dwarfs. Editorial Note #1 Th...
-Education
The following is from the pen of the editor of the Ohio Cultivator, Sept'l, 1858: But we are a deadly foe to sham and pretense, and never go with the multitude just because it is popular to be in the...
-Education - What Is It? - Girard College
In the following communication from one of our far seeing philosophers, we recognise an idea of much importance. The example of great institutions with liberal endowments are of great import; man is i...
-Education For Rustics'
Gervase Markham, who lived at the commencement of the 17th century, himself a practical husbandman, wrote a work with the object of enlarging the knowledge of the agriculturists of his time, and of r...
-Education Of Birds By Their Parents
Nothing is more striking than the efforts of the maternal birds to tempt their young to make the first experiment of trusting themselves to their wings. The nightingale flutters around her nest holdin...
-Education Of Gardeners
Tour judicious remarks respecting experimental gardens in the April number of last year, are so good that you deserve the thanks of every gardener in the United States, who wishes to see his professio...
-The Effect Of Camphor On Seeds - Curious Experiments
Some curious and all but forgotten experiments of much interest to agriculture and gardening, observes a London paper, have lately been revived by a German savant. Very many years ago it was discovere...
-Effect Of Street Gas Upon Vegetation
By a series of experiments upon the effect of gas upon different species of trees, by Messrs Spath and Meyer, in the botanical gardens in Berlin, it has been found that when the gas is brought into co...
-Effect Of The Severe Winter On Rare Evergreens
With all my heart I wish we had more such men as Mr. Sargent. Men who will try things, and then, after trial, tell us what they have amounted to. Many a man of taste is disposed to try a new plant, or...
-Effect Of The Stock Upon The Graft
I have a word to say in relation to the effect of the stock npon the graft. About thirty years since, my father grafted two apple-trees of some size, with scions taken from the same tree, and of the ...
-Effects Of Cold Weather
It is an old maxim, and a true one, too, that we are never too old to learn. This remark is, perhaps, quite as applicable to the horticulturist and pomologist as that of any other class of men. The ...
-Effects Of Cold on Peach-Trees
In this region we raise Peaches about two years in five; the rest of the time our buds are killed by the extreme cold in the winter. In the year 1827 I became convinced that the common opinion was inc...
-Effects Of Culture On Currants
A correspondent of an exchange says: About fifteen years ago I received as a present cuttings of the following varieties: White Grape, White Dutch, White Crystal, Cherry May, Victoria, Large Red Dutch...
-Effects Of Extreme Cold
The Salem (Mass.) Register says that during the late cold spell, the earth and ice cracked frequently with a loud report, and in one instance a large linden-tree, on Oliver-street, was split from the ...
-Effects Of Extremes Of Temperature Upon Vegetation
Few subjects connected with horticulture are of more general interest than the preservation of fruit-trees, flowers, and vegetables, from injury by exposure to extremes of temperature. Numerous have b...
-Effects Of Extremes Of Temperature Upon Vegetation. Continued
Let us now inquire what means appear best calculated to meet the several contingencies to which we have referred; and how far it appears to be within our control either to remedy or to avoid them. Th...
-Effects Of Frost In The Same Locality
Few things have more perplexed gardeners Chan the different degree in which the same species of plant has been affected by frost in the same locality. The last two winters have afforded abundant examp...
-Effects Of Grouping
Mr. Ellwanger also calls attention to some most excellent effects that may be produced by a proper assortment, either planted singly or in groups, of those varieties which present so great a diversity...
-Effects Of Last Winter On Osage Orange Hedges
I am anxious to hare from some of your correspondents who hare been engaged is the cultivation of Osage Orange for hedges, what has been the effect on them from the weather of the past winter. I have ...
-Effects Of Moonlight On Vegetation
Professor Lindley, in his new edition of The Theory and Practice of Horticulture, a work of the greatest merit, now greatly enlarged and assuming the size of a bulky octavo, makes the following remark...
-Effects Of Sulphate Of Iron On Vcge-Tation
Experiments, with this substance diluted, have been made within the circle of our own knowledge, and uniformly resulted favorably. We observe that a French scien-tist, M. Eusebe Oris, has been making ...
-The Effects Of The Cold
Autumn seems like a late and after the fair period, to speak of the results of a gone-by winter; yet the effects of such winters as the last are not always sufficiently developed to warrant an opin...
-Effects Of The Severe Winter On Rare Evergreens
My Dear Sir - In compliance with your request to know the effect of the past severe winter upon the new evergreens, I give you the following result of my examination, first premising that nearly every...
-Effects Of The Severe Winter On Rare Evergreens. Continued
Abiso-Smithiana, Douglasii, Menziesii. Piceses- Copphalonica, Pinsesso, Webbiana, Pindrow, Noblis, Cembra, Excelsa, Pumilis, Ponderosa, Lambertiana, Gerardiana, Austriacus, Sylvestris, Pinus...
-Effects Or The Hard Winter
Mr. Down-iso - Dear Sir: We have had an unusual cold winter here, destroying every peach bud west of the mountains. As far as I can learn, the crop is entirely destroyed in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Mi...
-Effects Or Winter On Conifers
The last winter has enabled us to judge more correctly than before of the effects of as low a temperature as we usually experience, even in extreme cases, upon most of the newly introduced trees and s...
-Egypt For Fruit
Editor of Horticulturist: - The peach buds are all right here as yet. (March 8,) and I think we may safely count on a good crop this season. Peach growing in southern Illinois bids fair to bec...
-Egypt For Fruit. Continued
Thus far for the present. Our society commenced under so favorable auspices, we hope and anticipate it is destined to increase in strength and utility, until it becomes an institution, as firmly estab...
-El Espirito Santo
IN 1826, Henry Barnard, Esq., then residing in Truxillo, Peru, sent to Richard Harrison, Esq., of Liverpool, England, the bulb of a remarkable cparasitical, orchidacious plant, which he had found in t...
-Electro Typing
The visitor to London cannot fail to remark the extensive electrotype manufactory of the Messrs. Elkington. This firm employs about five hundred workmen, executing the designs of the best artists of t...
-Elizabethan Architecture
From a very pleasant new book, entitled Shakspeare's England, by G. W. Thornbury, we extract the following passages : - The Elizabethan houses are wonderful in their individuality. They seem to sh...
-The Elm
The American Elm is, in most parts of the Eastern States, the most magnificent tree to be seen, and, probably, the one most cultivated, with the exception of the Maples, for shade and ornament. It aff...
-Elms And Maples
We sometimes observe in horticultural works the term English Elm. This is a vague definition of a tree; about as definite as some of the descriptions of fruit given in the Horticulturist recently by t...
-An Eloquent Plea For Birds
[We heartily sympathise with the following eloquent and beautiful appeal for the little feathered creatures of the air, from our fair unknown correspondent in New-England. If there is any common sight...
-Elsie's Letters. Woodside, Waukesha, Wis., Feb. 88,1855. The Sweet Gum
In the January number of the Horticulturist for 1864, Mr. Mohan, of Philadelphia, introduces a new shade tree to the notice of American Arboriculturists, or rather he has reminded them of a worthy nat...
-Elvaston Castle. A Leaf From My Note-Book
No doubt, Mr. Editor, yon have often been interrogated, by your friends who were about making the tour of Europe, with the question: Which are the finest parks, pleasure-grounds, and pinetums, to...
-Elvaston Castle. A Leaf From My Note-Book. Continued
Do it at the proper time, and judiciously; they are, with few exceptions, perfectly under control. I thought Douglas Fir was an exception, and that it was only handsome from seed? Of all the magni...
-The Emblem Or Ingratitude
Since our notes, No. 3 on Cuba, were printed, we have received the following letter from Havana, confirming the facts connected with the curious plant described as embracing the Bishop's house and the...
-Employment Of Statuary In The Decoration Of Gardens And Pleasure Grounds
There is perhaps no branch of Landscape Gardening in which the correct principles of taste are so frequently violated as in the introduction of statuary into ornamental grounds, and yet there is none ...
-Encharis Amazonica
One of the greatest recommendations this plant possesses is that it can be had in flower at any time by a little forethought and attention to its growth. They are very useful to come in about Christma...
-The Encroaching Visitor
The sun has disappeared behind the high trees some minutes since, so that I should not have recognized the fennel and the Angelica if I had not bean pretty well acquainted with them. The weather is h...
-The Encroaching Visitor. Continued
Well, then, I beg you, Edmond, do not flog him any more! Let him alone, let him alone; I want to see if he will obey me now. I ask it as a favor, that you will not make the experiment. . Pha...
-The Enemies Of The Rose
One of the worst enemies is the Aphis roses, which sometimes covers all the young branches and exhausts the sap from the tender leaves and shoots. The female aphis produces her young throughout the e...
-The Enemy
In the April number of the Horticultu-rist for 1866 is an earnest and able article under this caption. Many such articles, doubtless, appear from time to time. Some watchman on the walls gives the ...
-An Enemy To The Wistaria
The American Agriculturist states that plants of the wistaria have this season been injured by the Tityrus skipper (Eudamus tityrus), which is described in Harris' Insects. It is the first and only ...
-The English Bird Cherry
Taking up a catalogue of an Eastern nursery, under the head of Cerasus Padus it remarks, this is a most beautiful small tree; and it is most truly so. Our own Wild Cherry (C. serotina) is a gem in ...
-The English Crab, And The Apple
Prof. Mapes objects to the position taken by the Maine Farmer, that the English Crab is a distinct species from the common apple, and that the latter did not spring from the former as some have suppos...
-An English Garden Scene
Carpet Gardening is a term now somewhat in vogue with English horticulturists, as applied to lawn planting and decorations. Our frontispiece, this month, is a scene of this character, taken from the o...
-English Horticultural Journals
We have watched with more than customary interest the course of the leading English horticultural journals for the past three years, and have felt disposed, more than once, to say a word of compliment...
-English Or Broad Bean
This is a very different subject from those we have already treated on. It is the Vicia Faba of botanists, and grows three to four feet high, having a short stem, and very sweet-scented, black and whi...
