Badham's. See Brown Beurre.

Bancreif. See Crawford.

Banneux. See Jaminette.

Baronne de Mello (Adele de St. Denis; Beurre Van Mons; His).—Fruit large, of a curved pyramidal shape. Skin almost entirely covered with dark brown russet, which is thin and smooth. Eye small and open, placed in a very slight depression. Stalk half an inch long, slender, and inserted on the surface of the fruit. Flesh greenish-yellow, fine-grained, melting, and buttery; very juicy, rich, sugary, and with a fine aroma.

An autumn dessert pear of first-rate excellence. Ripe in the end of October, and continues three weeks. The tree is very hardy, an excellent bearer, and succeeds well as a standard or pyramid.

Bartlett. See Williams' Bon Chretien. De Bavay. See Autumn Colmar.

Beadnell's Seedling. — Fruit medium sized, tur-binate. Skin pale yellowish-green, with a blush of red on the side next the sun, and strewed with grey dots. Eye rather open, set in a shallow depression. Stalk about an inch long. Flesh tender and melting, very juicy and sweet. Ripe in October. Tree hardy, and an excel-lent bearer.

Beauchamps. See Bergamotte Cadet.

Beau de la Cour. See Conseiller de la Cour.

Beau Present. See Jargonelle.

Beau Present d'Artois (Present Royal de Naples).— Fruit large and pyriform. Skin greenish-yellow, covered with patches and dots of brown russet. Eye small and closed, set in a shallow basin. Stalk about an inch long, slightly depressed. Flesh melting, juicy, sweet, and pretty good flavoured. Ripe in September.

Bedminster Gratioli. See Jersey Gratioli.

Bein Armudi. See Bezi de la Motte.

Bell Pear. See Catillac.

Bell Tongue. See Windsor.

Belle Alliance. See Beurre Sterckmans.

Belle Andrenne. See Vicar of Winkfield.

Belle d'Aout. See Belle de Bruxelles.

Belle Apres Noel. See Fondante de Noel.

Belle d'Austrasie. See Jaminette.

Belle de Berri. See Vicar of Winkfield.

Belle et Bonne (Gracieuse).—Fruit large, roundish. Skin pale yellowish-green, covered with numerous russety and green spots. Eye open, set in a wide shallow basin. Stalk long and slender, fleshy at the base, and inserted in a narrow cavity. Flesh white, rather coarse, tender, buttery, sweet, and pleasantly flavoured. Ripe in Sep-tember, but not at all a desirable variety to grow.

Belle de Bruxelles (Belle d'Aout; Belle sans Epines; Bergamotte d'Ete Grosse; Bergamotte des Pay-sans; Fanfarean).— Fruit large, abrupt pear-shaped. Skin smooth, of a fine clear lemon-yellow colour, with a tinge of red next the sun, and strewed with freckles of russet. Eye small and half open, set in a shallow basin. Stalk an inch long, without a cavity. Flesh white, tender, juicy, sweet, and perfumed.

A good and handsome summer pear, ripe in the end of August. The tree is very hardy, and a great bearer.

Belle Epine du Mas (Colmar du Lot; Comte de Limoges; Duc de Bordeaux; Epine Dumas; Epine de Rochechouart).— Fruit medium sized, pyriform. Skin pale lively green, thickly covered with large dots and patches of brown russet on the shaded side; but next the sun marked with reddish-brown and orange. Eye small and open, set in a deep and furrowed basin. Stalk an inch long, stout, and inserted in a deep cavity prominently knobbed round the margin. Flesh tender, half melting, juicy, and sweet, but with little flavour. In use during November and December.

Belle d'Esquerme. See Jalousie de Fontenay.

Belle Excellente. See Duc de Brabant.

Belle Fertile. See Amour.

Belle de Flandres. See Flemish Beauty.

Belle Grabrielle. See Ambrette d'Hiver. Belle Heloise. See Vicar of Winkfield. Belle de Jersey. See Uvedale's St. Germain.

Belle Julie.—Fruit rather below medium size, oval. Skin clear olive-green, with a faint tinge of dull red on the side next the sun, and considerably marked with russet, particularly round the eye. Eye open, with spreading segments slightly depressed. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh white, buttery, and melting, juicy, sugary, and with a fine aroma.

