Red Gravel Walks

A surface of one to two inches of red gravel on the same base as recommended for the macadam path makes a walk that is really the best for paths within the property borders. Gravel walks are subject to surface washing and should be provided with gutters and catch basins.

Flagstone Walks

Flagstone walks, made with flags of North River blue stone or Indiana limestone, are the most serviceable of all walks.

The flags should be two to three inches thick and should be laid on a sub-base of cinders not less than six inches deep. Wet the cinders and tamp them to a hard, even surface; over this place one inch of bar sand compacted as a cushion for the flags. After the slabs are leveled and firmed the joints should be pointed with a flat cement mortar joint.

It is customary to lay flags cut in single blocks of various lengths to the full width of the walk.

Fig. 40.   Cross section through cement walk.   See page 47

Fig. 40. - Cross section through cement walk. - See page 47.

In recent years the custom, copied from abroad, has been introduced of breaking up the flags and laying them with random joints (Figs. 44 and 45), giving a very picturesque effect. The interstices between the stones may be pointed with cement mortar one to one and one-half inches wide, or the joints may be made from two to three inches wide, without mortar, allowing the grass to come up in the spaces. The latter is much more attractive when it is possible to keep the turf green by copious waterings during droughts.

Fig. 41.   Cross section through cement walk, with cement curb.   See page 47.

Fig. 41. - Cross section through cement walk, with cement curb. - See page 47.

Slate (Fig. 46) is sometimes used in a similar manner, and, coming as it does in various shades, some beautifully marked with rich brown splashes, makes a very pleasing appearance. When the slabs of slate are broken to be laid with random joints, with grass in the interstices, they may be laid directly on the turf where they will eventually settle into place with all the appearance of having "just happened there."

Fig. 43.   Cross section through macadam walk.   See page 48.

Fig. 43. - Cross section through macadam walk. - See page 48.

Fig. 42.   Cement walks are serviceable, but have little to recommend them from an esthetic standpoint. The surface is glaring in Summer and slippery in Winter.   See page 47.

Fig. 42. - Cement walks are serviceable, but have little to recommend them from an esthetic standpoint. The surface is glaring in Summer and slippery in Winter. - See page 47.

Fig. 44.   Walk of broken flagstones laid with wide mortar joints.   See page 49.

Fig. 44. - Walk of broken flagstones laid with wide mortar joints. - See page 49.