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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #8 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Fruit To Grass

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #8
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Fourth
Do not depend upon one kind of fruit, but have a variety ripening from the earliest down to the latest of the growing season - aspargus - strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, early pears, late pea...
-Fourth Massachusetts Legislative Agricultural Meeting
[Reported by John, C. Moore, for the N. B. Farmer]. The meeting of this Society in Representatives' Hall, last Monday evening, was well attended. Hon. Marshall P. Wilder was called to the chair. The...
-Fox Meadow Farm
We lately made a brief but long-projected visit to Fox Meadow Farm, the country seat of Charles Butler, Esq., whose hospitality it is always a pleasure to enjoy. The place itself is full of Revolution...
-Frames For Hothouses
At a late meeting of the London Horticultural Society, Mr. How-lett, a gardener of Norwich, sent a better model of his new plan of shading and protecting hothouses than that furnished by him at the gr...
-Francois Andre Michaux
The death of this distinguished botanist and writer on American forest-trees, took place at Vaureal, near Pontoise, France, in November, 1855, as has already been announced. His will proves to be of v...
-Frankford Pear
Specimens of this new variety were received from Mr. Robert Cornelius, who procured them from a crafted tree on the premises of Mr.Eli Merkins, a mile and a quarter from Frankford, Philadelphia. The s...
-Franklinii
This species of Gordonia appears to be restricted by nature within very narrow bounds, Having hitherto, says Michaux, been found only on the banks of the Altamaha, in the State of Georgia. It was ...
-Fratud In Fruit-Trees
The trade in trees has now grown to be so extensive, that a large number of persons are attracted to it who are mere dealers, buyers, and sellers. Many of these are- honest, responsible men, who aim a...
-Fraud In Seeds
Mr. Editor : Weeping Sufferer has struck a lead, as we say at the mines, which I hope to see followed up. He is after the fraudulent nurserymen. May he lack no recruits to join in the hue and cry, u...
-Freestone Cottage At Middletown, Conn
(See Frontispiece.) Dear Sib - As your journal is in part devoted to the progress of rural architecture, I venture to send you the engravings of a beautiful cottage erected in this place by Mr. D. Ba...
-Freight And Passengers On Rail Roads
A CORRESPONDENT last month related the difficulties often experienced in the transport by railroads of packages of nursery trees. The case stated was a hard one, and not uncommon) it is a matter that ...
-The French Gardeners
These industrious gardeners, especially around Paris, pursue a simple pian, which they find advantageous, paying attention to a few special plants for which there is a regular demand. The plan, will p...
-Friday Morning, Sept. 14
The convention re-assembled at 9 o'clock, Mr. L. F. Allen in the chair. In accordance with the resolution passed yesterday, several members reported lists of pears most affected by blight. The lists...
-Friind Mead
Having had my attention turned into a horticultural channel for the past few years, particularly to that part of it called grape culture, I have been not a little interested in the perusal of those ar...
-Friind Mead. Continued
I will mention, in conclusion, that we have not had a very good grape season. The Catawbas have rotted very badly. The Isabellas also, but not so much. But the Concords and Delawares have not rotted a...
-Frogmore Early Bigarreau Cherry
The London Florist describes a new cherry under the above name, as being large, obtuse heart-shaped; skin with a brilliant red cheek, dotted with minute yellow points; flesh delicate, translucent, te...
-Frontispiece
The mansion, of which the northeastern aspect is given in the frontispiece, is being built by me on Tilton Hill, near Wilmington, Del., for C. W. H., Esq. This hill is isolated, of an unusu ally symm...
-Frontispiece - Design For A Free School
In our January number we gave an original design for a district-school house, built of wood, in a simple, convenient and economical form, which we are glad to see has been extensively copied Into othe...
-Frontispiece - Vinery At Medary
Our vignette this month, is a very accurate view of the vinery at Medary, the country seat of Harry Ingersoll, Esq..near Philadelphia. We saw the vinery last autumn, just after its completion, and it...
-Frost Gage Plum
This Plum was introduced here about ten years ago. It came highly recommended by the very best authority, and was planted quite extensively by the most of our orchardists, and high expectations were e...
-Frost, And The Cunila Mariana (L.), Or Dittany
The common Dittany, a perennial of the Mint family, with small, purplish flowers, in corymbed cymes or clusters, growing on dry hills from New York to Kentucky, is too well known to require any furthe...
-Frosts And Fruits. - The Franklin Grape
Up to the opening of the present month, (June,) Western Pennsylvania presented a scene of almost unrivalled luxuriance and beauty. The few cold days in January, which proved so injurious to many of th...
-The Frozen Hall Method Of Transplanting
The frozen ball method of removing ornamental trees is preferred by many to all others for some purposes. It is well adapted to evergreens growing wild, if they are of much size. In order that it may ...
-Fruiifulness Promoted By Late Pruning
By pruning at the rising of the sap, we induce in trees, barren through over-luxuriance of growth, a flow of that sap from the roots, which of the roots. It is only when the buds are already considera...
-Fruit
Best assortment Fruit, all kinds, Horticultural colored plates, $4 00. Best do Apples, Horticultural colored plates, $4 00. Second best do do, Horticultural, $2 00. Best do Pears, Horticultural colore...
-Fruit (2)
By Wm. Bright, gardener to Joseph Lovering - twenty pots of grape vines in full bearing, of many varieties, an exceedingly beautiful display. By William Thompson, gardener to John Tucker - six pots of...
-The Fruit (3)
We regret to learn from Mr. Ernst that most of the fruit, cherries, peaches, apples and pears, which had escaped the extreme cold of the past winter, have been carried away by the recent and unexpecte...
-Fruit (4)
The preservation of winter fruit is a subject worthy of more care and attention than is generally bestowed upon it. In the first place, it should have been carefully handled in gathering; the slightes...
-Fruit (5)
The cultivation of the pear-tree grafted on quince roots, is now being a subject of discussion among fruit growers; we should be sorry to see this system of dwarf culture fall into unmerited disrepute...
-Fruit (6)
We are indebted to Mr. Chisholm for a fine collection of Pears. As there are more to come, (our mouth still waters,) we will speak of all together. Of two of them we shall give outlines. - To Mr. P. J...
-Fruit - The Chinese Sand Pear
We have just ripened the Chinese Sand Pear, says a Southern gentleman, which, in addition to its great beauty, bids fair to be a very useful variety of fruit. It was imported from China, we were infor...
-Fruit And Manure
In your November number my attention has been attracted by the Old Digger's letter. In my opinion it contains, in an elegant and compressed form, all that has been and could be said about the cultiv...
-Fruit And Vegetables
The exhibition of all kinds of fruit and vegetables was held in a spacious tent, affording ample accommodations for a large exhibition. The most extensive display was made by P. T. Quinn, of Newark, s...
-Fruit At The South
It is but a few years since our people became disabused of the idea that the pear, apple, and some other fruits, could not be successfully raised in the more southern States; yet, notwithstanding this...
-Fruit At The West
WE have had a very fruitful season. Although the apple crop has not been a large one, it has been more than an average, and the fruit unusually fair and free from worms. This is the reverse from what ...
-Fruit Boxes
We have lately received many inquiries in relation to fruit boxes, and, of course, have furnished the best information we could. Those who have such things for sale ought to have the good sense to adv...
-Fruit Bud Grafting
For the last eight years we have practised grafting blossom buds in order to cause barren trees to bear fruit; and the results have always been satisfactory. In endeavoring to extend the practice, we ...
-The Fruit Cabinet At Washington
THE Fruit Cabinet of the Agricultural Department at Washington city, contains plaster casts of the fruits from all the different sections of the United States, arranged so as to show at a glance the p...
-The Fruit Crop And Sorghum
Mr. Editor: - The fruit crop in this section was an entire failure the past year. We had no peaches, a very slight sprinkle of pears, and in place of about five thousand bushels of apples, which I oug...
-The Fruit Crop In Western New York
Apples, generally, are neither so abundant nor so fine as usual; a single orchard, or a few trees, here and there, are exceptions. The crop of pears is much below that of last year. Peaches have surpr...
-The Fruit Crop- Weather
The fruit crop in Western New York, after passing through several trying changes of temperature, promises well, and may now be considered out of danger. On the evening of the 18th of May we had a viol...
-Fruit Culture
Dear SIR; One year ago, a friend of mine presented me with one hundred dwarf pear-trees from the Rochester Nurseries, and, although their roots were unfeelingly lacerated by careless hands, they broug...
-Fruit Culture In Massachusetts
A striking characteristic of the agriculture of the present time, as compared with that of a former period, is the much greater attention now paid to the cultivation of fruit The early settlers made s...
-Fruit Culture In The United States
Our cotemporary, Mr. Barry, of the Genesee Farmer, who has been spending the summer abroad, from whence he has written the best letters that have appeared in the agricultural journals, on the matters ...
-Fruit Culture In Upper Georgia
The remarks of several correspondents in the July number of your paper, on the subject of Fruit Culture at the South, have induced me to throw together a few thoughts on the subject, which are the res...
-Fruit Culture In Western New York
RUIT is rapidly becoming one of the staple productions of Western New York Both climate and soil hare proved highly favorable to its cultivation. Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, Quinces, and all the ...
-Fruit Culture. - The Orchard House
In all establishments of any pretension, we have numerous structures for the cultivation of fruits, but, amongst modern inventions, there are none so useful to the amateur as the orchard house, which ...
-Fruit Culture. A Day With Charles Downing
There is not much that is either new or interesting in pomology this season; in fact, there has been a dearth of novelties for several years past, and one's eye for new fruit begins to grow dim from w...
-Fruit Culture. A Fairfield County Fruit Farm
Green's Farms, a part of the town of Westport, is situated on Long Island Sound, and on the line of the New Haven and New York railroad. The soil is comparatively fertile; some portions are formed of ...
-Fruit Culture. Are Our Nurserymen Reliable?
The experience of many prove the negative. Drummers from some of the leading nurseries travel through the country taking orders, and the trees or plants sent out, quite often, if not generally, prove ...
-Fruit Culture. Fruits For Small Gardens
IN selecting fruits for cultivating in a small garden, far more care is requisite than for grounds of considerable extent. Few owners of limited grounds care to experiment beyond what is actually nece...
-Fruit Culture. Fruits In Florida
This morning at sun-up the thermometer marked 48, and corn is in tassel; cucumbers and squashes in use, and yesterday a hailstorm occurred, with hail as large as one's little finger-end; and one night...
-Fruit Culture. General Principles Of Pear Culture
NO fruit so constantly maintains as high prices as pears. At first it would seem difficult to account for this. But the quality of a well ripened pear is very high, and the overstocking of the market ...
-Fruit Culture. Grape Culture - The Other Side
IF my experience or observation in Florida, the past five years, are of any use, I willingly give them, though I am sorry to dampen any one's bright hopes, in planting fruit trees, as so many more are...
-Fruit Culture. Grape Culture In Ohio
Its Extent, Progress And Prospect By M. B. Rateham A Horticultural friend in Pennsylvania, who attended some of the pleasant meetings and excursions of our Lake Shore Grape Growers Association, five ...
-Fruit Culture. Neglected Fruits
BY these, we do not mean that they are unknown, but undervalued. We, Americans, have a King-worship or a man-homage spirit. We have but two or three lawyers, which we applaud, and these we all pra...
-Fruit Culture. New Grapes
As proven this year of 1874, the following grapes are worth attention: Croton This grape in the Cayuga Lake Valley is healthy, hardy and prolific. Has a longish, loose bunch, with large berries, and...
-Fruit Exhibited
Apples By R. Buchanan - Baldwin, Alexander, Gravenstein, Summer Queen, Red Fenouillett, Harrison, Newtown, Spitzenburgh, Red Bellefleur, Ashland, Scholl's Red Winter, Sweet Pearmain, Minister, Setch,...
-Fruit For Our Wounded And Sick Soldiers
The heroes of our armies especially the wounded and sick, have claims upon us all which we must not neglect. An appeal comes to us from the sick and wounded for dried and preserved fruits, especially ...
-Fruit From Pennsylvania
We are indebted to our friend Dr. Eshleman, of Down-ington, Pa., for a box of fruits, among which are specimens of the Shenk or Hesenschcnch Pear - one from Lancaster county, which though rather over ...
