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Practical Landscape Gardening | by Robert B. Cridland



The importance of careful planning - Locating the house - Arrangement of walks and drives - Construction of walks and drives - Lawns and terraces - How to plant a property - Laying out a flower garden - Architectural features of the garden - Rose gardens and hardy borders - Wild gardens and rock gardens - Planting plans and planting lists

TitlePractical Landscape Gardening
AuthorRobert B. Cridland
PublisherA. T. De La Mare Company, Inc
Year1922
Copyright1918, A. T. De La Mare Company, Inc
AmazonPractical Landscape Gardening
Practical Landscape Gardening 1

This Book Is Dedicated By The Author To Joseph Meehan, Eminent Horticulturist Adviser And Friend

JOSEPH MEEHAN

Joseph Meehan.

Practical Landscape Gardening 3
-Foreword
This book is the outcome of a series of articles on Landscape Gardening which appeared periodically in The Florists' Exchange. At the suggestion of the publisher these articles have been augmented, ne...
-Publishers' Note To Second Edition
Expecting that Mr. Robt. B. Cridland's book would be well received on account of the thorough manner in which he had covered his subject, we printed a much larger first edition than is usual with work...
-Chapter I. Importance Of Careful Planning
How very seldom it is that the home builder gives the same thought and consideration to his outdoor home surroundings that he gives to the interior of his home ! Do we not enter a man's home the momen...
-Importance Of Careful Planning. Part 2
Uplift To The Community Nothing is so conducive to general carelessness, slovenliness and neglect as ill kept, unkempt and untidy exteriors. Likewise, nothing is more elevating and uplifting to a c...
-Importance Of Careful Planning. Part 3
The Plan The plan represents the conception of the designer committed to paper in a specific and comprehensive manner. Any development, to be worth while, should be studied in the plan before at...
-Chapter II. Locating The House
When planning the house, even for a small plot, much consideration should be given to the proper location. The aim should be to secure comfort, pleasure and enjoyment for the occupants, not only from ...
-Chapter III. Arrangements Of Walks, Drives And Entrances
After the site for the house has been located the next provision to be made concerns the best arrangement of walks and drives. Here, as in all the other features of landscape development, we have a wi...
-Arrangements Of Walks, Drives And Entrances. Continued
Width Of Walks And Drives As regards width, the walks should not be less than four feet six inches. The driveways should not be less than fourteen feet where it may be necessary to have vehicles pa...
-Chapter IV. Construction Of Walks And Drives
Walks and driveways are features which should be built with a view to permanency. The first cost of a properly constructed walk or road should not be considered prohibitive unless equal consideration ...
-Construction Of Walks And Drives. Part 2
Red Gravel Walks A surface of one to two inches of red gravel on the same base as recommended for the macadam path makes a walk that is really the best for paths within the property borders. Gravel...
-Construction Of Walks And Drives. Part 3
Brick Walks The brick walk, properly laid, is pleasing to the eye and makes a good contrast with the turf. It does not lend itself well to curved lines and so should be used only where straight lin...
-Construction Of Walks And Drives. Part 4
Stepping Stone Walks Stepping stones of local field stone (Figs. 53 and 54) are very naturalistic and picturesque. They may be laid in a single or double line; the double line for walks of importan...
-Construction Of Walks And Drives. Part 5
Driveways Of Cement On small properties the cement driveway is advisable and superior to any other. Oftentimes two cement tracks, with sod between, will take care of all traffic and yet apparently ...
-Construction Of Walks And Drives. Part 6
Cement Approaches At the point where the drive intersects the highway it is advisable to pave the surface from the outside edge of the gutter to the property line (Fig. 59). It is necessary, usuall...
-Construction Of Walks And Drives. Part 7
Brick And Sod Gutters Brick gutters should be laid on a four-inch concrete base and firmed with bar sand or a cement grouting. A concave brick gutter, eighteen inches wide, should slope three inche...
-Construction Of Walks And Drives. Part 8
Gratings Catch basins should be provided with gratings (Fig. 63) with ample open spaces between the bars for a free intake of all water. Small openings become clogged with leaves and are useless. ...
-Chapter V. Lawns - Grading, Construction And Upkeep
