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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #9 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Greenhouses To Improvement

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #9
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Great Variety Of Native Woods
It is amusing to an intelligent man who has much intercourse with our landholders and farmers, to note how little the most of them know of the prodigious forest wealth with which they are surrounded, ...
-The Great West - Illinois And The Prairies
WHEN we reflect on the prairies of the West, and remember the activity of the inhabitants of that great Empire, we are lost in pleasing anticipations of the future, no less than with gratification at ...
-Of Grecian Construction
According to the law of gravitation, all matter at rest keeps its place by its own weight, and is only to be removed by superior force acting in a different direction. A perpendicular rock, or a solid...
-The Grecian Style
Under this character are included all buildings in England, for which models have been furnished from Greece, from Italy, from Syria, and from other countries, unmixed with the Gothic style; for in al...
-Gree-House Boiler
We have had several inquiries from our subscribers about a chief and efficient boiler for propagating purposes, to be used in connection with the common brick flue. Until lately we have been unable to...
-Greek Ideals Of Gardening
To the earnest, practical scholar, who likes to keep his thoughts busy with something beyond the dry husks and integuments of ancient learning, everything pertaining to the country and landscape scene...
-Greek Ideals Of Gardening. Continued
As individual character often takes a tone from intimacy, or want of intimacy with trees, so national features may be detected in the treatment and culture of trees, as ornaments of the garden and the...
-Greeley
Greeley will yet be a success, I believe, although I am afraid too many are too poor to be able to hang on. The climate is more windy and uncongenial in winter than most are willing to admit, yet grai...
-Green Chops For Manure
A. J. Downing, Esq. - Dear Sir: On the score of sound practice in agriculture, rather than of courtesy to me, I claim the privilege of saying a word in relation to the strictures in your last number, ...
-Green Fly
If, by oversight, any plants have green fly, give them a good fumigating with tobacco, two or three nights in succession, before removing them outside. We mention this, for sometimes it is inconvenien...
-Green-House
Continue to shift into layer pots, young plants of fuchsias, calceolarias, etc, and repot generally all plants that require changing. A soil composed of rotted turfs will answer for all purposes; use ...
-Green-House Plants
M. E. Irwin, (Southbridge, Mass.) The proper soil for the plants you name - Gardenia Fortunia, aeschy-nanthus Hrsofieldii, ae. zebrina, Hoya bella, and Chorizema varium - is the following: one-third p...
-Green-House Plants. Continued
The improvements of the last few years in fruit tree culture have been very great, and are very easily extended. From having been pursued in the most careless and slovenly manner possible, it is now p...
-Green-House Plants For Winter Boquets
Your correspondent Querist built last year a small green-house, with the view of having cut-flowers regularly through the winter, for a center-table. He was very much disappointed, and, under pre...
-Green-Houses In Winter
Dear Sir: Very few persons appear to know the value of the sponge in a green-house. I mean for the purpose of washing the leaves of all those plants with leaves broad enough to admit of it. I took the...
-Green-Houses Of John B. Eaton & Co., Oaklands Nursery, Buffalo, N. Y
The most complete and elegant plant houses which we have seen in this country, devoted to commercial cultivation, are those of Messrs. Eaton & Co., of Buffalo, formerly Mason & LoverinG. Every conveni...
-Green-Houses, And Their Management
Having frequently heard complaints, particularly among amateurs, or those who do not keep professional gardeners, of the difficulty of getting a good supply of flowers from their green-houses during t...
-Greenhouse
The temperature may average from 40 degrees by night to 60 or 65 by day. The greatest source of disappointment proceeds from injudicious management of the atmosphere. Let it fluctuate simila...
-Greenhouse (2)
As the days lengthen, and the sun increases in power, the utmost vigilance will be necessary in this department. Most of the winter flowering plants will have commenced growth. Camellias and Azaleas t...
-Greenhouse (3)
Attention should now be directed to the propagation of plants for flowering next winter and early spring. Secure a good stock of Bouvardia leiantha, Cestrum auranti-acum, Coronilla giauca, Cytisus rao...
-Greenhouse (4)
Plants that have completed growth, may be now taken out of the house. It is a prevalent custom to set the plants out at a stated period, without reference to their condition; a practice which deprives...
-Greenhouse (5)
As the summer flowers wane, and previous to arranging the plants for winter, the house should undergo all necessary repairs. Fumigating strongly with sulphur will completely rout all the spider and bu...
-Greenhouse (6)
Artificial heat will now be required, and as the systems of heating are various, many are doubtful as to the most economical. The old-fashioned hot-air flue and furnace is so seldom mentioned, that it...
-Greenhouse (7)
Seedlings of calceolarias, cinnerarias, etc, should be transplanted as early as they can conveniently be handled. Cuttings of most flower-garden plants will form roots readily at this season; but by l...
-Greenhouse And Conservatory
The interior of ornamental plant structures can be much improved in appearance and rendered much more interesting by having graceful festoons of climbing plants depending from the roof. A series of cu...
-The Greenhouse And Flower Garden. Greenhouse For Februsary
This is a month in which this structure should be at its best, and give more enjoyment than at any season of the year. The cold wintry weather we usually expect at this season, preventing ladies and i...
-The Greenhouse And Flower Garden. Greenhouse For Februsary. Continued
There were two plants trained on a wall of a glass-covered promenade at Chatsworth which had reached a height of about thirty feet, and in March each year were covered from bottom to top with flowers;...
-Greenhouse And Pot Plants
JOSEPH POLLARD, who has charge of the extensive Greenhouses of Hon. Alexander Mitchell, Milwaukee, presented a paper on Greenhouse and Pot Plants, at the recent meeting of the Wisconsin State Horticul...
-Greenhouse For October
IF any pot plants remain outside, have them housed at once. We may expect sharp night frosts and heavy rains at any time alter this, which would damage even the most hardy plants in pots. The house ma...
-Greenhouse For October. Continued
Caladiums should now be generally at rest; if any late plants are still growing, withhold water to induce them to die down as soon as possible; it is a mistake to allow these plants to continue growin...
-Greenhouse Plants
Fine exhibitions were made by L. Menand,E. Corning. Jr., Col. J. Rathbone, though the collection did not embrace a large variety. Flowers The display was larger than at any previous exhibition, and ...
-The Greenhouse. - Results Of Experience
As many amateurs have a greenhouse which they conduct themselves, a few words of advice may not be thrown away. The writer often sees a greenhouse sadly neglected from the want of correct information ...
-The Greenhouse. Greenhouse For December
Our readers, with a comfortable greenhouse, will enjoy it most at this season, when the outside flowers, and also the bright-colored autumn leaves have disappeared for the year which is now nearly clo...
-The Greenhouse. Greenhouse For July. Watering
The weather at this season is usually too hot for enjoyment under a glass roof, and most of the plants being outside, there is little to be done in this department excepting watering temporary occupan...
-The Greenhouse. Greenhouse For May
The season having now arrived for planting out many of the plants stored in the house for the winter season, the remaining plants can be thinned and others grown on for summer decoration. It is a mist...
-The Greenhouse. Greenhouse For November
The Greenhouse will be the principal point of attraction during the present month; for, excepting a few Chrysanthemums in sheltered nooks, there will be few flowers remaining out of doors in the north...
-The Greenhouse. Greenhouse For September
IN the latitude of New York it is not safe to trust very tender plants out-of-doors after the third week in this month, for we frequently get a sharp frost tor a night or two about that time, and if t...
-Greenhouse. Watering
The application, or, rather, the misapplication of water, kills more pot plants than anything else. It is also a subject that will not admit of definite rules, so much depends upon individual circumst...
-Greenhouses - Their Temperature - Summer Use Of
Before again referring to the summer use of greenhouses, allow me to say a word or two upon the subject of correctly ascertaining the temperature. In my last article upon this subject (p. 144, No. 3,...
-Greenhouses Of J. Mccall, Esq., Statin Island, N. Y
New Brighton, Staten Island. J. J. Smith, Esq. Dear Sir: Inclosed I send you a perspective view and ground-plan of a collection of horticultural houses, designed by myself, for J. McCall, Esq., Stat...
-Greenhouses Of Miller & Hayes
During A recent visit at German town, Pa., one of our most enjoyable visits was spent at the greenhouses of Messrs. Miller & Hayes. Within the past three or five years this firm have developed a pecul...
-Greer Crops As Marube
We believe the majority of agricultural writers agree upon the advantage of plougfaing.in green crops as manure on exhausted lands, and it has long been practiced as one of the cheapest and best modes...
-Grimes Golden Apple
An Ohio cultivator has about one hundred varieties of apples, all the best kind, vet Grimes Golden is at the head of the list for hardiness, fairness of fruit, uniform bearing and superior quality. Th...
-The Ground Cherry
Under this name Mr. P. S. BERRS, of Southville, Conn., has sent us fruit of a species of Solanwm. It is about the siZe and shape of a Cherry, of a cream color, and enveloped in a dry, paper-like calyx...
-Ground Plan Of Houses, Showing Cross-Walls Beneath The Vine Borders. Section
When this was completed, dwarf walls, marked 3, were built across the border, three and a half feet apart, one foot square, in the pigeon-hole manner: on the top of these walls are laid rough flags; t...
-Grounds For Farm Houses
The grounds which are about a farmer's dwelling are of more or less importance, and they should be studied and looked after by the farmer himself. The ordinary manner in which farmers look npon this s...
-A Group of Summer Pears
Very few of oar summer fruits are hardy, well-shaped trees, though nearly all are good bearers. Madeleine comes first in eating. In Europe, as far north as the 55th degree of lat, it ripens always at ...
-Grouping
Probably one of the greatest attractions of English gardens is the art displayed in combining together shrubs and trees, which give such bold relief to their noble grounds. This system, termed groupi...
-Grouping And Blending
There are few things, says a recent writer, requiring more careful consideration, prudent forethought, and a clearer perception of ultimate results, and the grouping and blending of these with sur...
-Grouping Trees
In the arrangement of trees at the time of planting or thinning, two principles require to be respected: first, always to maintain a balance in the composition; and second, there should be form and va...
-Growing Almonds
A SAN JOSE, Cal., correspondent of the Pacific Press gives the following hints on the culture of the Almond: Select from the nursery trees that have been grafted or budded on peach stocks, and those ...
-Growing And Fruiting Dwarf Pears
The planting and growing of Dwarf Pears yearly increases, but comparatively slow in accordance with what would be supposed from the acknowledged fact of their correct cultivation being profitable in a...
-Growing Callas
Not long since I was at a friend's, and, N on going through her conservatory, was much struck with the luxuriant growth of a Calla. The leaves were home on stems three feet or more in length, and suc...
-Growing Evergreens From. Seed
At the last meeting of the Kansas Horticultural Society, Mr. Robert Douglas related his experience in growing evergreens from seed, his mode of culture, transplanting and pruning. He saw no reason why...
-Growing Forest Trees
R. S. Elliott, the great Kansas tree planter, gives'the following directions for starting certain forest trees: The white ash can be grown from seed planted in drills, and then cultivated, thinning o...
-Growing Isabella Grapes
Mr. Editor, - A hint is as good as a kick, and your Hints on Grape Culture have been of great service to me this year. To show you how I have profited under your instructions, I send you a basket of...
-Growing Melons In Pots
Since the increased attention given to orchard house culture of late, every thing relating to the cultivation of fruits in pots is read with interest Mr. Robert Fish, in a late number of the Engli...
-Growing Mushrooms In Winter
/. B. (Philadelphia.) Nothing is easier than to produce a crop of mushrooms under the stage or under the walk of a green-house, if the walk is one made partly open of wooden slats. All you want is mus...
-Growing Through Winter
There is no difficulty in growing and fruiting the Tomato through the winter and spring months, where such is desired. Indeed, no fruit-bearing plant is more easy to manage thus artificially, with the...
-Growth By Magic
All Paris has been marvelling, for some time past, at the exhibition, by a M. Hebert, of a process by which the this gentleman causes the blossoms of plants to burst into bloom instantaneously. No one...
-Growth Of Different Varieties Of The Pear On Quince Stock
Last summer, in looking over a small orchard of Dwarf Pear-trees planted in the spring of 1857, I made the following hasty notes in regard to the vigor and general appearance of the different varietie...
-Growth Of Different Varieties Of The Pear On Quince Stock. Part 2
Bartlett This universal favorite is rather uncertain on the quince, unless double-worked. Some trees will do as well as one could wish, growing and fruiting finely, while others with the same treatme...
-Growth Of Different Varieties Of The Pear On Quince Stock. Part 3
One of the most vigorous. Forms a handsome head. Sterling Growing moderately. Beurre Langlier Very thrifty indeed. Among the varieties which have been thoroughly tested, and may always be relied ...