-A Fruit Garden
In compliance with your request I.will give you particulars. My garden is on the corner: 60 feet front, south of the house, facing west; and 100 feet on the street, fronting south. I wish to set it to...
-The Fruit Garden And Orchard
All fruit trees must be trained low, in this climate. The protection of the stem and main branches, and the shading of the soil in which the roots find their support, from the powerful rays of the sun...
-Fruit Houses
The dearth of fruits in most sections this season convinces us more and more of the policy of erecting fruit houses, wherein to grow fruits for the supply of the tables of amateurs and those of wealth...
-Fruit In Canada
In looking'over the December number of the Horticulturist, I saw an article - written by Cockburn and Brown, of Montreal - speaking of the apple-tree being killed down; they say it is a thing almost u...
-Fruit In France And England
In the February number of the Horticulturist, a correspondent of the Leader mentions the extravagant price which was asked for some pears at Chevet's, in the Palais Royal, Paris. He says that Madame C...
-Fruit In Illinois
B. S. Cooper, of Henderson, Illinois, writes thus to the Knoxville Journals - The severe effects of the cold of last winter upon fruit and other trees, are without a parallel in the history of this ...
-Fruit In Indiana
NOW that the growing season is past, we can collect whatever items of interest or profit that may have been presented to our view, and store them away for future reference. Nothing is so beneficial to...
-Fruit In Jelly
Put in a basin half a pint of calfs foot jelly, and when it has become stiff, lay in a bunch of grapes, with the stalks upwards, or fruit of any kind; over this put a few vine leaves, and fill up the ...
-Fruit In Michigan
Mr. A. C. Hubbard, writing from Detroit, says: The season was very wet, cold and backward, but we have had no rain for several weeks, and it is becoming very dry. There will be but very little fruit ...
-Fruit In Minnesota
ED. WESTERN Horticulturist: I have delayed a report to learn the extent of damage done by the last winter, and in the meantime see what stood best of the hundreds of varieties on my grounds. The winte...
-Fruit In New York
As to the demand being regular or uncertain? My experience is - that you can never take fruit into New York at a wrong season of the year, and you can never take enough of it. But if you take all grap...
-Fruit In Southern Illinois
From a record of the Illinois State Horticultural Society, it is estimated there are south of Centralia, on the Illinois Central Railway line, 500 acres in strawberries; 516,400 peach-trees; 78,000 pe...
-Fruit In The Northwest
The Northwest sustains so close a connection with the Eastern clime and nurseries, that a word may not be amiss referring to errors committed in this part by the otherwise well-meaning tree growers, w...
-Fruit In Vernon County, Mo
This region of country is quite new as yet in respect to fruit culture; but from what is written us by Dr. M. A. Harding and others, we have no doubt of its proving a valuable and profitable fruit-gro...
-Fruit In Winconsin
J. G. Brayton, the horticultural editor of the Wisconsin Farmer, writes to the Ohio Farmer from Altaian Nurseries, Wisconsin, May 28: - The following varieties of the cherry and other fruits, have e...
-Fruit Not A Failure In Wisconsin
The Western Farmer says: The natural fear that the Horticultural Exhibition at the Wisconsin State Fair would be a meagre one was proven unfounded. In extent and quality the show compared very well w...
-Fruit Premiums At Exhibitions
Extracts from awards of premiums on fruits at horticultural exhibitions as recommendations of their value by interested dealers has become so general in use that it has come to be an abuse, which shou...
-Fruit Received
From Dr. Grant two boxes of fine pears, containing Dearborn's Seedling, Rostiezer, Beurre Giflard, Bartlett, Belle Lucrative, Flemish Beauty, Tyson, etc, etc., the Tyson of great size and beauty. From...
-Fruit Rooms
In reply to several inquiries in regard to fruit rooms, we will say that a dry, cool, clean cellar answers a good purpose. At this moment (May 10th) we have twelve or fifteen varieties of winter apple...
-Fruit Stealing
There is, unhappily, a very serious objection to cultivating fruit in our villages and suburban gardens; fruit-stealing is a common crime in most parts of this country, and the standard of principle o...
-Fruit Topics. Winter Peare
THE subject of Winter Pears is becoming one of very general interest. Summer pears, sold at prices of $5 per barrel, very soon cool the ardor of fruit growers, and many seriously entertain the idea...
-Fruit Tree Planting - Causes Of Its Failure
Who can tell the number of fruit trees that have been planted in the country within the last twenty-five years? That they have been many, every observer knows full well; that a large proportion of the...
-Fruit Vs. Fevers
A striking instance of the value of the use of fruit in warding off fevers, incident to ague countries, is given in the case of a family who moved from the East to the West, and who carried a large...
-Fruit of The Eugenia Ugni And Fuchsia Corymbiflora
Great expectations were at one time formed in regard to the value of the fruit of Eugenia Ugni for the dessert; these expectations bare not, we believe, in this country at least, been realized. Our ow...
-Fruit, Domestic And Tropical. Prices And Supply
The American Pomological Society met in New York on the 14th of September, and the members discussed several highly important questions. At the moment these discussions were proceeding, a change is c...
-Fruit-Bearing Age Of Fruit-Trees
The puberty, or fruit-bearing age of fruit trees, varies according to variety, climate and cultivation. Peach trees very often bear some fruit the second year from the seed, provided they are well cul...
-Fruit-Gatherer
I conceive that with the substitution of a hose of cloth (as recommended in one of the early volumes) for the net, which possesses several important disadvantages, this instrument would be more effect...
-The Fruit-Growers' Crusade Against The Grand Turk
Op what use is the curculio? This question has often forced itself on my mind, when witnessing the vexatious effects of its industry and perseverance; but I have never answered it to my own satisfacti...
-The Fruit-Growers' Crusade Against The Grand Turk. Part 2
People around me, pay but little heed to my advice, in regard to the curculio, because I have never been able to save a crop of fruit. This war of extermination must be general; a few individuals, sca...
-The Fruit-Growers' Crusade Against The Grand Turk. Part 3
Then the hotels here - especially in Shanklin - are absolutely romantic in their rural beauty. Designed like the prettiest cottages, or rather in a quaint and rambling style, half cottage and half vil...
-The Fruit-Growers' Crusade Against The Grand Turk. Part 4
I left the Isle of Wight with the feeling that if I should ever need the nursing of soft airs and kindly influences in a foreign land, I should try to find my way back to it again. Even one, blest wit...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Eastern Pennsylvania
The next meeting of this Society will be held, if we remember rightly, at Reading, Pa., on the first Wednesday in February, 1861. Will some friend there send us an account of the proceedings? Fruit-G...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York
The first annual exhibition of this Society was held at Buffalo on the 18th and 14th of September. Members were in attendance from a considerable number of the twenty-three counties embraced within it...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (2)
The September Meeting of this Society was held at Rochester, on the 25th of September. We are greatly indebted to a friend for an excellent report of the proceedings, which we here give in a somewhat ...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (3)
The regular June meeting of the Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York, was held pursuant to the call of the council, at Rochester, upon the 23d of that month. The Genessee-Valley Horticultural...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (3). Continued
Dr. Spence asked Mr. S., Would you recomend this girdling of trees as a steady practice? since it so probably produces an abnormal condition of the tree. Judge Langworthy answered No, for in a gr...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (4)
The June session of this Society was held at Buffalo on the 27th and 28th. The Presideut, Col. Hodge, being absent on account of illness, S. H. Ainsworth, Esq., took the chair. After the usual prelimi...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (4). Part 2
2. Cherries What are the best six varieties of Cherry for family use, and also for market purposes? and the best method of cultivation? Mr. Downing was called upon for his opinion, when he remarked ...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (4). Part 3
No. 2 is the Cherry, which is an enormous bearer and large, although quite acid, and needing considerable sugar to make it agreeable. A cool soil is the best for currants, not wet, but moist. It shou...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (4). Part 4
Mr. Manly, of Erie Co., recommended, 1st, Rostiezer, which is a vigorous grower, and needs pinching in regularly. 2d, Louise Bonne, for its productiveness and market qualities generally* 3d, Duchesse,...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (5)
The Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York held its seventh Annual Meeting at the Court-house, in the City of Rochester, on 8th and 9th January, 1862. For an account of its proceedings, somewhat c...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (6)
The meeting held at Rochester, on the 30th of June, was an interesting one. Strawberry cultivation was freely discussed, and a vote taken, which resulted in the following: For Amateurs. ...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (7)
This interesting and important Society organised by appointing its various committees in June last. We hope the country members are now mindful of their duties. We have entered upon the season of frui...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (8)
The winter meeting of this Society was held at Rochester. As usual there was a fall attendance from a large portion of the counties embraced by the Society, from Syracuse to Buffalo. There were sever...
-Fruit-Growers' Society Of Western New York (9)
This Society held its annual meeting in Rochester on the 9th and 10th of January. The attendance was large, and the proceedings of much interest The display of winter fruit is said to have been very f...
-Fruit-Growing At The South
On the 20th inst. it was my privilege to pay a brief visit to the fine estate of that enterprising and successful cultivator, Dr. John H. Batnb, of Prince Edward county, Maryland. For many years, he ...
-Fruit-Growing In Iowa
From a letter to one of our correspondents from Jno. Edgerton, of Coal Creek, Iowa, a man deeply interested in fruit-growing, we learn that the interest in tree planting is quite enthusiastic. He says...
-Fruit-Growing In Iowa - Its Difficulties
To aid me, an amateur fruit-grower in central Iowa, I have for some time been a subscriber to four Agricultural and Horticultural Journals, but as none of these papers has discussed the subject of fru...
-Fruit-Growing In The State of Mississipp
A report upon the subject of fruit growing in the State of Mississippi, should properly be prefaced with a few remarks upon the soil and climate. Soil My locality is six miles south of the city of N...
-Fruit-Growing In Virginia
ONE of the most important efforts of the American Pomo-logical Society, has been to ascertain what varieties of fruit are suited for general cultivation, and what varieties for special localities. The...
-Fruit-Growing In Virginia. Continued
Here, then, are four distinct sections, each having its own peculiarity of climate, arising principally from difference of elevation. At Norfolk peach trees will be in bloom earlier than at Richmond, ...
-Fruit-Spurs And Flower Buds
Some curiosity has been excited by a report upon the Paris Horticultural Society, in which it is mentioned that the finest pears exhibited were produced from flower buds which had been inserted on ba...
-Fruit-Trees
Summer pruning, or pinching the points of young shoots, seems not to be so thoroughly understood as its importance demands. It is not too much to assert that the highest degree of cultivation cannot b...
-Fruit-Trees And Fruit Of 1853
The autumn of 1852 was beautifully fine for ripening the wood of fruit trees. The season throughout was so dry that the growth of twigs was less, and stopped earlier than usual. The frosts began later...
-Fruit-Trees As Ornaments
Why can we not introduce them more freely on our lawns for ornamental purposes? A writer in the English Journal of Horticulture thinks that there are few objects more beautiful and interesting during ...
-Fruit-Trees In Orchard Houses
Fruit trees of all kinds flourish so luxuriantly in the open air in America, that it would, at first sight, seem perfectly unnecessary to provide them with glazed roofs, and nurse them up in pots; but...
-Fruit-Trees In Ornamental Plantations And On Lawns
The observations of the Editor of the Horticulturist and of his correspondent in the August number, deserve the consideration of every resident of the country. It is there remarked that some persons c...
-Fruit-Trees In Pots
We continue our extract from Dr. Diel's work. It will be found intersting. Fruit trees in pots require only a small flower garden, or even only a few boards before the windows; and yet for all that ...
-Fruits At The South
I have been cultivating pear trees for about 15 years, and during that period, out of near one hundred varieties, I have found only the Rousselet de Rheims and Verte tongue panachee to escape entirely...
-Fruits In Illinois And Wisconsin
This is our bearing year for peaches. There will be an abundance of seedling peaches in the northern part of this State this year, and, I believe, through the whole State. They do not bear oftener tha...
-Fruits In Kansns
The excursion party were favored with a most entertaining banquet at Leavenworth, offered by the Kansas Agricultural and Mechanical Association. At this banquet glorious specimens of Kansas apples wer...
-Fruits In Wisconsin
Mr. A. Q. Hauford wrote us in June from Waukesha, Wisconsin, but a gloomy report of the prospects of fruit in that region. The spring opened unusually early and expectations were raised for a beautifu...
