Tree Planting

Fig. 109. - Allow a slight depression around the stem after planting, which provides a cup to retain the moisture. - See page 115.

TREE PLANTING Fig. 110.   Recently transplanted trees should have wires attached to prevent swaying.   See page 115.

TREE PLANTING Fig. 110. - Recently transplanted trees should have wires attached to prevent swaying. - See page 115.

TREE PLANTING Fig. 111.   Showing a pot hole under a tree planted in a dynamited hole. When dynamite is used to blow tree holes the bottom of the hole should be thoroughly tamped; all pot holes found should be filled before planting.   See page 119.

TREE PLANTING Fig. 111. - Showing a pot hole under a tree planted in a dynamited hole. When dynamite is used to blow tree holes the bottom of the hole should be thoroughly tamped; all pot holes found should be filled before planting. - See page 119.

Tree Planting 117

All such pruning should be done carefully, making the cuts clean and close up to a bud or stem, so that no stubs remain to die back and cause injury. Hard wooded trees such as the Oaks and Hickories must be cut back hard as they are apt to have fewer feeding roots than the softer wooded trees. Do not waste time and material on a poor specimen. Secure good, healthy trees with good root system and, if possible, trees that have been frequently transplanted.

Tree Planting With Dynamite

The blowing of tree holes with dynamite is to be recommended from the standpoint of economy alone. A good, big tree hole is much more easily dug if the ground has first been loosened with dynamite.

The loosening of the soil aids root growth and affords easy penetration of moisture to the root feeding areas.

One-half a stick of forty per cent, dynamite is usually sufficient for a hole.

One thing to avoid in planting trees in dynamited holes is the pot hole (Fig. 1ll), formed by the gases at the time of the explosion. Holes are not dug deeply enough after the explosion and this hole is allowed to remain. After a few rains have loosened the soil above it drops down to fill up the hole, leaving roots uncovered, often resulting in the loss of the tree. All dynamited holes should be gone over carefully with a long pole or bar so that the earth will settle into any deep holes that may have been formed.

Moving Large Trees

On new estates quick results are often desired and may be secured by the planting of large specimen trees (Fig. 112).

The same principles apply to the moving of these large specimens as apply in all instances of tree transplanting. The trees must be carefully dug, preserving the small feeding roots even though they extend for a distance of from fifteen to twenty feet away from the trunk. As these are uncovered they should be tied up in bundles and bent out of the way, and protected with straw or burlap carefully wrapped around the roots.

If the trees are very large and heavy special apparatus must be secured for their proper handling.

The method of moving large trees with a six or eight foot ball of earth, cutting off all roots extending beyond, is not as satisfactory as tree moving where the roots are combed out and preserved.