An excellent pear, ripe during November. The tree forms a beautiful pyramid, and is a good bearer.

Belle Lucrative. See Fondante d'Automne.

Belle de Noel. See Fondante de Noel.

Belle Noisette. See Bellissime d'Hiver.

Belle sans Epines. See Hampden's Bergamot.

Belle Vierge. See Jargonelle.

Belle de Zees. See Bonne d'Ezee.

Bellissime. See Windsor.

Bellissime d'Hiver (Angleterre d'Hiver; Belle Noisette; De Bure; Teton de Venus).—Fruit very large, turbinate, flattened on the apex. Skin fine green, changing to brownish-yellow on the shaded side, and fine lively red next the sun; covered all over with russety dots. Eye large, set in an open depressed basin. Stalk an inch long, inserted in an irregular cavity. Flesh white, tender, fine, sweet, mellow, and free from grittiness. A stewing pear, in season from November to April.

Belmont.—Fruit large, obovate. Skin yellowish-green, tinged with brown next the sun, and covered with dots. Stalk very long, slender, and curved. Flesh coarse, but sweet, and juicy. I have found this one of the best stewing or baking pears in use in November and December.

Benvie.—Fruit small and obovate. Skin yellowish-green, sometimes tinged and streaked with dingy red next the sun, almost entirely covered with thin grey russet and large russet specks. Eye large and open. Stalk long, fleshy at the base, and obliquely inserted. Flesh yellowish, buttery, juicy, and perfumed.

A Scotch dessert pear of great excellence, ripe in August and September. The tree bears immensely, and attains a great size. The fruit is inferior when grown in the south.

Bequene Musque.—Fruit large obovate, and irregular in its outline. Skin pale yellow in the shade, and slightly tinged with dull red next the sun, thickly covered with large patches of grey russet. Eye small and open. Stalk an inch long. Flesh white, gritty, crisp, sweet, and musky.

A stewing pear, in use during November, but it is not one of the best for culinary purposes.

Bergamot. See Autumn Bergamot.

Bergamotte d'Alencon. See Bergamotte d'Hollande.

Bergamotte d'Austrasie. See Jaminette.

Bergamotte de Bugi. See Easter Bergamot.

Bergamotte Cadette (De Cadet; Beauchamps; Beurre Beauchamps). — Fruit medium sized, obovate. Skin greenish-yellow in the shade, and dull brownish-red next the sun, and marked with patches and large dots of pale brown russet. Eye open, set in a wide and rather deep basin. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh white, tender, melting, and very juicy, with a rich sugary and musky flavour.

An excellent dessert pear, in use from October to December.

Bergamotte Crasanne. See Crasanne.

Bergamotte Dussart.—Fruit rather above medium size, turbinate. Skin lemon-yellow when ripe, strewed with greenish and grey dots over the surface, and a few traces of russet. Eye frequently wanting. Stalk half an inch long. Flesh half-melting, very juicy, sweet, and vinous. December and January.

Bergamotte Esperen.—Fruit medium sized, turbinate, and uneven in its outline. Skin rough from being entirely covered with dark brown russet. Eye very small, with incurved acute segments. Stalk an inch long, woody, and obliquely inserted. Flesh tender, juicy and melting, sweet and richly flavoured.

This is one of our best late pears, ripening from the end of January up till March and April. The tree forms a handsome pyramid, and is an excellent bearer; but in late situations requires a wall.

Bergamotte d'Ete Grosse. See Belle de Bruxelles.

Bergamotte Fieve. See Fondante d'Automne.

Bergamotte Fortunee. See Fortunee.

Bergamotte de Fougere. See Bergamotte d' Hollande.

Bergamotte d'Hiver. See Faster Beurre.

Bergamotte d'Hollande (Amoselle; Bergamotte d'Alencon; Bergamotte de Fougere; Beurre dAlencon; Lord Cheney's; Holland Bergamot; Winter Green).— Fruit large, roundish. Skin greenish-yellow, covered with brown russet. Stalk an inch and a half long, slender, curved, set in a shallow, one-sided cavity. Eye small, in a wide, deep basin. Flesh white, crisp, very juicy and sprightly. April till June. Requires a wall.