-The Fruits Of Carolina
There is no better region in the world, for the cultivation of fruits, than the middle and upper districts of South Carolina, and the southern portions of North Carolina. Apples, peaches, pears, plums...
-Fruits Of Kentucky
It has been with feelings of astonishment, mortification, and disappointment, that I have searched the Horticultural periodicals of our country for at least an occasional hint of the progress of that ...
-Fruits Of The Season
Rambling notes are found to be the most useful and informing; hundreds of people who visit gardens walk with their eyes directed to the gravel, and ten chances to a quarter of one, they will be engage...
-Fruits Vs. Intemperance
The grand mission of the horticulturist, in subduing, cultivating, and embellishing the earth, - -of rendering the outward world a Paradise, - a garden of beauty and delight, (as the word Paradise lit...
-Fruits With Tender Skin
The four following conditions are necessary for the safe transport of these kinds of fruit: 1st To pick them a little before they are quite ripe. 2d. To wrap them and separate each one, with somethi...
-Fruits for Kentucky
The following lists of fruits are recommended for general cultivation in Kentucky by the Kentucky Horticultural Society, being selected from the hundreds of varieties exhibited on that Society's table...
-Fruits: On What Do Their Qualities Depend?
I am well aware that this is a question which no person is able fully to answer; involving, as it does, so many considerations, and so many debatable points, which await a vast amount of inquiry befor...
-Fuchsias
One of the most important considerations, and which must receive particular attention, is the proper preparation of the compost in which to grow the plants; for, if the radical condition of a plant be...
-The Fuchsia (2)
It has frequently been a matter of surprise to me that the lovely, elegant, long-blooming Fuchsia, has not been more planted in masses in the bedding-out gardens. I am sure it has everything to recomm...
-The Fuchsia And Its Culture
Notwithstanding all that has been written respecting the cultivation of the Fuchsia, it is seldom that we see well grown specimens of it, more especially about London; but in the midland counties matt...
-Fuchsias - F. Sebratifolia
The Fuchsia is fairly in the field as one of the fashionable and favorite flowers of the day. Hybridization and botanical discoveries are increasing its attractions with amazing rapidity. There is pro...
-Fuchsias From Seed
The majority of Fuchsias ripen seed freely; but, unless they are hybridized, it is almost waste of time to sow it, for the flowers so produced are seldom equal to the parent plant. The operation of fe...
-Fuchsias Of 1854
Birmingham has hitherto been justly celebrated for the introduction of new Fuchsias of first-rate quality, but I regret that this season there has been a sad departure from so wholesome a rule, and th...
-Fuchsias, Emperor Napoleon (Banks), And Tonus De Medci (Banks)
E. Banks, Esq., of Sholden Lodge, near Deal, has produced more really good Fuchsias than any other raiser. His Glory, Queen of Hanover, Elegans, Vanguard, Autocrat, and many others, even much older va...
-Fuller's Strawberries
It may be remembered that a Committee from the American Institute last year examined Mr. Fuller's Seedling Strawberries, and selected some eight or ten of the best for further trial. The same committe...
-Fumigating Plants
Observing a receipt for easy fumigation, I beg to hand you another, which I know from experience never fails, and is a still easier method; the plan was taught me by a foreman gardener, so I claim no ...
-Fumigating Plant Houses
I have often had occasion to observe, that during the process of smoking glass-houses, for the purpose of killing green fly, the men who perform this duty remain in the house to keep, as they say, the...
-Fumigation For Plant
Mr. J. C. Niven, of the Hall Botanical Garden, recommends tobacco fumigation (in London Garden) for cleaning green flies from certain house plants infested by them. His plan is to lay the plant on its...
-Fumigation Made East
First, as to the fumigating material. Buy'some good leaf tobacco. Mind, leaf, not roll. Next, make touch of it. Every boy, whether he be a growing boy of fifteen, or a grown boy of thirty, knows how...
-Functions Of The Leaves
The functions of the leaves appear to be a combination of those of the lungs and stomach of animals; they not only modify the food brought to them from the roots, so as to fit it for increasing the si...
-Fungi On The Apple
In a recent report made to the American Pomological Society, at Philadelphia, I mentioned in regard to the apples grown in Western New York (in one vicinity at least) that they were generally fair, ...
-On Fungi, Their Relation To Disease
Fellow of the Botanical Society, Edinburgh, Corresponding Member of the Botanical Society Of Canada, Surgeon to the West Norfolk end Lyan Hospital. It is now more than twenty years since it was first...
-On Fungi, Their Relation To Disease. Part 2
This I have proved by experiment; and 1 have recently obtained additional proof of the correctness of this view from the examination of spontaneous yeast of the tan-pits kindly forwarded to me from Ki...
-On Fungi, Their Relation To Disease. Part 3
Let us now inquire into the power which fungi have of generating disease. Their influence upon plants has never been doubted: first, because their ravages are too well known, too serious, to admit of ...
-Fungus Blight
I notice, in the October number of the Horticulturist, a note from Mr. Downher, in regard to a disease which has lately attacked his Apple and Pear trees. I send you a twig from one of my Pear trees, ...
-The Furnishing Florists
In London are those who make it a business to furnish or decorate windows. These men make it their business to produce plants in flower and suitable for the season and the place they are to occupy. T...
-Further Notes On Country Seats Near Boston
Rose Hill, the residence of Thomas Page, Esq., near Waltham, a pretty country residence fast rising into repute in the horticultural world, and named in honor of the proprietor's favorite flower, whic...
-Galvanic Slug And Snail Shocker
The following shocking method of destroying slugs and snails we take from the Gardeners* Chronicle. These pests are getting to be very annoying among us, particularly in frames and among orchideous...
-The Gapes In Fowls
Dear Sir: Believing it a duty to make public anything that may be advantageous to others, I submit the following infallible remedy for the gapes or gaps in young chickens. It. is well known that a spe...
-Gardens
Best adorned yard, Horticultural colored plates, $4 00. Best garden, Horticultural colored plates, $4 00. The Garden #1 No land pays a higher rate of interest than the humble, despised garden. - The...
-Garden Adornments - Designs For Covered Seats
Op all rural adornments, the covered seat is one of the first things that should command our attention in laying out a garden; if it be but half an acre, it would not be out of place; only let its des...
-A Garden And Fountion
There is no reason why a suburban garden should not be beautified by water scenery of some kind - by the formal stone basin and fountain, the circular pond shaded with rose arches, and stocked with or...
-The Garden Aquarium
There are thousands of situations where a supply of water, either from a spring or a running brook, may be introduced into a garden or grounds with great effect. Mildly and toft the western breeze ...
-A Garden Box Or Tub
The ever recurring round cedar tub for lemon trees, myrtles, etc.,etc, may be varied very beautifully in a simple manner. The makers of paper hangings employ square carved blocks with the pattern of t...
-Garden Culture
The same direction given for field culture of the strawberry is applicable to the small garden, with the exception of the arrangement of the beds; these should be four feet wide, planting three rows i...
-Garden Culture Of Strawberries
We find by experience that if cultivators will allow more room for their plants to form good strong hills, the produce will be much greater and the berries much larger. Two feet apart is near enough f...
-Garden Decorations
In our frontispiece are figured two very pretty and useful structures for decorating the lawn and garden. Fig. 1 is a little summer-house for the garden, or among the shrubbery of the ornamental grou...
-Garden Ferns
It gives us pleasure to refer to an article, in the present number, on ferns; these plants will sooner or later become great favorites with true admirers of the beautiful. Most lovers of a garden cont...
-Garden Furniture
Perhaps on no subject connected with horticulture is there more need of information than suitable decorations for the garden, or Garden Furniture, if we may be allowed the expressive term, embracing a...
-Garden Furniture. Continued
Fig. 2 (frontispiece) is constructed much in the same manner, only the supports in front are set upon a stone plinth to insure their durability. The seat and covering of the back and sides are covere...
-Garden Furniture (2)
We continue our extracts and illustrations from Mcintosh's Book of the Garden : Fig. 9 shows the elevation of the very elaborate moss-house in the grounds at Dalkeith Palace. It is now thatched with ...
-Garden Gossip
Planting for Autumn Foliage - In the excellent report on ornamental planting, read by Geo. Ellwanger before the Western New York Horticultural Society, we notice that he alludes to the subject with no...
-Garden Gossip. Novelties Of 1873
A Late number of the Gardener's Magazine opens with a capital editorial upon new plants and flowers. It says, a good old plant is always to be preferred to a bad new one, or to a novelty wanting in ...
-Garden Implement
Recently, at Edinburgh, we saw in operation an implement which combines the advantages of the hoe on an extensive scale, a harrow, a grubber, or fork, and a plough, or, rather, a machine for earthing ...
-A Garden Jungle
A correspondent who lores the ornamental, and succeeds in all he undertakes, writes thus: The most successful thing I had, this year, was a large circular bed, fifteen feet in diameter, which we call...
-Garden Of H. P. Norton, Esq
No one can look through Mr. Norton's garden without being surprised at the quantity of interesting and useful material he has assembled in such a small compass. In the rear are several very large Appl...
-The Garden Of Wm. R. Austin, Dorchester
Mr. Austin, though admiring, and to a considerable extent cultivating, flowers and ornamental shrubs, has devoted himself, especially, to the growing of fruit, the Pear in particular; in the cultivati...
-The Garden Or America
Mr. Editor: In early colonial times Long Island was called the Garden of America/' and was far-famed for its fertility and productiveness. The settlements on it were made at an early period, on both...
-Garden Ornaments
Basket-work, both rustic and artistical, enters into the list of gardenesque decorations; and, when filled with plants, either in pots to be removed when they go out of flower, or having them planted ...
-Garden Pot
The following account of a new kind of garden pot appears in the Revue Horticole. An English amateur, Mr. Keir, residing in Paris, has contrived a method by which the branches of trees can be more con...
-The Garden Raspberry
Editor horticulturist In all the American books, I can And no mention of a first qualify hardy raspberry. In the several varieties recommended for cultivation, they are spoken of as requiring winter p...
-Garden Shrubs
The planting season having arrived, it may be well to remind our readers of some of the new and rarer shrubs which are now in request. Among them are Prunus Sinensis flore albo pleno. It forces beauti...
-Garden Thermometers
Urwards of a year ago we drew the attention of our subscribers to the important subject of garden thermometers, and pointed out certain improvements therein effected. Since that time, we are happy to ...
-Garden Topics
Despite the adverse circumstances which may have produced its failure in some localities, the general testimony seems to be in its favor, and the Amaranthus salict-folius is a success. It appears to h...
-Garden Topics. Colors In Planting
IN our modern American gardens, our latest and strongest aims now seem to be, to gain color, as well as beauty of forms in our plants. Subtropical gardening is exactly adapted to our climate; our bril...
-Garden Utensils
[From The Gardener's Magazine Of Botany.] The annexed engraving represents some Belgian novelties of the class of garden utensils, and may, perhaps, be suggestive of some improvements in the mode of ...
-Garden Vegetables
At the Ohio Horticultural Society Meeting, Urbana, a discussion was held on the best new vegetables worthy of trial. Mr. Elliott commended the Yorkshire Hero pea ; and of sweet corn he said Brill's w...
-Garden Vegetables (2)
We condense report from committee of vegetables, of Western N. Y. Society, as originally published in the Rural Home: An expression of opinion as to the best and earliest tomatoes was called for. Mr....
-Garden Vegetables, No. 10 - The Mushroom
The Mushroom, in a natural state, is very generally distributed over many of the more temperate parts of the world. The species that is most commonly accepted is the Agaricus campestris of botanists -...
-Garden Vegetables, No. 11 - Asparagus
This justly esteemed vegetable has been in use, in Europe, from time immemorial, and is now seen in our own markets in the greatest abundance. In some instances, the cultivation is well understood; bu...
-Garden Vegetables, No. 12. - Beets
The many sorts of beets which are generally made use of for the kitchen are all of biennial duration; they belong to the natural order Chenopodea or Spi-naceous plants, and are recognized by the botan...
-Garden Vegetables, No. 8. - Turnips
As a part of the winter crop of turnips will have to be sowed in this month, a few remarks on their general culture may be in place at this time. We have two classes of this vegetable in cultivation,...
-Garden Vegetables, No. 9 - Cabbage And Borecole
Everybody who attempts to grow garden vegetables, and has possession of only a city lot, thinks of planting a portion with Cabbages; but the same everybody does not always cultivate the best varieti...