-The Guano Island
An officer of the U.S. ship Independence, gives us a poor account of the Guano Island they have been in search of. It proved of no value whatever, had no landing-place, is in a rainy district, and the...
-Guano, And Quince Stocks
During a brief visit, last autumn, to an intelligent cultivator, who resides in New Jersey, on the banks of the Delaware, some 20 miles above Philadelphia, and who grows fruit and vegetables for that ...
-The Guava Fruited At Cleveland
We find the following in the 0hio Farmer: - The Guava (Psidium Cattluanum.) - Editor Ohio Farmer. - Sir: I herewith send you a fruit of the Guava (Psidium). It was produced by a tree, in my greenhous...
-Gutta Percha
Great interest naturally attaches to a plant furnishing an important material like gutta percha, which has been found to be adapted to so many useful purposes. The concrete juice of the. tree was know...
-H. E. Hooker
The list of pears is so good - unexceptionable, in fact - that I cannot add to it. H. E. Hooker #1 This Society has heard, at a former meeting, a very elaborate report by Mr. H. N. Doolittle about t...
-H. . Hooker, Of Monroe County
Rebecca with me has not grown well enough. It does not make very strong wood upon my place; and the foliage sunburns. Am cultivating the Delaware, both upon an open trellis and trained upon the south ...
-Habits Of The Gopher Of Illinois. Geomys Bursarius
I send to the Institution a young Gopher, a little more than half grown, which I hope will reach yon in safety. If he arrives alive, take a flour barrel and fill it half full of moist earth, potatoes,...
-Haerothamnus Corynbosus
The Corymb - flowered Habrotkammu. This plant is an erect, much-branched shrub, with somewhat herbaceous stems, and alternate, large, ovate-lanceolate leaves, attached to the stems by a start-stalk. T...
-Hail Storm In May
We witnessed next morning the deplorable effects of a hail storm which occurred at Plainfleld, New Jersey, on the evening of the 24th of May last It would appear to have been extremely local, as no no...
-Hamilton College Grounds
In vol. 4, New Series of the Horticulturist, page 276, is a diagram of these grounds, with a notice of some improvements then contemplated. The trustees had placed the matter in the hands of a committ...
-Hampden Horticultural Society
The first exhibition of this society for the present season, took place on Friday at Springfield, Mass, The display of flowers, fruits, and vegetables, was highly creditable to the taste and skill of ...
-A Handsome Ornamental Tree. The Abies Albertiana
THIs beautifnl evergreen has not as yet been cultivated in this country, and we doubt whether it is even known upon the catalogues of our most extensive nurserymen. The plant is a native of Oregon and...
-Handy Helps To Useful Knowledge
Under this title is publishing in London a series of penny treatises on whatever may be the topics of the day. They are inarvelously cheap, and necessarily on very varied themes - from Eclipses to ...
-Hanging Baskets
Many readers are, no doubt, in a state of doubt as to what plants to select for their winter hanging baskets and vases. For this purpose we would strongly recommend the finer Tropaeolums. None are muc...
-A Hanging Basket Of Ferns
In this number is published a handsome illustration of a basket of ferns of rare character. It is modeled after one illustrated in The Gardener's Chronicle last year. It is constructed of wire, from s...
-The Happy Pomologist
Mr. Editor : - It is so rarely that we encounter in our 'go-ahead'country, true instances of rational contentment, which are the just result of wise and well regulated efforts in life, that the simple...
-The Happy Pomologist. Continued
And while refering to this division of our distinguished Pomologist's industry, I must not omit to mention the quarto volumes in which he has so beautifully and accurately painted, in water colore, al...
-Hardihood Of Hollyhocks
A correspondent suggests, or, rather, says, that we are wrong in classing the hollyhocks in our last number as perfectly hardy, because he says that while young plants will winter perfectly, the seco...
-Hardihood Of Pints Excelsa
Some six years since I planted, for a gentleman now deceased, several of the pinus excelsa. The ground is a stiff clay subsoil, only surface-drained ; top soil a good clay loam of about eight inches d...
-Hardihood Of Plants And Trees
It has long been our impression, that many trees and plants introduced from abroad, as well as grown by skillful American growers, would be hardy were they not over-stimulated in their growths either ...
-Hardihood of Apple-Trees
The rapidly increasing settlement and cultivation of our northwestern territory, together with the increased interest and attention given to fruit-growing, is demanding a knowledge of all the items te...
-Hardiness Of Flower Seeds
Every spring I look over my flower beds before spading, in order to ascertain what plants are coming up from self-sown seed of the previous autumn For several years I have never failed of an abundant ...
-Hardiness Of Non-Coniferous Plants In England
The following information, although in reference to an English climate, will not be without interest to collectors of new and rare plants in this country, as it indicates what may reasonably be expect...
-Hardiness Of Plants
The amount of cold that plants are capable of resisting is a question of much interest to fruit cultivators; and it becomes the more interesting when we reflect that this power is dependent upon circu...
-Hardy Annuals
In selecting varieties of hardy annuals, seek rather a few of those that bloom freely and grow vigorously, than to make your collection one of varieties. Very little satisfactory effect can be obtaine...
-Hardy Cherries
We received on the 28th of June, from B. B. Kirtland, Esq., of Greenbush, N. Y., samples of two varieties of seedling cherries - called Mary and Christiana, that seem to us worthy of the attention of ...
-Hardy Clematises
We have long known, and ere this spoken, of the great merit of some new hybrids and varieties of Clematis recently raised, but we had no sufficient idea of their capabilities till we visited the nurse...
-Hardy Ferns
No class of plants affords as much satisfaction to the grower the year throughout as do the native hardy ferns. Our forests, in many sections, abound with them in great variety, and at this season of ...
-Hardy Ferns, Native And British, By J. B., Geneva, New York
Dear Sir: Permit me to offer through the pages of the Horticulturist, a few remarks on this beautiful class of plants, which appears to be greatly neglected by the people of this country, especially a...
-Hardy Fruit
The extreme severity of the weather that we have experienced has caused great destruction among plants, and much anxiety is felt with regard to its effect on the coming fruit season. These visitations...
-Hardy Grapes
H. N. Langworthy would like to have gentlemen talk freely about the best method of cultivating the Grape. The finest Grapes, he often observed, were those that were grown on part of vines that had run...
-Hardy Perennials
The rural flower-garden, where little labor can be given, and that generally from those of more zeal than knowledge of the cultivation of flowers, is best made up from perennials. As a rule, any good ...
-Hardy Rhododendrons
At a late meeting of the West New York Horticultural Society, the information was elicited that the Rhododendron Catawbiense was the only sort that proved per-fectly hardy. In the latitude of New York...
-Hardy Seedling Peaches
The difficulty of growing and fruiting peach-trees in many locations makes every item of information toward overcoming it valuable. In a late number of the Country Gentleman, A Babcock gives an accoun...
-Hardy Shrubs
It is better to plant out in the fall than in spring. Fall-planted shrubs will often give many flowers the following summer, and make more vigorous growth than those planted in spring. Clean the Grou...
-Hardy Trees
It is interesting to note the hardiness of various trees or shrubs not yet well known in the country. Though the past winter has not been a cold one in the northern states, yet the alternation of heat...
-Hardy Trees And Shrubs - Planting And Arrangement
As in the animal kingdom man holds the first rank in regard to external circumstances, so do trees and shrubs hold precisely the same rank in the kingdom of vegetable nature. In their structure they a...
-Hardy White Grape - The King
As new varieties of grapes are occupying a good deal of attention at present, it may, perhaps, interest the readers of the Horticulturist to have a description of a new white grape, which seems to be ...
-Harmonizing Influence Of Horticulture
Mr. Editor, - In these times of partisan strife and disorder it is pleasant to call to mind the peaceful and harmonizing influence of horticultural pursuits. The recent national convention of pomologi...
-Harmony Of Colors In Flowers
One of the obscure points of science is the cause of the harmony of colors always observed in flowers. An exchange states that when two colors are found, they are generally complements of each other. ...
-Hartford Co. Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of the Hartford County Horticultural Society, the following officers were chosen for the year ensuing, and it was voted that a list of the same be forwarded for publication in th...
-Hartford County Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of the Hartford County Horticultural Society, held April 2,1853, the following gentlemen were chosen as officers for the year, viz: President WILLIAM W. TURNER. 1st Vice Presi...
-Hartford Prolific Grape
Raised by Mr. Steel, of Hartford, Connecticut: Hardy, vigorous and productive. We refer to one of our best authorities, our well-informed friend Charles Downing, Esq. We agree with him in all points...
-The Hartford Prolific Grape And Boston Pear
About six years since I sent to Hovey's Magazine an account of the Hartford Prolific Grape; it may be found in No. CCVII. page 114. At'the time it was thought to be too modest a statement by those who...
-Have Plants The Power To Create?
In a former number of this journal I queried whether Prof. Lindley meant to express it as his opinion that plants sometimes created silex and other minerals. The editor answers in the affirmative, at ...
-Have We Any Botanists Among Us?
In looking over the last Report of the Department of Agriculture, nothing was so encouraging as the progress in scientific phraseology visible over the entire volume. Whether the information itself is...
-Hawlet Or Douse Apple
Having been able to exhibit fine specimens of the Hawley apple at the Convention at Philadelphia, on the 13th of the present month, and flndiug them highly approved by gentlemen there, who were co...
-Health From Flowers
It is reported that an Italian professor has discovered that perfumes from flowers have a chemical effect on the atmosphere, converting its oxygen into ozone, and thus increasing its health-imparting ...
-Healthy Apricot Trees
Dear Sir - Observing the weight you give to shielding tender trees from the sun in summer, and rapid freezing and thawing in winter, I was induced to apply the practice to my aprtcot trees - the only ...
-Heat And Light - Acclimation
Fruit only obeys the general laws which regulate the formation of vegetable secretions. Heat and light are unquestionably the agents, though perhaps not the sole agents, upon which all the qualities o...
-Heat, Ventilation,, Rain
In the best plant houses, the pipes for heating the building are placed immediately fronting the ventilators, in the basement wall, so that all the air admitted into the house from below, must necessa...
-Heaths
J Tyro, (New-Bedford.) Thedif. ficulty which many complain of in growing heaths in this country, is in the hot and dry summer climate. The roots of all heaths are inpatient of extreme dryness. The mos...
-Heating Apparatus For Horticultural Glass-Houses
As at this time of the year our heating apparatus, for artificial culture, is inactive operation, a few practical remarks relating thereto may be of service to some of your readers. We all know that ...
-Heating By Gas
The greatest difficulty experienced by the residents in large towns who desire to cultivate plants on their balconies, or, as some say, who would wish to have Hanging Gardens, is to find some satisfac...
-Heating Houses
The length of time that has elapsed since the general introduction of coal has been so considerable, that it is astonishing so little economy has been studied in saving fuel, and employing the whole, ...
-Hedges
In directing osage orange hedges to be shortened or shorn annually, we mean both leading shoots and side shoots; but the latter require less shortening than the former, because they grow with less vig...
-The Hedge Orchard House
Some thirty years since, I planted numerous beech hedges for shelter; these stand with their ends S. E. and N. W. A few years ago their S. W. sides looked such compact green walls, 8 feet high, that I...
-Hedge Plant
Mr. Editor : - Now that some attention is being paid to the subject of good hedge plants, I would beg to suggest for trial by those experimenting, a native, which seems to have all the qualities of a ...
-Hedges - A Premium Offered
THE importance of suitable enclosures for farms and gardens, as well as for ornament and screens, has long exercised the thoughts of cultivators, and the best has not yet ceased to be a problem that m...
-Hedges And Evergreens
A complete Manual for the Cultivation, Pruning and Management of all Plants suitable for American Hedging; to which is added a Treatise on Evergreens. By John A. Warder, M. D. New York: A. O. Moore, 1...
-Heintzia Tigrina. Nat. Ord. Gerneriacea
This desirable gesneriaceous plant is figured and described by Dr. Flanohon, in the 7th volume of the Flore des Serres. As this tribe of plants is, generally speaking, well suited to our conservatorie...
-The Hemlcock Sprcck. Abie Canadenris
The Hemlock, common in all portions of our Union, possesses features of elegance and beauty unlike that of any other hardy variety. When standing alone, or on the outskirts of small groups, its dark y...
-The Hemlock
We are pleased to notice the Hemlock is attracting more attention. We consider it, beyond all question, the roost graceful, the most beautiful tree of the evergreen family indigenous to North America ...
-The Hemlock (Finns Canadensis)
Of all ornamental plants for this climate the Hemlock stands among the first in beauty, but like all the most beautiful things in this beautiful world, it is among the most expensive and tedious to pr...
