Damas Blanc. See White Damask.

Damas Blanc Gros. See White Damask.

Damas Blanc Hatif Gros. See White Damask.

Damas Dronet.—Fruit small, oval, and without any apparent suture. Skin bright green, changing to yellowish as it ripens, covered with a very thin light bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender, inserted in a narrow and rather deep cavity. Flesh greenish, transparent, firm, very sugary, and separating freely from the stone. Shoots smooth. A dessert plum. Ripe in the end of August.

Damas d'Italie. See Italian Damask.

Damas de Mangeron (Mangeron).— Fruit above medium size, round, and inclining to oblate, without any apparent suture. Skin adhering to the flesh, lively purple, strewed with minute yellowish dots, and thickly covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh greenish-yellow, firm, not very juicy, but sugary, and separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A baking or preserving plum. Ripe in the beginning and middle of September.

Damas Musque (De Chypre; Prune de Malthe).— Fruit small, roundish, flattened at both ends, and marked with a deep suture. Skin deep purple or nearly black, thickly covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellow, firm, very juicy, with a rich and musky flavour, and separating from the stone. Shoots slightly downy.

A dessert or preserving plum. Ripe in the end of August and beginning of September.

Damas de Provence (Damas de Provence Hatif).— Fruit above medium size, roundish, and marked on one side with a deep suture. Skin reddish-purple, covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellowish-green, sweet and pleasantly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots slightly downy.

A baking plum. Ripe in the end of July and beginning of August.

Damas de Septembre (Prune de Vacance).— Fruit small, oval, marked on one side with a distinct suture. Skin brownish-purple, thickly covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender, inserted in a narrow and rather deep cavity. Flesh yellow, firm, rich, and agreeably flavoured when well ripened, and separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A dessert or preserving plum. Ripe in the end of September.

Damas de Tours. See Precoce de Tours.

Damas Vert. See Green Gage.

Damaseen. See Prune Damson.

Dame Aubert. See White Magnum Bonum.

Dame Aubert Blanche. See White Magnum Bonum.

Dame Aubert Violette. See Red Magnum Bonum.

Damson (Common Damson; Round Damson).— Fruit very small, roundish-ovate. Skin deep dark purple or black, covered with thin bloom. Flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, very acid, and rather austere till highly ripened, and separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A well-known preserving plum. Ripe in the end of September.

Dauphine. See Green Gage.

La Delicieuse. See Cooper's Large.

Dennie. See Cheston.

Denniston's Superb. — Fruit above medium size, round, and a little flattened, marked with a distinct suture, which extends quite round the fruit. Skin pale yellowish-green, marked with a few purple thin blotches and dots, and covered with bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellow, firm, not very juicy, but rich, sugary, and vinous, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A first-rate dessert plum. Ripe in the middle of August.

Diamond.—Fruit very large, oval, marked on one side with a distinct suture, which is deepest towards the stalk. Skin dark purple, approaching to black, and covered with pale blue bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a narrow and deep cavity. Flesh deep yellow, coarse in texture, juicy, and with a brisk agreeable acid flavour; it separates with difficulty from the stone. Shoots downy.

One of the best preserving or cooking plums. Ripe in the middle of September.

Diaper. See Diapree Rouge.

Diapree Rouge (Diaper; Imperial Diadem; Mimms; Red Diaper; Roche Corbon).— Fruit large, obovate. Skin pale red, thickly covered with brown dots, so much so as to make it appear of a dull colour, and covered with thin blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a slight cavity. Flesh greenish-yellow, firm, and fine-grained, separating, but not freely, from the stone, juicy, and of a rich, sugary flavour. Shoots downy.

A good plum for preserving, or the dessert. Ripe in the middle of September.

Diapree Violette. See Cheston.

Downton Imperatrice.—Fruit medium sized, oval, narrowing a little towards the stalk, and slightly marked with a suture on one side. Skin thin and tender, pale yellow. Flesh yellow, separating from the stone, juicy and melting, with a sweet and agreeable subacid flavour. Shoots smooth.

An excellent preserving plum, but only second-rate for the dessert. Ripe in October.

Drap d'Or (Cloth of Gold; Mirabelle Double; Mira-belle Grosse; Yellow Perdrigon).—Fruit below medium size, round, indented at the apex, and marked on one side by a distinct but very shallow suture. Skin tender, fine bright yellow, marked with numerous crimson spots, and covered with thin white bloom. Stalk slender, half an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellow, melting, with a rich, sugary flavour, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A good dessert plum. Ripe in the middle of August.

Dunmore.—Fruit medium sized, oval. Skin thick, greenish-yellow, becoming of a bright golden yellow when ripe. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellow, tender, juicy, sweet, and richly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

An excellent dessert plum. Ripe in the end of September and beginning of October.