Bergamotte de Paques. See Faster Bergamotte.

Bergamotte de Paysans. See Belle de Bruxelles.

Bergamotte de la Pentecote. See Easter Beurre.

Bergamotte de Stryker.—Fruit small, roundish, of an even and regular shape. Skin smooth, and somewhat shining, of a greenish-yellow colour, and marked with russet dots. Eye very large and open, set even with the surface. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, quite green, and inserted without depression. Flesh white, half-melting, and very juicy, sweet, and pleasantly flavoured. Ripe in the end of October.

Bergamotte Tardive. See Faster Beurre. Bergamotte Tardive. See Colmar. Bergamotte de Toulouse. See Faster Beurre. Besidery. See Bezi d'Heri. Beurre d'Albret. See Fondante d'Automne. Beurre d'Alencon. See Bergamotte d'Hollande.

Beurre d'Amanlis (d'Amanlis; d'Albert; Delbert; Hubard; Kaissoise; Thessoise; Plomgastelle; Wilhel-mine).—Fruit large, obovate. Skin yellowish-green on the shaded side, but washed with brownish-red on the side next the sun, and considerably covered with dots and patches of russet. Eye open, set almost even with the surface. Stalk an inch long, obliquely inserted in a shallow knobbed cavity. Flesh white, melting, very buttery and juicy, with a rich sugary and slightly perfumed flavour.

One of our best autumn pears, ripe in September. The tree is hardy, with a straggling habit of growth, and is an abundant bearer.

Beurre d'Amanlis Panache.—This is a variety of the preceding, and differs from it merely in having variegated leaves and fruit striped with yellow or orange bands. It ripens at the same time, and is of the same merit.

Beurre Amboise. See Brown Beurre.

Beurre Anglaise. See Easter Beurre.

Beurre d'Anjou (Ne Plus Meuris of the French).— Fruit large, obtuse-pyriform. Skin greenish-yellow, with sometimes a shade of dull red next the sun, marked with patches of russet, and thickly strewed with brown and crimson dots. Eye small and deeply inserted. Stalk short and stout. Flesh white, rather coarse-grained, but melting and juicy, with a brisk and perfumed flavour. Ripe in December and January.

This is quite distinct from the Ne Plus Meuris of Van Mons. It is not unlike Beurre d'Aremberg in appearance.

Beurre d'Apremont. See Beurre Bosc.

Beurre d'Aremberg (Beurre Deschamps; Beurre des Orphelines; Colmar Deschamps; Delices des Orphelines; Deschamps; Duc d'Aremberg; L'Orpheline; Orpheline d'Enghein; Soldat Laboreur).—Fruit medium sized, obo-vate. Skin yellowish-green when ripe, and considerably covered with patches, veins, and dots of cinnamon-coloured russet. Eye small, with short segments, which frequently fall off, and set in a deep hollow. Stalk from half an inch to an inch long, obliquely inserted on the surface of the fruit. Flesh white, melting, buttery, and very juicy, with a rich vinous and perfumed flavour.

A first-rate dessert pear, ripe in December and January. The tree forms a handsome pyramid, and is a good bearer, but is apt to canker in cold soils.

Beurre d'Argenson. See Passe Colmar. Beurre Aurore. See Beurre de Capiaumont. Beurre d'Avranches. See Louise Bonne of Jersey.

Beurre Bachelier.—Fruit large and obovate, some-what irregular in it's outline. Skin greenish-yellow, strewed with russety dots. Eye small and closed, set in a shallow basin. Stalk short. Flesh buttery and melt-ing, rich, juicy, sugary, and aromatic.

An excellent pear, ripe in December. The tree is hardy, forms a handsome pyramid, and is a good bearer.

Beurre Beauchamps. See Bergamotte Cadette.

Beurre Beaumont. See Bezi Vaet.

Beurre Bennert.— Fruit medium sized, turbinate and irregular in its outline. Skin pale yellow, with a red blush on the side next the sun, and covered with a net-work of russet. Eye small. Stalk an inch long. Flesh juicy, sweet, and aromatic. Ripe in January and February.