-English Prize Flowers Of 1854
We take the following list of prise varieties of the most popular classes of florists' flowers from The National Garden Almanac and Horticultural Trade Directory fir 1856. In 16 meetings, the past sea...
-English Strawberries
At page 72 of current volume are some very interesting notes upon the fruits of 1857, by Mr. W. C. Strong. He says: That any English variety is desirable for our climate, is a question yet to be prov...
-English Strawberries (2)
In the January number of the Horticulturist is an article headed, English Strawberries versus Natives, by D. M. Richard. Would not good culture versus bad, have been more appropriate? for on the outse...
-English Strawberries (2). Continued
I am fully aware that many English varieties are not suited to our climate; others are disposed to burn. The nearest to perfection that a fruit reaches, the greater care and higher culture it require...
-English Strawberries Versus Natives
In the April number of the last volume, Mr. Saul in speaking upon strawberries, assorts that the foreign varieties succeed better in the vicinity of Washington City, than our American sorts. That Do...
-English Strawberries Versus Natives (2)
In the April number of the present volume, Mr. Saul, in commenting upon my article in the January number headed English Strawberries versus Natives, starts out by asking the question Would not good...
-English Strawberries Versus Natives (2). Continued
Mr. Saul asks if I ever saw Mr. Slater, or Mr. Cammack, sell Alice Maud at twenty cents per quart. I have seen the first-named gentlemen sell them for that and less. Mr. Cammack, I believe, does not r...
-English Views On Pear Culture
Last year, when I was about to visit England, an amateur friend, who makes Pear-culture a spacialty, handed me a list of questions, which he wished me to present to some experienced cultivator of this...
-English Window Gardens
A CAPITAL idea is prevalent in England, manifested by the encouragement of growing flowers for window gardens, and the award of prizes at annual exhibitions. We have nothing of this character yet amon...
-Enormous Grape-Vine
I have lately made an excursion to Burlington, New Jersey, for the purpose of obtaining the exact measurement of the most extraordinary grape vine I have ever heard of. It stands on a farm called West...
-Entomology
L. Wetherell, and J. W. Seward. Executive Committee Levi A. Ward. Mathew G. Warner. Patrick Barry, John Grey, Jason W. Sewara, and L. Wetherell. On motion of J. W. Bissell, a committee of six were ...
-Entrances To Country Seats And Villa Residences
[See Frontispiece]. Every traveller through England must have been struck by the effect produced upon its rural scenery, not only by the entrances to the more extensive parks of the nobility, but als...
-The Epacris
With the object of refreshing the memories of amateurs on the importance they generally attach to a supply of winter-blooming plants, both for cutting and for the decoration of greenhouses and sitting...
-The Equinetely Apple
This fine apple may be considered as one of the best among the southern native winter varieties. It originated, if my memory is correct, near the mountains which form the northern boundary of the Caro...
-Erhard's Ravenswood Pear
We present a cut of this early and excellent fruit produced on the place of Charles F. Erhard, Ravenswood, Long Island, N. Y., who has it now for sale. The cut represents the fruit rather below the av...
-The Erianthus Ravennae
LOVERs of ornamental grasses must not omit this season to find room in their flower garden or lawn borders for that gem of gigantic grasses, the Erianthus Ravennea, or Ravennas Woolly Beard Grass. Whe...
-Errata
In my communication in the last number of the Horticulturist, when speaking of the blossom-buds of the British Queen, bearing on Dr. Hull's grounds, you make me say a quarter of them bore: my notes sa...
-Errors
On page 57, February Horticulturist, read the following corrections for typographical errors: Sedums for Sodumes. Mesembrianthemums for Moscmbryan-themiuras. Sempervivums for Sempervivium. Purdy's...
-Errors Corrected
We regretted to find several typographical errors in our last number, which were quite unnecessary - Tropiolum, on page 111, should be Tropaelum. Leon le Clerc de Haval, on page 125, should be Leo...
-Errors In Ornamental Tree Planting
A few days since, in passing through the pretty village of Warren, the capital of Warren county, Pennsylvania, I was forcibly, not to say painfully, struck by the utter want of taste and judgment disp...
-Erythrina Indica (Lam. Dict. 2, P. 391, Var. A)
Stem, arboreal, prickly, with broad-ovate, acute leaflets, a spathaceons calyx, an ovate, concave, spreading banner; the stamens, monadelphous at the base. Native of the East Indies. Rheed, Malabb. t....
-Esculent In This Country
In May last I received from the Agricultural Division of the Patent Office, the Chufas or Earth Almonds,' known to botanists under the name of Cyperus Esculentus, with the following notice of the ...
-The Esperionb Grape
Mr. Aiton, writing in the Horticultural Society's Transactions, iii 93, where a colored drawing is given of this grape, says: I first noticed the Esperione Grape about the year 1804, in the catalogue...
-Essays
Among the Essays prepared and to be read at the September meeting of the American Pomological Society, are the following: Hon. W. C. Flagg, Illinois, on Diseased Apple Trees, and their Cause. Wm. Sa...
-The Essence Of The Fine Arts
By 8. H. [We find the following interesting article in a late number of that useful serial, the London Builder, and transfer it to our columns for the gratification of our readers.] My endeavor in t...
-Euchnris Amazonica
The Garden says that: So rapidly has this noble stove plant grown in the estimation of the plant-growing public, that it is already almost as indispensable to the stove collection as is the lily of t...
-Eugenia Luma
Is the name of a most superb plant figured in the last number of Curtis's Botanical Magazine, conducted by Sir William Hooker, who says of it: A charming shrub, from the open border of the nursery of...
-Eugenia Trinervia, D. C. Nat. Ord. Myrtacem
Native of New Holland, and introduced to cultivation by Allan Cunningham. Dwarf, and compactly branching. Branches round; and, when young, covered with short brownish hairs. Leaves opposite, shortly p...
-Eugenia Ugni
A cool house will suit it in winter, where many degrees of frost would not enter, and any house not kept hot will do for it in summer. The Guava is easily managed. If frost is excluded, both plants wi...
-The Eumelan Grape
At a recent meeting of tie American Institute Farmer's Club, a correspondent having asked for an expression of opinion about the Eumelan grape, Mr. T. O. Paine, of East Bridgewater, Massachusetts, sai...
-The Eumelan Grape In Minnesota
ED. Western Horticulturist: The Eumelan Grape having done so well with us for the last two years, I would call the attention of your readers to its great value. Of all black grapes that I have seen or...
-The Eumolongrass
Peter M. Gideon, of Minn., writes to the Prairie Farmer that, in his opinion, the Eumelan is the best of the black grapes, and we quote his remarks, which seem to us justifiably enthusiastic: Of all...
-The European Larch - Its Durability
ED. Western Horticulturist: I read Professor Matthews' article in the May number of the Pomologist, also 6. B. B.'s reply to it in the September number of The Horticulturist. I have not the May number...
-The European Larch - Its Durability. Continued
Vitruvius relates that when Caesar attacked the Castle of Larignum, near the Alps, whose gate was commanded by a tower built of this wood, from the top of which the besieged annoyed him with their st...
-European Parks
Quatreniere de Quincy, in his essay on The Nature, the End, and the Means of Imitation in the Fine Arts, draws attention to the difference between copy and imitation. To me the difference is clear ...
-The European Silver Fir. Picea Pec-Tinata
The European Silver Fir is one of our most beautiful evergreen trees. From its slow growth while young, and often losing its leading shoot until it gains a height of six to eight feet, many persons ne...
-Evening Party Apple, By Chas. Downing, Newburgh
Tree, vigorous and productive; fruit and foliage hang well and late on the tree. Origin, Bethel Township, Berks Co., Pennsylvania. Fruit small to medium; oblate, a little inclining to conic, slightly...
-Evenings At "Brightside." By W. Waybridge, Esq
Old Winter has come with his cold, chilling breath. The early and the latter rains fell copiously and gave us an abundant harvest. Our gardens never made a better yield. Of peas, we had abundance f...
-Ever-Bearing Mulberries
There are now three varieties of ever-bearing mulberries presented to us for selection or for general adoption. Downing's Ever-bearing is a seedling of the Multicaulis, which it resembles in wood and...
-Ever-Blooming Roses
Coleman's Rural World says that many persons are disappointed because their roses do not bloom constantly all summer, expecting from their title of Perpetual that they should do so. Now, the class of...
-Ever-Blooming Rosea
COLMAN's Rural World says, that many persons are disappointed because their roses do not bloom constantly all summer, expecting from their title of Perpetual that they should do so. Now the class of ...
-Evergreens
As we have answered another correspondent, we should prefer spring for transplanting, when the ground is dry and warm and growth about to commence. Where they can bo moved with a ball of earth, it may...
-Evergreens (2)
A new Enemy! - A valued correspondent writes, on the 28th of June: Do you know that, with consternation, this morning I discovered that my large Norway firs (seventeen years old) are curiously affec...
-Evergreens (2). Part 2
Trees of this kind should be sufficiently numerous to make the place pleasant, even when other trees are leafless; yet deciduous trees should so abound as to give the premises a new and heightened cha...
-Evergreens (2). Part 3
The child-blossom and his predecessor are heightening graces, each to the other - neither so beautiful alone, and both finding room enough, and enjoying the same summer together. Parent and child are ...
-Evergreens (2). Part 4
8. American Arbor- Vita Here comes the servant of all work - the tree which makes itself so generally useful. A child can transplant it. It is not fastidious about soils or exposure; nay, if any deli...
-Evergreens (3)
In looking over the evergreens in this vicinity, we find Abies Frazerii doing remarkably well; Menzesii, the same; Webbiana and Smithiana, poor, and much out up. Evergreens #1 Mr. Editor, - Will you...
-The Evergreen Cypress
The Evergreen Cypress is a native of California, and is undoubtedly one of those gigantic coniferous trees attaining the height of 300 feet. In the forest it grows as straight as an arrow, and is na...
-Evergreen Shrubs
We have had chapter on chapter on evergreen trees, but very little attention has been paid to that highly important, ornamental and interesting class of Shrubbery which is so useful in ornamental win...