-Garden Walks
The comfort and enjoyment of a garden, especially in our moist climate, depend in a great degree upon the condition of its walks; for unless these are smooth, firm, and dry, they can scarcely be passe...
-Garden Walks. Continued
It must be stated also, that even in situations where the traffic over them is considerable, they will soon cease to afford either comfort or enjoyment Necessity, therefore, compels the adoption of a ...
-Garden Wheelbarrow - The Whimsie
This barrow, although light and simple in its construction, is composed of eight different parts, which may be used as a whole or separately. We translate from the Revue Horticole. These parts are: 1...
-The Garden. A Pocket Manual Of Practical Horticulture
OR, HOW TO CULTIVATE Vegetables, Fruits and Flowers, Ornamental Trees and Shrubs. 12mo, muslin, price 50 cents. Contents Structure and Growth or Plants - Conditions Essential to Germination - Time ...
-Gardeners
Nurserymen and florists are frequently called gardeners, but in the present case I wish to be understood as meaning gentlemen's gardeners. To begin at the beginning, I will first inquire what a garden...
-Gardeners. Continued
If this is the case, he can borrow, or for a few shillings buy, a good geography, with maps. A few hours each evening for a week, with this before him, and he will become familiar with the above place...
-Gardeners (2)
In the January number of the Horticulturut, you give your readers a chapter on gardeners and experimental gardens. Much as has been said upon this subject by editors, amateurs, as well as the professi...
-Gardener's Commissions
Will you have the kindness to give a novice your opinion of the morality of a gardener receiving a discount from nurserymen for his own benefit. On finding that my gardener had purchased for me some v...
-A Gardener's Cottage
THE illustration of a gardener's cottage on the opposite page is taken from a model building erected at Wimbledon House, England, now the residence of H. W. Peck, Esq., a member of Parliament, for Mid...
-The Gardener's Mission
Ob! tell us not- that Parodist Bloomed in the distant past, Ere Culture o'er the darkened world Her radiant light had cast! Oh! talk not of a Golden Age hi centuries dim and old, Before creative Ar...
-The Gardener's Monthly And Horticultural Advertiser. Fourth Volume - 1862
A MONTHLY PERIODICAL devoted to the Dissemination of Practical and Re-liable Information on the Culture of Fruits, Flowers, Culinary Vegetables, and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs; ON the Management of H...
-The Gardener's Soliloquy
To sow ? or not to sow ? - that is the question, Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The greatest torment of a gardener's life In poring yearly through fat catalogues, Or to take means by ...
-Gardeners - So-Called
Mr. Elliott, in the first Dumber of the Ohio Farmer, comments on our complaint of the scarcity of really good gardeners - who understand the nature of our climate, as follows: Amateur cultivators of ...
-On Gardeners And Experimental Gardens
A capital idea, Mr. Editor, as any one who knows what trouble we poor mortals, who depend upon the labors of professed gardeners, have had in obtaining those of the right kind, will concede. A compete...
-Gardeners And Pretenders
Mr, Editor: As I have made a few remarks in your last number permit me to add a few more. This being the first year in 21 that I have been disengaged, I thought I would take a run around, to see how m...
-On Gardenia Radicans And Florida
Among the most delicate and fragrant early flowers these Gardenias may be classed; for they are now forced forward in abundance to meet the demands of our markets and gardens, and cultivated to a grea...
-Gardening
There is a pleasure in a garden which none but gardeners know. From the moment you love the art, and look nature in the face, you are at peace with your own heart; you have no absurd opinions to comba...
-Gardening And Manure
We continue our extracts from the proceedings of this Society. The following is a continuation of the subject of Manures: Stockhardt, in his field lectures, relates the experience of a Saxon farmer w...
-Gardening Cannas
WE doubt if any of the perennial bulbs bearing annual flowers and foliage, can rival the Canna in stately magnificence, grace, and sublimity. Adapting themselves as they do to almost any soil or situa...
-Gardening For Women
The Country Gentleman gives an instance of a young lady who cultivated one-half an acre of laud, both for the sake of health and a little profit. The labor was light, and the physical exercise gave gr...
-Gardening Gossip From England
I always read the pleasant pages of your Horticulturist with much satisfaction, and have often thought I would constitute myself your English correspondent; not that I can give you much news, unless i...
-Gardening Gossip From England. Continued
There is another way of cultivating Pear trees on Quince stocks in gardens - a sort of rough, old-fashioned, careless method, just the sort of gardening that suits those who have neither time nor incl...
-Gardening In North Carolina
A correspondent of Hearth and Home states that the country near Wilmington, N. C, is becoming filled up with fine truck farms. One truck farm in particular is noticeable for its size. Hogg, Cannon & ...
-Gardening. What's In A Name
Editor Horticulturist: What's in a name! How much of quality, of beauty, nay, of real elegance, a name is capable of expressing! How prone horticulturists and florists to the use of the superlative an...
-Gardens And Gardening At Montreal, Canada
A profession offering such rich materials, which almost every day are enlarged by new and interesting discoveries, opens a large field of study and labor, both to the theoretical and practical man; an...
-Gardens Around Boston (2)
One way to acquire information on the subject of ornamental gardening, is to study books which treat of it. Another is to visit good specimens of such gardening, and examine them somewhat in detail. T...
-Gardens Around Boston (2). Continued
Mr. HunneweD, like Mr, Sargent, seems to be a tree-taster for American planters, and as such deserves the public gratitude. Returning from this portion of the grounds - which would reward the study...
-The Gardens Of The Bible
Man was placed, at his creation, in a garden. This garden - or paradise, as in some parts of the Bible it is rendered, - was situated within another and larger domain called Eden. This whole region,...
-A Gardrn School
At Weimar, Germany, there is a garden industrial school, the object of which is to instruct school children, from their eighth to their fourteenth year, in their hours out of school, in gardening and ...
-Gas For Country Houses
We have already noticed the fact that very many country people are introducing gas of their own manufacture, and that, after the first outlay for the fixtures, the gas costs less than the price paid b...
-Gas Lime
Last month it was said, among Answers to Correspondents, that gas lime was worthless as a manure. This has brought us the following letter on the subject, which we give entire: In the March numb...
-Gas Lime A Preventive Of Cur-Culio
One of our correspondents tells us that he has this year grown an abundance of the finest plums on trees that heretofore have always had their fruit stung by the curculio, and that while his trees hav...
-Gas Pipes Fatal To Trees
Cuttings of Willow, the lower ends of which were placed in flasks containing a little water and filled with coal gas, developed only short roots, and the buds on the upper parts died shortly after unf...
-Gas-Water for The Bugs
Another remark, in the same paper, may prove very useful for the destruction of bugs, insects, etc., attacking the roots of trees, chiefly the fruit-trees, which seem to be more exposed to their attac...
-The Gases Plants Feed Upon
Plants play a very important part in the economy of the creation; for, independent of their relation to animals as the real source of all food, they are essential to the purity of the air. We are told...
-A Gate Fastener
In a field leading to the Tors, at this place, is a gate which opens into the grounds of Mr. Shepperson's pretty Tor Cottage. Ail sorts of contrivances for keeping it shut having been tried in vain, t...
-Gaterpillars
About the middle of June, the trees in New York and Brooklyn were infested with swarms of caterpillars. Elms were everywhere completely stripped, but Lindens, Horse Chestnuts, and in fact all save the...
-Gathering And Preservation Of Fruits
This is a subject respecting which we have much to learn in this country; and considering the vast amount of capital invested in fruit culture, and the prospective importance of the business in a comm...
-Gathering And Preservation Of Fruits. Part 2
In gathering fruits, a dry time and a cloudless sky should be chosen; and the middle of the day, from noon to four o'clock, is the best time to operate, as the fruits are charged with less humidity, ...
-Gathering And Preservation Of Fruits. Part 3
2. Two windows, (E,) about 20 inches square, placed on each side and opening at 18 inches from the soil, and closed by a double sash, of which the one opens out and the other in. The space between t...
-Gathering And Preservation Of Fruits. Part 4
When all the fruits are thus arranged in the fruit-room, the doors and windows are left open during the day, unless in wet weather. Eight days exposure to the air in this way will be necessary to de...
-Gathering Fruit
Pears should be gathered before being fully ripe. All of them are Improved when ripened in the house, and many of our best sorts may be ripened to insipidity by hanging too long on the tree. Fruit tha...
-Gazania Splendenb
This rare and beautiful evergreen summer bedding plant continues to unfold its lovely flowers at this establishment. This will undoubtedly become one of the most popular bedding plants ever introduced...
-Gbbbnhousb
Before the plants are arranged for winter, the house should be thoroughly cleaned. If not painted (which it should be once in four years at furthest), close it up, and fumigate by burning sulphur (whe...
-The Gen. Hand Plum
A minute and accurate account, as we believe, of the origin of this Plum was given by Mr. 0. G. Siewers, of Cincinnati, in Vol. 6, page 187, of the Hor-ticulturut. This was the first and only satisfa...
-Gen. Hand Plum (2)
Being a constant reader of the Horticulturist, I have noticed several articles on the Gen. Hand Plum, and as its origin seems somewhat of a mystery, and as I happen to know all that is known about it,...
-The Genebal Dutilleul Pear
This pear has now fruited with me three years. The scions were originally sent me by Mr. Charles Downing, and made the first summer after they were inserted a remarkable growth. The succeeding year t...
-General Crop
To get the general summer supply, and likewise as early as possible in the open ground, it is advisable to have strong and healthy plants ready to be turned out in a warm aspect, so soon as all danger...
-General Reflections On What He Saw
Where oaks were grown expressly for timber, there was observed an admirable usage of planting beech trees among the oaks. The oaks were first planted out eight by twelve feet apart. In a few years the...
-Genesee Vallet Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of this Society, held at Rochester on the 3d Feb., Jason W. Seward, Esq., was appointed chairman, in the absence of the president. The minutes of the last annual meeting were re...
-Genesee Valley Horticultural Society
The Summer Exhibition of this Society was held at Corinthian Hall, Rochester, on the 24th of Jane, The following are the Reports of the Committees: Export Of The Commtter On Flowers And Flowering Pla...
-Genesee Valley Horticultural Society (2)
This Society held iu principal summer exhibition at Rochester on the 26th and 26th of June. The display of plants and flowers was highly creditable to the contributors. The efforts of the managers of...
-Genesee Valley Horticultural Society At Rochester
The third weekly display of the Genesee ValleyHorti-cultural Society, lock place on the 20th of May. The varieties of flowers increase with the advance of the season, and a fine show was made. Ellwan...
-Genesee Valley Horticultural Society, At Rochester, New York
The usual June exhibition of the above-named Society, was held at Corinthian Hall for two days, and the display of cut flowers, floral ornaments, and greenhouse plants was equal to former ones. The St...
-Genesee Valley Horticultural Society, Bocheeter
This Society held its first exhibition on the 11th of May. It consisted principally, of plants from green-houses and nurseries, the season being too backward for mnny other productions. Hyacinths of u...
-Geneva June Horticultural Exhibition
Geneva held a very creditable exhibition on the 23d for the first time. One great reason why it succeeded so greatly to the gratification of all, was, doubtless, owing to the fact that numerous ladies...
-Geniser Valley Horticultural Society
The Annual Meeting of the Horticultural Society Of the Valley of the Genesee was held at the Court House, Rochester, on the 4th of February. P. Barry, Chairman of the Fruit Committee, being called upo...
-Gentiana Crinita, (Fringed Gentian.)
Nature seems not to have bestowed all her favors on spring or summer, but to have reserved this one of her most unique productions, for dull and sober autumn. The bright blue color of its petals, thei...
-Gentleman Farming
FOR any useful purpose, the old books on fanning are rarely resorted to; new theories, new modes, and new machines, are the order of the day; and yet, there is an amount of carious information, and fa...
-Gentleman Farming. Continued
However, a beginning is to be made, and his golden project is commenced. He hires a man, who, he is told, is well calculated to drive the wagon, and sell what may be sent to town. Being now, as he be...
-Gentleman Farming. - The Other Side
IN a former article, an attempt was made to show, by the experience of Mr. Lorain, that farming by city gentlemen of no experience was a dangerous experiment, attended with many vexations and unexpect...
-Gentleman Farming. - The Other Side. Part 2
The fifth year the field is permitted to rest in pasture. The consequence of this system is that we always have. One field in corn, oats and barley, wheat, clover and timothy, ...
