Planting And Care

Fall or very early Spring is the best planting season for dormant plants. If plants started in pots are secured they may be set any time after May first. The plants should receive frequent cultivation during the Summer. An abundance of water will help greatly in getting best results, so that, if possible, water should be piped to the Rose garden for convenience. Frequent spraying of the foliage with water is an aid in keeping insect pests in control. Spraying should be done in the morning, so that the foliage will be dry by night.

If the plants are robust and healthy, the result of favorable conditions, insect pests are not a serious menace.

Green fly and aphis are most prevalent. These are easily controlled by spraying with tobacco water. Leaf eating insects may be kept under control by occasional sprayings with arsenate of lead, eight ounces to five gallons of water, applied to the under side of the foliage. For mildew apply sulphate of potassium, one-half ounce to one gallon of water.

The proper pruning of the plants will depend largely on the type. The two principal types to be met in gardens are the so-called hybrid tea or everblooming Roses, and the hybrid perpetuals or June Roses.

Hybrid tea Roses should be cut back severely; the strong shoots should be cut to within twelve inches of the ground and the weak shoots removed entirely.

Hybrid perpetuals or June Roses are much stronger growing. To insure the best individual blooms the strong shoots should be cut back within a foot of the base. A less severe pruning will suffice where quantity of bloom is desired.

All pruning should be done very early in the Spring.

Roses may be successfully protected from severe Winters by a mounding of soil around the base. The entire bed should have a light mulching with coarse manure or straw. Too heavy a mulch is dangerous, as it induces growth to start too early in the Spring.

Varieties

As before stated, the two types of Roses most generally used in the Rose garden are the hybrid tea Roses and the hybrid perpetual Roses.

Fig. 168.   Roses well placed on a heavy soil. The drainage is excellent, and the elevation of the beds, ascending from the public road, produces a most satisfying picture when plants are in bloom. The series of unbroken lines are somewhat monotonous and could be improved by setting posts at intervals to support climbing Roses.   See page 213.

Fig. 168. - Roses well placed on a heavy soil. The drainage is excellent, and the elevation of the beds, ascending from the public road, produces a most satisfying picture when plants are in bloom. The series of unbroken lines are somewhat monotonous and could be improved by setting posts at intervals to support climbing Roses. - See page 213.

Fig. 169.   Rose arches clothed with hardy climbing Roses may often be successfully introduced into the Rose garden.   See page 219.

Fig. 169. - Rose arches clothed with hardy climbing Roses may often be successfully introduced into the Rose garden. - See page 219.

The hybrid tea Roses are popularly known as monthly or ever-blooming sorts. They are most satisfying for garden purposes, as they are usually of neat habit with pleasing foliage and fragrant flowers, in many delicate and beautiful colors. There are so many varieties to choose from now, that a selection must depend largely on the taste of the individual. For the guidance of those unfamiliar with such plants I will name this brief selection of dependable varieties: General MacArthur, crimson red; Laurent Carle, carmine; Farben Konigin, pink; Killarney, pink; Harry Kirk, a yellow tea Rose; Lady Hillingdon, a yellow tea Rose; Kaiserin Augusta Victoria, white.

The hybrid perpetuals or June Roses make a splendid showing in June when the plants are in full bloom. After that they have but a scattering bloom during August and September. A few of the best varieties are Frau Karl Druschki, white; General Jacqueminot, crimson; Ulrich Brunner, cherry red; Mrs. R. Sharman-Crawford, deep pink; Magna Charta, bright pink.

There are numerous reliable Rose specialists throughout the country from whom catalogues should be obtained and varieties studied out in order that a satisfactory selection be made.