-Hensel's Early Seedling Cherry
I inclose a few specimens of a seedling cherry which I believe will prove valuable. The original tree, of some age, stands on the property of Mr. G. W. Zahm, in the city of Lancaster, Pa.; the propert...
-Hepatica Acutiloba And Americana, (Liverleaf.)
These species resemble each other in their spotted lobed leaves, and in their numerous delicate blue and white flowers, and they You must follow me without particular invitation, as we visit, during ...
-Herbaceous Grafting
Grafting ligneous or other plants while in a state of active growth is usually termed Herbaceous grafting. The manner of uniting the cion to the stock is very similar, and in many instances the same a...
-Herbaceous Plants (2)
WE have no greater proof of the increasing love for flowers, than is afforded by the general inclination to once more pay especial attention to the class of plants above named. Fashion, with her unyie...
-Herbemont
Dr. Warder: Thin skin, fine for wine and table; not hardy; compact shouldered; does well in Southern Indiana, 111., and Mo. Steele, N. C; With us regarded as superior to the Catawba for wine. Added to...
-Hermann, Missouri, June 25,1856. J. J. Suns, Btq
In the May number of your Horticulturist, I found a notice to the Corresponding Secretaries of the horticultural societies, to send in their names, as you intend to publish a list of them. This seems ...
-Hertford County Horticultural Society
The annual meeting of the Hartford County Horticultural Society, was held on the 3d inst, and the following officers were chosen for the ensuing year, Afred Smith Esq., the President, declining a re-e...
-Hexamer's Pronged Hoe
We have used this implement, and consider it one of the most valuable garden tools in our possession. For working among strawberry plants, root crops, or any vegetables planted in rows, it will do dou...
-The Hiacinth
There is hardly a flower in cultivation so generally a favorite as the hyacinth, and certainly not one which so gratefully repays the attention bestowed upon it. There is not a medium capable of retai...
-Hibiscus (Rosa Sinensis) Punicena
A very attractive stove plant, of a remarkably dense and close-growing habit, as compared with others of this well-known, showy species. The leaves are shortly and broadly ovate, of a deep green color...
-High Training For Fruit-Trees
Dr. Swasey, of the Southern Horticulturist, gives up the pyramidal system of training pear trees, and now advocates high training altogether. He explains the system as follows : Lat spring we receive...
-A Hill Side Cottage. From New Edition Downing Cottage Residences
THIs cottage was designed for a situation where the ground descends very rapidly away from the line of the front, and this peculiarity was taken advantage of to get a kitchen and servant's rooms below...
-A Hint For Exhibitors
The Cottage Gardener has the following remarks- on staging plants at'exhibitions: The managers here have introduced a new and grand improvemenl on the former systems of exhibiting plants; the greates...
-Hints 0n Grape Culture
OUR last article left the vine at the close of the second year, ready to be pruned. Whether the pruning be done in the fall or spring, the operation will be the same. The best time to prune will form ...
-Hints About Trees
The following hints are so good, we regret our inability to quote with proper credit, but give them as we found them: For a border tree, hardy, erect, quick-growing, comely in outline and beautiful i...
-Hints For Country Houses
I think I could take that old home of Sir Waltrr Ra-uuqb's, and by throwing a long low veranda along the front, and shifting the chimneys into the body of it, make a very respectable affair in the way...
-Hints For Country Houses. See Frontispiece
We have engraved for our frontispiece this month, a view of a very interesting old Eng-lish building - known as Hayes farm, in Devonshire. It is doubly interesting to us. First, as having been the bir...
-Hints For Landscape Gardening
If buildings, vases, statuary, and other artificial works, are constantly recurring in very extensive gardens, they do not produce the variety which is sought for, but produce endless monotony. So man...
-Hints For Management
1, Uncover vines as early as they are'perfectly safe from any sudden check, or in this climate; about the first of May. 2. Force the growth as much as possible, by opening the house late and closing ...
-Hints For The Season
Owing to the backwardness of the spring, kitchen garden crops will be later than usual in many parts of the country; the first sowing, both in frames and in the open ground, were lost through sudden c...
-Hints For Young Gardeners
We quite agree with our good friend Jeffreys in his remarks contained in the September number, that want of taste amongst us, and too much anxiety about dollars and cents, is fearfully impeding our en...
-Hints For Young Gardeners. From The Frauendorfer Blatter
Cultivate nothing, carelessly. Whatever is worth cultivating at all, is worth cultivating diligently and well. Many kinds of garden seeds lose their germinating power when more than a year old. There...
-Hints On Bedding Out
As the time for planting the bedding out plants, where they are to form the great display of the flower garden, has arrived, it cannot be too strongly urged upon those who have this work to do, that s...
-Hints On Fruit Rooms By M. P. Wilder, Boston
We extract by permission, from a private letter of January fast, from Hon. M. P. Wildes, the following notes regarding the construction of a fruit-room, which will interest many of our fruit growers. ...
-Hints On Grape Culture
THERE can be little doubt, we think, that the grape is destined to play an important part in fruit culture. The grape will be very extensively cultivated, not only for the table, but for the manufactu...
-Hints On Grape Culture (2)
THE plan which we have laid down now brings us to that part of our subject which treats of the Best Time to Plant. As with many other parts of grape culture, so here, there is some diversity of opinio...
-Hints On Grape Culture (3)
MUCH as we love the subject of grape culture, we ap. proach our next topic with some misgivings, produced in a great measure by the effects of the past winter. We may not, it is true, have another su...
-Hints On Grape Culture (4)
NOT having yet said any thing in regard to the Proper Age for Planting', and the character of the plants, the present would seem to be a proper time for a few seasonable hints on this part of our subj...
-Hints On Grape Culture (5)
WE have as yet said nothing specially relating to the food of the vine. We remarked in one of our early articles, that the vine would grow in almost any soil; yet it has its wants, special and otherwi...
-Hints On Grape Culture (6)
THE subject of composts and manures having been left un-finished in our last, we propose adding a few additional hints here. We have already given muck a very prominent place in the compost heap; its ...
-Hints On Grape Culture (7)
A SUBSCRIBER would like to hear something now about the kind of stakes to be used in the vineyard, so that he may be getting them out during the winter. Our own thoughts had been running that way, a...
-Hints On Grape Culture (8)
IN the progress of these grape articles, there will be occasion, especially when treating of training the vine, to make use of technical terms, which may not be understood by the novice. Different ind...
-Hints On Grape Culture (9)
IN the present article we shall finish our description of the vine, so far as may be necessary to understand the meaning of the leading technical terms hereafter to be used. The roots, trunk, etc., wi...
-Hints On Grape Culture (10)
THE ground having been prepared, the vines selected and planted, and all preliminary operations performed, we will now give our attention to the care of the vineyard during the first year of its life....
-Hints On Grape Culture (11)
OUR last article was devoted mainly to the cultivation of crops between the rows of vines. The present will treat chiefly of training. It fortunately happens that the training of the vine during the f...
-Hints On Grape Culture (12)
HAVING gone through with the first year's care of the vineyard, we proceed seriatim with a description of the second year's routine. The treatment of the vine during the second year does not differ ve...
-Hints On Grape Culture (13)
IT may as well be stated here that we purpose taking up and following out one system of training at a time. The attempt to describe several modes at the same time must inevitably produce confusion. Th...
-Hints On Grape Culture (14)
IN our last we left the vines pruned at the end of the second year, and placed in their winter quarters, from which we now propose to bring them forth; that is to say, as soon as the frost is out of t...
-Hints On Grape Culture (15)
WE now propose to finish our last article, relating to the formation of arms. Our present description, it must be borne in mind, has special reference to the vineyard, though it will do for the garden...
-Hints On Grape Culture (16)
IN our former article we have thrown out, in as few words as possible, some necessary hints in regard to exposure and shelter. The latter is a matter of the first importance, to which little attention...
-Hints On Grape Culture (17)
HAVING selected a proper site for the vineyard, and examined the nature of the soil, it becomes important next to prepare it for the reception of the vines by some thorough mode of preparation. There ...
-Hints On Grape Culture (18)
THE ground being now prepared for the reception of the vines, it becomes necessary to consider the best mode of planting them. The act of planting is one of the most interesting and important operatio...
-Hints On Grape Culture (18). Continued
If the sides of the trench are made a little sloping, the wash, even during heavy rains, will be trifling, and do no harm. The reason of this open trench will become apparent in the subsequent treatme...
-Hints On Pear Culture
WE have already intimated that we purposed devoting a portion of our space to the cultivation of the pear. There are many among our readers who make the pear, especially as dwarfed on the quince, an o...
-Hints On Plant-Growing In Living-Rooms
Many persons are either deterred from, or misled in, growing plants in living-rooms by reading the lugubrious nonsense written about the danger of keeping plants in such situations after nightfall, or...
-Hints On Planting Ornamental Trees, With Particnlar Reference To Coniferae
For some years there has been an unusual degree of interest taken in evergreen coniferous trees. The amount of money expended on this class of trees is, we believe, without a parallel in the history o...
-Hints On Planting Ornamental Trees, With Particnlar Reference To Coniferae. Continued
It is also an excellent system to employ crates for preparing trees intended for removal, even to favorable situations. By using them larger and stronger, large and valuable specimens may be removed ...
-Hints On Roses
The following short epitome of rose-treatment contains all that is really necessary to be said on the subject: - Be not afraid of using the knife; one eye is enough to leave of any branch of the last ...
-Hints On Rural Architecture. Boathouses And Playhouses
Some of the readers of the Horticulturist who are so fortunate as to reside on the shores of the smaller lakes so numerous in our northern States, may be glad to learn the experience of a dweller in a...
-Hints On The Culture Of Standard Plants. From The London Horticultural Magazine
How strange a confirmation of the truism, Too much familiarity breeds contempt, may- be found in the world of flowers and plants! The most beautiful things in the vegetable kingdom are neglected whe...
-Hints On The Gathering And Ripening Of Summer Fruits
WE believe that full three-fourths of all the summer fruits consumed in this country, reach the hands of consumers in a totally unfit state for the use of human beings who are not prepared to commit s...
-Hints On The Gathering And Ripening Of Summer Fruits. Continued
Currants, when intended for the table in a raw state, should be quite ripe, otherwise their sharp acidity will render them unfit for use. Currants look ripe a long time before they really are so. Like...
-Hints On The Management Of Small Gardens
ONE of the finest features in the country towns of America, is that almost every dwelling has its garden - small in many cases it may be, but still a garden, and capable of yielding many of the comfor...
-Hints On The Rearing And Management Of Tress
VAST sums of money are annually spent in this country on trees; it would be impossible to make a close estimate of the amount, but we can not be very far out of the way in putting it at a million of d...
-Hints On The Rearing And Management Of Tress. Continued
The tree in the open field, exposed on all sides, requires an ample supply of both. It grows moderately; its trunk is stout; its wood is firm, compact, and hardy; its bark thick; its roots numerous, w...
-Hints On Transplanting
IN our last number we endeavored to call attention to certain points in the nursery management of young trees, necessary to prepare them for successful removal. We now propose to offer a few suggestio...
-Hints On Transplanting. Continued
Draining and subsoil plowing are the two great improving operations of modern farming; and they are by far more important to the orchardist and all who grow and plant trees, than to the farmer who cul...
-Hints To Beginners In Ornamental Planting
HOW shall I lay out my grounds? Where shall I ran my walks and roads, where plant evergreens and where deciduous trees, where make groups and where not, where put my summer-house, and where my flowers...
-Hints To Beginners In Ornamental Planting. Continued
When within the gates of our own premises, we wish to feel that we are lords of the soil, that we may lay aside formal restraint, may wear our oldest coat and most shocking hat, may romp and roll on t...
-Hints To The Purchasers Of Trees, Seeds
O pursuit or profession in life, however useful or honorable it may be, or however purifying and ennobling its tendencies, is wholly exempt from the evils of dishonesty. Not even the most sacred of ...
-Hints To The Purchasers Of Trees, Seeds. Continued
All manner of frauds are perpetrated, day after day and year after year, upon a credulous public, and yet the last reaps as rich a harvest as the first We have therefore but little hope that anything ...
-Hints for The Season
The winter over a great portion of the country has been very changeable, and on the whole what may be called severe upon trees and plants ranked as tender; yet up to this time we are not aware that fr...
-A Historical Essay On Taste
Is approaching a subject so varied and extensive as the Origin and Progress of Taste in Art, now principally in Architecture, it would not, I think, be unbecoming to request in-dulgence for the errors...
-A Historical Essay On Taste. Part 2
Here are the palaces, where their kings dwelt; the temples where their priests deceived; the tombs which have given up their dead for the daily inspection of the curious in modern museums, where death...
-A Historical Essay On Taste. Part 3
The bulk of their walls certainly seems proved by modern discovery; and we have also good reason to believe they had considerable power to work in metals. Altogether their taste was for the great and ...