-The Genus Correa
In a previous page will be found an essay on the cultivation of the genus Correa, by Mr. B. Sanders, of Albany, to which we invite attention. The. London Florist figures, in its last number, the beaut...
-The Genus Cytisus
The species and varieties belonging to this genus are among tie gayest and most easily cultivated of our winter and early spring flowering plants; producing, with ordinary management, an abundance of ...
-The Genus Kalosanthes
Some of the species of this genus are among the most showy and fragrant of summer-flowering plants, and they deserve to be more generally cultivated than they have hitherto been. The magnificent speci...
-Georgia:. Its Capabilities As A Fruit-Growing State
In looking forward to the future of our great cities, the mind must revert occasionally to the propitious climate of the Southern States, and to them as the means of supply. Every information that we ...
-Geraniums
Jane. There are three or four new varieties of the Scarlet Geranium, far sur. passing the old sorts. We saw this year two at Thorburn's at Astoria, named Cerise Unique, and Princess Alice, which you w...
-The Geranium (2)
The Zonale geranium is one of the most popular of our bedding plants, and deservedly a favorite. They are strong and healthy growers and stand our dry summers well, continually in bloom from June unti...
-Geraniums For The Garden
A correspondent of The Rural New Yorker finds the following a good selection: First, then, is Attraction or General Grant, which everybody now wants. Its flowers are bright scarlet and very abundant....
-German Experiences
A friend has translated the following from the Frauendorfer Blatter. Will he favor us with his present address? The unpleasant odor diffused through water in vases in which cut flowers are kept, it i...
-Gesmera Oblongata
When well managed this is decidedly a handsome plant, and it is more, accommodating in its habits than most varieties of the genus, growing and flowering as it does, for months in succession during wi...
-Gesnera Zebrina
This is a stove plant of great beauty, much admired for its zebra-like foliage, as also its brilliant scarlet flowers. The plant sinks into a state of perfect rest after the manner of the Gloxinia fam...
-Get The Best. Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
Nine Thousand to Ten Thousand NEW WORDs in the Vocabulary. Table of SYNONYMS, by Prof. Goodrich. Table giving PRONUNCIATION OF NAMEs of 8000 distinguished persons of modern times. Peculiar use of...
-Giant Asparagus
In a late number of the Horticutturist, we told all our friends who read that publication (and we regret the want of taste in those who do not) how we took some miserable, starved, sickly, dying, root...
-The Giant Ivy
We have sought for some time for a place where the genuine giant ivy could be procured in this country, and have found a quantity of well rooted plants for sale. We are sure our readers will thank us...
-The Giant Lily - Lilium Giganteum Of Wallich; Lilium Cordifolium Of Don
This nagnificent Lily has been one of the chief novelties at the late English shows; we trust will soon find its way across the water. We believe it will be sufficiently hardy for open round culture i...
-A Gigantic California Evergreen Tree - The Wellingtonia Gigantea
Under this imposing title the Gardeners Chronicle notices a new tree discovered by Mr. William Lobb, well known as the collector of the Messrs. Veitoh. This is probably the most magnificent tree of th...
-The Ginko
Salisburia adiantifolia, is one of the largest forest trees in China. The fruit has somewhat the appearance of an almond, and is much esteemed by the Chinese. To the Editor: - I notice that in the Au...
-Girdling The Vine
About 1745, Col. Buchott, of Metz, in France, invented, or claimed to have invented, the plan of girdling, or, as the French call it, the annular incision of the vine. For this, he was awarded a premi...
-Gishurst Compound
Ed. Horticultural: - Dear Sir: Allow me to say a few words in reference to this invaluable compound. I find it up to the mark with everything I have tried it upon. I have no mealy-bug, so can't say wh...
-Gishurst's Compound
An allusion to the above-named article, by yourself, or one of your contributors, in the April number of your Magazine, has induced me to solicit a small space in one of your next issues, to add my mi...
-The Gladiolus
The genus Gladiolus-now comprehends many brilliant species and varieties, and is fast increasing in interest with the floral world. The variety of colors, together with the beauty of its varied stripe...
-The Gladiolus (2)
One hundred thousand gladiolus bulbs are planted to the acre, and but little knowledge of arithmetic is required to figure out the number of plants growing in this fifteen acre plantation. It may well...
-A Glance at the Past and, an Editorial for the Future
With the advent of the glad New Year, we cheerfully perform the annual duty of turning over the leaves of our volume just closed, as we have done many and many a time before, so that the mistakes and ...
-Glass Screens For Walls
A simple description of screen, or if you please to cail it so, a pimple Orchard house, for protecting fruit from frost in spring and for encouraging a fine healthy growth, may be readily formed. For ...
-Glass-Houses
Those of our readers who intend to erect houses for use the coming winter, or to be planted with vines or trees the following spring, should have commenced operations, so that everything may be in rea...
-Gleanings, By E. H. C
There are, said Bernardin de Saint Pierre to J. J. Rousseau, more than five hundred modes of looking at Nature. Yes, replied Rousseau, and none of them true. Naturalists are apt to be like th...
-A Glimpse At The Gardens Of Rio
Dear Horticulturist - Allow a new but gratified subscriber to encumber a few pages of your incomparable monthly, in endeavoring to describe some of the beauties of a tropical climate, as seen during a...
-Glover's Models Or Fruits
Mr. Townend Glover, of Fishkill Landing, N. Y., has lately exhibited, at the Horticultural Hall, in this city, a collection of his model fruits. These models, produced by a process of which Mr. Glover...
-A Glowing Picture
A lady writer from the Isle of Singapore gives the following glowing picture of tropical flowers in Fruits and flowers of the Tropics, published in Lippincott's Monthly: Wo gathered whole handfuls ...
-Gloxinias
If not already done, Gloxinias should be taken out from old soil and potted in smaller pots and placed in a good heat. When in growth these plants require shade from bright sun and must not be wet ove...
-Glycine Apios, (Ground Nut.)
This plant, which from the edible character of its root, has attracted considerable attention in France, is found in the same neighborhood. It is a vine often ten feet in length, with handsome pinnate...
-The Glycine Sinensis - Where It It Found Wild
Before the last war with China, foreigners were confined to narrow limits about Canton and Macao, where they had no means of knowing anything of the more hardy plants of the north, which they sometime...
-Going Through The Fire
We now have a lively sense of the meaning of this expression. On the 19th of December, the Horticulturist was consumed at the large fire in Frankfort Street When we say that nothing was left but the ...
-Gold And Silver Fish
As an ornament in gardens or pleasure-grounds, a fountain and basin, or small piece of water, stocked with gold and silver fish, is generally admired, and justly so, especially when we consider the ex...
-Gold Fish
It is true that the gold fish has become naturalised in the Schuylkill above Philadelphia, or rather perhaps we should say in the Fairmount dam - - a distance of miles. They were introduced by the bre...
-Golden Bartonia - Bartonia Aurea
The Golden Bartonia was introduced into England, from California, in the year 1835, by the botanist Douglas. Mr. D. introduced many beautiful flowers as the result of his botanical tour in California,...
-Golden Champion Grape
This in all respects extraordinary grape was raised by Mr. Thomson, gardener to his Grace the Duke of Buccleuch, at Dalkeith Palace. It was, Mr. Thomson states, raised about five years ago from a s...
-The Golden Date (Phoenix Dactylifera.) By Wm. N. White, Athens, Ga
We see by the newspapers that the Date, the current year, has been successfully grown in the south of Franco. It may not be known that for some years past it has been grown in the open air in the Unit...
-Golden Fern (Gymnogramma De-Composita)
As a garden plant, this new golden fern will take the position of a companion to the silvery G. pulchella, the size, fine cutting, and triangular outline of the fronds producing a certain amount of si...
-Golden Hamburgh Grape
If this grape is as good as its mother, the Black Hamburgh, it is an acquisition to the grapery - for its color is a high attainment in such a grape. If I were to stock a vinery with a dozen grapes, t...
-The Goliath Strawberry
Among the various new strawberries that have been tested for two years past, the Goliath appears to be the finest of that class usually called Pine Strawberries. We believe the Goliath is a German va...
-Good And Bad Pruning
The annexed wood-cute will explain the effects of judicious and injudicious pruning better than a lengthened disquisition. Fig. 1 represents a tree of thirty years' growth, which has been regularly an...
-Good And Bad Taste
It is a delicate matter to find fault with those, who with great labor and industry have exerted themselves to add to the interest and attractions of our Horticultural exhibitions and State Fairs - es...
-Good Cultivation A Science
IT is with no small degree of pleasure, that minds seeking truths turn over the pages of the Horticulturist, and catch those beautiful gems evolved by free discussion. It agitates thought, which is th...
-Good Culture Pays
Mr. E. H. Skinner, in an address before the Northern Illinois Horticultural Society said that where I have laid out the most money in cultivation and manuring, I have realized the largest profit on t...
-Good For Janesville
Mr. J. C. Sloan, of Janesville, Wis, sends us a club of 20 subscribers for 1862, which he says he obtained by very little effort, and expects to add hereafter many additional names. One hardly knows w...
-Good List Of Apples For Profit
A Central New York fruit grower has made out a list of profitable varieties, and names the following which will be found to sell well, give excellent satisfaction, and ripen in succession: 6 ...
-Good News To Florists
THE obnoxious law, relating to seeds, plants, etc., passed by Congress, last summer, concerning which so much gossip and criticism have passed the rounds of the press, in relation to seeds, has been r...
-A Good Potting-Branch Practice
This Is a quick and pleasant way of shifting a plant without disturbing tender roots, and endangering a loosely-held-together ball. I have used it for years, and in some oases it is invaluable. Place...
-Good Rules To Observe
1. Never to water but when the plants are actually in want of it; that is easily known by feeling the soil with the finger. While it is moist no water is needed. When it feels dry, then water, which w...
-Good Seed
More failures in vegetable culture are attributable to the poor seed than to any other cause - either by the seeds not germinating, or by their turning out to be different varieties than for what they...
-Good Strawberries
THE past season, with us, was one of the best for this excellent small fruit, and I pro-pose here to give the result of my experience with the following named varieties: Green Prolific All large - m...
-A Good Suggestion
The officers of the American Pomological Society have done wisely, by addressing a circular to its members, soliciting suggestions as to the conduct of its future meetings. As it is probable that at t...
-A Good Tomato - Cedar Hill Early
Some seven years since we received plants of a tomato from John Sill, Esq., of Cedar Hill, Albany Co., N. Y., with a statement that among a large number of varieties cultivated by him, this was the ea...
-Goodrich Potatoes
Editor Horticulturist: I wish to say one word about the Goodrich potatoes which are yearly advertised as one of the best and most prolific. I have grown them now four years - they produced well, but w...
-Gooseberries
A constant reader, (Tren ton, N. J.) This fruit does not succeed here so well as in England, because our climate is too hot and dry for it. In Maine and Canada they bear very finely. To succeed in you...
-The Gooseberry On The Currant
Sir: A former correspondent of the Horticulturist, August, 1849, made some sensation by assuring us that he had succeeded in grafting the gooseberry on the yellow flowering currant, on stocks five fee...
-Gordon's Philadelphia
This new shrub, which has received the free notice of English horticulturists, is thus described by a correspondent of the Garden: This forms a many-stemmed, vigorous-growing deciduous shrub, which at...
-Gossep
The principal objection to good garden tools is their costlines; but this is more nominal than real, for, from their better quality, they generally outlast tools of an inferior stamp, and thus they ar...
-Gossep. Continued
They do not work with so simple a raw material as plants do; they use plants, indeed, directly or indirectly, as their raw material; but they convert them into products raised in industrial value by t...
-Gossip
It would be as impossible to pack away in this number all the favors of correspondents as to inclose the entire wardrobe, bonnets and all, of a large family going to the Springs in a pair of old-fa...
-Gossip (2)
A horsechestnut tree in full flower has been not inaptly called a giant's nosegay, and by another a gigantic hyacinth. The manner in which it scatters its flowers on the grass, and the comparative use...
-Gossip (3)
The cobweb-like spawn frequently observed about the roots of trees, especially of evergreens recently set out, should receive immediate attention whenever detected. The remedy to adopt if a plant appe...
-Gossip (4)
Cowper writes thus to his friend Newton: I delight in baubles, and know them to be such; for, viewed without a reference to their Author, what is the earth? what are the planets? what is the sun itse...
