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Kitchen Gardening Made Easy | by George M. F. Glenny



Gardening, to a certain extent, must necessarily differ in different climates, some of which are favourable to the growth of fruits, some to flowers, and others to vegetables; for the rearing of the latter, low, moist climates are the most suitable, and in this respect, England may perhaps be considered to equal, if not surpass, every other country in Europe. The first thing we have to look to, then, is the formation of the kitchen gardena subject embracing a variety of considerations, among which the following are of paramount importance Situation. This should be as near the dwelling-house and offices as is consistent with convenience and other arrangements. It should be on a gentle declivity, towards the south, and either in the rear or on the flank of the house, but never in front; as, independently of its appearance, the necessary traffic with the garden would always be offensive.

TitleKitchen Gardening Made Easy
AuthorGeorge M. F. Glenny
PublisherLondon Crosby Lockwood & Co.
Year1879
Copyright1879, London Crosby Lockwood & Co.
AmazonKitchen Gardening Made Easy

By George M. F. Glenny

Editor Of "Glenny's Illustrated Garden Almanack," And Author Of "Floriculture," Etc. Etc.

Showing How To Prepare And Lay Out The Ground

The Best Means Of Cultivating Every Known Vegetable And Herb

With Cultural Directions For The Management Of Them All The Year Round

Preface

If you are not satisfied with the contents of this book, a Preface will not help you; if you are, a Preface will not be necessary; but as it is customary to supply a Preface to every work, I shall give one, as a matter of form, but it will be short and to the purpose:

READ MY BOOK!

George M. F. Glenny.