-The Historical Magazine, And Notes And Queries
Concerning The Antiquities, History, And Biography Of America. This Megasine was commenced in January, 1857, for the purpose of furnishing a medium of intercommunication between Historical Societies,...
-The Historical Magazine, And Notes And Queries Concening The Antiquities, History, And Biography Of America
Ton Magazine was commenced in January, 1857, for the purpose of furnishing a medium of intercommunication between Historical Societies, Authors, and Students of History, and supplying an Interesting a...
-Historical Notes On The Strawberry
We last month gave an extract from Landmarks, containing Dr. Grant's mode of culture and preferences as respects the strawberry. We now give another extract, containing some very interesting historica...
-The History Of A Garden-Frame. Written By Itself
Yes! gentle reader, (as we used to say in the old-fashioned times - and I am an old-fashioned body in my way,) Written by itself. And why not? In these days we have tables and chairs dancing polkas...
-Hitter Pear
Specimens were received from Mr. Louis Bitter, of Beading, Pennsylvania. The tree from which they were obtained was purchased in the spring of 1851, for the Seckel, from an agent of Mr. John Perkins, ...
-Holcus Saccharatum, Sorghum Saccharatus, Or Chinese Sugar- Cane
This is another plant of late introduction from China, and which is now sought after in all sections of the Union, wherever its name and fame have been sounded. This plant will grow from Maine to Flor...
-The Holly
The Horticulturist, of late, has been bringing into public notice one of our brightest and most attractive evergreens, our own holly; with its living green leaves contrasted with its red berries, and,...
-The Holly (Bex Opaca)
Among the neglected evergreens of our country, the American Holly stands conspicuous, both for its beauty at all seasons, its patience of the shears, and the red berry, valuable as it is for the eye, ...
-The Holly Tree, (Ilex Opaca)
The best trees, like the best people, are the rarest; possibly we attach more interest to the rare, both in trees and in the human species, by an unjust standard; yet in the former, the slowness of gr...
-Hollyhocks
A Gardener. We have no doubt, if you grow these from seed, you will raise both new and desirable varieties, but you should plant a dozen plants of opposite colors together in a bed; and next year cros...
-Home
The favorite sitting-rooms of many families in Paris and Berlin, as the evening hour comes on, are the balconies and terraces near the roofs of the houses, under the shade of trellises covered with fl...
-Home Adornment
Placed a simple glass stand of some choice pattern, and neatly filled with the most slender, graceful vines and ferns that could be procured. The base was unusually flat and shallow, with the broad fr...
-A Home Among The Evergreens
A pleasant visit of an hour or two was afforded us lately at the farm and nursery grounds of Robert Douglass & Sons, Waukegan, Illinois. Mr. Douglass' residence is surrounded on all sides by evergreen...
-Home Decorations In Winter
MANY pleasant and suggestive papers have been written on the subject of house decoration, and the arts of design have been put to useful purpose in the cultivation of refined tastes. It is so simple a...
-The Home Education Of The Rural Districts
WHILE the great question of Agricultural Schools is continually urged upon our legislatures, and, as yet, continually put off with fair words, let us see if there is not room for great improvement in ...
-The Home Education Of The Rural Districts. Part 2
We are glad to see and record such signs of daybreak - in the shape of a recognition of the low social state which we deplore, and a cry for reform - which now and then make themselves heard, here and...
-The Home Education Of The Rural Districts. Part 3
Let the table which has always stood under the looking glass, against the wall, be wheeled into the room, and plenty of useful (not ornamental) books and periodicals be laid upon it. When evening come...
-Home Gardens
IT is difficult to name a list of roses suitable for out-door gardens in all parts of the country. We find that roses bloom and grow far more rigorously the farther southward they are cultivated. A ro...
-Home Gardening
Andrew S. Fuller commends the following List in the Rural New Yorker: Twelve Hardy Shrubs In this list I shall name the most hardy as well as beautiful. Amygdalus Pumila Double rose-colored almond...
-A Home In The Country
What a pleasant subject! How many associations cluster around a home in the country. Is there such a thing as a home in the city? Doubtless; but it is a very different and much less lovable thing t...
-A Home In The Country (2)
We now come to the arranging and preparing the ornamental grounds, adopting the style which has been termed beautiful. A most prominent feature, which may be said to belong to this style, is the lawn....
-A Home In The Country (3)
In planting the ornamental grounds about our home in the country, let us remember that we are seeking variety in unity. Contrasts, then, are admissible, and often desirable, but incongruity is to be a...
-The Home Of The Late A. J. Downing
When such a man as Downing dies - a man whose life has been eminently useful and beautiful - the world desires to know more of him. Many who in his life-time neither knew Mr. Downing nor felt any inte...
-The Homestead
With the new year The Homestead has put on a new dress, which we like better than the old one. It is now published in the octavo form, with twenty-four pages of matter instead of sixteen. The price re...
-Homewards
The ride from Portland to Boston offers glimpses of many good towns and settlements, but a rail car does not afford opportunities for inspection, much less for description. From Boston to New York, vi...
-The Honey Locust (Gleditchia Triacanihos)
This plant Mr. Reid has always considered the best for farm hedges, and we are disposed to agree with him ; after twenty years trial he is satisfied that it is more easily kept and better adapted for ...
-The Honey Peach
Well may this fine fruit be termed the Honey, as it is, undoubtedly, the sweetest of all peaches. Its shape is very peculiar, being a long oval, with a sharp, recurved point at the extremity. The s...
-The Honey Peach Of China
For the history and a drawing of this fruit I refer to the first volume of the Horticulturist, page 382. I obtained from my friend Mr, Chas, Downing, about three years ago, cuttings from the seedlings...
-Honeysuckles
Seldom do we see an American article on Honeysuckles, but English gardeners are alive to their beauties, and here is a beautiful as well as a practical contribution to the literature of climbing vines...
-The Honeysuckle As A Standard
A writer in The Villa Gardener thinks that the Honeysuckle is one of the most regularly flowered climbers in cultivation, taking rank for effect, and surpassing in many points - odor for instance - ev...
-Horace Greeley's Address Before The Indiana State Agricultural Society
We have not in many a year read an Address of this kind with so much interest as we have this. The main points are: Economy of Means; Necessity and Importance of Science; Draining, Deep Plowing, an...
-Horace Walpole On Gardens
Dear Sir: I have Just been reading over Horace Walpole's History of Taste in Modern Gardening, an essay written about one hundred years ago; I think it might be worthy of reprinting; it would make abo...
-The Horse Chestnut
Botanists describe only two species of this tree in the United States, namely, the large Yellow, and Ohio Buckeye or Horse Chestnut. The value of the American Horse Chestnut consists mainly in the be...
-The Horticultural And Agricultural Exhibition
We call the particular attention of our readers to the great Annual Exhibitions to take place this fall. Many, we fear, are not aware of the advantages to be derived from these gatherings, when proper...
-Horticultural And Agricultural Periodicals
While, with a pardonable partiality, we would commend our own Magazine strongly to our friends, we are not insensible to the merits of others, and herewith append a list of the various Agricultural an...
-Horticultural Books
One of our subscribers writes us inquiring as to books on different horticultural subjects, and remarks that he considers it short-sightedness in agricultural and horticultural book publishers that t...
-Horticultural Club Of Poughkeepsie
There is a Club at Poughkeepsie by this name, who hold frequent conversational meetings, and an occasional exhibition. They seem to be doing a good work, and we hope they will continue in it. In June ...
-Horticultural Courtesy
To one whose knowledge of human nature has been derived from intimacy with men in the crowded avenues of trade, the noisy political caucus, or the contaminating precincts of the bar-room, the country ...
-Horticultural Department New York State Fair
The following are the Premiums on Fruit and Flowers, awarded at the N. Y.State Fair. We are indebted to the Secretary for a correct list. Flowers .PROFESSIONAL List John Hewitt, gardener to Alfred B...
-Horticultural Department Of Pennsylvania State Agricultural Society's Exhibition
As many of our readers ore aware, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, by the recommendation of its special committee, abandoned its Fall exhibition and united with the Pennsylvania State Agricultu...
-Horticultural Department Of The Provincial Fair, Upper Canada
The floral hall, which is at all times the principal attraction, was situated on the summit of the elevation. It was one hundred and twenty feet long by eighty feet broad, forming a center hall about ...
-Horticultural Display At Saratoga
The arrangements made for the display of horticultural products at Saratoga were decidedly the worst we have ever seen made at any State Fair in this State, since the first. All preparations seem to h...
-Horticultural Display At Saratoga. Continued
Of vegetables there were a few small collections. The best were from Theodore Backus, of Rochester; N. Culver, of Wayne county; and P. Reilly, gardener to J. B. Finley, Esq., of Saratoga. Mr. Crosman,...
-Horticultural Exbitions
The Twbnty-seventh Annual Exhibition of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, was held in Philadelphia on the 11th, 12th, and 13th of September. As no hall could be found large enough to accommodate...
-Horticultural Exhibitions
The season of our principal Horticultural Exhibitions for the year is just concluded, and a few words upon them may not be altogether useless. We have, in truth, been much gratified by the aspect of t...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Continued
Those who remember what our hot-house and green-house plants were ten years ago, must have gazed with unfeigned pleasure upon the many fine specimens which have this year decked the tables of our exhi...
-Horticultural Exhibition At Chiswick July 9
We take the following extracts from the Gardeners' Chronicle: Roses (cut) were shown in abundance, and maintaining as they did their freshness and fragrance well, they formed, as they generally do in...
-Horticultural Exhibition At Chiswick, Junk 11
The Gardeners' Chronicle says: The second meeting of the Horticultural Society took place last Saturday, at Chiswick. The day was one of the best possible in England: the sun shone brightly but fitf...
-Horticultural Fair At Auburn
Horticultural exhibitions in June, so as to include Roses, Strawberries, Ac, Ac., appear to be rapidly on the increase. Cayuga county has long been distinguished for her devotion to fruits and flowers...
-A Horticultural Guide Wanted For The Vicinity Of New York
M. 6. Bateham, of Painesville, Ohio, writes us as follows: Editor Horticulturist: In common with many other horticulturists, I am anticipating the pleasure of visiting your metropolis about the time ...
-Horticultural Meeting At Toledo, Ohio
At a meeting of the citizens of Toledo, convened July 2, 1858, in pursuance of a call published in the city papers, Matthew Johnson was called to the chair, and T. M Cooley appointed Secretary. On mo...
-Horticultural Notes
The horticultural season in Western Massachusetts has been prolific beyond our anticipations, and consequently of a nature to call for more vigorous action. Horticultural Notes #1 In response to the...
-Horticultural Notes From Michigan
Mr. Adaib has most opportunely opened a new country for our investigation - Michigan - a state from which your readers have not for a long time heard. One hundred and twenty-eight bushels of pears on ...
-Horticultural Notes On Country Seats
Dear Sir: Tour most admirable magazine is not one to which exception can often be justifiably taken - certainly not in any case where your own hand guides the pen, and but seldom in that of your corre...
-Horticultural Notes Prom Michigan
A. J. Downing, Esq. - Dear Sir: Your correspondent, Mr. Lewis F. Allen, in the March number of the Horticulturist, says he would give a trifle to know if the old French Pear trees on the Detroit riv...
-Horticultural Plough
Mr. Wilkinson, of the Mt. Airy Agricultural Institute, has lately read an interesting paper before the Philadelphia agricultural association on ploughs and tillage. He exhibited a plan of a horticultu...
-Horticultural Premiums Awarded At The Ohio State Fair
The following are the horticultural premiums awarded at the late State Fair, at Dayton, Ohio: Flowers. Professional List Mrs. W. Jennison, Dayton, variety of dahlias, $2. William Heaver, Cincinnati,...
-Horticultural Reminiscences
Progression is the great idea of this era and this community, and we move so rapidly that it becomes us occasionally to stand for a moment and look back, so that we may note the extent of our progress...
-The Horticultural Shows And Festivals
The month of September has been an unusually gay one among both the Agriculturists and Horticulturists all over the land. Shows have been numerous and fine, and in several instances they have closed w...
-Horticultural Societies (2)
The Cincinnati Horticultural Society met Saturday, Sept 10th, 1853, Dr. Mosher presiding. Minutes of the last meeting read and approved. M. T. Winter presented two reports of the Philadelphia Hortic...
-Horticultural Societies (3)
Errors of the Press must be forgiven in the hurry of new beginners, and the absence of the editor. We doubt not some few of the last pages of the July number were Greek instead of Latin to some of our...
-Horticultural Societies (4)
Under this head we propose to give, in a condensed form, the proceedings of Horticultural Societies. The Brooklyn Society has set them an example which they might well follow with advantage to themsel...