-Gossip (5)
The foreign papers say that Messrs. Sehroeder and Dnsch make it apparent that meat may be kept fresh for a long time in filtered air. The filtration is effected by very simple means, namely: panels of...
-Gossip (5). Continued
On these bleached leaves her ladyship painted various beautiful designs and writings, which were much admired. - If you have not a blind to protect your camellias from the sun, melt some jelly me, wit...
-Gossip (6)
A gentleman in Connecticut has succeeded in artificially breeding trout in his cellar, through which he has turned a stream of water. - A few years ago, it was difficult to procure salmon in Paris for...
-Gossip (7)
The Havanese may be compared to the Chinese, in their love of smoking. Hen, women, and children, live with pipes in their mouths. The laborer smokes in the field, the clerk at his desk, the traveller ...
-Gossip (8)
The coming event, expected with anxiety, but fully expected, is steam ploughing. Who doubts it? The same people who doubted ocean steamships and the telegraph. The agricultural papers describe a machi...
-Gossip (9)
Fifty specimens of a good flowering plant, when put together, will give more effect when in bloom than fifty varieties of the best flowering plants in the world; and one kind of annual will have more ...
-Gossip (10)
A RRallt well-flavored wine can only be obtained from grapes at a point of perfect ripeness. In countries where the vintage begins everywhere on the same day, much wine is necessarily pressed from the...
-Gossip (11)
I like this. Half the mental pleasure of this hum-drum world is drawn in from the colloquial interchange of ideas commonly called gossip. There are as many varieties of gossip extant in the differen...
-Gossip (12)
Ireland is taking a lead in a movement for the scientific training of agriculturists. A great farm school has been established at Glasnevin, near Dublin. The cook of Louis XVI. was known all over Eu...
-Gossip (13)
In the Jardin des Plantes, at Paris, is a sun-dial bearing this inscription: Horas non numero nisi serenas (I count only the sunny hours) - a pretty and appropriate motto. The merry mortal forgets t...
-Gossip (14)
The amount of the influence of vegetation, as such, upon the air we breathe, has thus been demonstrated. For every six pounds of carbon which plants have accumulated in their structure, they have with...
-Gossip (15)
Mr. Fortune sailed from England to China, about two months since, in the service and interest of the United States, to collect a supply of tea-plants for trial in this country, as well as to procure o...
-Gossip (16)
It was the boast of Luculius that he changed his climate with the birds of passage; but how often must he have felt that the master of many houses has no home. If alchemy was an error, says the Westm...
-Gossip (17)
The amount of fruit trees that may be placed in a small garden has frequently been noticed. A recent paragraph from California will be remembered by our readers. We now find it stated that a Mr. Capro...
-Gossip (18)
We should take a lesson from the Grape mildew in behalf of Gooseberries. As the disease, in its first stage, like the Grape mildew, is an Outturn, there is every reason to believe that the game treatm...
-Gossip (19)
The Cloth Moths, (Tinea pillonetta,) deserve to be celebrated on account of their interesting proceedings. They are born naked, but immediately think of clothing themselves, thinking nothing of colors...
-Gossip (20)
The name of Larkspur has been given, in consequence of the horn-shaped nectary of the flower, being in form like the spur of a lark's foot. There are many beautiful varieties now cultivated. - Some id...
-Gossip (20). Continued
The little useful animal was hatched from the egg of a wild duck, and laid an enormous number of eggs last year. Might it not add to the profits of the poultry-yard if similar experiments in breeding ...
-Gossip (21)
A London Mend writes us, that a party of French swindlers opened in the spring a bazaar of extraordinary seeds, near Regent Street, where great interest was excited by a display of colored drawings ...
-Gossip (21). Continued
It not only has a tendency to give strength and hardness to the straw (which guano weakens), but prevents the loss of ammonia, which is constantly going on even in a dry atmosphere. M. Barral, the Fre...
-Gossip (22)
What is the source of the vegetable matter conveyed to sterile soils, except the minute portion contained in the seeds wafted thither by winds or waves? a vast quantity has been produced, and is repre...
-Gossip (23)
Pyramus, a resident of Babylon, became enamored of This be. Their parents forbade marriage, but the lovers interohangec| sentiments through the aperture of a wall They agreed to meet at a given time a...
-Gossip (23). Continued
Thus treated, the cotton becomes semi-lucent, retentive of heat, and is not one-fifth the cost of glass. - Extraordinary accounts of the effects of electricity on vegetation were circulated ten or twe...
-Gossip (24)
Agriculturists have their jokes as well as literary men. Judge peters, of punning memory, one of the founders of the Pennsylvania Agricultural Society, commenced a reform in butter making, as an examp...
-Gossip (25)
A lemon girthing, eighteen and a half inches from the footstalk to the flower point, girth cylindrical fourteen inches, and weight one pound nine ounces, has been wonder of a large neighborhood in Eng...
-Gossip (26)
In a quaint old book by Gabriel Thomas, will be found the following description of Philadelphia when it was a mere village: In the said city are several good schools for youth, for the attainment of...
-Gossip (26). Continued
But his most novel speculation asserts that man requires poetry and health to contrast with his physical and moral destitution; he lives better in the open air than in badly ventilated houses; he live...
-Gossip (27)
A correspondent lately compared the usual habitual mode of trimming apple-orchards by the ignorant, who have learned from their fathers that spring was the. time to do it, to the Connecticut deacon's ...
-Gossip (27). Continued
Marshall's Dwarf Prolific was also much admired.------Dr. Lindsay has published a popular history of British lichens, from which we make the following extract: When we consider that many species have...
-Gossip About Fruit-Trees And Fruit
There is no doubt that the age of some fruit trees has much influence on the flavor of the fruit. This fact is quite in accordance with what might be assumed would be the case, judging from the laws o...
-Gossip About Roses
Colman's Rural World treats its readers to some pleasant suggestions about Roses, and remarks: Almost all persons give a preference to dark roses - those rich, deep, dark, velvety crimsons, scarlets...
-Gossip From The Northwest
Dear Sir: Many of your friends and readers here, in what was once the Far West, are disposed to pick a crow with you for preferring the cram and jam of the Illinois State Fair, in Chicago, last Octo...
-The Gothic Style
The Castle Character requires massive walls, with very small windows, if any are allowed to appear externally. The correct imitation of this, in modern times, must produce the effect of a prison. Th...
-Government Seed Bags
Well, here is a go, surely. Mr. Vick, the irrepressible people's favorite is authority for this statement: We had a laugh - how could we help it, when we read in an order sent by the Great Americ...
-Governor Wood Cheery
This is a variety, the tree of which was grown at same time as Kirtland's Mary, but afterhaving fruited one season, was by mistake transplanted, and thus retarded in again showing perfect fruit for ...
-The Governor Wood Cherry
Decidedly the most successful attempt made at raising seedling fruits by any individual in this country is that of Dr. J. P. Kirtland, of Cleveland, Ohio, who has produced no less than twenty-eight va...
-Grafted Gonifers
I have long been satisfied that the popular prejudice existing against grafted Conifers has no substantial foundation, provided proper scions and stocks are used. But in no branch of horticulture is t...
-Grafting
Do not use old roots, or pieces of roots of Apple trees; it is a most vicious made of propagating fruit trees. There is no necessity lor it, as good healthy seedlings are now abundant in all parts of ...
-Grafting (2)
To be short in this point, cut your graft, in any sort or fashion, two inches long, and ioyne him cleanly and close to any other sprig of any tree in the latter end of time of grafting, when sap is s...
-Grafting By Approach
More than two hundred methods of grafting are described by the horticultural artists of France, a large share of them being curious rather than useful. Grafting by approach is an operation easily perf...
-Grafting Cacti
Mr. J. C. Bidwell, of Ti-nana, New South Wales, recommends Cereus triangularis as being a superior stock for graftbear great heat, considerable coolness, any amount of wet above ground, and in rich so...
-Grafting Evergreens
Grafted evergreens are generally not of much value. The Spruces may be grafted on one another, not on Pines. We wish to obtain a description of the size, color, and quality of the following varieties...
-Grafting Geraniums
A writer in the Cottage Gardener says on this subject: Mr. Peed, gardener to T. Tredwell, had a collection of real ouriosity and great interest - one of grafted geraniums, thus: 1. Miss Emily Field, ...
-Grafting Grapes
The introduction of new and improved varieties of fruits has of late been so great that there are few persons so well supplied with really excellent kinds, that it will not be to their interest to add...
-Grafting Grapes (2)
In answer to Mr. Bissell, who said that grafting the grape was difficult, I said that I had found no difficulty whatever in grafting; that we graft them within doors as successfully as the Apple. Had ...
-Grafting Grapes (2). Part 2
With a goodly number of Peare in bearing, this fruit is too scarce yet with me during the bimonths of October, November, and December. I have kept a few St. Germains and Winter Bonchretiens till Chris...
-Grafting Grapes (2). Part 3
The same spring I interspersed among grape trellises small bundles of hay, saturated with coal-tar, hoping its offensive odor would deter the curculio from stinging the fruit. Nevertheless, when ripe,...
-Grafting Grapes (2). Part 4
The American locust is, however, a very different insect from the locust of the Eastern hemisphere. They might be equally delicious for those who are fond of such things, but as they appear here at su...
-Grafting Grapes (2). Part 5
He says the Catawba is susceptible of the same, as proven by him later in the season. This very desirable object is obtained by summer pruning; that is, as soon as two or three bunches of fruit set o...
-Grafting Grape-Vines
At a recent meeting of the Horticultural Society Of Western New York, D. S. Wagener gave a description of the method he adopts in grafting the crape vine. He grafts from early spring till last of June...
-Grafting Nursery Stock
There seems to be an erroneous impression among farmers and others about to plant out an orchard, that the young trees that are offered by nurserymen are from suckers, and therefore will not come into...
-Grafting Old Apple-Trees
Mr. Hodge said, if trees were healthy and vigorous, it would be wise to graft; if old and sickly, it would be much better to cut them down, and plant out young trees. Some years since, a gentleman in ...
-Grafting Roses
It should be remembered that all the hardy perpetual roses, which are somewhat difficult to propagate by cuttings, can be easily and rapidly increased by grafting on small pieces of roots. At any tim...
-Grafting Soft-Wooded Bedding Plants
Quite a number of desirable curiosities were shown us lately in the form of grafted Coleus. On one upright plant of the Coleus there were grafted three other varieties: the Setting Sun, Her Majesty, a...
-Grafting The Cactus Tribe
The method employed in grafting Cacti is thus described, in the Gardeners' Chronicle, by Mr. John Green, one of the most skilful growers of ornamental plants: I grow four stocks, Pereskia acule-ata, ...
-Grafting The Grape
During the last few years a very general and very intense interest appears to have been awakened in the culture and improvement of grapes. From this interest we may very reasonably expect an extraordi...
-Grafting The Grape. Continued
Being dug up, and fifteen roots laid bare, of all sizes from half an inch to two inches diameter, they were sawed off, smoothed with a knife, and carefully grafted - most of them cleft-grafted, some s...
-Grafting The Grape (2)
The February Horticulturist honors me with a question which I must have the politeness to answer, although I have nothing original or interesting, as yet, to say on the subject of grape-grafting. You ...
-Grafting The Grape On Its Laterals
ED. Western Horticulturist: Your method of grafting the vine as described in the Pomologist some months ago, is correct in accordance with my experience, but I have improved a little on that. I find i...
-Grafting The Grape-Vine
We have met with many experienced persons who have never Been the grape-vine grafted. The process is so easy, that thousands who are anxious to possess the newer varieties, should especially take care...
-Grafting The Grape-Vine (2)
During the past twelve years my statements of the success or failure of attempts to graft the vine have appeared in the horticultural journals, but the precise conditions of success have not yet been ...
-Grafting The Grape-Vine (2). Continued
I have not spoken of grafting the branch above ground. A few words on that will suffice. It may be as readily done as below ground, and with nearly the same prospect of success, but can scarcely be ho...
-Grafting The Grape-Vine (3)
There is no fruit tree cultivated, under glass of so much importance as the vine, nor any so useful for the dessert. Pine-apples, although expensive, owing to the amount of fuel which they require, ar...
-Grafting The Grape-Vine (3). Continued
I caused cold water from a well to be thrown upon the roots of the plant,- but neither this nor any other plan which I could devise, prevented the sap from flowing, which it continued to do with so mu...