-Evergreen Shrubs (2)
The scarcity of evergreen shrubbery in our pleasure grounds is a standard theme with writers on rural taste, and comparisons with other countries in this respect invariably result unfavorably to us. T...
-Evergreen Shrubs (2). Continued
The humidity that is constantly arising by evaporation from the surface soil in hot weather is very congeniat to vegetation. To prevent its rapid exhalation is therefore a desideratum, and this is mos...
-Evergreen Shrubs By B. Munn, Landscape Gardener, New York
While I fully agree with Horticola in his admiration of evergreens, as being indispensably requisite to the perfection of shrubbery plantations, I can assure him he is much mistaken in supposing tha...
-Evergreen Shrubs By B. Munn, Landscape Gardener, New York. Continued
The Prinos glaber is a native plant which might with advantage be extensively used, and I am not aware that it possesses any quality that unfits it for the shrubbery. Too many people suppose that beau...
-Evergreen Shrubs. From Elliott's "Lawn And Shade Trees"
A more common, free, and abundant use of evergreen shrubs should be adopted, because of the cheerful, bright, verdurelike appearance produced in the landscape when their dark and light green foliage a...
-Evergreen Trees
In the embellishment of private gardens, as well as public grounds, the evergreen trees should be planted. While the deciduous trees have lost their foliage, nature, as far as trees are concerned, see...
-Evergreen Trees (2)
I don't like evergreens - they look so cold and gloomy in winter, and it is so mournful to hear the wind blow through them, is an expression, not so common as it once was, to be sure, but one yet qu...
-Evergreen Trees (2). Continued
In the matter of size, we would not be particular, further than in having an abundant supply of root for the trunk. This is more readily obtained to small than large trees, and, in most cases, ten yea...
-Evergreen Trees - The American Holly
We took occasion so often, while our universally lamented friend Downing was at the head of the Horticulturist, to discourse on evergreens and their culture - their value in giving warmth and shelter ...
-Evergreen Trees - The American Holly. Continued
In all our various excursions in the woods and fields, from childhood and youth upward, we had never met with anv wild growing thin so beautiful so charming, so altogether perfect, and so desirable as...
-Evergreens - Their Use And Culture
We have often thought of painting, as a lesson and study for our friends in various parts of the land, who have the good fortune to reside in the country - two pictures; the one representing a house p...
-Evergreens Among Orchard Trees
Heretofore, planting evergreens among orchards of fruit has been deemed incongruous, and undeserving the attention of planters, or as presenting a careless waste of land without system or order in arr...
-Evergreens Among Pear Trees
Hon. E. H. Hyde, Vice-President of the Connecticut State Board of Agriculture, planted a number of small evergreens in a circular form around some pear trees, simply for ornament, intending to keep th...
-Evergreens In Orchards
OF the advantages accruing to the orchardist who mingles evergreen trees occasionally with his pears, apples, etc., I have before written, and it is, I rejoice to know, gradually becoming an acknowled...
-Evergreens In The Spring Of 1857
In reply to your desire to know the effect of the past winter upon the newer Evergreens, I regret I shall be compelled to give you an unsatisfactory result A winter so unprecedented in its character a...
-Evergreens Losing Their Foliage
It is safe to say that cultivators, as a rule, know little or nothing of the capabilities of evergreen trees and shrubs to renew a loss of foliage or recover vitality when, through some careless handl...
-Evergreens, And Other Matters
Evergreens are picturesque in many grounds - beautiful, too, when both soil and climate suit them. Otherwise, they had better be let alone. A foxy looking Evergreen, studded with bare spines, striking...
-Evergreens, Novelties And Dwarfs
Report of T. C. Maxwell, of Genova, to Western New York Horticultural Society. Probably never before was there a time when so many intelligent men were so deeply interested in the cultivation and dev...
-Evergreens, Novelties And Dwarfs. Continued
The list of fancy and dwarf evergreens is a very interesting one, and contains a good variety of form and color, and gives the planter a wide range for selection in forming his combinations and contra...
-Evergreens. What Shall We Plant?
A well prepared catalogue of trees, with information such as an experienced nurseryman is capable of giving, if he inclines to embody his acquired knowledge, we always welcome. It is a task to make su...
-Evergreens. What Shall We Plant?. Continued
Mespilus, Pyracantha, Or Evergreen Thorn There is not a more beautiful plant during our autumnal and early winter months; neither is there a more neglected one than the present subject; thickly studd...
-Evergrenn Hedoges
Will you please Inform me of the best time and mode of trimming a Hemlock hedge which was set out about the 25th of May. It is not that Its rapid growth demands any very vigorous pruning, but because ...
-Everlasting Flowers
F. B. Elliott recommends for indoor ornament during the winter, when many flower-lovers are not able to maintain a green-house, the use of Everlasting Flowers. These flowers are grown out-doors, and i...
-Everlasting Flowers And Their Management
Helichrysum (called by some Graphalum apiculatum) is the golden eternal flower, which, with the globe amaranth and white satiny seed-pods of the honesty - Lunaria biennis - formed the whole list of fl...
-Everlasting Flowers And Their Management (2)
NO flower garden should be considered complete without an assortment of everlasting or eternal flowers. For their retention of life-like appearance long after the season of growth, and, if properly ga...
-Every Gardener And Small Fruit Grower Should Keep Cows
Manures are the secrets of success in small fruits and gardening. Mineral manures are excellent to add where the soil is already supplied with vegetable mold. We believe small fruit growers should not...
-Evils Of Deep Sowing
In many seeds, the vital principle is so strong, that to scatter them upon the soil is sufficient to insure their speedy germination; but in others, the power of growth will only manifest itself under...
-The Evils Of Drainage
It is amusing to learn from the English and Scotch papers that while land has no chance of showing what it can do in the way of production while it is left at the mercy of all the rain that falls, dra...
-An Example And A Bit of Advice
No matter for the neighborhood of what city the following extract of a letter received this last Spring emanates; suffice it that it is genuine and only a portion of a history of an enthusiastic gentl...
-Example In A Poplar Tree Of What Nature Will Effect When Assisted By Art
On the 10th of August, 1842, the lightning struck our Lombardy Poplar tree, not far from the house, with' a crash as though the house itself had fallen in ruins. This tree, at 18 feet from the ground,...
-The Example Of Prussia
In one of the morning journals, we perceive that the example of Prussia is adduced as one which we ought to follow in providing public instruction in agriculture. Prussia has, it is said, five agricul...
-The Exchordia Grandiflora
THIs pretty shrub is still but little known in this country, only one or two nurseries keeping it as a specialty. It reaches the height of about six feet, and has a peculiarly graceful habit; when cov...
-Excretion Of Plants
Every person connected with the cultivation of the soil is aware that soils wear out, or become exhausted, by being constantly cropped with one kind of plant. It has been supposed by many, that the so...
-Excretions Of Plants
I must be a poor, very poor, physiologist, since, with all my patience in reading over and over again and trying to understand something about the article on the excretion of plants, published in yo...
-Excursion To The West
The New York Agricultural Excursionists returned to New York, August 25th, after an absence of five weeks, and a tour over 5,600 miles of Western territory. They were received with special honors at e...
-The Exeter Nurseries
The city of Exeter is in the West of England, and is about 200 miles on the Great Western Railway. We very recently visited the two Exeter nurseries; that of James Veitch and Son was the first to whic...
-Exhibited
Fruit:-Only a small display of fruit was made to-day. W. C. Strong had very fine Grapes, and Stephen Driver, Salem, superior Beurre Bose pears. Mr. James Swan sent a sample of a Grape - evidently a ne...
-Exhibitions
The New York Horticultural Society (see advertising pages) announce their fall exhibition on the 20th, 21st, and 22d of September - the same days, unfortunately, on which the N. Y. State Fair is held ...
-An Exhibition Day At Chiswick
Last summer, business took me to England, and as I went well provided with letters of introduction, I soon found myself domiciled in the family circles of the Merchant Princes of London, as they ch...
-An Exhibition Day At Chiswick. Continued
But lover as I am of flowers, for once my attention, after a hasty glance over them, was involuntarily arrested and completely transfixed by the animated portion of the scene around me. Walking amidst...
-The Exhibition Of Fruits
The Committee on Fruit made the following report: Cherries - One collection, two varieties, viz.: May Duke and Gov. Wood, from E. Ware Sylvester, Lyons. Strawberries - Collection, 15 varieties, comp...
-Exhibition Of Fruits At Muscatine, Iowa
We take the following report of the Committee on Fruit from the Muscatine Journal: The show of fruit this season owing to the late frosts of spring and the summer drouth, Is very much inferior to wha...
-Exhibition Of Kitchen Garden Products In England
The first show of the season under the new arrangement was held on the 24th of May, and, strange to say, there were but two competitors. The Gardener' Chronicle reports: Of collections of vegetable...
-Exhibition Of Strawberries At The Western New York Horticultural Fruit-Growers' Society, And Notes on Varieties Ik The Grounds Of Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry
Mr. F. R. Elliott sends us the following notes on the Strawberries shown at the Rochester (N. Y.) Exhibition, June 27th, and also his notes of varieties examined in Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry's grounds...
-The Exhibition Of The American Poultry Society
Which took place in this city on the 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th of December, we are assured, was a perfect success. The show of fowls was very large and of unusual excellence - in fact, so far as qual...
-Exhibition Of The Brooklyn Horticultural Society
THE fall exhibition, before alluded to, took place at the Academy of Music on the 24th, 25th, and 26th September. Our notice was crowded out last month for want of room. We have heretofore spoken of t...
-Exhibition Of The Montreal (C. E.) Horticultural Society
The June exhibition this year, which took place yesterday, was not so extensive as we have seen it on previous occasions. Nevertheless, the various horticultural products which were shown were, in qua...
-The Exhibitiows
The period of exhibitions is upon us. Our readers will not forget the gathering of the American Pomological Society, at Rochester, on the 24th of this month, and at the United States National here on ...
