Rose Garden Designs

For the best effect Roses should be planted in mass and in this way they can be shown to greater advantage in a garden of formal outline. The design (Fig. 167) may vary greatly, depending on the garden location, individual taste, and the space at hand, but the beds should always be narrow with larger turf area. Gardens built on several levels should have one level reserved for Roses (Fig. 136). Gardens built all on the same level should have the Roses in the outside beds with the perennial beds toward the center.

Position

The Rose garden should be on high ground in an open situation that will allow an abundance of sunshine and a free circulation of air (Fig. 168). The garden should not be too close to large trees, the roots of which extend for some distance. A southeastern exposure is the best.

Beds

Experience has taught us that Roses thrive best in narrow beds not more than twelve inches wide, (though up to three feet is practical,) with a turf path from two feet six inches to three feet wide between each bed (Fig. 167). The plants should be placed from twenty-four to thirty inches apart. It is a great mistake to plant Roses too far apart, a good average distance being twenty-four inches.

The broad turf area forms a pleasing setting for the Roses, quite in contrast with the usual broad beds, which are unsightly, impractical for the proper care of the plants, and a source of great aggravation when gathering the flowers.

Preparation Of Beds

The beds should be very carefully prepared if the best results are to be obtained. This is even more important than a good selection of varieties. Roses like fertile, well drained soil, at least eighteen inches deep. If the soil is very heavy, affording poor drainage to the plants, the beds should be dug out deep and crushed stone or cinders placed in the bottom to carry off the excess. Although Roses should be in well drained soil they do not thrive vigorously in very light soils. A good loam, well enriched with cow manure, will produce splendid flowers.

Planting Plan

Planting Plan. Fig. .167. See page 213.

Key To Planting Plan.-Fig 167.

Fig. 167. - A design for a Rose garden. Narrow beds with larger turf areas.

See pages 213, 216.

Key

No.

Quan.

Variety

Common Name

1.

8.

Spinea Thunbergii

Snow Garland

2.

8.

Rosa rugosa

Japanese Rose

3.

10.

Rosa Baby Rambler

Everblooming Dwarf Rose

4.

8.

Ligustrum lucidum

Evergreen Privet

5.

10.

Rosa rugosa, white

White Japanese Rose

6.

6.

Thuya occidentalis pyramidalis

Pyramidal Arborvitae

7.

8.

Rosa rugosa Ferdinand Myers

Pink Japanese Rose

8.

30.

Rosa multifiora

White Rose

9.

8.

Juniperus Schottii

Pyramidal Cedar

10.

12.

Rosa, Harrison's Yellow

Yellow Bush Rose

11.

8.

Rosa rugosa Mme. Bruant

Double White Japanese Rose

12.

10.

Rosa rugosa, red

Red Japanese Rose

13.

6.

Thuya occidentalis pyramidalis

Pyramidal Arborvitae

14.

8.

Ligustrum lucidyim

Evergreen Privet

I5.

150.

Hybrid tea Roses

Everblooming Roses