No single feature connected with the landscape development of a property is so important as the lawn. We speak here of a lawn principally in the sense of an open grass plot, not in the composite sense...
-Lawns - Grading, Construction And Upkeep. Part 2
Lawns Ascending From Highways If the house is located on ground ascending from the highway, with still higher ground in the rear of the house site, it is necessary to provide a plateau for the buil...
-Lawns - Grading, Construction And Upkeep. Part 3
House Below Pavement Grade Quite frequently topographical conditions are encountered that make it necessary to set the house below the grade of the pavement. (Fig. 70.) In such cases the site selec...
-Terraces
When to introduce terraces is a problem that requires careful consideration. On a ground slightly undulating and where the surface slopes are rather gentle, the effect is more pleasing if the lawn rol...
-Lawn Making
While the building is in course of construction the soil will become very much compacted by the teams and mechanics, a condition which is rather bad for the sustaining of grass. All the areas which ha...
-Seeding
Time of sowing and the best seed are subjects of equal importance. Unless we look well to these two essentials we may have our trouble in the manuring and preparation of the ground set to naught. Spri...
-Chapter VI. Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs
Although the drives, walks and topography contribute much toward the general effect of the home grounds, it is upon the embellishment of the whole, through the proper selection and arrangement of the ...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 2
Trees For Framing The House Where horizontal lines prevail in the general architectural scheme trees of a pyramidal type should be used. The Ginkgo (Salisburia adiantifolia), European Larch (Larix ...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 3
Base Plantings Houses which set close to the ground should have no planting at the base. The turf should extend up to the lines of the porches or paved terrace, with group plantings at the corners....
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 4
Unity In Lawn Plantings Between the house and the boundary lines lies that portion of the lawn which is most difficult to handle and the part that we usually find the least tastefully designed. On ...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 5
Specimen Lawn Trees Specimen trees planted on the lawn should be low branched unless it is desirable to maintain a view under the overhanging limbs. Surface rooting trees, such as the soft or Silve...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 6
Planting In Lawn Depressions Where depressions occur in the lawn they may be accentuated by plantings on the slopes and high ground, leaving the depression open. Planting In Valleys The v...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 7
Evergreens In Border Plantings If evergreens are used for a border planting set them in masses rather than as scattered specimens. Plant them in positions where it is desirable to have a Winter scr...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 8
Specimen Trees In Front Of Border Plantings Specimens planted in front of border plantings should always be at the salient points and not in the bays formed by the border outlines. The positions of...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 9
Summary Briefly expressed, the use of ornamental trees and shrubs for the embellishment of a scene must be along lines that are both esthetic and practical. The selection of a particular plant or g...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 10
Tree Planting Fig. 109. - Allow a slight depression around the stem after planting, which provides a cup to retain the moisture. - See page 115. TREE PLANTING Fig. 110. - Recently transpla...
-Ornamental Planting Of Trees And Shrubs. Part 11
Root Pruning When it is desired to move a large tree from one portion of the estate to another, the specimen should be root pruned at least one year in advance of the transplanting. This is accompl...
-Chapter VII. The Flower Garden
The highest personal note in the art of landscape design is the flower garden, and no scheme of landscape development is complete, no matter how small the property, which does not provide space for a ...
-The Flower Garden. Part 2
Garden Dimensions And Design - Garden Entrance The principal entrance to the garden (Fig. 113) should be from the house and on an axis with some important door or window. It is from this point that...
-The Flower Garden. Part 3
Key To Planting Plan.-Fig. 114a-Continued Key No. Quan. Variety Common Name 64. ...
