Saffran d'Automne. See Spanish Bon Chretien. SafFran d'Ete. See Summer Bon Chretien.

St. Denis.—Fruit small, turbinate, and uneven in its outline. Skin pale yellow, with a crimson cheek, and thickly dotted with crimson dots. Eye open, set in a shallow basin. Stalk an inch and a half long, not depressed. Flesh, half-melting, very juicy and sweet, with a fine aroma.

A nice early pear. Ripe in August and September.

St. Germain (Arteloire; Inconnue la Fare; Lafare; St. Germain Gris; St. Germain d'Hiver; St. Germain Jaune; St. Germain Vert).—Fruit large, oblong-obovate, rather irregular in its outline. Skin pale greenish-yellow, thickly covered with small brownish-grey dots and sometimes tracings of russet. Eye open, set in a narrow, uneven depression. Stalk an inch long, curved, and in-serted without depression. Flesh white, very juicy, buttery and melting, with a sprightly refreshing sugary and perfumed flavour.

A fine old dessert pear, in use from November till January. The tree requires to be grown against a wall.

St. Germain d'Ete. See Summer St. Germain.

St. Germain Gris. See St. Germain.

St. Germain d'Hiver. See St. Germain.

St. Germain Jaune. See St. Germain.

St. Germain de Martin. See Summer St. Germain.

St. Germain Vert. See St. Germain.

St. Ghislain.—Fruit medium size, obtuse-pyriform or turbinate. Skin smooth, clear yellow, with a greenish tinge, and with a blush of red next the sun. Eye open, slightly depressed. Stalk an inch to an inch and a half long, inserted without depression. Flesh white, very juicy, buttery and melting, rich, sugary, and vinous. An excellent pear. Ripe in September.

St. Jean. See Amire Joannet.

St. Lambert. See Jargonelle.

St. Lezin.—Fruit very large, pyriform. Skin of a dull greenish-yellow colour, covered with flakes of russet. Eye open, set in a deep furrowed basin. Stalk two inches long, not depressed. Flesh firm, crisp, juicy, and sweet.

A stewing pear, in use during September and October.

St. Marc. See Urbaniste. St. Martial. See Angilique de Bordeaux. St. Martin. See Winter Bon Chretien. St. Michel. See White Doyenne.

St. Michel Archange.— Fruit above medium size, obovate. Skin smooth and shining, of a golden-yellow colour, speckled with crimson on the shaded side, and with a bright crimson cheek on the side next the sun. Eye small and closed, set in a narrow depression. Stalk half an inch to an inch long, not depressed. Flesh yellowish-white, tender, melting and juicy, with a sugary juice, and a very agreeable perfume.

A very excellent and beautiful pear, covered with crimson dots like Forelle. Ripe in the end of September.

St. Michel Dore. See Bed Doyenne.

St. Michel Gris. See Bed Doyenne.

St. Nicholas. See Duchesse d' Orleans.

St. Samson. See Jargonelle.

Scotch Bergamot. See Hampden's Bergamot.

Scot's Cornuck. See Charnock.

Seckle (New York Red-cheek; Shakespear; Sicker). —Fruit small, obovate. Skin yellowish-brown on the shaded side, and reddish-brovrn next the sun. Eye small and open, not depressed. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a narrow depression. Flesh buttery, melting, and very juicy, very sweet and rich, with a powerful aroma.

A most delicious pear. Ripe in October. The tree is an abundant bearer, and very hardy; but does not succeed well on the quince.

Seigneur. See Fondante d' Automne.

Seigneur. See White Doyenne.

Seigneur d'Esperen. See Fondante d' Automne.

Seigneur d'Hiver. See Easter Beurre.

Sept en Gueule. See Petit Muscat.

Serrurieur d'Automne. See Urbaniste.

Seutin.—Fruit medium sized, oval. Skin yellowish, covered with flakes and dots of russet. Eye prominent and open. Stalk an inch and a half long. Flesh half-melting, coarse-grained, pretty juicy and sweet. Ripe in December and January.

Shakespear. See Seckle.

