Caledonian. See Goliath.

De Catalogue. See White Primordian.

Catalonian. See White Primordian.

Cerisette Blanche. See White Primordian.

Chapman's Prince of Wales. See Prince of Wales.

Cherry (Early Scarlet; Miser Plum; Myrobalan; Virginian Cherry).—Fruit medium sized, cordate, somewhat flattened at the stalk, and terminated at the apex by a small nipple, which bears upon it the remnant of the style like a small bristle. Skin very thick and acrid pale red, and marked with small greyish-white dots. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, slender, and inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellow, sweet, juicy, and sub-acid, adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

More ornamental than useful in the dessert, but is good when baked, or in tarts. Ripe in the beginning or middle of August.

Cheston (Dennie; Diapree Violette; Friars).—Fruit medium sized, oval, and rather widest at the stalk; suture scarcely discernable. Skin purple, thickly covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender, and not depressed. Flesh deep yellow, firm, brisk, and with a sweet, agreeable flavour, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A dessert or preserving plum. Ripe in the beginning and middle of August.

De Chypre. See Damas Musque.

Coe's. See Coe's Golden Drop.

Coe's Golden Drop (Bury Seedling; Coe's; Coe's Imperial; Fair's Golden Drop; Golden Drop; Golden Gage).—Fruit very large, oval, with a short neck at the stalk, and marked with a deep suture, which extends the whole length of the fruit. Skin pale yellow, marked with a number of dark red spots. Stalk about an inch long, stout, and not depressed. Flesh yellow, rich, sugary, and delicious, adhering closely to the stone. Shoots smooth.

One of the finest plums, and adapted either for the dessert or preserving. It ripens in the end of September. It is much improved by being grown against a wall.

Coe's Imperial. See Coe's Golden Drop.

Coe's Late Bed (St. Martin; St. Martin Rouge).— Fruit medium sized, round, marked on one side with a deep suture. Skin bright purple, covered with a thin blue bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, not depressed. Flesh yellowish, firm and juicy, with a sweet and sprightly flavour, and separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

As a late plum, ripening in the end of October, and hanging for a month or six weeks later, this is a valuable variety.

Columbia (Columbia Gage).—Fruit very large, almost round. Skin deep reddish-purple, dotted with yellowish dots, and thickly covered with blue bloom. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small, narrow cavity. Flesh orange, with a rich, sugary, and delicious flavour, sepa-rating from the stone. Shoots downy. Ripe in the middle of September.

Columbia Gage. See Columbia.

Cooper's Blue Gage. See Blue Gage.

Cooper's Large (Cooper's Large American; Coopers Large Red; La Delicieuse).—Fruit above medium size, oval, considerably enlarged on one side of the suture, which is broad and shallow. Skin pale yellow on the shaded side, and dark purple on the side next the sun, covered with numerous brown dots. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellowish-green, juicy, with a rich and delicious flavour, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth. Ripe in the end of September and beginning of October.

Corse's Admiral.—Fruit large, the size of Bed Magnum Bonum; oval, considerably swollen on one side of the suture, which is deep and well defined. Skin light purple, dotted with yellow dots, and covered with pale lilac bloom. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh greenish-yellow, brisk and juicy, pleasantly flavoured, and adhering closely to the stone. Shoots downy.

A preserving plum. Ripe in the end of September.

Corse's Nota Bene. — Fruit large, round. Skin brownish-purple, with somewhat of a greenish tinge on the shaded side, and thickly covered with pale blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a small round cavity. Flesh greenish, firm and juicy, with a rich, sugary flavour, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A dessert plum. Ripe in the middle and end of September.