-Expeditious Grape Growing
Seeing, by the report of the last meeting of the Horticultural Society, that my brother has succeeded in fruiting and ripening wood and fruit of the Black Hamburgh Grape from eyes struck in February l...
-Experience Versus Theory
When our attention is attracted to the pages of the Horticulturist, it is either from a love of knowing how the beautiful things in Nature burst spontaneously into existence, or fostered forward by th...
-Experience Versus Theory (2)
Mr. Editor: - We have no desire to annihilate Mr. Eaton, nor any other gentleman, especially one who has the power and faculty, of contributing one jot or tittle to the great cause of Horticulture. I...
-Experience Versus Theory (2). Continued
Let us see what Mr. Eaton says himself on this point, after giving us the plan in question. It must be remembered that we said, that in curvilinear houses we invariably find the fruit better on one s...
-Experience Vs. Theory
Nearly annihilated as I would naturally be supposed to have been by the crushing denunciation of the gentleman from Fox Meadow, in your September number, it is, perhaps, no more than proper, Mr. Edito...
-Experiment
Trenched one piece of land three feet deep, and the vines planted upon it made wood beautifully, but bore very little fruit. Tried planting the vines twelve feet apart each way, and found that they we...
-An Experiment In Deep Digging
Last spring we took a corner of an old garden spot which, though it had always been liberally manured and plowed as well as such a piece of ground could be, and to put it in a condition for fruit tree...
-Experiment In Wine-Making
Capt. John Spalding, near Cleveland, O., sends us two bottles of wine made from the refuse grapes of his nine acres of vineyard last fall. His course was to mash the grapes and leave them about twenty...
-An Experiment With The Osage Orange
The hedge value of the Osage Orange must be ascertained from actual experiments. Believing that a collection and comparison of facts already discovered would go far to settle the question, I will vent...
-Experimental Garden
I was pleased to read the address of Viator to the various Horticultural Societies in your last number, and trust the different successful associations will move in the matter of experimental garden...
-Experimental Strawberry Garden
EDITOR Horticulturist: In the last two years I have collected and planted at Woodburn Farm (near Columbus, Ohio), some fifty of the newer varieties of strawberries, chiefly for the purpose of testin...
-Experiments In The Destruction Of The Oyster Shell Bark Louse
In a communication from J. W. Robson to the Jo Davies County Horticultural Society, we find some unusually valuable ideas of what will and what will not destroy the oyster shell bark louse, which is s...
-Experiments In Transplanting Forest Trees
Respecting the transplanting of Chestnut trees, I have seen the experiment tried by others, and have tried it myself, but without success. I have taken them up much the same as we take up nursery tree...
-Experiments In Transplanting Forest Trees. Continued
But when evergreens are transplanted, it should always be done in the frozen ball, or in the clod, especially the white pine, spruce, hemlock or firs, and the more carefully it is done, the surer will...
-Experiments With Early Cabbage
THESE experiments, Bays Mr. H. K. Vicroy, orchardist and gardener, were made on poor land, lightly manured with coarse horse manure and plowed under about eight inches deep. They were planted the same...
-Experiments With Tomatoes
These were planted on poor ground, without any manure, three plants of each variety; all planted at the same time, and given equal care and attention. Trophy, New York Market, and Early Smooth Red, s...
-Experiments With Tritoma Uvaria, And Other Matters
Mr. Horticulturist: - I was a little premature in announcing the good news that Tritoma Uvaria can be easily grown from seed; and wish now to amend the statement by restricting the phrase easily to ...
-Experiments With Turnips
IN October, 1869, I planted on rich, sandy loam, good Sea Island cotton land, Yellow French and German Tultowa turnip seed ; both grew vigorously; very soon the Tul-towa had got its full growth, and w...
-An Explanation
We have received a letter from Messrs. ThoRp, Smith, Hanohktt & Co., of Syracuse, in reply to a note of Dr. EshlEMan in our last number Conoerning the Homuhmk Pear. It will appear in our next. Explan...
-Explanation Of The Drawings
They represent, one side, the section of a Fig, showing the flower within the fruit; on the other side, a branch of a Fig-tree, showing the summer fruit at D, the autumnal or second crop at A, B, and ...
-Explanation Of The Figures
The frame shown in the drawing, was placed against a wall of a new construction, and which has existed for more than twenty-five years. The wall is formed of a framework of oak, forming squares, in wh...
-On Expression In Architecture
From The London Builder A great part of the difficulty in reference to decorative expression arises from our contracting too much the field of our resources, from a neglect of many sources from which...
-On Expression In Architecture. Continued
We do well to immortalise in atone the fading forms of nature; but artificial forms are often called for, and may not only be useful in expression, but conducive art instruments are graceful in form, ...
-Expression In Architecture (2)
From The London Builder. - By H. S Some are of opinion that the beauty of the human face consists entirely of expression; and in truth the charm of an agreeable countenance seems to arise from the ca...
-Expression In Architecture (2). Part 2
But the use of each apartment in a house should be indicated for its own sake. The ancients dedicated each chamber to the divinity that presided over the use to which it was applied, and decorated it ...
-Expression In Architecture (2). Part 3
In places of worship in particular, the entrance doors should be prominent, rendered by ornament conspicuous and inviting, and much wider than they generally are, in order to avoid unseemly thronging ...
-Expression Of Purpose
LANDSCAPE Gardeners and Architects sometimes use a phrase that has much meaning., Expression of Purpose has a significance in many cases which no other simple phrase conveys. The builder who erects ...
-Extensive Establishments
Among the many large establishments in this city, there are none, perhaps, that possess more interest to all classes of the community than those in which fruit and other luxuries peculiar to the summe...
-Extensive Strawberry Cultivation
The Baltimore American Fanner gives the following account of strawberry cultivation near Annapolis, Maryland, exceeding anything we now so collect: Our Anne Arundel County friends can claim a pre-emi...
-Extraordinary Yield Of Honey
The following surpasses any thing of the kind which has come under our notice, but seems to be sufficiently vouched for. The Journal of the California State Agricultural Society says: However sur pri...
-F. W. Woodward, Esq (2)
Dear Sir: In resuming my pen for the purpose of giving you the promised monthly dissertation upon the subject of Poultry, I have concluded to submit to you a paper upon that variety of chickens, which...
-F. W. Woodward, Esq (2). Continued
Up to the period when this information was communicated, the gentleman informed me that his two pullets together had supplied him with over 140 eggs. One of the prime qualities of the Brahma is, that ...
-Fact In Grafting, By Lyman B. Langworthy, Greece, New York
The better process generally for working Cherries and Plums, is to bud or inoculate at the proper season; but it often happens that it is desirable to work trees too old, or the season so dry that the...
-A Fact In Manuring
A person carrying some orange trees from China to the Prince of Wales' Island, when they had many hundred fruit on them, expected a good crop the next year, but was utterly disappointed: they produced...
-Facts And Comments On Grape Culture
Mr. Editor: In your article on Grape Culture, No. VII., I am pleased to see the Delaware rated as No. 1; that is doubtless the right thing in the right place. With my present knowledge and experience,...
-Facts And Figures
The cost of planting an orange orchard must vary greatly in different localities, depending partly upon the original condition of the land and partly upon the expense of getting the trees from the wil...
-Facts In Grape Culture
In the remarkable scarcity of hardy fruits which prevailed the past season, I have found the culture of the grape under glass to possess unusual interest, and have devoted to it much more attention th...
-Facts In Grape Culture (2)
I discovered, with some surprise, Mr. Editor, upon opening your May number, that a remark of mine in a former communication under the above title has greatly disturbed the equanimity of Mr. Chorlton. ...
-Facts In Isabella Grape Culture
Some time ago, yon may remember, you invited me to communicate to you such facts for publication as I might have met with in grape culture that would be likely to be of interest to the public. I had t...
-Facts Versus Fustian
Mr. Editor:- I was educated in England as a gardener, and have pursued that avocation for so many years, that I am so strongly attached to it, that it has almost become a part of my being; and when I ...
-Fairfield Co. Horticultural Society
Under this name our friends in Fairfield County have formed a Horticultural Society, to whom we extend a most hearty welcome. The movement originated, we believe, with Mr. Davenport, of Stamford, who ...
-Fairie's Venus' Slipper, (Cypriped1um Fairieanum.)
(From the Revue Horticole). The tropical orchids have for a long time been objects of intelligent culture, and amateurs have not feared to make considerable sacrifices for the acquisition of these ch...
-Fairmount Park
Our fellow citizens are becoming impatient at the conduct of their representatives in Councils. A large sum of money has been paid by private persons, to present a large addition to the Fairmount Park...
-Fall Or Aurora Fruiting Raspberry
I notice a short article under the above heading in the October number of the Horticulturist, page 813, in which you say: We have been not a little surprised at the statements made by some of the Wes...
-Fall Planting Of Trees
One of the best ways is to plant very early. Do not wait for the fall of the leaf, but commence as soon as the first heavy fall rains have thoroughly loosened the ground. If the leaves have not fallen...
-Familiar Botany - Have Ferns Sexes?
Our fathers believed that when a fern produced its seed, the little brown grains at the back of a fern-leaf were all that nature had provided for the purpose. Linnaeus thought so, and so did everybody...
-Famine And Wives
The grasshopper seems likely to destroy the entire crop of the Mormons. The time comes to the best of us when the grasshopper is a burden; but we apprehend that when no grain is to be had, repudiati...
-Fancy Training Of Fruit-Trees
It is a favorite theory of some writers that fruitfulness and barrenness in plants and trees are influenced by the mode of training. Constraining fruit-trees within limited bounds we know answers a go...
-Farcing
Rhubarb admits of being forced very readily, and thus will take the place of apples in pastry. The same practice and conveniences as are recorded in the November No. (1857) for asparagus, will apply t...
-Farfugium Grande
For the next few years this will be the most popular plant among the fancy variegated-leaved plants, because it is, like Isolepis gracilis, everybody's plant; a plant for the queen's drawing-room, and...