-The Flower Garden. Part 4
Garden Background It is important to consider the garden from the picturesque point of view. This will include not only the arrangement of the interior beds but, quite as important, the setting of ...
-The Flower Garden. Part 5
Height Of Garden Enclosures The height of outer garden enclosures will vary according to the surroundings. Where the outlook is not particularly attractive they may be six or seven feet high. High ...
-The Flower Garden. Part 6
Brick Walls The brick wall (Fig. 119) as a garden enclosure is not so pleasing from an esthetic point of view as those of other materials. Because of the color it does not make a good background fo...
-The Flower Garden. Part 7
Dry Stone Walls The rubble stone wall of field boulders is most satisfactory, and, when partly covered by vines, is highly picturesque. The dry wall may also be used to enclose the garden, especial...
-The Flower Garden. Part 8
Retaining Walls If it is found advisable to construct the garden on more than one level, much thought should be given to the selection of material and the design of the necessary steps and retainin...
-The Flower Garden. Part 9
Walks And Beds The interior arrangement of walks and beds must be practical and simple in outline, avoiding a complication of geometrical figures which are unrestful and difficult to keep up. Strai...
-The Flower Garden. Part 10
Turf Walks The turf path (Fig. 127) is the most attractive of all. It is pleasant to walk on, restful to the eye, and blends delightfully with the varying shades of color in the plantings. It makes...
-The Flower Garden. Part 11
Humus Humus in the form of decayed vegetable matter from bogs or lakes should be used generously in preparing garden beds. This material is rich in plant foods and, worked well into the surface soi...
-The Flower Garden. Part 12
Bulbs Bulbs should have a more intimate place in the garden than is customary (Fig. 133). Not in straight rows, but planted in clumps along the edges of the beds. Annuals Regardless of th...
-The Flower Garden. Part 13
Planting Around Garden Enclosures The outside line of the garden enclosure on the lawn side should always be hidden with foliage. A mixed plantation of flowering shrubs, with a few pyramidal evergr...
-The Flower Garden. Part 14
Key To Planting Plan. - Fig. 137-Continued Key No. Quan. Variety Common Name 49. 7. Rudbeckia Newmanni ...
-Chapter VIII. Architectural Features Of The Garden
The flower garden, even that of the tiniest dimensions, does not seem complete without some garden ornament, and in this day of great possibilities in this line, with the material procurable but but l...
-Architectural Features Of The Garden. Part 2
Fountains And Pools The fountain (Fig. 139) is a garden feature greatly admired by all. The sound of falling water is ever a source of great delight. When the fountain has a surrounding pool the wa...
-Architectural Features Of The Garden. Part 3
Water Supply And Drainage The pool should be connected with the general water supply, if practicable, and a drain provided (Fig. 141) so that the pool may easily be emptied, cleaned and refilled. T...
-Architectural Features Of The Garden. Part 4
The Plants For the average garden pool a selection from the many varieties obtainable of hardy and tender Nymphaeas will be found most satisfactory. These may be planted just as they start into ...
-Architectural Features Of The Garden. Part 5
Garden Seats The value of the seat as a garden feature has long been recognized. A seat affords a comfortable and delightful resting place to those who would walk or work within the garden. Seat...
-Architectural Features Of The Garden. Part 6
Pergolas Garden houses of closed top construction are preferable to those of the pergola style within the garden. Pergolas used in the garden should be treated as terminal features (Fig. 148) or as...
-Architectural Features Of The Garden. Part 7
Floors Pergola floors should be built with a view to permanency. The foundation should consist of eight or twelve inches of clean cinders wet and thoroughly compacted, or of equal depth of crushed ...
-Chapter IX. Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens
Perennial Borders Of the many ways in which the cultivation of flowers is undertaken none is so popular as the mixed or hardy border (Fig. 155). Such borders are seen on nearly every property a...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 2
Preparation Of Beds In itself the word hardy is suggestive that permanency should be the first consideration in the planting of such a border, so that with but simple care the plants will continu...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 3