-Grafting The Grape-Vine On Pieces Of The Root Of The Wild Fox Grape
Several years ago I read something about grafting the grape vine on pieces of the root of the wild Fox grape, and, fond as I am of experiments, I concluded to try it as soon as I should have an opport...
-Grafting The Mulberry
What stock is best to propagate Mulberries on; and how do you do it by bud or graft; and how do you treat them after planting; and what kind is best for our climate? (1) What stock do you work Medlars...
-Grafting The Pine
IN my first attemps at grafting the pine, I met with many failures (and I believe this is the case with nearly all nurserymen in the United States), until I adopted the following method under which fa...
-Grafting The Vine
The uncertainty and inconvenience of the customary mode of cleft-grafting the grapevine are known to all who have practiced it, and the only course of practice that has been discovered tending to incr...
-The Grand Bretagne
The Grand Bretagne in exterior appearance bears a marked resemblance to the Beurre D'An^ jou - indeed, so strong is the likeness, that were it not for the lateness of its maturity, one might believe i...
-A Grand Medal For Cleveland, The Wilson Sewing Machine Takes The Grand Prime At Vienna
Three separate dispatches from Vienna combine to dispel all doubt as to what sewing machine has won the first honors of the great Exposition. The first was a special to the New York press on Monday, a...
-A Grand National Exhibition Of Stock
Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Swine - open to competition to all the States of the Union, and to the British Provinces, will be held by the United States Agricultural Society, in the city of Boston, on Tu...
-Grapes
The Muscat of Alexandria is considered by many of the most successful English grape growers as the best variety in cultivation. What say our growers? The Black Barbarossa is a new variety spoken of ve...
-The Grape (2)
WHILE writing the article on the Progress of Horticulture in the last number, the cultivation of the Catawba & Isabella grapes for market might have been successfully dwelt upon. Dr. Underhill who ...
-Grape (3)
There is nothing that people a peculiar voracity is shown whenever a Grape with new qualities is said to make its appear-ance. We must, therefore, take care, as far as in us lies, that our worthy frie...
-Grapes (4)
Oh grapes, grapes!! We go from bad to worse. All the grapes raised in Illinois last season, would not make nectar enough to fill Hebe's smallest cup. All remedies and theories, have utterly failed. Th...
-Grapes (5)
The season is prolific in new varieties of grapes; from J. Fisk Allen, Esq., we have received a box of specimens of his new hybrids. The Rebecca, all our correspondents agree in praising very highly, ...
-Grapes (6)
We are greatly indebted to Mr. W. N. White, of Athens, Ga., for specimens of most of the grapes mentioned in the lucid and able report of the Georgia Pomological Society. The Chairman (Mr. White) has ...
-Grapes (7)
Your correspondent Mr. Miller, in the June No. of the Horticulturist, speaks of visiting some vineyards in Berks Co., Pa., and says in substance that those vineyards which received the least care prod...
-Grapes (8)
Mr. Barry spoke of the Delaware (concerning which so much has been lately said,) as very early, and perfectly hardy. Of the Rebecca as a very handsome, free grower, and bear ing a fine crop; d...
-Grapes (9)
Mr. Editor: Mr. John Fiske Allen, in your November number page 516, writing about grapes, remarks: I have never been able fully to satisfy myself that there really was any permanent difference betwee...
-Grapes (10)
A correspondent of the Ohio Farmer, F. R. E., (it will not be difficult to guess who that is,) describes the following new grapes. . The Mottled and the Mary we have alluded to in a former number, the...
-Grapes (11)
13. Is grape culture, for wine, profitable north of the latitude of New York city? If so. what varieties wilt make the most and the best wine to the acre? 14. Which grape juice becomes good wine with...
-Grapes (12)
For some few years it has been the fashion for gardeners in lordly places to grow grape-vines in pots, which, after bearing one crop of fruit, have been destroyed. Now these pots are generally of such...
-Grapes (13)
Being a constant reader of your valuable HorticuLturist, and seeing the notices about new grapes from all parts of the country, it struck me that perhaps neither you nor your readers would object to a...
-Grapes (14)
Which among the new hardy varieties have proved to be adapted to our climate? P. Barry thought more highly of the Delaware this year than ever before. In favorable situations and under good treatment...
-Grapes (15)
Friend Mead: - A stormy day and a good cold conjoin to keep me in-doors today, and this has been pretty much the case for several days past, so that I have read up the Horticulturist and Monthly, ...
-Grapes (16)
As it is sometimes amusing, and oftener perplexing, to the readers of the Horti-culturist to determine whose experience is worth the most, I am willing to take my share of criticism on observations ma...
-The Grape And Its Culture - In-Doors And Out
To say that the grape-vine is as old as the hills, or that the varying arguments of ancient and modern cultivators respecting the individual modes of treatment are infinite, would be going a little to...
-The Grape And Wine
At a recent meeting of the American Wine Growers Association at Cincinnati, the following was read from N. W. ThatCher, of Chillicothe: * * The great desideratum in wine growing is, ...
-Grape And Wine Culture In Los Angeles, California
The cultivation of the Grape has been attended with unparalleled success, even beyond that of the most prolific countries of Europe; but, owing to causes which have now become known, the manufacture o...
-Grape Bobder For Vineries
J. (Philadelphia.) Your border must not be less than 14 feet vide and 2 1/2 feet deep. If the sub-soil is porous, so that it drair that will answer; If clayey, you must make the border three inches lo...
-Grape Bonders
Persons about to make new borders, should take into consideration their durability above all things, and provide against excessively wet periods that do so much damage. It is very easy to make borders...
-Grape Borders
The observant remarks, and questions asked, respecting the culture of grapes, by your correspondent S. Miller, in the June Horticulturist, reminds us that established rule is not always a sure guide a...
-Grape Culture
Mr. Editor: - In your February number, Mr. Eaton, of Buffalo, has an article on Facts in Grape Culture, in which occurs the following paragraph: My practice is, to ventilate freely throughout the ...
-Grape Culture (2)
Let me for a moment call your attention to the cultivation of the grape. This is now assuming so much importance in our country, that it seems entitled to special attention at this time. Its progress ...
-Grape Culture (3)
AT a meeting of the Middlesex County Agricultural Society, Capt. John B. Moore gave the following account of his experience in planting vines and raising grapes . Aspect of the lot, a very slight inc...
-Grape Culture - Propagation, Growth, And Market Valua
The question was asked, Cannot we graft a good substitute upon our vines, and get them to bear the first or second year? Mr. P. Bissell. The grafting of the grape-vine during the full flow of the sap...
-Grape Culture At The Paris Exposition
In a recent number of the Journal d'Agriculture Pratique, M. Joigneaux has given elaborate reports in regard to grape culture as represented in the Paris Exposition. His last report is exceedingly ...
-Grape Culture For Wine
Hilkia, the priest, found a book of the law of the Lord, given by Moses. Having read part of- a very interesting address by David Thomas in the February number of the Horticulturist, in which he co...
-Grape Culture In Florida
For many years I have been interested in the success of grape culture in Florida, and deem the subject worthy of being noticed through the colums of the Horticulturlst. Many flattered themselves that ...
-Grape Culture In Florida (2)
I Have lands on the hills sloping to Lake Hall, where subsoils for four feet deep (as far as I have examined them) are composed principally of silex, with a sufficiency of clay to make them of a good ...
-Grape Culture In Florida (3)
Another section of the state deserving the attention of the grape grower, is Marion, one of the central counties. It extends from latitude twenty-nine degrees to twenty-nine degrees thirty minutes, wi...
-Grape Culture In Florida (3). Continued
If one of the posts, poles or sapplings decays, it is easily replaced. With regard to gathering the fruit, the Scuppernong is accommodating. The crop ripens over a period of several weeks, and is eas...
-Grape Cuttings
Many persons have a few grape cuttings which they wish to propagate. A good way is to trim them this month, February, cut them up into cuttings, each having two buds. Make the cut at the lower bud jus...
-Grape Cuttings From Modern History
Numebous are the theories of naturalists as to the origin and creation of the vegetable kingdom, some asserting while others deny the Biblical account as related by Moses; but be this as it may, no on...
-Grape Cuttings From Modern History. Continued
But in these, the utmost regard is paid to the selection of varieties adapted to the soil and climate, well knowing that one variety which may do well in one district may be wholly worthless in anothe...
-The Grape Disease
The devastation of this disease has been more widely spread in Europe, the past season, than is generally credited; indeed, the disease may be celled sporadic, and its fatality may be judged of when w...
-Grape Entomology
I thank my old friend, Mr. Reid, for coming to my rescue at a time when I had to spend, not a single hour, but every hour of daylight in my vineyard. He also is a Pratiquer, and I take much pleasure i...
-Grape Houses
A. J. R., (Middleborough, Mass.) you cannot do better than follow Mr. Rivers' plan, detailed in vol. 6, page 17, ex-cept that we recommend you to build the house higher so as to avoid the sunken walk;...
-The Grape In Vineries
Is there any rule for the distance of grape vines from the glass in different latitudes? From my own experience in this part of the state, I would recommend about nine footles, but in a more southern...
-Grape Leaves
Ah examining trip among acres of vineyards in association with scores of grape-growers, and the frequent question of What is this variety? put by many a vine-grower, caused us to think somewhat of t...
-Grape Memoranda
A readable record, but with a tinge of praise to the Ives Seedling that makes one wonder how such grape-men as Cincinnati affords, should have so long remained in ignorance and blindness when the know...
-Grape Mildew
Several months ago, I observed in the Horticulturist an inquiry relative to the mildew. on Grapes, and as the subject is one of great importance, I had anticipated seeing some fight thrown upon it by ...
-Grape Notes From The Parsonage
THE past season has been peculiarly favorable for the grape crop in New England. Oar remarkably warm and dry summer and autumn, though in some instances rather trying to the vines, have yet, on the wh...
-Grape Phylloxera (2)
THIs is a term which, if the present opinions of many distinguished and useful men are sustained, must become familiar to every grape grower. There has long been noticed certain unaccounted-for years ...
-Grape Raising Abroad
It is self-evident to one familiar with the grape-growing regions of the old countries of Europe and Asia, that certain parts of the United States are destined, in the progress of civilization, to bec...
-The Grape Reviewer
The second part of Mr. Fuller's Review of the Grape Question, in the October number of the Horticulturist, is so grossly erroneous in the description of my proposed inside border, that I feel called u...
-The Grape Show In New York
The spacious office of the American Agriculturist was rendered doubly attractive in the closing days of October by the multitude of beautiful grapes exhibited there by some well-known keepers of viney...
-The Grape Swindle
From childhood, Mr. Editor, I have been suffering from an incurable attack of vito-mania, and as my experience is not of yesterday or to-day, I may be excusable for clothing my opinions in the drapery...
-Grape Wine For The Million
The Grape crop on the Hudson, like all other fruit crops, has this year been very abundant. Many of your friends will probably be pleased to have a simple and reliable recipe for making wine. My exper...
-Grape, The Cambridge
This is a new seedling grape which originated in the garden of Mr. Francis Houghton, of Cambridge, Mass., six or eight years ago, and has now been in continued bearing for four or five years. With reg...
-Grape-Culture In Cold Vineries
I cheerfully comply with your request by giving Notes of Experience in Grape Culture; but in doing so, I feel that little can be added to the many sensible articles already published in the Horticul...
-Grape-Grafting
I was shown a freak in the Grape Tine, a lew days since, that beats all that has ever come under my notice. WM. Lxhman, of Lebanon, a very exact and careful florist and horticulturist, engrafted grape...
-Grape-Grafting (2)
By the last mail I received The Gardeners' Monthly for the present month, (November,) and while reading it yesterday I found the following on page 347, in the proceedings of the Grape-Growers' Conven...
-Grape-Grafting (2). Continued
Vine C. Eight grafts of supposed Rebecca, but now believed to be Chasselas. But one grew. The growth was remarkable for size and vigor. The main stem, with six large branches from near the ground, mad...
-Grape-Growers' Meeting And Excursions
The Lake Shore Grape-Growers' Association will hold their summer meeting and excursion for the inspection of vineyards, commencing at Cleveland, August 25th, and continuing two or more days; embracing...
-Grape-Vines
We are following the fashion and collecting for experiment a rich list of the newer grape vines. Mr. J. Fisk Allen, of Salem, Mass., has obliged us by forwarding Allen's Hybrid, of which he says: It ...