-Horticultural Societies (4). Continued
Dr. Grant undertakes it with reluctance, yet feels that he is able to treat the subject. First, the ground should be prepared of sufficient depth, which is easily done in Brooklyn, and we will go to t...
-Horticultural Societies, Etc. Brooklyn Horticultural Society
The regular Conversational Meeting was held January 28th. The President being ill, Mr. Barnes took the chair. Mrs. Humphries exhibited a basket of cut flowers. Mr. Brophy exhibited cut flowers. Mr. M...
-Horticultural Societies, Etc. Brooklyn Horticultural Society. Continued
The Society met again February 11th, the President in the chair. On the table were Ferneries and cut flowers from Mr. Bridgeman, seedling Carnations from Dailledouze and Zeller, a Wardian case, baske...
-Horticultural Societies. Brooklyn Horticultural Society
This flourishing community held their third and last general meeting on the 17th, 16th, and 19th of September, when upwards of $520 were distributed in prizes. To any person acquainted with horticult...
-Horticultural Societies. Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
The stated meeting of this Society was held in Concert Hall, on Tuesday evening, October 16,1855, the President in the chair. Premiums were awarded as follows, by the Committee on Plants and flowers: ...
-Horticultural Societies. Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (2)
The regular stated meeting of this Association was held on Tuesday evening, December 18, 1855, at Concert Hall, E. W. Keyser in the chair. Premiums were awarded by the Committee on Plants and Flowers...
-Horticultural Societies. Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (3)
The stated meeting of this Society occurred, at the Concert Hall, on Tuesday evening, August 19 1856, Dr W. D. Brinckle in the chair. Premiums were awards us follows, viz: - Committee On Plants And F...
-Horticultural Societies. Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (4)
The following comprises the premiums awarded by the Society at the Twenty-Eighth Autumnal Exhibition, held at Penn Square on the 16th, 17th, and 18th of September, 1856: Collection Of Plant Collecti...
-Horticultural Societies. Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (4). Continued
The Committee on Pears and Melons respectfully report the following awards: - Pears (native), collection, three specimens each, $10, Hovey & Co., Boston, Mass.; second, $5, Dr. J. K. Eshleman. Pears ...
-Horticultural Societies. The Forty-Sixth Annual Exhibition Of The Massachusetts
Horticultural Society Was held September 16th, 16th, 17th and 18th, and on the whole, was fully equal to the splendid exhibition of last year. The fruits were shown in the upper Horticultural Hall, an...
-The Forty-Sixth Annual Exhibition Of The Massachusetts. Continued
The show of vegetables was so uniformly good, that it is difficult to particularize. Perhaps the most interesting collections were the new varieties of potatoes, from B. K. Bliss & Son, of New York, a...
-Horticultural Society In New-York
The friends of Horticulture held a meeting at the Stuy-vesant Institute, on the 22d March, for the purpose of forming a Horticultural Society. On motion, R L. Pell was appointed Chairman, and George W...
-Horticultural Society Of Morrisania
J. Jay Smith, Esq. - As doubtless you feel interested in every thing passing round you, horticulturally, we take pleasure in informing you, that we have just succeeded in organizing a Horticulturist S...
-Horticultural Society Of The Valley Of The Genesee
The annual meeting of this Society was held at the Court House, in Rochester, on Monday, the 11th ult., W. A. Reynolds, the President of the Society, in the chair. The following officers of the previ...
-Horticultural Society's Garden, Turnham Green
One of the most interesting plants at present in flower here is the Pampas Gross of Brazil, (Gynerium argenteum) a good specimen of which is growing in the American garden, near its entrance. This pla...
-Horticultural Telegraphic News
The increasing interest felt in gardening and fruit operations I have sometimes thought may yet become so great that information thereon may hereafter be considered of as much value as some of the ite...
-Horticulture
If there be two topics most likely to occupy deservedly the attention and regards of Americans beyond all others, those topics will be found to be Agriculture and Horticulture. Our tastes, and our wan...
-Horticulture. Continued
Instances like this are not so rare as our readers may suppose. New York has but lately been supplied with grapes from Croton Point, by a gentleman of enterprise and good taste, to whom it might, in o...
-Horticulture And Landscape Gardening In England
An. Address, fry P. T. Quinn, before the Rural Club of N. Y. THE first view of the British Islands, as seen from the deck of a steamship, in the English channel, is strikingly beautiful and picturesq...
-Horticulture As An Ally Of Agriculture
One of our exchanges says: In the public mind there is some confusion in regard respective mission Wns of horticulture and agriculture. A recent writer has per case this way : Horticulture does not be...
-Horticulture As Novelties At Exeter
If the reader would wish to know what is doing in this country, in the importation of new plants, he must visit Exeter. Near that ancient city lies a gentle valley, forming the nursery occupied by Mes...
-Horticulture At The Farmers' Club Of Thr American Institute
The Farmers' Club of the American Institute is before the public as a valuable and influential body, laboring for the improvement of Agricultural science and practice; falling back for reputation an...
-Horticulture At The South
The following interesting letter was not written for publication, but has been placed in our hands by the gentleman to whom it was addressed, with permission to make use of it. The writer is a gentlem...
-Horticulture In Colorado
Denver is a remarkable market for fruit. I was told by reliable parties that fully $2,000 worth of fruit a day were sold there, and to judge from the frequency of the fruit stands, the estimate is not...
-Horticulture In Delaware
As it is desirable to compare notes as to the success of various fruits in different parts of our great country, I send you a few lines about fruit in New Castle Co., Delaware. Pears and grapes are al...
-Horticulture In Oregon
We have during the past month received some very flattering letters from Oregon, and what is more interesting to the publisher, some very long lists of subscribers. About thirty copies are taken at on...
-Horticulture In The Canadas
The following letter from Col. Little, one of the most experienced horticulturists in Maine, contains some matter interesting to fruit growers at the extreme northern part of the Union, and we transfe...
-Horticulture In The Far West. Editorial Notes. Forest Tree Planting On The Great Plants
I OBSERVE an universal love of tree planting, both for shelter and ornament, as well as profit. In some localities it is a great hobby, and a very sensible one too. Beyond the central portions of Kans...
-Forest Tree Planting On The Great Plants. Continued
The Scotch and white pines have made shoots of four to six inches in length; the Corsican pine and Lawson's cypress a perfect failure. The Austrian pine and Norway spruce are variable. At each station...
-Horticulture In The Interior Or Georgia
Although but a recent subscriber to your valuable periodical, I have been an interested reader of it for some two years past, and I venture to offer an article for publication in it, if you think it w...
-Horticulture In The Northwest - Action Of State Societies
THE rapid and marked progress of horticulture in the Northwest, for the last ten years, is worthy of special note. Neither is it confined to isolated localities, favored situations, or peculiar tact o...
-Horticulture In The Par West. Notes From Editorial Travel
THE abundance of fruit in Missouri and Kansas is a constant topic of conversation and admiration by as all. In St. Louis, just as we were leaving, we were treated to luscious grapes and peaches as ear...
-Horticulture On The Delaware Peninsula
IN the middle of August, a small company of eastern horticulturists spent a week very pleasantly in a visit to some of the fruit farms of the Delaware Peninsula - among them were Charles Downing, Geo....
-Horticulture What's In A Name?
We have often met persons so foolish as to think that a horticultural journal was not as good as an agricultural ope, and somehow have gained the idea that horticulture (because so hard a word) was of...
-Horticulture, Etc., In Missouri
Feeling a common interest with my brother Horticulturist, I have thought a few words from the far West might be of interest to your many readers, and, with your permission, I would occasionally give s...
-The Horticulturist
Dear Sir: I have been looking over several publications of merit respecting horticulture lately, and am greatly interested to observe how much in advance the work you now have in charge seems to have ...
-The Horticulturist For 1860. The Fifteenth Volume. Begins With The January Number
The publishers desire to return their thanks for the liberal patronage bestowed on this work. Its influence on the progress of Gardening and Rural Taste is now too strikingly apparent to need a word o...
-The Horticulturist For 1872
Once more, the publisher asks the friends of The Horticulturist to assist him and it in good words and faithful endeavors. Every one of its present readers knows it has been vastly improved since it c...
-The Horticulturist For 1874
Since the adoption of illustrated frontispieces, monthly, we are pleased to observe the eager interest and appreciation of our readers. . Probably there has never been a single volume, in the entire h...
-The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Taste
PETER B. MEAD AND GEO. E. WOODWARD, EDITORs AND PROPRIETORS. The Seventeenth Volume of the Horticulturist begins with January, 1862, introducing many improvements, rendering it more valuable than eve...
-The Horticulturist. Its History, Progress And Present Position
PROBABLY there have been few periodicals of its limited circulation that have had around it a more attached and select list of leaders. It was popular, in the truest sense, from the moment it was know...
-The Horticulturist. Its History, Progress And Present Position. Continued
A marked improvement has taken place within the period we are commenting on, in the character of the nursery business, and the nurserymen engaged in it. Not that all have become more honest, for there...
-The Horticulturist. Various Estimates Of Its Value
THE point of view we take in examining any subject is of the utmost importance in determining its character. This is folly illustrated by several personal interviews we have lately had when in a semi-...
-Horticulural Exhibition At Paris
I went to the show of the Societie Natiouale d'Horticulture de la Seine, on Saturdy, the 27th of September. It was held in a very large tent, pitched over one of the fountains in the Cliamps Elysees. ...
-The Hosenschen Pear
Messrs. Thorp, Smith, Hanchett, & Co., of Syracuse, were kind enough to send us specimens of this fruit, but they were received in our absence, and the drawing and description preserved for us were to...
-Hosenshenk Pear
In August last, we forwarded to you, as an act of courtesy usual among nurserymen, two specimens of the Hosenshenk Pear, just then received by us from Doct. J. Garber, of Pennsylvania. We accompanied ...
-Hot - Bed
Started some seed in a hotbed, others in cold frame; had no second hot-bed for replanting, and the plants got spindling, and when it was warm enough to transplant in open air, they did not go ahead'...
-Hot Water
Our correspondent Brooklyn, who furnished a description of his hot-beds in the February number for 1861, suggests as an improvement in the construction of water hot-beds, to run the pipes through o...
-Hot Water Beds
As the season for these approaches, I beg to suggest the use of water ones to gardeners. Dung hot beds are troublesome, especially those required in action for a length of time, as fruiting beds for m...
-Hot Water For Cactus
So you are really going to do it, I ex-O claimed, as she came in with the teakettle. I should think you would be afraid. I know you'll kill them, and its too bad, after having them so long. Let me ...
-An Hour At Home
For the past year my grape culture may be put down as a failure, and notwithstanding all my enthusiasm in its success, candor compels me to admit this result. For these three years past my Catawba vi...
-An Hour In The Vineyard
Spring has come, with its birds and blossoms. The wild flowers and the peach-bloom are scenting the air with their perfume; and the song of the blue-bird is heard in the grove: the long winter is past...
-An Hour In The Vineyard (2)
The operations of the vine-dresser for spring work are about over; the pruning, the staking, the tying, and hoeing are all done, and the young buds have burst from their winter cerements, and the bloo...
-An Hour In The Vineyard (3)
Having opened the Horticulturist for June, and examined some of the valuable articles therein, Mercury, my old mentor, hinted the propriety of spending another hour in the vineyard for 1861. How chang...
-An Hour In The Vineyard (4)
Tis winter, and the snow lies cold and white on the leafless vines. Not a single grape is found in all the vineyard, and the snow-birds chirp mournfully among the waving canes. The vital principle app...
-An Hour In The Vineyard (5)
The spring having opened in this region of our beloved country, like a cold and surly master, the work in the vineyard this season is at least two weeks behind; but, with May, came balmy gales and gen...
-An Hour In The Vineyard, By Judgt Reid
In my former communication I promised to write again, when the blight of June, and rot of July had passed away. The month of June opened with the vineyard in excellent order, the fruit well set, and e...
-The House
A walk, flagged with Saugerties stone, leads through thes hrubbery, to a porch of entry, open upon two sides, trimmed with gothic columns, under a pointed. ITALIAN VERSION OF KIRRI COTTAGE. See Fr...
-House And Cottage Furniture
This is a subject so thoroughly discussed in the books, of late, that anything which may here be said, would avail but little, inasmuch as as our opinions might be looked upon as old-fashioned, o...
-House And Cottage Furniture. Continued
'* In connection with the subject of furniture, a remark may be made on the room arrangement of the house, which might, perhaps, have been more fittingly made when discussing that subject, in the desi...
-House Conservatories And Heating
The reader will be attracted in the present number with the portrait of a small conservatory made in a bay window of our own dining-room at a small cost. With regard to a system of warming a greenhous...
