Walks And Beds

The interior arrangement of walks and beds must be practical and simple in outline, avoiding a complication of geometrical figures which are unrestful and difficult to keep up. Straight lines (Fig. 126) always give more character than curved ones and are much easier to maintain.

Walks - Width

The width of the paths will be regulated more or less by the area devoted to the garden, but they should always be as broad as the space will allow. In the smallest formal garden the minimum width should be four feet for the main paths, while the others may be as small as two and one-half feet.

Fig. 124.   Ramp in wall to meet high pier at garden entrance.   See page 149.

Fig. 124. - Ramp in wall to meet high pier at garden entrance. - See page 149.

Fig. 125.   Cross walls ramping up to meet higher side walls.   See page 150.

Fig. 125. - Cross walls ramping up to meet higher side walls. - See page 150.

Fig. 126.   This shows the possibilities of making a picturesque garden on unpretentious lines. The beds are placed along the walks and the rectangular plats formed by the cross walks are left in turf. The Lombardy Poplars and conifers give a picturesque note to the scene, while the trees without, which are some distance from the enclosing hedge, form a pleasing setting.   See page 150.

Fig. 126. - This shows the possibilities of making a picturesque garden on unpretentious lines. The beds are placed along the walks and the rectangular plats formed by the cross walks are left in turf. The Lombardy Poplars and conifers give a picturesque note to the scene, while the trees without, which are some distance from the enclosing hedge, form a pleasing setting. - See page 150.

Fig. 127.   Turf walks are preferable for gardens. The greensward forms a canvas of pleasing color upon which to arrange the contrasting units of flowering plants.   See page 155.

Fig. 127. - Turf walks are preferable for gardens. The greensward forms a canvas of pleasing color upon which to arrange the contrasting units of flowering plants. - See page 155.

Fig. 128.   An effective use of brick for a garden walk, with bricks on edge for a border.   See page 155.

Fig. 128. - An effective use of brick for a garden walk, with bricks on edge for a border. - See page 155.

Walks - Materials

Garden walks may be constructed of a variety of materials; among the most popular are gravel, brick, field stones, flagstone, tan bark and turf. The element of color is important and should be given careful consideration. For this reason the grayish tint of crushed stone is not pleasing; limestone is too glaring.