Early Damask. See Morocco.

Early Favorite (Rivers' Early Favorite; Rivers' No. 1).—Fruit rather below medium size, roundish-oval, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin deep dark purple, almost black, marked with russet dots, and covered with thin bloom. Flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet, and of excellent flavour, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

An excellent early plum, raised by Mr. Rivers, of Sawbridgeworth, from Precoce de Tours. It ripens in the end of July; and is deserving of a wall, when it will ripen in the middle of the month.

Early Morocco. See Morocco.

Early Orleans (Grimwood Early Orleans; Hampton Court; Monsieur Hatif; Monsieur Hatif de Montmo-rency; New Orleans; Wilmot's Early Orleans; Wilmot's Orleans).—Fruit medium sized, round, flattened at the apex, and marked with a suture, which extends the whole length of one side. Skin deep purple, mottled with darker colour, and covered with thin blue bloom. Stalk slender, about half an inch long, inserted in a rather deep cavity. Flesh yellowish-green, tender, of a rather rich flavour, and separating freely from the stone. Shoots downy.

A second-rate dessert plum, but excellent for culinary purposes. Ripe in the beginning and middle of August.

Early Prolific (Rivers' Early Prolific; Rivers' No 2).—Fruit medium sized, roundish-oval. Skin deep purple, covered with thin bloom. Stalk half an inch, long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellowish, juicy, sweet, with a pleasant brisk acidity, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A valuable early plum, ripening in the end of July. The tree is great bearer, and very hardy, rarely ever missing a crop. It was raised by Mr. Rivers, of Saw-bridgeworth, from Precoce de Tours.

Early Royal. See Royale Hative.

Early Russian. See Quetsche.

Early Scarlet. See Cherry.

Early Yellow. See White Primordian.

Egg Plum. See White Magnum Bonum.

Emerald Drop.—Fruit medium sized, oval, marked with a deep suture, which is higher on one side than the other. Skin pale yellowish-green. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a very shallow cavity. Flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet, and of good flavour, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

Ripe in the end of August and beginning of September.

Empress. See Blue Imperatrice. Fair's Golden Drop. See Coe's Golden Drop. Fellemberg. See Italian Quetsche. Florence. See Red Magnum Bonum. Flushing Gage. See Imperial Gage.

Fonthill. See Pond's Seedling. Fotheringay. See Fotheringham.

Fotheringham (Fotheringay; Grove House Purple; Red Fotheringham; Sheen).—Fruit medium sized, obo-yate, with a well-defined suture, which is higher on one side than the other. Skin deep reddish-purple on the side next the sun, and bright red where shaded, covered with thin blue bloom. Stalk an inch long, not deeply inserted. Flesh pale greenish-yellow, not juicy, sugary, with a pleasant subacid flavour, and separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A good dessert plum. Ripe in the middle of August.

Franklin. See Washington. Friar's. See Cheston.

Frost Gage (American Damson; Frost Plum).— Fruit small, roundish-oval, and marked with a distinct suture. Skin deep purple, strewed with russet dots, and covered with a thin bloom. Stalk about three quarters of an inch long. Flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet, and rather richly flavoured, adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

An excellent little plum. Ripe in October. The tree is a great bearer.

Frost Plum. See Frost Gage.