-A House In The West
We present herewith a wood engraving of a first-class mansion erected at Cottage Hill, Illinois, near the Chicago and Galena Railroad, and eighteen miles from Chicago, by Thomas B. Bryan Esq., an ente...
-House Plants
P. B. Mead, Esq. - Dear Sir: I think many would like to indulge in the above, who are deterred by the fact that plants generally do not thrive if kept continuously in living-rooms. Even when, by extra...
-House Plants (3)
At a late meeting of the Rhode Island Horticultural Society, there was some pleasant talk about House Plants. Mr. Levi Metcalf said he had been quite successful this and previous winters in raising v...
-House Plants In Winter
What is the reason that my plants do not grow so well as Mrs. Jones'? I am sure I take a great deal more pains with them, and water, and nurse, and air them, but all will not do; they are weak, slen...
-House Ripening Of Fruit
Your leading article, in the last number of the Horticulturist, is on a subject of great importance, in my opinion, and in itself is a host of information. Bat as you ask others' experience, I will ta...
-Hovea Celsl
This is universally admitted to be one of the most beautiful of greenhouse plants; but it is also one of the most difficult to induce to form what is termed a handsome specimen. It is easy enough to g...
-Hovey's Nurseries
We called, on the way to Dr. Gray's, at the bouse of Professor Longfellow; then visited the extensive nurseries of C. M. Hovey & Go. Their pear-trees, both dwarf and standard, are among the best we ha...
-How About The Peaches?
THERE seems to be a great outcry amongst fruit growers generally that the very prolific fruit year of 1872 will be followed by a season of great scarcity. We do not entertain such ultra views, yet, ju...
-How Dr. Torrey Became Botanist
The late Dr. John Torrey, the distin-guised scientist, is said to have first acquired a taste for scientific pursuits in the following remarkable manner: - His father held some official station which ...
-How Greatly To Increase Grape-Vines From Laterals
At a late meeting of the London Horticultural Society, a Mr.. Fleming produced some cuttings 6f vines, which, in five days, had formed roots as much as three inches long, and which had been prepared b...
-How Much Fruit Is Enough?
I think my family canned enough fruit last season to enable me to have it on my table every day in the year. Such was the remark made to me a few days ago by my neighbor L. It certainly was what but...
-How Pears Sell In New York
In the vicinity of New York there is a large number of old trees of the Bell pear, and they usually bear a crop every year. This variety always meets with a ready sale, early in the season, for shippi...
-How Plants Grow
[We have already given the highest commendation in onr power to Professor Asa Gray's most luminous rudimentary work on botany, just issued by Ivison & Phinney, New York, the title of which is First Le...
-How Plants Grow. Continued
388. The Growth of the Plantlet when it springs from the seed, is only a continuation of the same process. The bladder-like cells of which the embryo consists, multiply in number by the repeated ...
-How Seedlings Are Produced
In attempting to produce a new variety of strawberries from seed, it should first be decided what are the qualities desired, and then, by selecting two varieties that possess these qualities as near a...
-How The Dutch Cauliflowers Are Grown
A German newspaper, the Landwirth-schaftliches Centralblatt, gives the following as the method by which the Dutch obtain their cauliflowers, so famous for size and delicacy. In autumn they dig deep so...
-How The Romans Grafted The Grape-Vine- By Horticola
Many years ago, being disgusted with my inability to decide for myself in regard to the relative worth of certain Greek and Roman classics without having read them, I concluded to follow the example o...
-How They Grow Peaches On The Delaware Peninsula
A committee appointed by one of the South Jersey Agricultural Societies, after visiting Delaware, made the following report: The trees are set 20, 24, and 30 feet apart; the latter distance not being...
-How To Avoid Risk From Frost
THE frosts which occurred in some parts of California early in April, and which for a time threatened serious damage to the grape crop of the current year, have called out investigations that may be o...
-How To Bud The Rose And Root The Manelli Stock The Same Season
Take Manetti stocks that have been growing two years or more in the same place, when they have made shoots three or four feet long, which will be about the first of August; they are then ready for bud...
-How To Build Tour Country Houses
The present number is illustrated by a design I have made for a gentleman at Flushing, L. I. It is situated on an eminence, and commands extensive views on the east and south sides. The outline of th...
-How To Build Your Country Houses
In presenting to the readers of the Horticulturist a series of articles on, and designs of, country houses, embellishments, etc., I do not purpose giving an elaborate treatise on rural architecture, b...
-How To Build Your Country Houses (2)
Rural Architecture is a branch of the profession that may be considered as having more latitude in fancy and design than any other, - requiring greater thought, taste and judgment to compose the parts...
-How To Build Your Country Houses (3)
(Sse half title in front) By Charles Duggin, Architect, 582 Broadway, N. Y. The house I have selected to illustrate the present number, was erected in 1860, at New Brighton, Staten Island, and forms ...
-How To Calculate The Cost Of Your Proposed New House
It is always a very difficult matter, with parties about to build, to ascertain what the house they propose erecting will probably cost. As a general -thing, the person purposing building cannot obtai...
-How To Cook A Cauliflower
The good or bad cooking of this vegetable makes so decided a difference, that it may be nnwholesome and tasteless, or nutritive and delicious; and perhaps a few words on this part of the subject, deri...
-How To Cook Locusts
During the present year, we believe, the Locusts are again to make their appearance. Some of our readers may be fond of them; if so, here is the proper mode of cooking them: The locusts generally fl...
-How To Cut Willows
If the reader will turn to page 172 of the last year's volume, he will find an admirable article on Willow-Culture, by Mr. Chas. Downing, of Newburgh, N. Y., in which the subject is so plainly discu...
-How To Destroy Insect In Your Orchards
The address of J. W. Robson before the Jo Daviess County (Illinois) Horticultural Society, has some excellent points relating to orchard culture, and especially the depredations of insects, and he rec...
-How To Dress Salads
Mr. Chorlton has given in previous pages the true mode of raising Salads, but our Table would not be complete without Sydney's Smith's receipt to dress them. His daughter quotes him, saying: But ...
-How To Enjoy A Garden
Dissatisfaction with ourselves and doings is the first step to improvement. Grumbling dissatisfaction that we have not the variety, grandeur, and extent of some one else who possesses and employs twen...
-How To Get Rid Of Cockroaches
Mr. Tewkesbury, of Nottingham, in a letter to the Manx Sun, says: - I forward an easy, clean, and certain method of eradicating these insects from dwelling-houses. A few years ago my house was infes...
-How To Grow Canteloupes Or Musk Melons
The public seem to be inclined to drop the familiar name of Musk Melons, and are adopting the old style cognomen of Canteloupe. The Germantown Telegraph says that the culture of this garden fruit is b...
-How To Grow Lilliputian Plants
From the Journal de la Societe Imporiale et Centrale d'Horticulture. Chinese gardeners are famed for the skill with which they reduce plants which are naturally of some considerable size, and even la...
-How To Grow Mushrooms
Amongst the many valuable communications in the Horticulturist, this esculent has not received the attention which it deserves. Many persons suppose that there is great difficulty in its artificial pr...
-How To Grow Mushrooms. Continued
It must be equally and firmly beat down, that it may produce a mild, equable heat. Push a few stakes at intervals all round; drawing these out occasionally and feeling them with the hand, will afford ...
-How To Grow Quinces From Cuttings
For pear-stocks, quinces grown from cuttings are in many respects preferable to those grown from stools; although I succeeded well enough in growing them according to Fuller's method, that is, the cut...
-How To Grow Raspberries Successfully
My manner of planting and cultivating Black Cap Raspberries is very simple and cheap. When I planted my experimental lot, I placed them in rows ten feet apart, and at intervals of eight feet in the ro...
-How To Grow Strawberries
Mr. John B. Moore, of Concord, Mass., in a recent lecture on market gardening , gave his method of cultivating Strawberries for the Boston market. He said that there were several methods of treating t...
-How To Grow The Cauliflower
I have been successful in raising Cauliflower, and as there appears to be a want of success - so far as I am acquainted - I will give you my method of cultivation. I sow my seed in the open air at the...
-How To Grow The Pyraeantha A Hedge
If properly planted, ninety-five out of every one hundred cuttings will grow, and that vigorously. I know no plant that grows more readily from the cutting, and have planted with equal success in Octo...
-How To Have Roses In Winter
Dear Sir - As the winter flowering of roses is a matter of some importance to all lor-ers of flowers, perhaps a few plain directions by which they may be successfully grown and brought to bloom with l...
-How To Identify Stolen Fruit
When the thief gets off undiscovered with his booty, - the finest peaches, nectarines or apricots on the wall, - it is usual to give them up for lost. Who could identify fruit? Who could say, these th...
-How To Increase The Size Of Fruits. - By A. Dubreuil
[Translated from the Journal de 1'Academie d'HorticuKare de Gand.] Several persons having requested information as to the processes by which we may increase the size of fruits, we shall here point ...
-How To Make A City Garden
Take barrels and bore holes around the middle, and one hole large enough to admit the nose of your watering pot. Fill the barrels with stones as high as the rows of holes, and fill in with good, rich,...
-How To Make A Lawn
Mr. P. Barry, in his excellent address before the Geneva Horticultural Society, says the following is the simplest and best way to make a handsome lawn: The ground should be entirely free from stagn...
-How To Make Accurate Outlines Of Fruit
Now that the pears and apples of the later and more valuable varieties are ripening, I wish to suggest to all cultivators desiring to preserve of accurate outlines of their fruit for future reference ...
-How To Make An Amateur
The history of trees in the United States, has been too much after the following fashion; much of the land had the reputation, if it had not the reality, of abounding in chills and fevers, or fevers a...
-How To Make Large Flower Baskets
In several places in Mr. Allen's grounds were large flower baskets resting on the top of a stump of a tree, which had been cut off three or more feet from the surface of the ground. A few stakes drive...
-How To Make Strawberry Beds
As I presume a large part of your readers prefer practice to theory, perhaps some of them, about to plant strawberry beds, may take an interest in the following hints, though they are neither novel no...
-How To Make The Bede
We will consider a suitable sized bed is four feet wide by ten feet long, which will reqnire about one barrowful of material to each two feet in length. Collect for this enough horse droppings, fresh ...
-How To Make Vinegar
In the Horticulturist for December and February, there are notices of the Vinegar plant, there described as a minute fungus, allied to the mucor or mould, Penicillium glaucum, of which the myceliu...
-How To Market Pears
IN looking through the columns of your beautiful monthly, I have been very much interested in the different articles on the culture of the Pear, and I also learn that you, with a number of gentlemen, ...
-How To Market Strawberries
IT is a question with some growers which size basket should be most preferred, quarts or pints. This depends upon the kinds of berries to send to market, strawberries, raspberries or blackberries. If ...
-How To Obtain Cuttings
As a rule, plants to be propagated from at this time of year should be in a free-growing state. We advise placing old plants of verbenas, petunias, etc., in a moist heat, in order to start them for cu...
-How To Pack Stratobowrv Plants For A Journey
Take up good, sound, young and well established runners; remove all decayed leaves, tie them in bunches of twenty-five or fifty, with their crowns evenly arranged; wrap in moist, swamp moss; pack tigh...
-How To Paint Country Houses
THE following practical suggestions were embodied in an excellent article read recently before the Farmers' Club of this city, by H. E. Colton. Paint on the farm is no longer a luxury; it is a matter...
-How To Pick Strawberries
It has often occurred to us that the usual method of picking and sending Strawberries to the table is by no means the best that could be devised. In taking off the stems and calyx the berries are much...
-How To Plant Shrubs
Another point in planting should be well considered, viz.: get your plants into the ground as soon as possible after their receipt. Cover them with soil, even if but for a temporary day or week; keep ...
-How To Plant Tear Trees
The holes should be a foot deep and three feet across; they may be mostly made by the plough or by the spade, as each person finds handiest. For standards twelve to sixteen feet, and dwarfs ten feet a...
-How To Popularize The Taste For Planting
HOW to popularize that taste for rural beauty which gives to every beloved home in the country its greatest outward chartn, and to the country itself its highest attraction, is a question which must o...
-How To Popularize The Taste For Planting. Part 2
Another season, still another desirable tree or plant might be taken in hand, and when ready for home planting, might be scattered broadcast among those who desire to possess it, and so the labor of l...
-How To Popularize The Taste For Planting. Part 3
And the custom is met in the same beautiful spirit by the people at large; for in the main, those embellishments that turn the highway into pleasure grounds, are respected, and grow and bloom as if wi...
-How To Propagate The Bed Cedar And Spruce
The berries of the Bed Cedar when gathered, must be buried in sand or sandy earth for a year, then sow in light earth. If sown the same season they are gathered, they lie a whole year in the ground be...
