Fountains And Pools

The fountain (Fig. 139) is a garden feature greatly admired by all. The sound of falling water is ever a source of great delight. When the fountain has a surrounding pool the water should always be on the same level as the garden, or below that level. Instances are frequent where this rule is not observed and the water allowed to rise to a plane above the surrounding ground. The lack of repose in such a pool is very noticeable; such a situation is incorrect.

Pools or fountains (Fig. 140) are at their best when placed in the center of the garden or at the end of a vista down a garden walk or broad turf area.

Depth

Pools should never be less than twenty-two inches deep when it is desired to grow Water Lilies. Two feet or two feet six inches are even better depths.

Construction

Pool walls (Fig. 141) may be constructed of brick or concrete.

Brick walls should be one and one-half brick thick, coated on the inside with a Portland cement mortar in which some waterproofing should be incorporated. The bricks should be laid in a waterproofed cement mortar.

Concrete walls should be six inches thick, consisting of five inches of reinforced concrete and a one-inch finish coat. A waterproofing material should be incorporated both in the general mix and in the finish coat, or a damp-proofing and bonding paint applied to the rough surface before the finish coat is applied.

Pool bottoms will depend on the size of the pool and the character of the soil. They should have a base of cinders or crushed stone, to prevent heaving, on which should be laid a slab of five inches of waterproofed reinforced concrete with a finish coat of one inch. If concrete walls are to be built the reinforcing iron should be long enough to turn up.

Pool Coping

The coping may be of good hard brick laid on edge, or on what is called row-lock fashion; this is much to be preferred to the cut limestone or cement coping.

The gray sandstone (Fig. 140) to be had in the vicinity of Philadelphia is an excellent stone for this purpose, using either dressed or selected flat pieces, laid quarry face, uniform thickness, using one through cross stone alternately with two pieces showing a joint through the center.

The coping or curb should never stand more than four inches above the surrounding grade; the closer the coping level is to the garden grade the more pleasing will be the appearance.

A sod edge extending to the pool has a softness and a natural appearance which have much to commend it. When a sod edge is desired the side walls of the pool should be beveled back to give as much depth as possible to the soil around the edge for the proper support of the turf. Under some conditions boulders around the margin are pleasing, particularly when the position is somewhat shaded, and ferns and other shade enduring plants may be planted between the boulders.

THE BIRD BATH

THE BIRD BATH.

Fig. 138. - " The bird bath attracts the birds to the confines of the garden, enlivening the scene by the touch of life, color and song." - See page 172.

FOUNTAIN AND POOL Fig. 139.   The rustic pergola in the background of the garden fountain is an added allurement to a quiet retreat.   See page 172.

FOUNTAIN AND POOL Fig. 139. - The rustic pergola in the background of the garden fountain is an added allurement to a quiet retreat. - See page 172.

GARDEN POOL WITH WATER LILIES

GARDEN POOL WITH WATER LILIES.

Fig. 140. - " Pools are at their best when placed in the center of the garden or at the end of a vista down a garden walk or broad turf area." - See pages 172, 173, 179.

Pool Coping 152