Shobden Court.—Fruit below medium size, oblate, even in its outline. Skin deep, rich yellow, with a blush of red next the sun, and covered with rough russety dots. Eye very small, almost wanting, set in a small, round, rather deep basin. Stalk very long and slender, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh white, coarse-grained, juicy, briskly acid and sweet, but not highly flavoured. Ripe in January and February.

Short's St. Germain. See Summer St. Germain.

Sicker. See Seckle.

Sieulle {Bergamotte Sieulle; Beurre Sieulle; Doyenne Sieulle).—Fruit medium sized, roundish-turbinate. Skin smooth, pale yellow, thickly covered with russet dots, and sometimes with a tinge of red next the sun. Eye open, set in a shallow basin. Stalk an inch long, set in a small cavity. Flesh coarse-grained, buttery, and very juicy, rich, sugary, vinous, and aromatic. Ripe in October and November.

Simon Bouvier.—Fruit below medium size, obtuse-pyriform. Skin smooth, bright green, becoming yellowish as it ripens, and dotted and mottled with brown russet. Eye small, placed in a slight depression. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, slightly curved, and inserted without depression. Flesh white, tender, and melting, rich, sugary, and finely perfumed. Ripe in September.

Small Winter Beurre. See Bezi de Caissoy.

Snow. See White Doyenne.

Soldat Esperen.—Fruit large, obovate. Skin pale lemon-yellow, marked here and there with tracings of russet, and considerably covered with minute dots. Eye large, slightly closed, and placed in a shallow depression. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a narrow cavity. Flesh yellowish-white, buttery, melting, and very juicy, rich and sugary, having somewhat of the flavour of the Autumn Bergamot.

A very excellent pear. Ripe in November.

Souveraine. See Passe Colmar.

Spanish Bon Chretien (Gratioli d'Automne; Saffran d'Automne; Spanish Warden).— Fruit large, pyriform. Skin greenish-yellow, covered with cinnamon-coloured russet, and with a deep lively red colour next the sun. Eye open, set in a depression. Stalk an inch and a half long, slender, inserted without depression. Flesh white, fine-grained and crisp, with a brisk flavour, and fine musky aroma.

A fine stewing pear, in use from November till March.

Spanish Warden. See Spanish Bon Chretien.

De Spoelberg.—Fruit about medium size, somewhat turbinate and uneven in its outline, being considerably ribbed and undulating. Skin smooth, pale straw coloured, sprinkled with green dots and patches of russet. Eye large, half open, and prominently set. Stalk an inch and a quarter long, inserted without depression. Flesh yellowish, buttery, not very juicy, sweet, slightly musky, and richly flavoured. Ripe in November.

Spring Beurre. See Verulam.

Staunton. See Gansel's Bergamot.

Sucree Vert (Green Sugar).—Fruit medium sized, roundish-turbinate. Skin pale yellowish-green, covered with numerous green and grey dots, and a few tracings of russet. Eye small and open, set in a wide and shallow basin. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellowish-white, melting and very juicy, sugary and perfumed. Ripe in October.

Suffolk Thorn.—Fruit medium sized, roundish-turbi-nate. Skin pale lemon-yellow, covered with numerous small dots and irregular patches of pale ashy-grey russet, which are most numerous on the side next the sun. Eye very small and open, set in a deep basin. Stalk short and stout, not deeply inserted. Flesh yellowish-white, exceedingly melting, buttery, and juicy, with a rich, sugary juice exactly similar in flavour to Gansel's Bergamot.

A most delicious pear. Ripe in October. The tree is quite hardy, and an excellent bearer, forming a hand-some pyramid on the pear stock.

Summer Archduke (Amire Roux; Archduke d'Ete; Brown Admiral; Grosse Ognonet; Ognonet; Ognonet Musque).—Fruit medium sized, turbinate. Skin smooth and shining, yellowish-green, covered with dark brownish-red next the sun. Eye open, set in a shallow depression. Stalk an inch long, stout, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh whitish, rather gritty, juicy, and sweet. Ripe in the beginning of August.

The Summer Rose is also called Ognonet.

Summer Bell. See Windsor.