-How To Raise Asparagus
FOR more than twenty years I have been accustomed to hear about the same class of questions asked by consumers, why it was that Asparagus, a vegetable that was always in good demand, and usually comma...
-How To Raise Norway Spruce From Seed
(D., Hamden, Conn.) Prepare a bed or border six or eight feet wide, soil light sandy loam; rake perfectly level, and sow the seed broadcast about twice as thickly as you would Apple or Pear seed; the...
-How To Raise Seedlings
When the berries from which we wish to grow seedlings are ripe, they should be mashed and mixed with dry sand, so thoroughly that no two seeds shall remain together, putting sufficient sand to absorb ...
-How To Raise Seedling Pears
Planting Pear pips for the purpose of raising new varieties, is a very interesting employment. Some 8-inch pots should be kept at hand filled to within an inch of their rims with tolerably fine mould,...
-How To Renovate An Old Garden
As this question, how am I to renovate my old garden? is invariably put by a numerous class of your readers - wh^perhaps cannot afford to employ a professional gardener, and are therefore obliged to...
-How To Save Leaves In Winter
Sweep them up when dry. Keep the Oak leaves by themselves if you can; for they don't make such good leaf-mould as others. Burn Fir leaves. Keep the leaves as dry as you can by packing them close in dr...
-How To Stock ▲ Geernhouse
I bullt, last year, a small greenhouse, with a view of having cut-flowers regularly for the center table. I had previously known little of the cultivation, and no more than a transient frequenter know...
-How To Take Impressions Of Plants
The advantage of being able to take accurate impressions of plants without much labor need hot be pointed out to those who can appreciate what is useful. It is not brought forward as a substitution fo...
-How To Treat Peach-Trees
April is the time to shorten-in your peach, apricot, and nectarine-trees, both for the sake of the fruit they will bear this season and the health and good condition of the trees. I suppose everybod...
-How To Treat Plants Which Have Been Dried 0p, As Orange Trees, &C., Received From Abroad
It may, perhaps, be worth while to detail the means by which a plant apparently quite dead from drought was restored to vigorous growth. A large Gardenia florida was received in such a condition as to...
-How To Wake A Plant Case
Make the box in any form you may desire; let it be about six inches deep; this should be well painted inside and out. At one end, in the bottom, insert a small faucet or wooden plug, to allow the wate...
-How To Water Plants
From careful experiments, Mr. Mechi discovered that plants slightly watered every day often- perish, and always become dwarfed; whereas a good soaking, given twice a week, almost invariably proved ver...
-How Tree Planting Is Encouraged In Europe
The success of national legislation in behalf of general tree planting, has never been so well illustrated as in Egypt and Algiers. Egypt, well known for its dry climate after the destruction of its ...
-How Trees Grow
That is a fine piece of Oak, remarked an experienced and very intelligent person the other day while looking at the section of one of the old principals of the chapel roof of Hampton Court; how fas...
-How Wood Is Formed
In the 5th number of the present volume of the Horticulturist is an article headed Bad Grafting - How wood is formed, taken from the Gardener's Chronicle. The conclusions of the writer do not appe...
-Howell
The Howell Pear is one of the most beautiful in cultivation. It was raised from seed by a gentleman of that name, at New-Haven, many years since. From the experience of three or four years, this varie...
-The Howell Pear
WE have no hesitation in pronouncing the Howell as the most beautiful, and one of the finest Pears of American origin. The first published account we have of it is in vol. 15 (1849) of Hovey's Magazi...
-Huckleberries
The Carolina mountains have a great variety of huckleberries (Vaccin-iam and Gaylussacia) ripening in succession from July to September. When we first met with acres of those bushes, in September, cov...
-Humea Elegans
For purposes of general out-door decoration, or for planting round or near fountains or other ornamental water, the Humea Elegans stands unrivalled.. Its gracefully drooping tresses of silky brownish-...
-A Humorous Pruning Scene
A Humorous scene occurred one day in April at nurseries of Ellwanger & Barry, Rochester,which is good enough to stir up a little humor among the most staid of Horticulturists. It is thus told by the R...
-Hunt Botanical Garden
A meeting of the trustees of the Hunt Botanical Garden was held last evening, at the Athenaeum, corner of Atlantic and Clinton street, and the Chair was occupied by Joint W. Degrauw, Esq., President o...
-The Hunt Botanical Garden (2)
This intended establishment was first mooted amongst the members of this society, aided by the energetic determination of its worthy president, A. J. S. Degraw, Esq., and has met with such favorable s...
-Huntington Pear
Specimens of this and the two succeeding varieties, were exhibited at the late meeting of the Society at Rochester, by Mr. S. P. Carpenter, of New Rochelle, New York, and were noticed in the Report of...
-Huntsman's Favorite
A new apple under the above name is described in the Rural World as a seedling raised on the farm of John Huntsman, Fayetteville, Mo. The description says: Size, large; color, yellow, with a red chee...
-Hussar's Reafing Machine
It wonld appear from tie English papers,-that Hussey's Reaping Machine, (which we believe has always had the preference of experience judges in this country,) has taken the first rank m England, after...
-Hussman On Summer Pruning The Vine
WITHOUT proper and judicious summer pruning it is impossible to prune judiciously in the fall. If you have allowed six or eight canes to grow in summer where you need but two or three, none of them wi...
-Hyacinths
Among a small collection of choice Hyacinths, forced the past winter, in glasses, in a common room, I had one that I deem worthy of note. It was a Grand Vain-queur, or single white, and had flfty-flve...
-The Hyacinth (2)
THIs plant, though a native of the desert, has been domesticated for many centuries, and is aptly styled the Domestic Flower for it is closely enshrined in the hearts of all lovers of flowers. Haarl...
-Hyacinth Beds In The Lawn
A correspondent of The Rural New Yorker, last year, recommended the planting of Spring Flowering Bulbs, in masses, on the land, after the manner of summer bedding plants, and describs the great deligh...
-Hybrid Ferns - Asplenittm Ebenoides (?)
Much speculation has been indulged in recently, by those interested in the cultivation of ferns, upon the subject of obtaining hybrid ferns by proper manipulation, in plant houses. The question has al...
-Hybrid Fruits
IN the February number of the Gardener's Monthly, the editor acknowledges the receipt of some abnormal fruit, supposed by the raiser to be the product of a cross between the apple and pear. As the ide...
-Hybrid Fruits. Continued
Several farmers of my acquaintance, who hold the popular belief on this subject, have acknowledged to me that they have planted seed of a variety of corn which to all appearance was perfectly distinct...
-Hybrid Fruits And Vegetables
IN the Horticulturist of August, in a paper upon hybridising and kindred matters, Mr. Jacob Moore, of Rochester, N. Y., thinks the strange specimen of fruit from Mr. Arnold, described in the Gardener'...
-Hybrid Grapes
The past season I have fruited several Hybrid vines. Some of them have given fruit of fine flavor, and free of pulp. Several of these have been shown at different Horticultural exhibitions. As early a...
-Hybrid Perpetuals
This class is the most desirable and magnificent of Roses - perfectly hardy, flowering freely from June to the end of October. Plant in strong clay loam, enriched with well-rotted manure; prune last y...
-Hybrid Perpetual Etienne Levet
A thorough good rose is Hybrid Perpetual Etienne Levet; and this so completely established its character as a good autumnal flower, that its general good qualities may be taken for granted. This is of...
-Hybrid Perpetual Roses
1. Baronne Prevost Bright rose color, a very large flower, strong, vigorous, free grower, blooming freely from June till November. Always opens its blooms well, whether in the heat of summer, or the ...
-Hybridising The Grape
In the April number of the Horticulturist is an article on hybridising the Grape-Vine, by Wm. N. White. It refers particularly to the seedlings of Mr. Rogers of this place. Mr White says, that if the...
-Hybridizing
The sensitiveness of the delicate Persian melons in the open air has interfered with their cultivation in this country. To harden and acclimate them, I made experiments of cross-breeding with our ordi...
-Hybridizing (2)
The improvement of vegetable races by hybridizing is one of the most direct and important means which we possess in modifying and adapting them to our purposes, and a subject worthy of special attenti...
-Hybridizing (3)
Ik the preceding article we endeavored to establish that the vine presents unusual obstacles to cross fertilization. In the present, we shall give the evidence we promised, that hybridizing, though re...
-Hybridizing (3). Part 2
II. We know there are a few genera, such as Rhododendrons, Pansies, Fuchsias, Roses, Verbenas, etc, in which the species do readily hybridize. These genera are very few ; but our critics insist that t...
-Hybridizing (3). Part 3
Passe Colmar was considered the standard of good seeds, and its generations have filled our catalogues with most delicious fruits. In originating improved varieties, he found the art to consist in ...
-On Hybridizing (4)
Mr, Editor: - If we were asked by some person how the human mind could be improved, - how the human soul could be made radiant with joy, - how to gain a positive knowledge of, and be able to realize i...
-Hybridizing (5)
The word hybrid, when correctly used, is only applied to the offspring of a mixture of two species. For instance, if we should take the native strawberry (Fragaria Virginiana) and the English strawber...
-Hybridizing Fruits
I am very glad to see, Mr. Editor, the prominence your valuable journal gives to such interesting subjects as that of Mr. W. N. White, in your August number. It would not become me, as a practical man...
-Hybridizing Grapes
In Mr. W. N. White's interesting report on the grapes of Georgia, I notice the following sentence: We would not, however, assert that hybridization, naturally or artificially, is absolutely impossibl...
-Hybridizing The Grape
OBSERVING, in some of the late numbers of your invaluable Horticulturist, that an interest is awakening in the important results from hybridizing' grapes, and also, in an article on the Delaware tha...
-Hybridizing The Grape (2)
In the October number of the Horticulturist, the Georgia Committee, in their report on grapes, say: As Le Conte observes, ' although, among some families of plants, hybrids occur naturally, or may be...
-Hybridizing The Grape (3)
Mr. J. Fiske Alllen's description of the mode of hybridizing the grape is the most lucid and practical, and as the subject is attracting attention anew we present, by the kindness of Mr. A. 0. Moore, ...
-Hybridizing The Grape. - Concluding Article
Much encouraged by the present trial, with a view of obtaining a still greater variety of choice grapes, adapted to open-air culture here, and for wine making, we have again, the last spring, hybridiz...
-Hybridizing The Vine (2)
I should have preferred waiting until it was again in blossom before discussing farther the practicability of hybridizing the vine, as, with its floral organs before them, your readers could then deci...
-Hybridizing. Lord Bacon
There is no evidence that hybridization (or crossing the sexes of plants of the same genera together, to produce new varieties in the progeny) was known to the nations of antiquity, although grafting ...
-Hyde's Eliza Grape
In the article on Grapes in the January number of the Horticulturist for 1859,1 said that Hyde's Eliza, as received from two or three sources, was identical with York Madeira; but the past season I ha...
-The Hydrangea And Luculia Gratissima
When Flora has once smitten the heart of man at any period of his life, especially in his youth, and the force of circumstances carries him from those higher orders of her gorgeous attractions - when ...
-Hydrangea Deutzaefolia - New Hardy Shrub
This plant appears to be perfectly hardy, as we had several plants out last year that were entirely uncovered, and which wintered perfectly, not even a tip was killed. It has. just opened its showy fl...
-Hydrangea Deutziafolia
This variety was introduced from Japan by Dr. Hall, and placed in the hands of Messrs. Parsons & Co., of Flushing, L. I. Its vigorous habit, the season of its blooming, August and September, its magni...
-Hydrangea Involucrata Var. Flore Pleno
All the species of this beautiful genus are tained by some French cultivators, by whom it was soon extensively distributed. The plants produced at first only small and few flowers, in consequence of i...
-Hydrangea Panioulata Grandiflora
Without exception, this seems to us the most gorgeous of the flowering shrubs. We are surprised that it does not become more quickly and favorably known. It is now about six years since its first intr...
-The Hydraulic Rah
This little machine, one of the most useful inventions of the age, gives to every farmer the use of water raised by it to a higher level, and at about the same expense for the same distance, as it for...
-Hydraulic Ram - Vineries
Mr:- Downing - Dear Sir: I wish to trouble you with a few inquiries about the water ram, and. glass structures, such as cold graperies. The principle of the water ram has been made plain, through the ...
-The Hygienic Teacher And Water-Cure Journal
The very best advice that can possibly be given to persons of either sex, of any age, and in any condition of life, can be summed up in three words: Preserve your Health. From no other publication c...
-I have a small garden, and room for three grapevines. Now, what shall I plant?
[The testimony of the Western New York Fruit Growers' Society, as well as that of all other meetings, and of most cultivators, is, that for rich garden soils there is no one grape superior to the Dela...