-Part I. The Formation And Requirements Of A Kitchen Garden. Exposure, Aspect, Extent, Shelter, Shade, Soil
Gardening, to a certain extent, must necessarily differ in different climates, some of which are favourable to the growth of fruits, some to flowers, and others to vegetables; for the rearing of the l...
-Water, Form, Walls
Water Another consideration engaging our attention is water, a plentiful supply of which is essential to a good kitchen garden, it being no-cessary alike to the commencement and progress of vegetatio...
-Water, Form, Walls. Continued
It must be allowed that a south wall receives more sun than a south-east one, but this is of little or no advantage; for before the time the sun leaves the latter, the air will be sufficiently warmed ...
-Cultivation And Management Of The Ground, Concluding Advice
Cultivation And Management Of The Ground We shall now proceed to treat on its cultivation and management, which includes, or should include, every requisite necessary to the production of vegetables ...
-Cultivation And Management Of The Ground, Concluding Advice. Part 2
Three crops should be had off this surface also, and then trench two spits deep as before, turning the surface spit to the bottom, and the second to the top; by this means the middle becomes the top a...
-Cultivation And Management Of The Ground, Concluding Advice. Part 3
Pricking Out The season for pricking out and planting each crop must be well attended to, by doing it as early as circumstances and weather will permit. Then, again, sufficient room must bo allowed b...
-Part II. Vegetables And Their Culture. Artichoke, Globe, Artichoke, Jerusalem, Asparagus, Beans, Broad, Beans, Kidney Or Dwarf
Artichoke, Globe (Cynara Scolymus) Seed should be sown early in the spring, in deep, rich, loamy soil, in drills one foot apart, and thin the plants to four inches asunder in the rows; or they may be...
-Beans, Scarlet Runner, Beet, Borecole, Or Kale, Broccoli
Beans, Scarlet Runner (Phaseolus Multiflorus) These suffer from drought sooner than the above; but the season must be a very bad one in which they will not make an ample return for the very little ca...
-Broccoli, Sprouting, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Capsicum And Chili, Cardoon
Broccoli, Sprouting This is one of the most valuable of vegetables; but to make a good return it must have a long season of growth, and for this reason it should be sown in the open ground as early i...
-Carrot, Cauliflower, Celery
Carrot (Daucus Carota) This highly esteemed root is one of the most profitable crops that can be grown, provided the grub can be avoided. Carrots love a deep, generous, and rather sandy soil,.but alm...
-Celeric, Or Turnip-Rooted Celery, Chicory, Or Succory, Chives, Corn Salad, Or Lamb's Lettuce, Couve Tronchuda, Or Portugal Cabbage, Cress, American, Cucumber
Celeric, Or Turnip-Rooted Celery (Apium Napaceum) Sow the seeds at the same time as for celery, and treat the plants in the same way for the open ground, until the time of final transplanting; but fo...
-Cucumber (Cucumis Sativus)
No mysteries are connected with the growth of cucumbers: when the principles have been overcome, the secret of success will be self-evident. In a word, the slightest neglect or carelessness will tell ...
-Dandelion, Egg Plant, Endive, Garlic, Gourd, Horse Radish
Dandelion (Leontodon Taraxacum) This has a close resemblance to the endive, and is now considered one of the most wholesome, and known to be one of the earliest salading plants we have. Seed should b...
-Kohl-Rabi, Leek, Lettuce, Maize, Or Indian Corn, Melon
Kohl-Rabi (Brassica Caulo-Rapa) This vegetable, when about three inches in diameter, is very delicious if cooked and served up in the same manner as turnips. Seed should be sown in March or April in ...
-Kohl-Rabi, Leek, Lettuce, Maize, Or Indian Corn, Melon. Continued
The dung is now in a uniform state as to general character and moisture; therefore the bed may be established. One thing I would call your attention to - the advantage to be derived from mixing tree-l...
-Mushrooms
Mushroom (Psalliota Campestris) To make a mushroom bed well you must get some short dung, consisting chiefly of horse-droppings, and turn it over several times, shaking about each time to moderate th...
-Mustard, Parsley, Parsley, Hamburg Or Tuberous-Rooted, Parsnip
Mustard (Sinapis Alba Those who appreciate salads should be always well provided with this plant, of a proper age and tenderness. It is a very good plan to keep a few boxes in use for the purpose in ...
-Pumpkin, Pea, Potato
Pumpkin (Cucurbita Pepo) Sow seed in April on a gentle hot-bed; and as soon as the seedlings have a pair of rough leaves, pot them off- - two in a forty-eight sized pot. Let the plants be grown on as...
-Radish, Rampion, The Rat-Tail Radish, Rhubarb, Salsify, Savoy
Radish (Raphanus Sativus) Quick growth for radishes is absolutely essential, as when grown slowly they become hot, tough, and ugly; speedy growth ensures mildness, tenderness, and beauty. A light, ri...
-Soorzonera, Sea-Kale, Shallot, Skirret, Spinach, Round Or Summer, Spinach, Prickly Or Winter
Soorzonera (Scorzonera Hispanica) An open compartment of well-manured and deeply-dug ground is essential to this plant, and if the sou be of a light texture so much the better. Sow the seed in drills...
-Spinach, New Zealand, Tomato, Turnip, Vegetable Marrow, A Few Of The Best Vegetables
Spinach, New Zealand (Tetragonia Expansa) This may be raised in heat from seeds sown in March, and planted out about the middle of May, three feet apart in every direction; or the seed may be sown in...
-Part III. Herbs And Their Culture. Angelica, Balm, Basil, Sweet, Basil, Bush, Borage
