Parker's Mammoth. See Washington.

Paterson's. See Gisborne's.

Peach.—Fruit large, roundish, inclining to oblate, marked with a shallow suture on one side. Skin bright red, dotted with amber. Flesh tender, melting, juicy, very sweet and luscious, separating freely from the stone. Shoots smooth.

An early dessert plum. Ripe in the beginning of August. It is quite distinct from the Nectarine Plum, which is also known by this name; and was introduced some years ago by Mr. Rivers, of Sawbridgeworth,

Peach. See Nectarine.

Perdrigon Blanc. See White Perdrigon

Perdrigon Rouge. See Red Perdrigon,

Perdrigon Violet. See Blue Perdrigon.

Perdrigon Violet Hatif. — Fruit medium sized, roundish-oval. Skin purple. Flesh rich, juicy, and excellent, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A first-rate dessert plum. Ripe in the middle of August. The tree is very hardy, and an abundant bearer. This is not the same as Perdrigon Hatif and Moyeu de Bourgogne with which it is made synonymous in the Horticultural Society's Catalogue, both of these being yellow plums.

Petite Bricette. See Mirabelle Tardive.

Petite Damas Vert. See Yellow Gage.

Pickett's July. See White Primordian.

Pigeon's Heart. See Queen Mother.

Pond's Purple. See Pond's Seedling.

Pond's Seedling {Fonthill; Pond's Purple).—Fruit very large, oval, widest at the apex and narrowing towards the stalk, marked with a wide suture. Skin fine dark red, thickly strewed with grey dots, and covered with thin bluish bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted without depression. Flesh yellowish, rayed with white, juicy, and briskly flavoured, adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

A valuable culinary plum. Ripe in the beginning and middle of September.

Precoce de Bergthold.—This is a small, roundish-oval plum of a yellow colour, similar in appearance to, but of better flavour than, White Primordian. The flesh is juicy and sweet, separating from the stone. Shoots downy. It is very early, ripening before the White Primordian in the latter end of July.

Precoce de Tours (Damas de Tours; Noire Hative; Prune de Gaillon; Violette de Tours).—Fruit below medium size, oval, sometimes inclining to obovate, and marked with a shallow indistinct suture. Skin deep purple, almost black, thickly covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender, inserted in a very slight depression. Flesh dull yellow, rather juicy and sweet, with a pleasant flavour, and adhering closely to the stone. Shoots downy.

A second-rate dessert plum, but well adapted for culinary use. Ripe in the beginning of August.

Prince Englebert. — Fruit very large, oval, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin of a uniform deep purple, covered with minute russety dots, the whole thickly covered with pale grey bloom. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a rather deep cavity. Flesh yellow, rather firm, sweet, juicy, with a brisk and rich, flavour, and adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

An excellent plum either for the dessert or for culinary purpose, and "delicious when preserved." Ripe in Sep-tember. The tree is a great bearer.

Prince of Wales {Chapman's Prince of Wales).— Fruit above medium size, roundish, inclining to oval, marked with a distinct suture. Skin bright purple, covered with thick azure bloom, and dotted with yellow dots. Stalk short and stout, inserted in a slight cavity. Flesh coarse-grained, yellowish, juicy, and sweet, with a brisk flavour, and separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A dessert plum of second-rate quality, but suitable for all culinary purposes. Ripe in the beginning of Septem-ber. The tree is a very abundant bearer.

Prince's Imperial Gage. See Imperial Gage.

Prune d'Allemagne. See Quetsche.

Prune d'Ast. See d'Agen.

Prune Damson (Damascene; Long Damson; Shrop-shire Damson).—The fruit of this variety is much larger than that of the common Black Damson, and more fleshy. It is generally preferred for preserving, and of all the other Damsons makes the best jam. The flesh adheres to the stone. Shoots downy.

The tree is not such a good bearer as the common Damson. Ripe in the middle of September.

Prune de Gaillon. See Precoce de Tours.

Prune d'Italie. See Italian Quetsche.

Prune de Milan. See Imperiale de Milan,

Prune d'Orleans. See Orleans.

Prune Peche. See Nectarine.

Prune Peche. See Peach.

Prune du Roi. See d'Agen.

Purple Egg. See Red Magnum Bonum.

Purple Gage (Heine Claude Violette; Violet Gage). —Fruit medium sized, round, slightly flattened at the ends, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin fine light purple, dotted with yellow, and covered with pale blue bloom. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh greenish-yellow, firm, with a rich, sugary, and most delicious flavour, and separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A dessert plum of the greatest excellence, and particularly richly flavoured if allowed to hang till it shrivels. Ripe in the beginning of September.