-Farm Drainage
THE PRINCIPLES, PROCESSES, AND EFFECTs OF Draining Land, WITH STONES, WOOD, PLOWS, AND OPEN DITCHES, AND ESPECIALLY WITH TILES: INCLUDING TABLEs OF RAIN-FALL, Evaporation, Filtration, Excavation, Cap...
-Farm for Sale
We ask attention to the advertisement of a farm for sale in Westchester County. It has many advantages, such as a fine view of Long Island Sound, with two hundred acres of land covered with fruit of a...
-A Farmer I Once Knew
I have known in my life a good many farmers of enlarged means, whose sons, after receiving what is commonly called a liberal education, invariably deserted the farm and betook themselves to some other...
-Farmers' Club, At Clifton, Near Cincinnati
The President of the club mentioned below, allows us to extract the following proceedings from the regular minutes: - At a meeting of the Amateur Farmers of Clifton, held recently at the School-hou...
-The Farmers' Neglect Of The Kitchen Gaarden
The reluctance shown by this class of people to give a little time and labor to the production of Vegetables for the use of their families, is most surprising. They appear to think the employment alto...
-The Farmers, Gardens, And Ladies Of Norfolk County, Mass
A correspondent of the Baton Herald thus speaks of the gardening operations, ladies, etc., of Norfolk county. He seems to have overstepped the bounds of sober prose, but this is to be expected on such...
-Farming And Farm Buildings Esthetically Considered
Br farming and kindred terms, we and the reader, this present writing, will consent to understand what pertains to the useful, not the amateur cultivation of the earth. A farmer, we will agree to cons...
-Farming And Farm Buildings Esthetically Considered. Continued
For small families, a sufficient number of sleeping apartments, a living-room, and kitchen are abundantly sufficient For Very large families with more wealth, it may be well to add a parlor; but what ...
-Fast Growing Shade Trees
It is often objected to us as a people, that we are too forward to make haste. We have little credit for extreme patience. Whatever we have to do, must be done at once. The more haste the less speed,...
-Fastening And Stretching The Wires On Trellises
Nothing is more desirable for the horticulturist and vine grower than to have some cheap and convenient arrangement for stretching and loosening the wires on trellises. M. Du Breuil describes and figu...
-Fauns For Maryland
Having but recently moved to the country, I hare been anxiously consulting authorities in regard to stocking my place with choice fruit of all the desirable kinds. On reading your leading article in t...
-Feast's King Of The Prairie Rose
Mr. Feast writes us that he has at length succeeded in obtaining a variety of the Prairie Rose, as fragrant as the old Damask Rose, larger than the Queen, and of a bright peach color. This must be an ...
-A Feat In Cultivation
Mr. Richard Corke, of Maidstone, recently laid four wagers that by his system of cultivation he would produce more grapes, melons, cucumbers, strawberries, and vegetable marrows, or in fact any vegeta...
-Feeding Bees
Bees should always be considered as natives of a warm climate, by which means we can account for their ways being opposed to their own security. Instead of their keeping together in a strong colony, t...
-Fermentation
The crashed mass, with or without the stems, is next thrown into vats and allowed to ferment. The vats are large casks, generally without bulge, the largest at the bottom, and open at the top. In some...
-Ferns
The transplanting of ferns, and their growth after transplantation, is quite an easy matter. The ravine just north of Cornell University is full of them, as are the ravines of the Cayuga and other lak...
-Fern Cases
One of the most charming modes of adorning the window is by the use of fern cases or ferneries. They consist simply of a basin holding earth, in which are planted the ferns, and the whole surmounted w...
-The Fern House At Hillfield
THE Frontispiece this month illustrates the interior of a celebrated Fern House at Hillfield, near Reigate, England, of which The Gardener's Chronicle thus speaks: The Fern House, of which the centr...
-Ferns - Remarks Upon
Ferns, or filices, (so called from their beautiful forms,) have many claims on public attention, and it is very gratifying to know that all those who have any pretension to good taste in matters ...
-Ferns And Lycopodiums
Throughout Europe no family of plants are more popular, and certainly none possess more claims to admiration. My love for this interesting and beautiful class of plants existed long before they became...
-Ferns And Mosses; Or, The Links By Which Society Is Held Together
There was Fern on the mountain, and Moss on the moor - The Ferns were the rich, and the Mosses the poor; And the glad breeze blew gaily - from heaven it came - And the fragrance it shed over each wa...
-Ferns For Bouquets
Choose Adiantum cvneatum and Pteris serrulata, two of the very best of A. cuneatum. There is an elegant variety named J. gracillimum (elegan-tissimum), a kind with finer fronds than those of the speci...
-Ferns. Remarks Upon Raising From Spores, Artificially And Otherwise
As many of the finest perennial, and all those with an upright rhizoma, with the annual kinds, can only be propagated from spores, 1 will point out the ways by which we have been very successful with ...
-The Fertile Currant of Palnau, By Baptiste Desportes, Angers, France
It is generally known that France is the country, where, thanks to the climate and the nature of her soil, fruit attains the highest degree of perfection; and where, for the same reason, the study of ...
-Fertilisers For The Lawn
F. R. Elliott rocommends in the Cleveland Herald the following fertilizers: Bone meal is the only one that can give off a bad odor, and if that could be sown upon a light snow, or just before a rain, ...
-Fertilizing Plants Artificially
It is announced from Vienna that a process indicated by M. Hooibrenk, for facilitating the fertilization of plants, has proved successful in the Botanical Gardens there. The process consists simply in...
-A Few "Bedding Plants"
Our correspondent, Fox Meadow, who is always looking about with his eyes open, sends us the following useful hints about Bedding Plants: Mr. Editor, - Roving through our horticultural beauties in t...
-A Few Casual Remarks On The Importance of Propagating Flowers From Well-Saved Seed
Now that the season is rapidly approaching when all who are interested in Floriculture will be contemplating what selections shall be made for another year's operations, we take this opportunity of ur...
-A Few Choice Flowers
Come, gentle Spring, ethereal mildness, come! And, from the bosom of yon drooping cloud, Veiled in a shower of shadowy roses, On our plains descend. - Thompson. HOW many hearts are longing for her co...
-A Few Choice Fruits For Country Homes. The Davison's Thornless Black-Cap Raspberry
THREE years ago I Was persuaded to try Davison's Thornless Black-Cap. My object is not to find fruits first for profit, but for enjoyment, and, possibly, profit afterward - fruits that will contribute...
-A Few Choice Fruits For Rural Homes
IF we seek a strawberry for market we shall certainly pass by Lennig's White. It is confessedly not a rival for the Wilson in producing a sure crop on all soils; nor of the Jucunda in size and evennes...
-A Few Choice Roses And Pyrethrums
Recently visiting the grounds of Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry, Rochester, I saw about five acres of Roses in bloom, and examined and made notes of many varieties. The Hybrid Remontants have now become so...
-A Few Hints For Beginners
ONE of the most fruitful Sources of disappointment to the tyro in gardening, is the injudicious choice of material, or, in other words, the selection of objects for cultivation not adapted to his expe...
-A Few Hints For Beginners. Continued
In ornamental culture we would recommend precisely the same principles, and here indeed it is, if possible, more important than in fruit culture, inasmuch as the objects grown are more varied, and inv...
-A Few Hints On Budding, Or Inoculation
Budding, or inoculation, is one of the most general, and, in this country, by far the most important method of summer propagation. This operation consists in removing a bud from the variety to be prop...
-A Few Hints On Church Building
IN going through our country towns, it is almost a matter of impossibility to recognize the churches, from the fact, that, so little attention having been paid to their characteristic features, it bec...
-A Few Hints On Farmers' Houses
It is a little strange that in this State not one farmer's yard in five hundred has more than half a dozen ornamental trees in it; and in the greater number there are no trees at all. The farmer who v...
-A Few Hints On Pinching
Train up a child in the way he should go is a venerable maxim, and One that all good parents endeavor to carry into practice. Trees, like children, require training in their youth; the wise and skil...
-A Few More Words On Grape-Culture
The communications in the September number of the Horticulturist, touching the question of originality in the system of Grape-culture proposed in my recent work on that subject, may seem to require so...
-A Few More Words On Pear Culture
In manifesting his intention of setting me over on his side of the question, my friend Mr. Allen has made one or two remarks which seem to require a reply from me, as he is evidently laboring under...
-A Few Notes On Grapes, Pears
I am quite ready to confess that I am no pomologist; neither do I wish to write for the sake of Buncombe, as it is called here in our State. Nor should I have pretended to write at all, but for the...
-A Few Notes On The Strawberry
Since a brief article I sent to the Horticulturist for December appeared, I have received numerous letters of interest and inquiry, on the nature and culture of the strawberry, from amateurs, both in ...
-A Few Of The Most Effective Flowering Bedders
There are so many thousands of varieties of bedding plants in cultivation, that amateurs may well be perplexed in attempting to make choice among them. Having for many years past made it a practice to...
-A Few Remarks On Cherries. Triumph Of Cumberland
I have a cherry which passes under the name of the Triumph of Cumberland, which, as far back as I can trace it, originated at the Cumberland county almshouse, (a seedling.) The last two years it has b...
-A Few Remarks On Good Culture
Notwithstanding the oft reiterated assertion amongst our modern progressive cultivators that our present experience is far a-head of our forefathers, I am led to think, sometimes, when ruminating over...
-A Few Remarks On Late Grape Crops, By William Chorlton, Statin Island. New York
IT will, no doubt, be well remembered by many, that on the 4th Nov., 1854, there was a severe frost, which entirely destroyed the leaves of the grape-vines in most of the late graperies in this part o...
-A Few Words About Port Wine
At this time, when so much interest is taken in the culture of the grape, and its manufacture into wine, together with opinions respecting grapes adapted to the production of certain classes of wine, ...
-A Few Words About Sickly Pear-Trees
I find, on looking about my garden, talking with fruit growers, and looking through the pages of your paper, that it is an undeniable fact, that a good deal more difficulty is experienced in cultivati...
