Stepping Stone Walks

Stepping stones of local field stone (Figs. 53 and 54) are very naturalistic and picturesque. They may be laid in a single or double line; the double line for walks of importance, the single line for secondary paths. The stones should be set into the sod to a depth that will bring the flat surface level with the turf to allow of the lawn mower passing over. Space the stones twenty inches apart, center to center, using stones not less than twelve inches wide nor larger than eighteen inches wide. Vary the stones and avoid placing pieces of the same dimensions close together.

Terrace Walks

Terrace walks (Fig. 55) should be of rather generous dimensions, never less than five feet wide, while on very broad terraces the walk may be from seven to ten feet wide. It is good practice on broad terraces to place the walk nearer the house than the edge of the terrace, that is, to have more turf area on the outside of the walk than between the walk and the building.

Fig. 53.   Stepping stone walk; the stones, gathered from local sources, are laid twenty inches apart, center to center.   See page 54.

Fig. 53. - Stepping stone walk; the stones, gathered from local sources, are laid twenty inches apart, center to center. - See page 54.

Any of the materials mentioned for walk construction are suitable for terrace walks. Something substantial looking, such as the flags, or bricks, are most appropriate, and should always be laid on a firm base.

Dutch Tile

Dutch tile, sometimes called brick tile on account of the similarity in texture, should be more generally used for terrace walks. These should always be laid on a concrete base with mortar joints not less than one-half inch wide.

All paving material should be laid true and even, and on walks it is essential to give them a crown of one-half of an inch to the foot. Terrace walks should follow the general slope of the ground.

Fig. 54.   Field stones laid in turf are very pleasing where a walk of some width is desired. See page 54.

Fig. 54. - Field stones laid in turf are very pleasing where a walk of some width is desired. See page 54.

TREATMENT OF THE TERRACE WALK

TREATMENT OF THE TERRACE WALK.

Fig. 55. - Terrace walks should be of generous dimensions, never less than five feet wide.

See page 54.

Fig. 56.   A cross section through a waterbound macadam road with cement curb and gutter.   See page 62.

Fig. 56. - A cross section through a waterbound macadam road with cement curb and gutter. - See page 62.