Angelica (Angelica Officinalis) In former years this plant was much more cultivated than it is at present, chiefly on account of its leaf stalk, which, when blanched, will be found a very good substi...
-Burnet, Carraway, Chervil, Curled, Clary, Coriander, Dill, Fennel
Burnet (Poterium Sanguisorba) This is a hardy perennial, increased by division of the root any time between March and May. The slips or sets should be inserted in any ordinary soil, in rows one foot ...
-Hyssop, Lavender, Marjoram, Pot, Marjoram, Sweet Or Knotted, Marigold, Pot, Mint
Hyssop (Hyssopus Officinalis) This is a hardy evergreen shrub, propagated by seed, slips, or cuttings. If by seed it may be sown in March or April, either broadcast, or in drills eight inches asunder...
-Pennyroyal. {Mentha Pulegium), Purslane, Rosemary, Rue, Sage
Pennyroyal. {Mentha Pulegium) This is a hardy perennial plant, used in cookery and for distillation. It is propagated by division of the root, by offsets, and by cuttings. The first-mentioned is the ...
-Savory, Summer, Savory, Winter, Tarragon, Thyme, Common, Thyme, Lemon
Savory, Summer (Satureja Hortensis) This is a hardy annual, and is always raised from seed, which should be sown broadcast, in March or April, and raked in. As soon as the plants are about an inch in...
-Part IV. Work In The Kitchen Garden All The Year Round. Preliminary Remarks. January
It is not necessary to make a great stir about the uses to which a Garden Calendar is, or should be, put; suffice it to say it is a reminder, and that is enough. It may strike some of our northern fri...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in February
Beans, Broad The main crop of these may be sown any time between the middle and end of the month; the smaller kinds in rows from a foot to eighteen inches asunder, the larger sorts two or three feet ...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in March
Artichokes, Globe As soon as the weather will permit you may remove the protecting material, so as to give the plants more air; likewise make fresh plantations by putting in suckers two feet apart, i...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in April
Asparagus No time should be lost in making new beds where required, either with plants or by sowing seed. If it were not for having to wait so long, the latter method makes the best bed: but as the f...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in April. Continued
Now put a bar-rowful of good loam and dung mixed in the centre of the bed in a heap like a cone, and if there be more than one light, a heap under each; make a hole in the centre of this heap like a b...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in May
Asparagus Let this, for your own eating, grow three inches above the ground before you cut it. As a rule, it is better to cut the whole of the shoots as fast as they are of a proper size, than to sel...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in June
Asparagus This should not be cut too closely, nor too late in the month, as it only tends to weaken the roots without an adequate return for impoverishing them. A good dressing of salt will prove adv...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in July
Beans, Broad Top those in flower, and draw earth to the stems of such as are sufficiently advanced for the purpose. Another sowing may be made early in the month if necessary. Beans, French Or Dwarf...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in August
Artichokes, Globe As soon as the heads are gathered the stems should be cut off close to the ground, the dead leaves removed, and the soil round about them loosened with the hoe. Beans, Broad Top t...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in September
Artichokes, Globe If these were not cut down as advised last month, the sooner you do so the better after the heads are gathered, as it promotes the growth of shoots from the root before the winter s...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in October
Artichokes, Globe As soon as these have done their work, have the flower-stems cut down, most of the larger outside leaves removed, and the roots covered with litter, or -something of the kind, as a ...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in October. Continued
As the side branches of the plant grow out place them on the bed, so as to divide them equally all round, and when they have grown pretty nearly to the side and end of the bed, they may be topped agai...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in November
Artichokes, Globe These should be amply protected against frost by first of all cutting off the leaves to within a foot of the ground, and then covering them with dry litter of some kind on each side...
-Work In The Kitchen Garden in December
Artichokes, Globe The heads remaining, if any, should be cut off with a good length of stalk, that they may, if not required for immediate use, be placed in damp sand, in a good place; with this trea...
-Part V. Sundry Operations. Forcing, Heating Glass Structures
Forcing, Fumigating, Labelling, etc.; and the Importance Of attending to the same. Forcing There are various ways of accomplishing this operation; it can be done by means of hot-water pipes, flues, ...
-Fumigation, Labelling, A Novel Suggestion
Fumigation This has hitherto been one of the most unpleasant operations attending the cultivation of plants under glass, such as cucumbers, melons, vegetable marrows, etc, and one always dreaded by g...









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previous page: Town Planting And The Trees, Shrubs, Herbaceous And Other Plants That Are Best Adapted For Resisting Smoke | by Angus D. Webster
  
page up: Gardening and Horticulture Books
  
next page: Ornamental Gardening In Florida | by Charles Torrey Simpson