-A Few Words On Business
The close of a volume is always an event in the history of a periodical, especially in one that depends for its support on a single, and that not a very large, though most intelligent class. To the pr...
-A Few Words On Evergreens And Other Matters
CEDAR OF LEBANON. IMPORTANT to the landscape, for shelter, and for winter and summer beauty, as evergreen trees and shrubs are, we never lose an opportunity of speaking a good word in their behalf,...
-The Fewer Sheds The More Juice
Watch, Bays the London Farmers' Magazine, the intelligent vine-grower diligently thinning his grapes, He looks for produce not in seeds or grains (as the corn-grower does), but in pounds of Juice. ...
-Fibre
Mr. Jacob Stauffer, of Mount Joy, Penn., calls our attention to a very strong native fibrous substance in the following communication, which we regret to be obliged to condense. The article sent is no...
-Field Notes For, 1862
8. D. HARRIS, Editor, Agricultural and Field Department. MRS. FRANCEs D. GAGE, Editor Home Department. The Second year of this new Weekly Journal will commence on the 1st of January, 1862. Amid all t...
-Figs
(S. T. T.) Figs require a poor soil; gravel, lime-rubbish, etc. is better than manure; to have a fall crop, shallow, dry subsoils are the best, and the growth requires to be checked if fruit is wanted...
-The Fig (2)
This may be made a most desirable tropical orchard-house tree, and so managed as to give its quota to the Christmas dessert. Trees of one or two years old, that have been protected from the winter, in...
-The Fig (3)
In point of historical interest, there is no fruit which claims higher regard than the Fig. It is of very great antiquity; a pomological noble, not a parvenue of recent birth and upstart prete...
-Fig Cuttings
There have been imported from the south of France some choice varieties of the Fig. They are designed for experiment in Southern and Southwestern States, where it is known that this product thrives we...
-Fig. 1
Commom Curculio Magnified. Fig. 2. Pupa in the progress of transformation, showing the incipient wings, wing covers, legs and mandibles turned under the throat. Fig. 3. Head and mandibles as used in...
-Fig. 1. Part 2
We have two other varieties of this insect here, which I intended to have sent you, but they have accidentally escaped. One is quite small, and the other three or four times the size of the common kin...
-Fig. 1. Part 3
To be precise and in order: Professor Johnston arrived at Halifax on the 7th day of August, 1849. On the 4th of September he took the steamboat at St. John, and arrived the following morning, at Portl...
-Fig. 1. Part 4
in the New-England states and in New York the Devon blood prevails. Most of the stock are grades, as they are called, or crosses of the pure Devon bull with the older stock of the country, which is o...
-Fig. 1. Part 5
Agriculture - of which every idea that he has, as applied to the region of which he discourses, is given by some previously introduced acquaintance, or fellow passenger in the cars - receives a part o...
-Fig. 1. Part 6
Indignant that so marked an insult should be given to an esteemed guest and neighbor, simply because he was a countryman of his own, by Mr. Johnston, our host immediately turned to the other, and in c...
-Fig. 1. Part 7
It were bootless to follow our erudite Professor through all the various topics which engage the remaining part of his time while in and around Boston. In the dead of winter, when he could make few or...
-Fig. 1. Part 8
From New York to New-Haven, and thence to Boston. On the third day of April, A. D. 1850, Professor Johnston leaves, for the last, as well as only time, we trust, the shores of America, for England. We...
-Fig. 2, Hand Bellows
F, pipes or joints made of tin, to fit nicely on the nose of the bellows, and by adding joints, any length desirable may be obtained. G, a tin globe, with a short socket to fit nicely on a joint, and ...
-Final Planting
Between the 1st and 15th of June, taking advantage of cloudy weather, the ray apart in soil well worked and manured with rotten dung. Basins are formed round each and water is supplied several times a...
-The Finchley Vine
This vine, the history of which is a study, and the progress of which speaks most emphatically in behalf of the extension system where circum-stances favor its adoption, is so remarkable an instance o...
-A Fine Bed Of Geraniums
The American Rural Home describes a fine bed of Geraniums, at Elwood estate, Rochester, N. Y. The gardener commences making cuttings for the next year's bed in July, which he strikes in pots, and keep...
-Fine Early Spring Flowering Shrubs
Among shrubs that make an early display on the lawn, we must call especial attention of young planters to the following, while their impressions are fresh on our minds. 1. The well known Japan Quince ...
-A Fine Example Of Bedding
IN the Royal Gardens at Kew, near London, England, there was exhibited, last summer, a remarkable example of arrangement in bedding plants. The illustration represents a large round bed, at the end of...
-The Fine Family
The Pines, Firs, Spruces, Junipers, and Cedars form a very interesting, distinct, and striking natural group. The name evergreen, by which they are commonly known, is liable to the exception that one ...
-A Fine Park
In a recent issue of Lippincotts Magazine, appeared a commendatory notice of the successful efforts of Robert Morris Copeland, in developing fine architectural and landscape effects wherever he had fu...
-Fine Pears
Messrs. Editors: I was somewhat surprised recently, on reading the American Journal of Horticulture, to find the Edgewood farmer, a man who writes freely, if not always correctly, assert that our fi...
-Fine Strawberry Crop
Allow me to add one to the numerous accounts of large crops of that excellent fruit, the Strawberry. In the spring 1849,I selected a small patch of ground 8 by 18 feet for a bed. It was nothing bette...
-Fine Vegetables
We have received from the farm and garden of Judge McHenry, at Oakland, some of the finest vegetables we have yet seen grown in this State. They were not so very large, but yet full size, well and han...
-A Fine Vine
One of the most remarkable vines we have ever seen is now in full bearing in Kaye's Nursery at Finchley. It is not so large as either the Hampton Court or Cumberland Lodge vines - much smaller, in fac...
-The Finer Varieties Of The Fuchsia As Winter Flowering Plants
It may not be generally known, or if known but little acted on, that some of our finest varieties of Fuchsia form magnificent objects during the dreary months of winter, if rightly prepared, and a gen...
-Firs
First will come the Nordnrann Fir, a grand tree from the eastern slopes of the Caucasus. Its habit is close and compact, its color is a rich dark glossy green, its ultimate stature is among the highes...
-Fire Blight
E. W. Leavenworth had found the fast growing sorts of the pear, and those stimulated with high manuring, much more liable to blight than those with short, compact wood; and that the disaster usually o...
-Fire Blight In Pear Trees By A. H. Ernst, Cincinnati
A. J. Downing, Esq. - Dear Sir: Pardon me for again touching a subject on which there has been so much speculation, without really advancing new facts, or shedding additional light to aid in removing ...
-The Fire Blight. Cracking Of Pears
I have been a learner for the last fifty years, a large portion of it devoted to Horticulture. My zeal has prompted me to a close scrutiny of the various phenomena that often cross the Horticulturist'...
-The First American Work On Grape Culture
A few evenings ago I stepped into the study of a friend whom I shall name Bib-los, and who is known among his friends as having the finest library of agricultural works in this part of the country. I ...
-The First American Work On Grape Culture. Continued
L. Well, B., I am afraid you have worked too much among books for me to have any chance with you in an argument on bibliographical subjects. Let us set down Antill's Essay as the first. I would like t...
-First Annual Report Of The Commissioners Of Prospect Park, Brooklyn
Lieut. Viele will please accept our thanks for the above, which we shall read carefully. C. W. Seelye't Descriptive Catalogue of Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Roses, etc, cultivated and for sal...
-First Evening
The Winter Nelis Pear being called up for discussion, P. Barry, of Rochester, stated that it was of weak and crooked growth, would not grow on the quince; but he admitted it was a pear of high flavor....
-First Evening. Cracking Of The Pear
The subject of the cracking of the pear, was introduced, and a number of gentlemen present were unanimous in stating that in New England and in other places where the cracking had generally destroyed ...
-First Flowering Of The Victoria Regia In The U. S
The great event in our floriculture world just now, is the blooming of the Victoria - it queen of water lilies - at the country residence of the President of the Pennsylvania, rtcultural Society. Mr. ...
-First Flowering Of The Victoria Regia In The U. S. Continued
13. This morning we discovered, to our great delight, a flower bud rising a little in advance of the 28th leaf, which was also approaching the surface. The latter presented a dark object, whilst the f...
-The First Fuchsia
The history of the first fuchsia, its introduction to Europe, and the commencement of its subsequent popularity, form a very romantic story, and we condense it from the original story as told by the G...
-First Moss Roses
On the first introduction of the old red Moss Rose, it was sent over with some plants of Orange trees from the Italian States, to Mr. Wrench, then a nurseryman and gardener at Broomhouse, Fulham, in o...
-The First Philadelphia Park
The noble gift made by a number of our neighbors to fas city of Philadelphia, of forty-five acres of land for a. public park, has already been: ohronioled in these pages. It affords us sincere pleasur...
-The First Work On American Grape Culture
The remarks of Liber in the November number of the Horticulturist are quite interesting as well as instructive. The history of American Horticulture will evidently be written at some future time, and ...
-Fish
The Ohio Farmer, published at Cleveland, Ohio, has commenced a series of articles, detailing the experiments of two physicians of that place, on the propagation and rearing of fish artificially. The s...
-Fish And Dormice
The movement by the New York Agricultural Society, in offering a premium for essays on the cultivation and domestication of fish, we have already designated as it deserves. The subject is not only dis...
-Fish Ponds
Mr. J. C. Carmichael says: It has now been about fourteen months since I built my first pond, and now I have three, with a fourth nearly complete. I estimate my fish by the million, many of which are...
-Five Summers In The Land Of Flowers
AN article in this month's issue of The Horticulturist, by Al Fresco, I consider calculated to mislead, by failing to tell the whole truth and give the reasons therefor. That I can tell all the truth ...
-Flat Culture
FOR a number of years there has been a diversity of opinion in regard to two strongly contrasted modes of culture, the one termed flat culturet and the other hilling, the distinguishing feature of t...
-Flat Dutch, Or Drum-Head
This is the best for winter keeping. It makes a large, solid, and flat head. If sown the last week in May, it will be in use from November, and may be preserved through the winter as follows: When it ...