-I. Dotmfnl Du Cornice D'Angers
Tree - vigorous, pyramidal shaped, productive; fruit - very large, regularly turbinate; skin - greenish yellow, speckled with russet dots; flesh-melting,buttery, juicy, sugary, agreeably perfumed; ver...
-I. Necessary Implements And Tools
60. The tools or implements necessary for pruning fruit-trees are the secateur, the pruning-knife, and the saw. Fig. 3. GOTHIC WINDOW - exterior. I need not describe these instruments, which are s...
-I. Yucca Gloriosa, Or Adam's Needle
This is the largest and most striking of the hardy Yuccas. It is, in fact, an evergreen shrub, growing two to five feet high, with its woody stem or trunk, clothed with tares almost to the ground. The...
-II. Of Pruning, Properly So Called
62. The name of winter-pruning is given to the principal pruning, because it is generally performed at that season. As for us cultivators, who have a large number of trees to manage, we have no fixed ...
-II. Of Pruning, Properly So Called. Part 2
70. In gentlemen's gardens, where the walls are higher than ours, four lower and four upper secondary branches may be established on each of the main branches; but as they are formed in the same way a...
-II. Of Pruning, Properly So Called. Part 3
79. The second (fig. 2) has double eyes, c: the one, a, a wood-bud; the other a flower-bud. 80. The third (fig. 3) has triple eyes, d; two of them flower-buds, and a wood-bud, a, between them. 81. T...
-II. Of Pruning, Properly So Called. Part 4
Should this take place, we have then a successional shoot to which the branch can be cut back at the summer-pruning if its fruits have dropped; or after they have been gathered, if they hold on. 88. ...
-II. The Pruning Of The Peach-Tree In The Square Form After Its Formation Is Complete
180. Having explained the various annual operations by which the complete formation of the tree is effected at the eighth winter-pruning, it is now necessary to state by what means its regularity, as ...
-III. On Planting The Peach-Tree
44. A. On The Choice Of Trees For Planting Those who are unable or unwilling to bud their own trees, should be careful properly to select, or cause to be selected, in the nurseries, the sorts budded ...
-III. Yucca Flaccida, Or The Free Blooming Yucca
This is one of the most popular, and commonly cultivated sorts in our gardens - growing and blooming with as much ease as a cabbage. It is a native of Georgia - but is as hardy as an oak all over the ...
-IV. Nailing
103. The nailing consists in fastening all the branches of a Peach tree, whatever their nature may be, in the place most suitable to them. The regulation or training of the principal branches, which h...
-IV. Yucca Anoustifolia, The Narrow Leaved Yucca
A fine hardy species, found by Nuttall on the banks of the Missouri - and grows and blooms in our gardens exceedingly well. The foliage is long and narrow, edged with threads, and quite stiff. The lea...
-Iberis, Or Candytuft
The gardening world must look with no little interest at the old-fashioned, neglected things that are, from time to time, resuscitated from the oblivion into which caprice or indifference has cast the...
-Ice
NOT very many years ago, there was exhibited in a window in the Strand, London, a huge plate, apparently of ice; a little water was in the plate around a remarkably transparent piece of glass, and on ...
-Ice-House Management
This is a matter of no small importance, yet, how often do we see it treated not only with indifference, but upon the very worst principles possible to ensure its preservation; not one ice-house in fi...
-The Ichneumon
The Ichneumon animal eats the eggs of the crocodile, to some extent controlling its numbers. The cuckoo in England and the cow bunting in this country, lay their eggs in the nests of other birds, and...
-Ignorance Of Common Things
It is indeed to be deplored, that whilst the clergy and gentry are founding schools in almost every village, and duly providing trained masters and mistresses to instruct the rising population in wh...
-Illinois And The Prairies
A wonderful country is Illinois, and the States which lie around it - incomprehensible, too, to those who have never seen the broad territory they cover. Great efforts are making by the earnest men ...
-Illinois Cattle
Our enthusiastic friend, Bross, of the Chicago Press, never loses an opportunity of speaking well of his own State, of which he is one of the most useful citizens. The following information, abridged ...
-Illinois Horticulture - Insects - Prof. Turner
Dear Sir - In your July number, I find a letter from that excellent western nomologist A. H. Ernst, of Cincinnati - commenting on Prof. Turner's discovery of insects, supposed to be the cause of bligh...
-Illinois State Horticultural Society
The annual meeting of this Society will be held at Jacksonville, 111., December 12 to 15, instant. It will doubtless be a very interesting session. Illinois State Horticultural Society #1 THE sixtee...
-The Illustrated Bouquet, London
There are now three quarterly numbers of this illustrated work issued - June, September, and February, with five large Bouquets in each. The Bouquet of Gloxinias has ten kinds in it. That of new Fuc...
-An Immense Seed Establishment
We have now in this country a number of very large seed establishments, most of which are found recorded in our advertising columns, and the following account, taken from the Country Gentleman, of one...
-Impatiens Jerdoniae. Translated From The Revue Horticole
The Balsame, to which the present species belongs, affect shady, damp localities, and the decayed mould of large forests in both hemispheres;, they are annual or perennial plants, with cylindrical sta...
-Impatiens Jerdonle
A specimen of this new, greenhouse, herbaceous plant, exhibited by Mr. Veitch, at the last meeting of the Horticultural Society, received a Silver Knightian Medal, in testimony of its singular beauty ...
-Implements Connected With The Garden And The House. Exhibited At The Royal Agricultural Society's Show, England
Besides most of the usual implements serviceable to the gardener, Messrs. Cottam and Hallen, 2 Winsley Street, Oxford Street, exhibited the following: Footpath Or Accommodation Gate And Curve These ...
-Importance Of Mulching
Though the subject we have placed at the head of this communication, has received some attention from scientific cultivators in certain parts of the country, and allusions to its use and importance ha...
-The Importance Of Self-Esteem
Phrenology teaches that in some human craniums this very wonderful organ varies to a very considerable extent; that in some individuals the feeling of I am, the great I am, scarcely has an existenc...
-Importance Of Shelter
HELTER is a subject which comes directly home to every man who lives in the open country, and hopes to have a comfortable residence, with fields, orchards, and gardens, that may be cultivated with p...
-Importance Of Shelter. Continued
In Western New York these cold winter winds are severely felt too are really much more injurious to vegetation than the most intense cold which we ever experience. A great many tender trees and shrubs...
-Importance Of The Onion
The onion is worthy of notice as an extensive article of consumption in this country. It is largely cultivated at home, and is imported, to the extent of seven or eight hundred tons a year, from Spain...
-Importance Of Timely Culture
In a climate and soil like ours, spontaneous fruitfulness can never be expected. There are doubtless choice positions where a few trees or vegetables, having once taken root, will grow luxuriantly and...
-Importance Of Water In Gardening
In your late article on the Importance of Water in Gardening, you solicit information from those who have had experience in such matters, as to the best modes of supplying water. I have long entert...
-Important Pomological Movement In Belgium
From the London Gardeners' Chronicle and other European papers we have intelligence of a movement in Belgium of the utmost importance to American pomologists. The Belgian Government has issued a Royal...
-Important Sale of Plants At Cooper's Hill, Englefield Green
The first portion of a magnificent collection of Azaleas, and other store and greenhouse plants, was recently brought to the hammer here by Mr. Stevens. Of Azaleas, Glory of Sunning Hill, 3 feet 6 inc...
-Important To Rick-Growers
We have had the pleasure of examining a large collection of samples of Batavia rice-seed, just received by Mr. J. Q. A. Warren, Corresponding Member of the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society, to whom...
-Importation And Exportation Of Fruit
Pears are now selling at John Taylkr's, (confectioner,) in Broadway, New-York, which were imported by the steamer from France. They are labelled Bon Chretien and Poire de Libra. They are not of very g...
-Imported Raspberries
For many years strong efforts were made to introduce the fine English and French varieties, and to grow seedlings from them, thinking they would be more easily acclimated - but with no better results ...
-Imported Roses
In this country the propagation of the Rose has been much neglected until within a very few years. We have been supplied mostly by importations from Europe; but we look for better things in the future...
-Imported Roses (2)
Mr. Editor: We did not expect that our article in the March number of the Horticulturist on imported roses, would meet the approbation of all dealers; but we cer tainly did not expect an opponent from...
-Imported Roses (3)
Mr. Editor, - It is presumed that when persons send articles for publication to any journal, they have something to communicate that will be of interest or a source of instruction to the general reade...
-Imposition
A correspondent from Germantown, Ohio, writes us as follows: There has been a man here, taking orders for the Northern Muscadine Grape, at $3 per plant He has a showy handbill, with a drawing of sai...
-Imposition Exposed
In the March number of the Horticulturist is an article from German-town, Ohio, headed Imposition. Whether or not that movement is a part of the following described system of fraud we do not know, ...
-Imposters. - The Lawton Blackberry
For one I feel under great obligations to the Horticulturist for your very sensible remarks in your leader for June, exposing the many frauds and species of deception practiced upon nurserymen and the...
-The Impostor's Graft
Mention is made by Pliny, of a tree in the garden of Lucullus, at Tivoli, which is described in his Natural History. On the trunk of one tree he saw branches which produced pears, others figs, apples,...
-Improved Varieties Vs. Common Fowls
Does it ever strike the farmer, or any one who keeps fowls either for profit or pleasure, that there is a great advantage in keeping improved breeds of poultry over the common barnyard fowls ? Hardly ...
-Improvement And Domestication Of The Wild Cherry
Most of our cultivated fruits are in an artificial state, and not natural forms, many of them unpalatable, and some of them, in their original condition, are even deleterious, if not poisonous, when t...
-Improvement Of Fruit By Cross-Breeding
In the July number of the Cultivator, is the substance of a paper by the President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, on raising new pears. He urges the importance of raising seeds for new va...
-Improvement Of Fruit By Cross-Breeding. Part 2
Again, a species of animal or plant is capable of being progressively improved by the skill of man, or, in other words, they can be made to assume, by improved culture and judicious selection, through...
-Improvement Of Fruit By Cross-Breeding. Part 3
The Seckel and Louise Bonne de Jersey Pears, for instance, which it is proposed to cross, possess to begin with, many desirable qualities. They are both hardy, adapted to the climate, good bearers, an...
-Improvement Of Fruit By Cross-Breeding. Part 4
By the action of light on leaves, the crude sap undergoes certain chemical changes which fit it for the nourishment of new parts; the trees should not, therefore, be shaded by others, but fully expose...
-Improvement Of Grounds
In connection with your well-timed and judicious remarks on the Improvement of Grounds in the October number of the Horticuiturist, the. preservation of Nature's trees and shrubbery claims our most ...
-Improvement Of Lawns
In laying out my grounds, one acre in extent, two years ago, I was unable to obtain manure to mix with the soil at the time of plowing and seeding down to graea. My trees and shrubs being now planted,...
-Improvement Of Our Domestic Architecture
GOOD degree of attention has been given to the architecture of suburban and country houses, within the last ten or twelve years. The late Mr. Downing was the first to make any real impression on the...
-Improvement Of Our Domestic Architecture. Part 2
Such an impulse has been given to the public mind as will eventually lead to a thorough reformation, and place our domestic architecture in a position worthy of a people so enlightened, prosperous, an...
-Improvement Of Our Domestic Architecture. Part 3
We urge upon every person to study the face of nature; learn the names, habits, and qualities of trees and plants, that they may enjoy and appreciate the beauty of gardens and beautiful scenes or obje...
-Improvement Of Public Streets
The correct arrangement of the suburban streets of our large cities, as well as those of country villages, appears to us as demanding more of thought and attention than has thus far been devoted to it...
-Improvement Of The Portable Steam Engine
The great improvement added to this machine consists of the attached endless railway, which is composed of a series of flat boards, six in number, plated with iron on both sides of each wheel, equal i...
-Improvement Of Vegetable Races
NOTWITHSTANDING all the drawbacks of the violent extremes of climate, the United States, and especially all that belt of country lying between the Mohawk and the James rivers, is probably as good a fr...
-The Improvement Or Gardeners
Sir: Being anxious to promote the profession of gardening, I will suggest the idea of gardeners and nurserymen, in the vicinity of large towns and cities, meeting to form libraries, to consist chiefly...
-Improvement Qf The Vegetable Races
We are altogether in the novitiate as yet in the United States, so far as much progress in this respect is concerned. What with getting a living, clearing up the forests, subduing the land, getting av...
-Improvements Around Dwellings
The following good suggestions are from the pen of Mr. D. Breckenridge, the Floral editor of the American Farmer: The approaches of carriage drives to the country seats of our wealthy population, are...
-Improvements In Flower Pots
For all the common purposes of plant cultivation, the Flower Pots in general use are all that can be desired; but there are many tribes and plants which do not thrive in our hands without difficulty; ...









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