Arrangement Of Plants In Hardy Borders

The arrangement of plants in the hardy border (Fig. 161) should be with a view to color effect and sequence of bloom. The beds should be interesting from early Spring to late Fall. The most difficult plants to handle successfully with a view to good color effect are those with magenta and mauve shades. It is safe to separate these from conflicting shades with white and pale yellow. The white must be used sparingly, however, as it is the most conspicuous color in the combination. The scarlet shades are the high lights in the garden and we cannot place magentas or blues too close to the scarlets with satisfactory results. It is better to pass from orange and yellow to blue.

Fig 159   The appearance of the vegetable garden may be improved by the introduction of perennial borders along the outer walks. See pages 197, 198.

Fig 159 - The appearance of the vegetable garden may be improved by the introduction of perennial borders along the outer walks.-See pages 197, 198.

Fig. 160.   Showing an arrangement of perennial borders surrounding a vegetable garden.   See page 198.

Fig. 160. - Showing an arrangement of perennial borders surrounding a vegetable garden. - See page 198.

Fig. 161.   An attractively planted border showing what a pleasing effect may be produced with a small variety of plants. The Delphiniums give height and dignity to the scene, and the Iris and Funkias an agreeable contrast of foliage.   See page 200.

Fig. 161. - An attractively planted border showing what a pleasing effect may be produced with a small variety of plants. The Delphiniums give height and dignity to the scene, and the Iris and Funkias an agreeable contrast of foliage. - See page 200.

To get a good color scheme and sequence of bloom it is well to make a plan of the beds first and figure out the spaces and the quantities, such as has been done on the plans illustrated. To facilitate this work a list of plants to be used, arranged according to season of bloom, height and color, will be of great help.

Border Beds Should Not Be Graduated Evenly As To Height

It is a mistake to plant all the rear row with tall plants, the middle rows with medium growing ones, and the border with low varieties. More consideration should be given to the profile or, as the artist would say, the "sky line." To obtain the most pleasing effects with perennials plant so that the taller varieties (Fig. 162) will stand out boldly and not be held up on both sides by some other tall kind. Set off the Larkspurs (Fig. 162), Hollyhocks (Fig. 163), or Foxgloves by some lower growing kind next to them, and show the medium growing varieties to better advantage by introducing tall kinds for contrast.