-Flavor Of California Pear
Some Easter Beurre pears, shipped from California to London, arrived in good condition and were put on exhibition in the shop windows of Covent Garden. They were pronounced by connoisseurs, in regard ...
-Flavor Of Plants As Affected By Soil And Culture
One day, at table, I offered some radishes to a friend from the other side of the Atlantic, who refused them with the remark that he never ate radishes in this country. Now, my friend is a liberal man...
-A Flaw In The Patent Laws
The patent laws secure to the inventor such a monopoly of bis machine or device as will richly repay him for his skill and ingenuity; the copyright act gives to the author the control of the fruits of...
-The Flood In California
Mr. H.B. Eastman, writing from Lewiston, Trin-ity Co;, Cal., under date of January 1, 1962, says of the then recent flood: The past six weeks I have had my hands full in trying to clear up the wreck...
-A Florak City
A traveller writes of the beauty of the flowers in south France: The profusion of violets, roses and camellias that are hawked about the streets of Nice during March and April is very attractive, a...
-Floral Catologues
The Seedsmen have vied with each other this spring, in attractive covers and illustrated interiors to their gaily-decorated Catalogues. Vick's New Catalogue is resplendent with all the colors of the ...
-A Floral Clock
Hearth and Home mentions the curious characteristics of many flowers opening and closing at different hours of the day. Some flowers close at night, some are closed during the day and open at night,...
-A Floral Decoration
A writer in Les Mondes suggests a new idea for floral decoration, which it seems may readily be put in practice. An ordinary earthenware flower-pot is filled with water, the hole in the bottom of cour...
-Floral Decorations For The Table
Ferns and Mosses are among the most useful things for the decoration of the table, and even such a common thing as the Male Fern (Lastrea Ftlix-mas), which may be found in the hedgerows in almost ever...
-Floral Decorations In New York
The profuseness with which flowers are used in New York at bridal or funeral occasions is fairly a subject of extraordinary comment. We have personally known flowers to the amount of $6,000 worth brou...
-Floral Notes. Fumlgatlng Plant
Tobacco smoke is well-known as a specific remedy for the minute insects infesting roses and other garden plants. Sometimes a keg turned bottom upwards over the plants will suffice to confine the smoke...
-Floral Prize
Amid the great interest in preparing floral decorations with cultivated flowers, it is certainly an item of curiosity to learn that the first prize at the annual exhibition of the Tun-bridge Wells Hor...
-Flore Des Serres
The three last numbers of this journal, unrivalled for the beauty of its illustrations, contain figures of the following new plants superbly drawn and colored: Lalia purpurata; Dircaea blassii; Mandev...
-The Florence Flask
The common Florence Flasks, in which salad oil is imported, make very pretty and useful vessels for the culture of minute flowering plants and ferns, and for the preservation of the lowest forms of ei...
-Florets' Flowers
As we are drawing near to the close of the floral year, we may turn back at our leisure and review some of the work that has been done in the various departments of floriculture. In what has there bee...
-Floricultural Perfection
There are few persons, even among our most experienced horticulturists, on this side of the Atlantic, who know to what perfection floriculture is carried in some parts of Europe, where certain plants ...
-Floriculture
ThE cultivation of flowers is an employment adapted to every grade, the high, the low, the rich, and the poor; but especially to those who have retired from the busy scenes of active life. Man was nev...
-Floriculture As A Science
This embraces, first, the cultivation of flowers in the highest degree of perfection; secondly, the improvement of the races. The former is practised successfully by thousands, the latter is becoming ...
-Flour Of Sulphur A Cure For The Mildew on The Grape
It is wondrous strange that the savans of Europe have Just made this discovery, when it has been published in this country over twenty years. I believe, first in the American Flower Garden Directory, ...
-Flower Garden
To have a good display of flowers during next summer, dig five or six inches of manure eighteen inches deep in the flower beds. If the ground is trenched over and the poor soil brought to the surface,...
-Flower Garden (2)
Cut the faded flowers of rose bushes, and make cuttings of the stems; they root readily at this season, in a shaded spot, if well-ripened cuttings are chosen. China roses, and their hybrids, that are ...
-Flower Garden Aed Pleasure Ground
It is more difficult to arrange small places satisfactorily, of from one to three acres, than those of fifty or a hundred, especially when the attempt is made to develop all the features of the large ...
-Flower Garden And Pleasure Grounds
The operations in these departments, at present, are principally of a routine character. In geometrical gardens, the outlines of the beds ought to be kept distinct, and trim the plants when they grow ...
-Flower Garden For February
With the amateur this is a month of leisure in this department, so it allows time to consider what improvements and alterations can be made in the planting arrangements, and to prepare plants, seeds a...
-Flower Garden For October
Tender plants which are required for stock, such as geraniums and scented verbenas, must be taken up and protected at once. It is useless saving old verbenas, petunias, and such plants, young ones doi...
-Flower Garden Hints
So many people say that their flowers, which once did well, do not thrive any more; and the reason is incomprehensible to them. In many cases the trouble is from worn-out soil; and if a little manure,...
-The Flower Garden. Bedding Plants
A ND by this title we do not mean the flow* ering plants alone, but those with richly tinted foliage should be included. Much as we love beautiful flowers in all their variety of color, form and fragr...
-The Flower Garden. Flower Garden For April
Make all possible preparation this month in readiness for planting when the season is advanced enough for that purpose; see there is a stock of stakes of the sizes required for tying large plants whic...
-The Flower Garden. Flower Garden For July
IF any plants are not very strong and well established, there will probably be some blanks to fill up, which should be done at once from a few plants reserved for that purpose; and bedding plants gene...
-The Flower Garden. Flower Garden For May
This is the most important month in the year in this department, as the beauty or otherwise of the arrangement for the summer and autumn depends on the time and manner of planting. Lawns - It is not ...
-The Flower Garden. Flower Garden For September
This should be the gayest month in the year in this department, and the weather being dry and the nights cool in the early part of the season, in fact it has been very dry through July in many parts, ...
-The Flower Garden. Rose Beds
As the formation of a rose bed is not designed for the season only in which it is planted, but to remain permanently, annually increasing in growth and beauty, it is there -fore necessary to select th...
-Flower Garlands
Flowers are an essential part of a bridal array in all countries, and it would be difficult to name the nation where they are most lavishly used. All European nations are profuse in their use on every...
-Flower Glasses
THE old style of hyacinth and flower glasses, with long necks and small bases, are gradually giving place to the newer and more handsome styles of Tyes' Patent. The new glasses have a shorter neck, bu...
-The Flower Grarden. Carpet Gardening
This term, although applied indiscriminately to all manner of flower-beds, is really a very expressive title for the system which employs only the dwarf-growing plants, arranged in intricate patterns,...
-Flower Markets
One of the first things which strikes a stranger entering St. Petersburgh, is the evident passion which all the inhabitants, rich and poor, old and young, have for flowers. The eye admires, with surp...
-The Flower Mission
In the cities of New York and Philadelphia, there have been in active operation this season, societies of ladies who have made it a pleasure and business to gather bouquets of flowers and distribute a...
-Flower Pots
The two conservatory flower pots here figured, are from a German manufactory (that of Edward Saelzer), and must be admitted to be in fine taste; they are orna-mentecl, with wreaths painted in gay colo...
-Flower Reds
There are but few regular designed flower gardens in this country, which is generally the best style, for it gives a freer system of planting. One of the prettiest we have seen was at Mr. Hunnewell's ...
-Flower Seeds
We have, from Mr. Dreer, of Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, samples of his flower seeds, put up to go by mail, which is a great convenience to distant gardeners, ladies, &o.; they have only to put a do...
-Flower Seeds. Continued
Returning from the Lily House, we pass down on another side of the Cactus House, the rafters of which are clothed with Bignonia venusta, adorned with festoons of flowers, Bignonia picta, Passiflora el...
-Flower Trade In St. Petersbirgh
A fair, which is held as soon as the frosts are over, and which lasts a whole month, viz: from the 25th of May, to the 25th of June, is almost exclusively a flower fair; it is at this fair that the no...
-The Flower Trade Of New York. Cultivation Of Plants Under Glass - How The Retail Trade Is Supplied [Second Article.]
THE raising of flowers and plants under glass is first in importance in the consideration of the flower trade of New York. The outdoor culture, although important when considered in its relation to th...
-The Flower Trade Of New York. Its Progress - The Producers - Bulbous Plants And Their Culture - Summer Flowers
DURING the past ten or fifteen years the flower trade of the city of New York has grown up to something marvellous in quantity, and but very few are aware of its present extent and importance. The Eve...
-The Flowering Of The Fig
TO the uneducated eye the fig is a wonder. The fruit seems to come out in the place where the flowers ought to be; and the appearance is that there are no flowers before the fruit, as there is in othe...
-Flowering Of The Nelumbium Speciosum At Springbrook
When, in the autumn of 1851, Mr. Cope was enabled to acquaint Mr. Downing with the successful result of his munificent zeal in the cultivation of the far-famed Victoria, I am sure he little anticipate...
-Flowering Plants In Green-Houses Through The Winter
By the complaint of your correspondent Querist, in your October number, he appears to be sorely disappointed with regard to the produce of his new green-house, and after expending $800, that he has ...
-The Flowering Raspberry As A Fruit
Most horticulturists are familiar with this plant (the Rubus odoratus of botanists), as it is very commonly seen in shrubbery borders, where it is introduced for the sake of its very showy flowers. I ...
-Flowering Shrub
W. D. Brackenridge, a Baltimore florist, recommends the following flowering shrubs for a family garden: As shrubs we have first the Clethra ulnifolia, whose flowers are white and fragrant; height of ...
-Flowers And Botanical Notes
A thing of beauty is a joy forever, said poor young Keats, who would have stayed in this troublesome world to the present day, could his admirers have had their own short-sighted way about it. A gro...
-Flowers And Plants In Cemeteries
IN our rural cemeteries we usually find too little taste displayed, or attention given to adornment. How often is it the case that cemeteries are entirely destitute of embellishment, except it be here...