Arrangement Of Plants In Hardy Borders The arrangement of plants in the hardy border (Fig. 161) should be with a view to color effect and sequence of bloom. The beds should be interesting from earl...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 4
Background For Borders Where space permits of long borders of good width the question of a suitable background (Fig. 164) should not be entirely overlooked. Good supporting growth adds greatly to t...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 5
Summer Flowering Bulbs Of the Summer flowering bulbs and tubers the Gladiolus and Dahlia are the best known. Gladioli may be had in very choice colors and are unexcelled for planting among Peoni...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 6
Autumn Bulbs Of the Autumn flowering bulbs, Colchicum autumnale, the Meadow Saffron or Autumn Crocus, is perhaps best known. The flowers very much resemble Crocuses. The bulbs should be planted in ...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 7
Rose Garden Designs For the best effect Roses should be planted in mass and in this way they can be shown to greater advantage in a garden of formal outline. The design (Fig. 167) may vary greatly,...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 8
Planting And Care Fall or very early Spring is the best planting season for dormant plants. If plants started in pots are secured they may be set any time after May first. The plants should receive...
-Hardy Borders And Rose Gardens. Part 9
Climbing Roses Rose arches (Fig. 169) and Rose chains may often be very successfully introduced into the Rose garden. These should be clothed with the hardy climbing Roses, of which there is a larg...
-Chapter X. Wild Gardens
The wild garden, as the name suggests, is a garden of informal outline, but it is not, as many think, a wilderness, requiring little or no attention. The primary purpose of the garden is flowers, and ...
-Wild Gardens. Part 2
Flowers In The Wild Garden As in the flower garden, the aim should be toward continuity of bloom. There should be no lack of flowers at any time, although the Spring and Fall seasons will be greatl...
-Wild Gardens. Part 3
Moisture Important When a rock garden is constructed on a dry hill it should be provided with a sub-irrigation system, as many Alpine plants require a deep, moist soil. This is very much more impor...
-Wild Gardens. Part 4
Garden Steps With Pockets For Plants Garden steps of field stone (Fig. 175) in fashion with the retaining walls may be so constructed as to leave pockets for the planting of Alpines. Following a fi...
-Chapter XI. Planting Plans And Keys Thereto
The plans illustrated on the following pages are mostly of properties which have been developed as planned and, though they will not apply to other plots in every detail, they, may be readily adjusted...
-Planting Plans And Keys Thereto. Part 2
Planting Plan A On this plan, representing a width of 80 ft. by a depth of 200 ft. stand two semi-detached houses. The entire boundary is arranged in plantations of shrubbery and are of such v...
-Planting Plans And Keys Thereto. Part 3
Planting Plan B This plan provides for the possible treatment of a lot of 50 feet in width and 118 feet in depth over all, on which is situated a residence which leaves but a small space on eithe...
-Planting Plans And Keys Thereto. Part 4
Planting Plan C This scheme differs from the preceding in that the treatment in the rear is of formal outline. This garden is planted with an assortment of hardy perennials, and the whole is encl...
-Planting Plans And Keys Thereto. Part 5
Planting Plan D In this plan (50 ft. wide by 108 ft. deep over all) the planting along the western boundary line consists entirely of flowering shrubs with specimen evergreen shrubs along the eas...
-Planting Plans And Keys Thereto. Part 6
Planting Plan E In this scheme the treat ment is of formal character the only informal part bein in front of the porch, and th small plantation at the south west corner. The diagram rep resents a...
-Planting Plans And Keys Thereto. Part 7
Planting Plan Fig. 179. - Showing a good treatment of a property 50 feet x 150 feet, using broken flagstones with mortar joints for the main walk and stepping stone walk to the service quarters and...
-Glossary Of Technical Terms
Axis A line actually drawn and used as the basis of measurement. Bar Sand Seashore sand. Batter (or break back) A term used to signify a wall or other material which does not st...









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previous page: Design In Landscape Gardening | by Ralph Rodney Root, Charles Fabens Kelley
  
page up: Gardening and Horticulture Books
  
next page: Landscape Gardening | by Frank A. Waugh