De Cadet. See Bergamotte Cadet.

Caillot Rosat (English Caillot Rosat; King Pear). —Fruit above medium size, pyriform. Skin smooth, greenish-yellow in the shade, and quite covered with a brownish-red cheek and streaks of brighter red on the side next the sun. Eye open, set in a shallow cavity. Stalk three quarters of an inch long. Flesh tender, very juicy and melting, sweet, and nicely perfumed.

A nice early pear, ripe in August; and the tree is an excellent bearer. This is not the Caillot Rosat of the French, which is the same as our Summer Rose.

Calebasse (Beurre de Payence; Calebasse d' Hollande; Pitt's Calebasse).—Fruit medium sized, oblong, undulating in its outline. Skin yellow, covered with thin grey russet in the shade, and cinnamon-coloured russet next the sun. Eye open. Stalk an inch and a half long, obliquely inserted, with a fleshy lip on one side. Flesh crisp, juicy, rich, and sugary. Ripe in October.

Calebasse Bosc. See Beurre Bosc.

Calebasse Carafon. See Calebasse Grosse.

Calebasse Delvigne. — Fruit above medium size, pyriform. Skin yellow, strewed with cinnamon-coloured russet. Eye open, with stout segments, set in a shallow basin. Stalk short and stout. Flesh white, rather coarse-grained, juicy, melting, with a rich and perfumed flavour. Ripe in October.

Calebasse d' Ete.— Fruit medium sized, pyramidal. Skin yellow, covered with brown russet. Flesh white, half-melting, very juicy and sweet. A good early pear, ripe in September.

Calebasse Grosse (Calebasse Carafon; Calebasse Monstre; Calebasse Monstrueuse du Nord; Calebasse Royal; Triomphe de Hasselt; Van Marum).—Fruit very large, sometimes measuring six inches long, pyra-midal. Skin greenish-yellow, considerably covered with dark grey russet in the shade, and entirely covered with light brown russet on the side next the sun. Eye small, set in a pretty deep basin. Stalk an inch long. Flesh coarse-grained, crisp, juicy, and sweet. Ripe in October. Its size is its only recommendation.

Calebasse d'Hollande. See Calebasse.

Calebasse Monstre. See Calebasse Grosse.

Calebasse Monstrueuse de Nord. See Calebasse Grosse.

Calebasse Royale. See Calebasse Grosse.

Calebasse Sterckmans. See Beurre Sterckmans.

Calebasse Tougard. — Fruit medium sized, some-times large, pyramidal and curved, uneven in its outline. Skin greenish-yellow, entirely covered with brown russet. Stalk short and thick. Flesh yellowish-white, crisp, juicy, and sweet. Ripe in October and November.

Calebasse Vasse. See Beurre de Capiaumont. De Cambron. See Glou Morceau. Canet. See Duc de Nemours.                                 

Canning. See Easter Beurre.                               

Canning d'Hiver. See Easter Beurre. Capiaumont. See Beurre de Capiaumont.           

Captif de St. Helene. See Napoleon.

Cassante de Mars.—Fruit produced in clusters, below medium size, roundish-obovate. Skin deep yellow, speckled and traced with light brown russet. Eye large, and wide open. Stalk about an inch long, inserted without depression. Flesh yellowish-white, crisp and breaking, juicy, sweet, and richly flavoured.

An excellent pear for so late in the season. Ripe in April and May.

Catillac (Bon Chretien d'Amiens; Chartreuse; Grand Monarque; Gros Gilot; Monstrueuse de Landes; Teton de Venus; Bell Pear; Bound Pear).—Fruit very large, flatly turbinate. Skin at first of a pale green colour, changing to lemon-yellow, with a tinge of brownish-red next the sun, and covered with numerous large russet specks. Eye open. Stalk an inch and a half long. Flesh white, crisp, gritty, and with a musky flavour.

One of the best stewing pears, in use from December to April.

Catinka.—Fruit medium sized, obovate. Skin of a fine deep lemon-yellow colour, thickly covered with large cinnamon-coloured freckles and tracings of russet. Eye rather small, and open. Stalk three quarters of an inch long. Flesh yellowish, melting, but slightly gritty, juicy, very sugary, with a rich full flavour, and a fine aroma of the rose.

A very first-rate pear, with rich saccharine juice, ripe in December.

Cellite. See Basse Colmar.