Summer Bon Chretien (Florence d'Ete; Gratioli; Gratioli di Roma; Saffran d'Ete).—Fruit large, pyri-form, very irregular and bossed in its outline. Skin yellow, with a tinge of pale red next the sun, and strewed with green specks. Eye small, set in an uneven, shallow basin. Stalk two inches and a half long, curved, and obliquely inserted in a knobbed cavity. Flesh yellow, crisp, juicy, sweet, and pleasantly flavoured. Ripe in September.

Summer Crasanne (Crasanne d' Ete).—Fruit small, roundish, and flattened. Skin pale yellow, entirely covered with cinnamon-coloured russet. Eye wide open, set in a shallow basin. Stalk an inch and a half long. Flesh half-melting, very juicy, sweet, and aromatic. Ripe in the end of August and beginning of September.

Summer Doyenne (Doyenne d' Ete; Doyenne deJuillet; Duchesse de Berri d'ete; Roi Jolimont).—Fruit small, roundish-obovate. Skin smooth, of a fine yellow colour, and frequently with a red blush on the side next the sun, and strewed with dots. Eye small and open, set in a shallow plaited basin. Stalk short, not depressed. Flesh white, melting, and very juicy, rich and sugary.

An excellent early pear. Ripe in the end of July, but requires, to be gathered before it becomes yellow, otherwise it soon decays. The tree is hardy, and a good bearer.

Summer Franc Real (Coule Soif; Fin Or d'Ete; Franc Real d'JEte; Great Mouthwater; Gros Mieet d'Ete; Grosse Mouille Bouche).—Fruit medium sized, obovate. Skin smooth, pale yellowish-green, strewed with numerous brown and green dots. Eye small and open, set in a small undulating basin. Stalk short and thick, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh white, fine-grained, buttery and melting, rich and sugary.

An excellent early pear. Ripe in September.

Summer Rose (Epine Rose; Ognonet; Rose; Thorny Rose). — Fruit medium sized, oblate. Skin greenish-yellow on the shaded side, and bright reddish-purple on the side next the sun, strewed with russet dots. Eye open, set in a wide and shallow basin. Stalk an inch and a half long, slender, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh half-melting, tender, juicy, sugary, with a pleasant, refreshing flavour and musky aroma.

A very nice early pear. Ripe in August.

Summer St. Germain (St. Germain d'Ete; St. Ger-main de Martin; Short's St. Germain).—Fruit medium sized, obovate. Skin greenish pale yellow, mottled and speckled with brown russet. Eye open, set in a narrow and slight depression. Stalk an inch and a quarter long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh juicy, slightly gritty and astringent, with a brisk, sweet, and rather pleasant flavour.

A second-rate pear. Ripe in the end of August.

Summer Thorn (Bugiarda; Epine d'Ete Couleur de Rose; Epine d'Ete Vert; Fondante Musque).— Fruit medium sized, pyriform or long pyriform, and rounded at the apex. Skin smooth, and covered with greenish-russet dots, green in the shade, but yellowish next the sun and towards the stalk. Eye small, set in a shallow and plaited basin. Stalk an inch long, curved, and obliquely inserted without any depression. Flesh white, melting, juicy, and of a rich musky flavour.

It is an excellent autumn pear, ripe in September, but does not keep long.

Supreme. See Windsor. Surpasse Reine. See Rameau.

Suzette de Bavay.—Fruit medium sized, turbinate. Skin yellow, covered with numerous large russet dots and traces of russet. Eye open, placed in a shallow, undu-lating basin. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh melting, juicy, sugary, and vinous, with a pleasant perfume. Ripe in January and February.

Swan's Egg. — Fruit medium sized, roundish-ovate. Skin smooth, yellowish-green on the shaded side, and clear brownish-red next the sun, and covered with pale brown russet. Eye small, partially closed, slightly de-pressed. Stalk an inch and a half long, inserted without depression. Flesh tender, very juicy, with a sweet and piquant flavour and musky aroma.

A fine old variety. Ripe in October. The tree is very hardy, and an excellent bearer.

Sweet Summer. See Jargonelle.

Sylvange d'Hiver. See Easter Beurre.