-Grape-Vine Borders
Those who read the various periodicals of the day, and who reflect on the past, present and future, must have their risibilities frequently agitated by articles on the composition of grape vine border...
-Grape-Vine Roots Or Cuttings
Dr. Underhill states in the last American Agriculturist, that his experience indicates a saving of time by the use of well-rooted plants instead of cuttings, and that the vineyard thus formed, is far ...
-Grape-Vine Trellis
Seeing in the January number of the Horticulturist, in Hints on Grape Culture, your mode of making a trellis, I will give your subscribers mine, if I do not trespass on your time and patience too mu...
-Graperies
Our correspondent, William Saunders, advertises to construct graperies on terms which must command numerous customers. Four dollars and a half for each running foot is so reasonable, when combined wit...
-Graperies And Grape Growing
In the March number of the Horticulturist, for 1858, I described a system of building glass-houses on the fixed-roof, or continuous-rafter principle. Having, since then, had several houses put up on a...
-Graperies For Amateurs
THERE is probably not an individual in the horticultural community whose feelings at this moment are not more or less imbued with the enthusiasm prevalent on the subject of Grapes; it amounts, in fa...
-Graperies Of W. 0. Strong, Esq,, Newton
The most extensive culture of Grapes under glass which we have had an opportunity of seeing in this country, is that of Mr. Strong. He has three houses, each upwards of 200 feet long. One is a forcing...
-Grapery
(J. D., Warren, R. I) Vines can be obtained at any of the nurseries, at fifty to seventy-five cents each. Any nurseryman will send yon a priced list We nev,er recommend. The border may be partly insi...
-Grapery (2)
As the young shoots progress, tie the canes up to the rafters, but keep their points pendant until the lower buds are well into growth. Attend early to disbudding - a very necessary operation on close...
-Grapery (3)
If the treatment recommended in former calendars with reference to air and temperature has been fully carried out, the young wood will be well ripened, the best safeguard against rigorous winters. Sti...
-Grapery (4)
The canes will grow with more regularity, if their points are retained in a pendent position; as the shoots grow out, tie them up. Admit air every favorable day; of course, cold, rustling winds must b...
-Grapes - Devereux, Lenoir
Dear Sir: - In the Horticulturist of November, 1857, were given some descriptions of our native grapes, among which was one of the Devereux. This grape, as first known here, proved the same as the Len...
-Grapes - Open Culture
The prospect for field or vineyard culture of grapes in Massachusetts, is not flattering. Catawba and Isabella, except in the most favorable locations, do not hold out much hope of success; and hence ...
-Grapes - See March Number
Dr. J. A. Warder, of Cincinnati, writes us that in our notice of the Longworth and Lyman grapes we committed an error, and refers us to the Pomological Transactions of 1866 for correction. We took our...
-Grapes A New Enemy With A Defence Against Him
J. Jay Smith, Esq. - Last season I noticed a singular kind of spot on some of my grapes, which at first induced me to think they were about coloring very early, but which afterwards proved to be somet...
-Grapes And Grape Culture
It may perhaps be gratifying to some of your readers engaged in grape culture, to have a few words more at the close of the season. The vines in my house did well, and the fruit was in good condition,...
-Grapes And Grape Houses
The culture of the foreign grape under glass has become such a palpable reality, and on account of its easy accomplishment is of so much practical importance, that almost every one who has indulged in...
-Grapes And Grape-Vines
The attention given to grape vines at the present time, is likely to lead to good results. Some years ago, we stated in this journal, that we were on the eve of important discoveries in new varieties;...
-Grapes And Grape-Vines. Continued
And lis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathe. Bear Sir: - An old subscriber wishes you the best of success. Go it strong on pears and pear culture, and you will please me. I have a ...
-Grapes And Graperies
In looking over the December number of the Horticulturist (a work which I often re-peruse with increased interest), I notice the queries of C., Chicago, regarding the failure of his grape vines. Hav...
-Grapes And Mildew
Mr. Editor: As your correspondent in the January No. of the Horticulturist has solicited my mode of preventing and destroying mildew, the great bar to successful growing and ripening of foreign grapes...
-Grapes And Pears
Two years ago, some correspondents, with but a poor appreciation of the value of a free press, were gravely inquiring, in the columns of a useful and widely popular journal, whether the Horticulturist...
-Grapes And Raisins
ON reading the article taken from a correspondent of the Pacific Rural Press, from Napa county, California, page 85, in your number for March, current volume of The Horticulturist, etc., giving his pl...
-Grapes And Roses
A correspondent from Michigan asks: Why is it that some of your Rochester pomologists so set up the Clinton Grape! adding, that it is hardy and prolific; and that is all he can say in its favor. To ...
-Grapes And Strawberries
I am gratified to learn that the Diana grape is of good quality south. The fruit in Boston is far inferior to the Catawba with us. I doubt not it will bo improved here. I have several vines that will ...
-On Grapes And Wine
Mr. Downing - There is much experience, and the hest of all sense, common sense, in your remarks in your Dec. No., on the cultivation of the foreign grape in the open ground. But you say Mr. Long wor...
-Grapes For A Cold Vinery
On the 29th of August, I took from my vines, one bunch each, of the following kinds of grapes: Muscat Blanc Hatif, White Muscat of Alexandria, Grizzly Frontignan, and Royal Muscadine, and submitted th...
-Grapes For General Cultivation
Question No. 2 Can any other varieties of grapes beside Isabella be recommended for general cultivation? Mr. Hoag, of Lockport, thought highly of the Hartford Prolific, which ripened four weeks ea...
-Grapes For The Family Garden
It is a question whether the large grower for profit enjoys his horticultural work as much as that amateur who takes care of his dozen vines or so, in his garden. Indeed, we rather believe the latter...
-Grapes For Wine And Raisins
A CORRESPONDENT of the Pacific Rural Press, writing from Napa county, estimates the value of raisins annually imported into the United States greater than the whole grape crop produced in California. ...
-Grapes From California
I send you by express two bunches of Grapes, just received from W. B. Osborn, Esq., Los Angelos, California. The Grapes were packed in Red-wood sawdust, as Mr. Osborn had exhausted all his hard wood...
-Grapes In 1856
Mr Editor: This has been one of the most propitious seasons for grapes, and the Isabella has never been knewn to grow larger, or perfect itself better. La crops have been grown, and price reduced to f...
-Grapes In California
As a source of future revenue to the State, it may not be inappropriate to state that the wine interests are receiving a new impetus. A company has been formed, the sphere of whose operations is in th...
-Grapes In Massachusetts
The subject of obtaining new, hardy varieties of Grapes, which will mature in our climate, has occupied the attention of our cultivators for a number of years. Probably in no State in the Union are so...
-Grapes In New York
The New York market, says the American Agriculturist, has been unusually well supplied with excellent grapes during the present season. The number of persons in the vicinity of the city who have a few...
-Grapes In Vineries
Dear Sir: As a reason for troubling you to do me a favor, my only apology is, that I am a lover of horticultural pursuits, an original subscriber to your Horticulturist, and that I have endeavored to ...
-Grapes In Western New York
Mr. J. H. Babcock, at Lockport, New York, reports as follows: Hartford is the first for market. First shipment, August 31st; September 14th, crop nearly all marketed at good prices. The crop will net ...
-Grapes On The Lake Shore
Mr. Elliott writes us, under date of August 10th, that he has recently visited very many of the large vineyards along on the south shore of Lake Erie, and that as a rule the crop promises very abunda...
-Grapes Ripening In The Shade
FOR several seasons the best Isabella Grapes we have had, ripened thoroughly in a situation where they received no ray of sun till after twelve o'clock. In consequence of this absence of light for hal...
-Grapes Under Glass
I would again repeat the advice given in former calendars: Towards the end of the month, leave the top sashes open a little during the night, allowing the temperature to fluctuate similar to the ext...
-Grapes Under Outside Doors
The Saratoga County Press says, respecting the Vermont Patent Grapery mentioned in-our September number: In reading the notice of a Vermontor's patent for a grapery, we are reminded of a conversation...
-The Grapes, Old And New Varieties - Their Conduct In 1866
It may be interesting to your readers how - after the excessive wet summer of 1865. and the enormous crops which some varieties produced, and which occasioned an imperfect ripening of their wood - the...
-The Grapes, Old And New Varieties - Their Conduct In 1866. Continued
Cunningham Fair crop, and healthy vines; will do, under same treatment as Herbemont, and makes an excellent wine. Hartford Prolific A large crop, and fair fruit; profitable for early market, and ...
-Grapes, Vineyards
The interest manifested at the present time in grape culture in this country is rapidly on the increase, and from evidences that I have received this last fall, I think I can safely say, that we are h...
-Grapes. Old And New Varieties, Their Conduct In 1866
I am glad to see this record. The writer gives, in his usual manner, plain statements, and in his comments on Norton's Virginia, handles the egotism of the old-fogy Cincinnatians in a sharp manner. To...
-Grapes. What are the beet six varieties for family use, and which are the best two for vineyard purposes?
Mr. Knox of Pittsburg has been testing a number of varieties, of which three have given entire satisfaction, viz.: Concord, Delaware, and Hartford Prolific. The Concord and Hartford Prolific are entir...
-Grapevines From Green Wood
A. M. Burns, of Riley County, Kansas, writes the Prairie Farmer, referring to rot, diseases, etc., in grape culture as follows: Although we have been free from rot and comparatively free from mildew...
-The Graph
We publish, in a former page, an interesting article from Mr. W. N. White, on hybridizing the grape. Mr. W. informs us that in consequence of the receipt of a dozen new varieties from Dr. Grant, the r...
-Grass And Its Lessons
Perhaps the finest passage relating to grass in our literature is found in Ruskin's essay, which runs thus: There are several lessons symbolically connected with this subject which we must not allow ...
-Grass For Lawns
We observe in the grounds in front of the Patent Office, a very vigorous growth of beautiful Lawn Grass, the seeds of which were selected by the agent of the office, in London, some months ago, and so...
-Grass Lawns
It seems almost like a waste of words to repeat our caution relative to the close mowing of lawns during this month; but we have, as we sit down to write, just come from advising relative to recuperat...
-Grass Versus Cultivation For Orchards
The practice of permitting the grass to grow and form a sod on the surface of the ground devoted to orcharding is advocated by some quite intelligent writers; while others, equally as intelligent and ...
-The Grasshoppers In Minnesota In 1856-7
This destructive insect appeared in vast devastating numbers in '57, east of the Mississippi, and there is but little doubt that the cultivator in the states south and east, at least in parts of those...
-Gravel As A Mulch
IN the spring of 1870, I had the superintendence of planting some 200 trees of various kinds in and around our public grounds. The spring and succeeding summer was one of unusual and excessive drouth....
-A Great "Cattle Convention" In Ohio
We have to call the attention of our read-era to the following ciroular. The United States Society has made a very fortunate choice of location for such a gathering - the very heart of the greatest s...
-Great Bale Of Greenhouse Plants
By reference to the advertisements, it will be seen that there will be one of the largest sales of plants in this city, in May next, that has ever taken place here. The fine collection belonging to th...
-The Great Discovery
Under the acricultural head, If the advantages to be derived from it are as great as Mr. Cornstock promises, we are sure the Legislature will no longer withhold from him the paltry sum of $150,000. ...
-The Great English Rose Exhibition
The (London) National Rose Exhibition, at the close of July last, was a success. The Gardeners' Chronicle says: Half the nurseries in England poured their treasures into St James's Hall, and all thei...
-Great Exhibit-Tow In Russia
That system of holding great public meetings for the purpose of exhibiting Horticultural produce, which originated more than thirty years ago with the Horticultural Society Of London, after crossing t...
-The Great French Exhibition
The following circular has just been placed in our hands by Col. Johnson. It is not likely that any display of American horticultural productions will be made at Paris. Collections of fruits might be ...
-The Great Palm House At Kew
We have already alluded to this beautiful, tropical glass house, in which the palms and other trees of the equatorial regions, growing in the ground and in huge tubs, reach the altitude and wear the s...
-The Great Pear
A pear was exhibited at the stall of H. Gushee, Washington Market, which was raised on the farm of George Walling, on the Willamette River, a few miles above Portland, Oregon; it weighed four pounds, ...









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