Summer Flowering Bulbs

Of the Summer flowering bulbs and tubers the Gladiolus and Dahlia are the best known.

Gladioli may be had in very choice colors and are unexcelled for planting among Peonies and other herbaceous plants with heavy foliage and but a very short blooming season. Gladioli may be planted weekly from May to July, and will afford a succession of bloom through the Summer.

Fig. 162.   A good arrangement of plants in a border planting along a Rose trellis.   See page 204.

Fig. 162. - A good arrangement of plants in a border planting along a Rose trellis. - See page 204.

Fig. 163.   Hollyhocks in a border planting.   See page 204.

Fig. 163. - Hollyhocks in a border planting. - See page 204.

Fig. 164.   This early flowering border of Iris, Peonies, Foxgloves and English Daisies illustrates the advantages of a background. The Funkia cordifolia, as a center feature at the corner, is well placed.   See page 204.

Fig. 164. - This early flowering border of Iris, Peonies, Foxgloves and English Daisies illustrates the advantages of a background. The Funkia cordifolia, as a center feature at the corner, is well placed. - See page 204.

Fig. 165.   This picturesque rear yard is most artistically planted. The fence line is bordered with high growing perennials and a turf walk, two feet wide, divides it from a larger border on the lawn. The small border along the walk to the garage is planted with Roses and Rose arches tie the beds together and apparently increase the distance,   See pages 197, 204.

Fig. 165. - This picturesque rear yard is most artistically planted. The fence line is bordered with high growing perennials and a turf walk, two feet wide, divides it from a larger border on the lawn. The small border along the walk to the garage is planted with Roses and Rose arches tie the beds together and apparently increase the distance, - See pages 197, 204.

Dahlias given but ordinary treatment in the garden will repay one with a wealth of bloom in the late Summer and Fall months. Varieties may be had in many forms and colors to suit the individual taste. Plant young plants in preference to tubers and give them an open, sunny position. The plants should be kept upright and tidy by the use of supports.

Tuberous rooted Begonias may be introduced into the shaded portions of the garden and will afford a variety of gay colors in large and beautiful flowers. They are more effective when planted together in a bed rather than scattered through the garden. Better treatment can be afforded them in this way as they need a light but rich soil for the best results. The tubers should be started indoors to ensure early bloom.

The Summer Hyacinth (Hyacinthus candicans) is a splendid Summer flowering bulb to scatter through the borders in clumps of five or more. The bell-shaped flowers appear on long stems, three to five feet high; there are as many as thirty flowers on a stem.

Many of the Lilies are hardy and may be successfully introduced into the borders. Groups of L. auratum (the gold-banded Lily of Japan); L. elegans, a lovely, upright, orange-colored type; L. speciosum, a Japanese variety, and L. tigrinum, the old-fashioned Tiger Lily, are the best for border use.

The Tuberose is an old-fashioned favorite, rather stiff, it is true, but very fragrant and beautiful. By careful management, starting to plant as soon as the conditions are favorable in the Spring and continuing until July, a succession of bloom may be had all Summer.

The Eremurus, or Giant Asphodel, might well be classed among Summer flowering bulbs, as it has a stout, fleshy root with a central crown from which the rootlets radiate. Well drained land and plenty of plant food are requisites. The flowers come on tall stalks sometimes eight to ten feet high. The flowers form on the upper part of the stalk and continue to form as the stem lengthens. Eremurus needs considerable room in the border, so should only be used where extensive space is to be had. It should be set in the Autumn, planted at least six inches deep.