Trees For Framing The House

Where horizontal lines prevail in the general architectural scheme trees of a pyramidal type should be used. The Ginkgo (Salisburia adiantifolia), European Larch (Larix europaea) and Lombardy Poplar (Populus fastigiata) are good examples of such trees. The Ginkgo (Fig. 78) occasionally assumes a broad, spreading top, but this type is so infrequently met with that it may be, for all purposes, classed and used as a pyramidal tree. For planting near the house it is in a class alone and apart. Briefly, these are its chief attributes: Rapid growth, neat tapering head, unusual grayish bark, immunity from insects, beautiful leaves resembling greatly in form the leaves of the Maidenhair fern, and long life. The form and outline harmonize exceedingly well with buildings. The European Larch (Fig. 79) is a cone-bearing tree and belongs to the Pine family. It is not an evergreen, however, as it sheds its leaves in the Fall as do the deciduous trees. Perhaps its greatest charm is the picturesque appearance of even young trees. It has such an expression of boldness and freedom that, planted near the house, this effect must be relieved somewhat by grouping it with smaller harmonious trees, such as the White or Pink Dogwood (Fig. 3). The Lombardy Poplar in large quantities (Fig. 2) should be introduced only on large estates and to frame great houses. When planted near moderately sized dwellings the great height, often attained very quickly, is overwhelming.

Fig. 78.   The Ginkgo, or Maidenhair Tree (Salisburia adiantifolia); a good type of pyramidal tree.  For planting near a house it is in a class alone and apart.  See page 80.

Fig. 78. - The Ginkgo, or Maidenhair Tree (Salisburia adiantifolia); a good type of pyramidal tree. "For planting near a house it is in a class alone and apart." - See page 80.

Fig. 79.   The European Larch (Larix europaea); a splendid tree to use near houses where horizontal lines predominate.   See page 84.

Fig. 79. - The European Larch (Larix europaea); a splendid tree to use near houses where horizontal lines predominate. - See page 84.

Fig. 80.   The Cedrela (Cedrela sinensis). A good type of tree with spreading character; quick growing and free from insect attacks.   See page 84.

Fig. 80. - The Cedrela (Cedrela sinensis). A good type of tree with spreading character; quick growing and free from insect attacks. - See page 84.

When perpendicular lines predominate in the building the trees planted close to it should be of a spreading character unless for some particular reason the perpendicular lines are to be accentuated. We have a great variety of such trees to choose from. If the house is large the Red Oak, White Oak, Elm, Cedrela, Sugar Maple and Ash are equally good. The Cedrela (Fig. 80) is a Chinese tree resembling the Ailanthus, but without its objectionable features. It is rapid growing and generally desirable. Near medium or small houses the Scarlet Maple, Sweet Gum, European Linden, Yellow Wood and Oregon Maple all have the needed characteristics. The Oregon Maple is uncommon and should be more frequently planted. It somewhat resembles the Sycamore Maple, but is a more robust grower; it has a large, handsome, dark green leaf.