-Flowers For Ornament And Decoration
ONE important rule in the grouping and arrangement of flowers will bear frequent repetition. It is this: green gives character, white gives brilliance. With plenty of green there will be more distinct...
-Flowers For Ornament And Decoration (2)
A FINE figure for a niche, or a comer bracket, is a large vase filled with a tall bouquet. Flower-stalks of gladioli are especially effective here; also branches of lilies, or individual lilies of the...
-Flowers For Ornament And Decoration (3)
A TABLE or stand bouquet should be somewhat of a pyramid in shape, to form which, any flowers of medium size are proper - accompanied by their complementary colors in the racemes and spikes of finer f...
-Flowers For Window Gardening
A correspondent of the Agriculturist thinks that people who live in the country have no excuse for being without good food for pot plants. Dead leaves and earth or mould from the woods are always atta...
-Flowers In Masses
For growing in beds, in masses, we consider such kinds as aster, candytuft, dianthus, pansy, petunia, phlox, portulaca and verbena most effective, and these, with exception of aster, are procumbent - ...
-Flowers In The Tropics
Winwood Reade says, that, even for a man of science, there is much that is disappointing in the tropics. At home we see the beautiful flowers of the torrid zone massed together in the greenhouses, but...
-The Flowers Of The Prairies And Mountains. Editorial Notes Of An Excursion To Colorado
A WORD ought to be said as to the brilliancy of the flowers of the prairies and mountains. While riding on the far Western plains of Kansas, from Salina to Denver, our attention was called to a little...
-Foliage Plants
A great mistake is made by many in the arrangement of the garden, in not giving sufficient attention to foliage plants. A bed of flowers may be ever so rich, and the display of colors may be dazzling,...
-Fondante De Malines. Melting Of Malines
Size medium, 2 1/2 inches long by two and a quarter in diameter. Form - roundish obovate. Stem - long, set without depression, sometimes curved. Calyx - small, in a narrow furrowed basin, and frequent...
-Fondante De Septembre
One of the gains of Professor Van Mons, to which I cannot affix the exact data. The tree is a good grower, does well upon quince and standard, and is very prolific. As we have not too many good and c...
-Food Bulb
Mr. Paul Kane, of Toronto, Canada, gives an account of his travels among the Chinook Indians of the northwest coast of America. He states that the only vegetables in use there are the Camas and Wappat...
-For Early Spring And General Summer Crop
The seed may be sowed the last week in September, in the same way as above stated. In all latitudes where the frost is severe, these plants will require some winter protection. When they have grown th...
-For Fall And Midwinter Use
About the last week in May, choose a plot of not over-rich soil, dig and break up well, and sow the seeds thinly in drills, one foot apart and half an inch deep. If the earth be very dry, give a good ...
-For Hanging Baskets
Line the basket with moss, with a little soil attached. Place in the center a small pot, containing a showy plant of upright habit; fill up the surrounding space with rich woods and old hot-bed soil; ...
-For Market Purposes
Is an expression frequently employed in conventions and other places, to designate and recommend a description of article which looks well and is readily produced. It might be proper for some one to p...
-For The Grapery
In the fall of the first year, cut down to five or six feet, and in the spring following, keep the heads curved downwards until the buds have burst. The object now is to form a future handsome plant. ...
-For The Horticulturist
W. R. Prince was right when, some time ago, he asserted in the pages of the Horticulturist that the tamarind was not growing in Virginia. His reason was that it was too tender to stand our mildest...
-Force Of Growth Or Plants
The following inquiries and answers from the London Gardeners* Chronicle, will be interesting to many of our readers, and satisfactory to those who do not inquire: What is vital force! Will you, or ...
-Forcina Asparagus
Those who are fond of this delicious vegetable, and desire to lengthen its season, can do so with little trouble or expense by starting some roots under glass in a hotbed in the early part of March. T...
-Forcing
There is no vegetable more readily forced than Asparagus, and there are different contrivances for accomplishing the object. The most perfect mode is, to have one or more beds prepared as above, in a ...
-Forcing By Dung-Beds
The Cucumber may be successfully grown as an early spring crop on a hot dung-bed, covered by a box frame and glass sashes. Commence by putting together a heap of fresh, unfermented horsedung, and, if ...
-Forcing Frames
(C.) Nothing is more easily forced than lettuce. Indeed, we doubt whether anything is better fitted for the purpose than the common hotbed frame. For artificial heat, stable manure or leaves are prefe...
-Forcing Fruits
The system of growing grape-Vines, and other fruits, in pots and tubs, for early forced crops, presents many advantages over the old method of fruiting plants permanently set out in the soil. The root...
-Forcing In The Hothouse
There is no difficulty in having Cucumbers fresh-gathered from the vine all the year round, but, of course, with a plant which is so soon injured by cold, all, excepting the summer crop, have to be gr...
-Forcing Lettuce In Hotbeds
Not to trespass on your valuable space, I will, as briefly as possible, describe the method of forcing lettuce, as practised by the market gardeners in the vicinity of Jersey City. The dates used, of ...
-The Forcing Orchard House
This kind of fruit house may be built in the same way as the common orchard house; but it is necessary to nail felt over the boards to prevent its being too airy in early spring, when forcing is comme...
-Forcing Plants
Place a few more roses into a warm house; some plants of Asters, Japonicas, and Spirea palmata. Some Lilies of the Valley should be placed in a warm place under the stage. Bright light is not necessar...
-Forcing Strawberries
AT the annual meeting of the Pennsylvania Fruit Growers Society at Chambers-burg, Pa., last January, in the course of the session, the subject of forcing strawberries under glass was discussed. The mo...
-Forcing-Houses
Peaches, nectarines, figs, cherries, and plums are successfully forced in pots, or tubs, and, when properly managed, are comparatively more productive than trees in the open ground. The plants are mor...
-Foreign Fruits
Gradually, as civilization develops itself, new resources spring up to cheer mankind on the journey of life. The fruit, formerly denied to northern climes, now finds its way where our grandparents had...
-Foreign Garden Gleanings
(St. Pr-tersbi'rgh - Florists - Among the different florists of St. Petersburgh, M. Alwarch, a German, stands first. He cultivates nothing but those plants which are universally sought after in Kussia...
-Foreign Grape
Of the vast number of varieties of the foreign Grapes now in cultivation in Europe and the United States, all arc referred to the single species, Vitis vim/era of Linnoeus, a native of the southern pa...
-The Foreign Grape Under Glass
It has been often remarked, in the best publications of the day, that there is advancement in the science and the art of horticulture. The evidences of the truth of this are numerous and satisfactory....
-Foreign Judgment On American Wines
An Ohio horticulturist, annoyed at the severe criticisms of foreign connossieurs on American wines, without an attempt at careful judgment, sent samples of sufficient numbers of varieties of wines rai...
-Foreign Notices
It is to be feared that all round London the hopes of the gardener have been destroyed by a sadden and severe frost on the night of the 24th inst From the 18th to the 20th the weather was excessively ...
-Foreign Seeds
An interesting letter from the Patent Office to the Congressional Committee on Agriculture, briefly reviewing what has been done in the way of naturalizing foreign herbs and plants in the United State...
-Foreign Vines In North Carolina
A. J. Downing, Esq.- Sir: I am much obliged to you for all you are pleased to say on the cultivation of the vine in general, and especially with respect to the universal failure, in this country, in c...
-Forest Gleanings - April And April Flowers
The pine hath a fringe of softer green, And the moat looks bright where my steps hare been. - Hemans. The month of April in Canada is decidedly the least agreeable one in the whole year. It is ofte...
-The Forest Poplar, (Liriodendron Tulipifera.)
Deciduous - is another of our trees that no one should omit to plant in his grounds; it can be transplanted without difficulty, [only when very small,] and is of moderately rapid growth; symmetrically...
-Forest Trees
Mr. Harrison, of Painesville, Ohio, was asked to discuss the propagation of forest trees. He is largely engaged in propagating the American chestnut. Mr. Lay thought the subject of cultivating forest...
-Forest Trees Of America
Amongst our native Forest Trees, the Elm stands pre-eminent. Its beauty of form, and luxuriance of foliage, with its long and graceful branches, renders it peculiarly fitting for a shade tree. Its lon...
-Forestry In Europe
We sometimes have an idea that Europe is not well wooded, but on account of the small farms, there seems to be, when you look across the county, more wood than there is in fact. The trees are planted ...
-Forests And Rainfall
IN the November number of the Horticulturist, page 338, Dr. Housley refers to the fact of an abundance of rain in the timbered regions of the Rocky Mountains, while east of there, on the great plains,...
-Form Of Seeds
Variation is the rule with seeds as well as in all other natural productions. Those which belong to a particular family or genus may have sufficient general resemblance to enable us to determine the g...
-Form Of Various Trees
In ascertaining the habits of growth of various trees of the several popular varieties of apples that are largely cultivating in the neighborhood of Cincinnati, we have taken our own experience as a s...
-Forsyth's Dressing
(A. T.) The dressing for large wounds in trees is as follows: One bushel of fresh cow-dung is intimately mixed with half a bushel of lime rubbish, as from ceilings or walls, the same quantity of wood ...
-Fortune's Five Colored Rose
Messrs. Parsons & Co., of Flushing, have successfully introduced this rose. A small plant, which they had the kindness to send us lately, has produced some fine flowers, pure white, striped with red, ...
-Forwarding Lettuce In Cold Frames
Mr. Editor: - I sent a paper on this subject to an agricultural journal some years ago, but our experience since has enabled us to improve somewhat on our practice at that time; and, besides, the Hort...
-Fountains
Fig. 1. In his Classical Tour, Eustace states, if oar memory does not deceive us, that Rome had fifty-two rivers flowing through her proud streets in the period of her greatest prosperity, sop-plyi...
-The Fountain Plant
Awallingford, Conn., contributor of the Oneida Circular, seems to have had unusual success in the cultivation of the new Amaranthus Salicifolius Whether there is anything in the situation, soil or ...









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