Chambers' Large. See Uvedale's St. Germain.

Chambrette. See Virgouleuse.

Chapman's. See Basse Colmar.

Chapman's Passe Colmar. See Basse Colmar.

Charles d'Autriche.— Fruit large, roundish, hand-some, and regularly formed. Skin greenish-yellow, thickly covered with russety specks and thin patches of grey russet; and with a few streaks of faint red on the side next the sun. Eye open, set in a smooth shallow basin. Stalk an inch long, scarcely at all depressed. Flesh tender, half-buttery and melting, juicy, sugary, and richly flavoured.

A dessert pear, ripe in October. This name is by the French sometimes applied to Napoleon, but erroneously.

Charles Van Hooghten.—Fruit large, roundish-oval, even in its outline. Skin of a uniform straw colour, considerably covered with large russety dots, and traces of pale brown russet. Eye wide open. Stalk an inch long, slender. Flesh white, coarse-grained, gritty, half-melting, and not very juicy; sweet, sugary, and rather richly flavoured, and with a musky perfume. Ripe in the end of October and November.

Charlotte de Brouwer.—Fruit large, roundish, inclining to ovate, similar in shape to a large Ne plus Meuris. Skin entirely covered with a coat of light brown russet, with a little of the yellow ground shining through on the shaded side. Eye very small, with short, erect segments. Stalk very short, placed in a knobbed cavity. Flesh white, half-melting, and rather crisp, very juicy, but very astringent. Ripe in October and November.

Charnock (Drummond; Early Charnock; Scot's Cornuck).—Fruit small, pyriform. Skin greenish-yellow in the shade, and entirely covered with dark dull red next the sun. Eye small and open. Stalk fleshy, obliquely inserted. Flesh yellowish, half-buttery, juicy, sweet, and with a high aroma.

A Scotch dessert pear, ripe in September, but soon becomes mealy.

Chartreuse. See Catillac.

Chaulis. See Messire Jean.

Chaumontel (Bezi de Chaumontel; Beurri de Chau-montel; Beurre d'Hiver; Guernsey Chaumontel; Grey Achan; Oxford Chaumontel; Winter Beurre).—Fruit large, oblong, or obtuse-pyriform, irregular and undulating in its outline. Skin rather rough, yellowish-green, covered with numerous russety spots and patches, and with brownish-red next the sun. Eye open, set in a deep, irregular basin. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a deep knobbed cavity. Flesh yellowish-white, buttery and melting, rich, sugary, and highly perfumed.

A dessert pear of high merit, in use from November till March.

De Chypre. See Early Rousselet.

Citron des Carmes (Gros St. Jean; Madeleine; Early Rose Angle).—Fruit below medium size, obovate. Skin smooth and thin, yellowish-green when ripe, and with a faint tinge of brownish-red on the side next the sun. Eye small, and set in a shallow depression. Stalk an inch and a half to two inches long, inserted without depression. Flesh yellowish-white, tender, melting, very juicy and sweet.

A delicious summer pear, ripe in the end of July and beginning of August. It is very apt to crack.

Citron de Septembre. See White Doyenne.

Colmar (D' Auch; Bergamotte Tardive; Colmar Doree's; De Maune).—Fruit above medium size, obtuse-pyriform. Skin smooth, pale green, changing to yellowish-green, strewed with grey russet specks. Eye large and open. Stalk an inch to an inch and a half long, stout and curved. Flesh greenish-white, buttery, melting, tender, and with a rich sugary flavour.

An old and justly-esteemed dessert pear, ripening in succession from November till March. The tree is not an abundant bearer, and requires to be grown against a wall.

Colmar d'Aremberg (Fondante de Jaffard; Karto-fell).—Fruit large, obovate, uneven, and bossed in its outline. Skin lemon coloured, marked with spots and patches of russet. Eye rather small and partially closed, set in a very deep round cavity. Stalk short, and rather slender, deeply inserted. Flesh yellowish-white, coarsegrained, half-melting, juicy, and briskly flavoured.

A fine-looking but very coarse pear, ripe in October.

Colmar Charnay. See Arbre Courbe. Colmar Deschamps. See Beurre d'Aremberg. Colmar Dore. See Passe Colmar. Colmar Dore. See Colmar. Colmar Epineux. See Passe Colmar. Colmar Hardenpont. See Passe Colmar. Colmar d'Hiver. See Glou Morceau. Colmar Jaminette. See Jaminette. Colmar du Lot. See Belle Epine du Mas.

