Specimen Lawn Trees

Specimen trees planted on the lawn should be low branched unless it is desirable to maintain a view under the overhanging limbs. Surface rooting trees, such as the soft or Silver Maple, should not be used, as it is difficult to maintain a lawn under them. The Oaks (Fig. 89) are deep rooted and almost unsurpassed as lawn specimens. The Sugar Maple, the large growing Magnolias, Kentucky Coffee, American Ash (Fig. 90) and English Ash, Sweet Gum and the Elms, are among the best deciduous trees. Specimen evergreens are greatly desirable and add to the Winter aspect. Such splendid trees as Nordmann's Fir, Cedar of Lebanon and Deodora Cedar (Fig. 91), Hemlock Spruce, Silver Fir, Blue Spruce (Fig. 92) and White Pine are among the most important. If one has a love of trees, it is in the individual lawn specimens that a great variety may be had and, if care be used in the placing, the unity will still be preserved. As advised for specimen planting along drives, avoid straight lines. Keep the larger trees toward the back and do not crowd along the property line; place the smaller varieties toward the point of view.

Fig. 87.   Groupings of trees and shrubs along curved driveways are artistic and pleasing.

Fig. 87. - Groupings of trees and shrubs along curved driveways are artistic and pleasing..

Lines of trees should be avoided. - See page 93.

Lawn Groupings

The lawn plantations or groups, those which are planted in the middle distance, should be pleasing in outline and so placed as to accentuate the view to some pleasing object beyond. The plants should be so arranged in the group that the outline is flowing and not stiff and regular. For the general arrangement and varieties best suited to such groupings we may take some suggestions from Nature, as there are certain trees and shrubs which we frequently find standing apart from woodlands.

The Balsam Fir and the White Birch (Fig. 93) make a pleasing combination planted together, also either the Austrian or White Pine and the Beech. The Oriental Spruce, Nordmann's Fir and Roster's Blue Spruce (Fig. 92) may be used together in groups with very gratifying results. The Japanese conifers, such as the Retinis-poras, should always be grouped together or with the Arborvitaes. They do not harmonize well with the coarser leaved conifers.

Key To Planting Plan. - Fig. 88 - A Naturalistic Planting Along A Curved Driveway

Key

No

Quan.

Variety

Common Name

I

2.

Quercus rubra

Red Oak

2.

6o

Rhodotypos kerrioides

White Kerria

3.

3.

Pinus sylvestris

Scotch Pine

4.

6o

Abelia grandiflora

Hybrid Abelia

5.

2.

Ulmus americana

American Elm

6.

25.

Viburnum tomentosum

Japanese Snowball

7.

I

Acer saccharum

Sugar Maple

8.

70.

Lonicera Morrowi

Bush Honeysuckle

9.

I

Pyrus floribunda

Flowering Crab

IO

20.

Crataegus Oxycantha

English Hawthorn

ii

I

Juniperus Schottii

Schott's Cedar

12.

I

Tsuga canadensis

Hemlock

13.

70.

Hydrangea quercifolia

Oak-leaved Hydrangea

14.

I

Cerasus japonica rosea

Pink Japanese Cherries

I5.

I

Cedrela sinensis

Chinese Cedrela

16.

40.

Cercis canadensis

Red Bud

17.

40.

Buddleia Veitchii

Butterfly Plant

18.

I

Thuya occi. pyramidalis

Pyramidal Arborvitae

19.

60.

Viburnum dilatatum

Japanese Bush Cranberry

20.

SO

Pyrus meianocarpa

Dwarf Pyrus

21.

40.

Cornus florida

White Dogwood

22.

I

Betula lutea

Sweet Birch

23.

30.

Spiraea Thunbergii

Snow Garland

Key

No

Quan.

Variety

Common Name

24.

3.

Pterostyrax hispidum

Wistaria Tree

25.

75.

Jasminum nudiflorum

Yellow Jasmine

26.

