Climbing Roses

Rose arches (Fig. 169) and Rose chains may often be very successfully introduced into the Rose garden. These should be clothed with the hardy climbing Roses, of which there is a large selection to choose from. Climbing Roses should be given plenty of space so that they may freely develop. To get the best results with climbers the question of pruning is very important. The plants should be cut back just as soon as the flowering season has passed, cutting out the old flowering shoots and leaving the young growth to develop. June and July are the months when climbing Roses are at their best, and the floral treatment of the garden should be so designed that this wealth of bloom and color may be taken advantage of to the fullest extent. These varieties are recommended: Carmine Pillar, single carmine with white center, early; Hiawatha, ruby carmine with white center; Crimson Rambler, crimson double; Dorothy Perkins, double pink; Christine Wright, double pink; Dr. Van Fleet, flesh pink; Alberic Barbier, a double pure white; Gloire de Dijon, white shaded with salmon, rather tender; Tausendschon, semi-double pink.

Fig. 170.   The wild garden will appear best in a depression where it is practicable to plant the side slopes with evergreens and flowering shrubs in a naturalistic way.   See page 221.

Fig. 170. - The wild garden will appear best in a depression where it is practicable to plant the side slopes with evergreens and flowering shrubs in a naturalistic way. - See page 221.