Colmar Neill.—Fruit very large, obovate. Skin smooth and glossy, of a uniform yellow colour, dotted and lined with cinnamon-coloured russet. Eye open, set in a wide and rather deep basin. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small, close cavity. Flesh white, very tender, buttery and juicy, with a high musky flavour. Ripe in October, but soon becomes mealy.

Colmar Nelis. See Winter Nelis.

Colmar Preul. See Passe Colmar.

Colmar Souverain. See Passe Colmar.

Colmas Van Mons.—Fruit medium sized, pyramidal, irregular and uneven in its outline. Skin yellowish-green, much covered with a thick coat of smooth brown russet. Eye small and open, set in a small round basin. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, obliquely inserted in a narrow cavity. Flesh yellowish, buttery and melting, very juicy and sweet, but not highly flavoured. Ripe from November to January.

Comte d'Allos.—Large and pyriform, very much the shape of Marie Louise. Skin pale yellow, with a greenish tinge, covered all over with large russety freckles, and with a coating of russet round the eye. Eye very small and open. Stalk three quarters of an inch long. Flesh yellowish, coarse-grained, and rather gritty, melting, juicy, sweet, and richly flavoured, but soon rots at the core. Ripe in December.

Comte de Flandre.—Fruit very large, pyriform. Skin almost entirely covered with large freckles of cinnamon-coloured russet. Eye open, and rather large, with very short deciduous segments. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, slender. Flesh yellowish, melting, juicy, and sugary, with a rich and agreeably perfumed juice.

A first-rate pear, well worth growing, ripe in November and December.

Comte de Lamy (Beurre Quetelet; Beurre Curtet; Dingler; Marie Louise Nova).— Fruit medium sized, roundish-obovate. Skin yellowish-green, with brownish-red next the sun, and strewed with russety dots. Eye small, set in a slight depression. Stalk an inch long, set in a small cavity. Flesh white, tender, buttery, melting, sugary, and richly flavoured.

A delicious pear, ripe in October. Tree hardy, a good bearer, and succeeds well either as a standard or pyramid.

Comte de Limoges. See Belle Epine du Mas.

Comtesse de Frenol. See Figue de Naples.

Comtesse de Treweren. See Uvedale's St. Germain.

Conseiller de la Cous (Bo de la Cour; Beau de la Cour; Marechal de la Cour).—Fruit below medium size, pyriform. Skin smooth, yellowish-green, covered with dark green dote, and with a patch of russet round the stalk. Eye large and open, set in a deep, wide hollow. Stalk above an inch long, slender, obliquely inserted, without depression, by the side of a fleshy lip. Flesh white, half-melting, juicy, and briskly flavoured, but not particularly rich. Ripe in January. Coule Soif. See Summer Franc Real.

Crasanne (Bergamotte Crasanne; Beurre Plat; Cra-sanne d'Automne).—Fruit large, roundish, and flattened. Skin greenish-yellow, marked all over with veins and dots of grey russet. Eye small and open, set in a deep, round, and narrow basin. Stalk two to two inches and a half long, slender and curved, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh white, buttery, melting, rich and sugary, with a fine perfume.

A fine old pear, ripe during November and December. The tree is not a good bearer, and requires to be grown against a wall.

Crasanne d'Austrasie. See Jaminette.

Crasanne d'Automne. See Crasanne.

Crasanne d' Ete. See Summer Crasanne.

Crawford (Bancrief; Lammas [of the Scotch]).-—-Fruit below medium size, obovate. Skin greenish-yellow, changing to pale yellow, with sometimes a tinge of brownish-red next the sun. Eye open. Stalk an inch long. Flesh white, buttery, juicy, sweet, and with a husky flavour. Ripe in the middle of August.

Croft Castle.— Fruit medium sized, oval. Skin greenish-yellow, covered with large brown dots. Eye large and open, with long recurved segments. Stalk an inch and a half long, slender and curved. Flesh very juicy, sweet, and perfumed. Ripe in October.

The tree is a most abundant and regular bearer, succeeds well as a standard, and is well adapted for orchard culture.

Cuiellette. See Jargonelle.

Cure. See Vicar of Winkfield.

Cypress. See Early Rousselet.