Nectarine (Howell's Large; Jenkins Imperials Peach; Prune Peche).—Fruit large,roundish, and hand-somely formed. Skin purple, covered with fine azure bloom. Stalk half an inch long, stout, inserted in a wide and shallow cavity. Flesh dull greenish-yellow, with a sweet and brisk flavour, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A good plum for preserving and other culinary pur-poses. Ripe in the middle of August. This is quite distinct from the Goliath, which is sometimes called by the same name.

Nelson's Victory (Knevett's Late Orleans).—Fruit medium sized, round, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin deep purple, and covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, set in a shallow cavity. Flesh firm, rather coarse, sweet and briskly flavoured, adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

A culinary plum, Ripe in the middle of September. The tree is a very abundant bearer.

New Orleans. See Early Orleans.

Noire Hative. See Precoce de Tours.

(Euf Rouge. See red Magnum Bonum.

Old Apricot. See Apricot.

Orleans (Anglaise Noire; Monsieur; Monsieur Ordinaire; Prune d' Orleans; Red Damask).—Fruit medium sized, round, somewhat flattened at the ends, and marked with a suture, which is generally higher on one side than the other. Skin tender, dark red, becoming purple when highly ripened, and covered with blue bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a considerable depression. Flesh yellowish, tender, sweet, and briskly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A preserving and culinary plum. Ripe in the middle and end of August.