Battle Monument. See Blue Perdrigon.

Becker's Scarlet. See Lombard.

Beekman's Scarlet. See Lombard.

Belgian Purple (Bleu de Belgique).—Fruit medium sized, roundish, marked with a shallow suture, one side of which is a little swollen. Skin deep purple, covered with blue bloom. Stalk about an inch long, inserted in a cavity. Flesh greenish, rather coarse, very juicy, sweet, and rich, slightly adherent to the stone. Shoots smooth. Ripe in the middle of August.

Belle de Septembre (Reina Nova; Gros Rouge de Septembre).—Fruit large, roundish-oval, marked with a shallow suture. Skin thin, violet-red, thickly covered with yellow dots, and a thin blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender, inserted in a shallow cavity. Flesh yellowish-white, firm, juicy, sweet, and aromatic. Shoots downy.

A first-rate plum for cooking or preserving; it furnishes a fine crimson juice or syrup. Ripe in the beginning and middle of October.

Black Damask. See Morocco.

Black Morocco. See Morocco.

Black Perdrigon. See Blue Gage.

Bleeker's Gage. See Bleeker's Yellow Gage.

Bleeker's Scarlet. See Lombard.

Bleeker's Yellow Gage (Bleeker's Gage; German Gage).—Fruit medium sized, roundish-oval, marked with a faint suture. Skin yellow, containing numerous imbedded white specks, and covered with thin white bloom. Stalk downy, an inch and a quarter long, not depressed. Flesh yellow, rich, and sweet, separating freely from the stone. Shoots downy. Ripe in the middle of September.

Bleu de Belgique. See Belgian Purple.

Blue Gage (Azure Hative; Black Perdrigon; Cooper's Blue Gage).—Fruit of medium size, quite round. Skin dark purple, covered with a blue bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long. Flesh yellowish-green, juicy, briskly and somewhat richly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A second-rate plum. Ripe in the beginning of August.

Blue Imperatrice (Imperatrice; Empress). — Fruit medium sized, obovate, tapering considerably towards the stalk, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin deep purple, covered with a thick blue bloom. Stalk about an inch long, not depressed. Flesh greenish-yellow, of a rich sugary flavour, and adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

A first-rate plum either for the dessert or preserving. Ripe in October. The tree requires a wall, and the fruit will hang long on the tree, when it becomes shrivelled and very rich in flavour.

Blue Perdrigon (Brignole Violette; Battle Monu-ment; Perdrigon Violette; Violet Perdrigon).— Fruit medium sized, oval, widest at the apex, flattened on the side marked with the suture, which is shallow. Skin reddish-purple, marked with minute yellow dots, and covered with thick greyish-white bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a small and rather deep cavity. Flesh greenish-yellow, firm, rich, and sugary. Shoots downy.

A good old plum, suitable either for the dessert or preserving. The tree requires to be grown against an east or a south-east wall; the bloom is very tender and susceptible of early spring frosts.

Bolmar. See Washington.

Bolmar's Washington. See Washington.

Bonum Magnum. See White Magnum Bonum

Bradford Gage. See Green Gage.

Bricette. See Mirabelle Tardive.

Brignole. See White Perdrigon.

Brignole Violette. See Blue Perdrigon.

Brugnon Green Gage. See Green Gage.

Bullace. See White Bullace.

Bury Seedling. See Coe's Golden Drop.