20.

Cornus alternifolia

Blue Dogwood

27.

135.

Berberis Thumbergii

Japanese Barberry

28.

40.

Cornus mas.

Cornelian Cherry

29.

1.

Thuya occidentalis

Arborvitae

30.

60.

Viburnum acerifolium

Maple-leaved Viburnum

31.

5.

Crataegus Oxycantha

English Hawthorn

32.

2.

Pyrus Ionensis, Bechtel's Double-flowering

Bechtel's Crab

33.

150.

Hypericum Moserianum

St. John's Wort

34.

60.

Cotoneaster Simonsii

Shining Rose Box

34

15.

caragana arborescens

Siberian Pea

35.

3.

Pinus Strobus

White Pine

36.

70.

Exochorda grandiflora

Pearl Bush

37.

35.

Xanthorrhiza apiifolia

Yellow Root

38.

5.

Pinus austriaca

Austrian Pine

39.

75.

Cercis japonica

Japanese Judas

40.

1.

Cedrela sinensis

Chinese Cedrela

41.

30.

Cornus florida

White Dogwood

42.

75.

Rosa humilis

Native Rose

43.

1.

Acer saccharum

Sugar Maple

44.

1.

Tsuga canadensis

Hemlock

Key To Planting Plan Fig 88 A Naturalistic Plantin 94ONE OF THE BEST TREES FOR THE LAWN

ONE OF THE BEST TREES FOR THE LAWN.

Fig. 89. - Pin Oak (Quercus palustris). Among other requirements, specimen lawn trees should be low branched. The Pin Oak fulfills every requirement. - See page 93.

THE AMERICAN ASH MAKES A DESIRABLE SPECIMEN

THE AMERICAN ASH MAKES A DESIRABLE SPECIMEN.

Fig. 90. - American Ash (Fraxinus americana). A quick growing type of desirable lawn tree. - See page 93.

A SUITABLE SPECIMEN TREE FOR SMALL LAWNS.

A SUITABLE SPECIMEN TREE FOR SMALL LAWNS..

Fig. 91. - Deodar Cedar (Cedrus Deodara). Recommended as a specimen lawn tree. Of beautiful form and foliage; closely related to the Cedar of Lebanon. - See page 93.

ALWAYS REMARKABLE AND ALWAYS DESIRABLE

ALWAYS REMARKABLE AND ALWAYS DESIRABLE.

Fig. 92. - Koster's Blue Spruce (Picea pungens Kosteriana). Well known as a desirable evergreen; tips of foliage of a beautiful blue sheen. - See pages 93 and 94.

Groups on small areas should not be overcrowded. If immediate effect is desired first arrange for the permanent trees and then others may be added and removed as the desired trees develop. Individuals in group plantings should have ample space to show their true characteristics, otherwise they assume a stiff, unnatural habit, and mar the scene they are intended to embellish. It is a question often as to just how much space some trees and shrubs require, so great is the diversity in habit of growth. For the tall growing shrubs, such as the Weigela, Mock Orange, Snowball and Lilac, six feet apart is a good average; three feet will suffice for medium-sized plants; two feet for the dwarf growing kinds. If these distances are followed it is advisable to set the plants in the turf and leave a space around each plant spaded up; when the grass dies out between the plants, the area may be made into a dug bed. This system is much better than having a dug bed from the first with large, bare spaces between plants. Should conditions favor the dug bed, a ground cover, such as Pachysandra, creeping Phlox, Candytuft, Rock Cress or Hypericum may be used to advantage.

THE BARK OF THE WHITE BIRCH OFFERS A PLEASING CONTRAST

THE BARK OF THE WHITE BIRCH OFFERS A PLEASING CONTRAST.

Fig. 93. - The cut-leaved, pendulous White Birch (Betula alba laciniata pendula) is a good tree for lawn groupings. With its white bark and graceful habit it lends itself to many pleasing combinations. - See page 94.