St. Barnabe. See White Primordian.

St. Catherine.—Fruit medium sized, obovate, tapering towards the stalk, and marked with a suture which is deepest at the stalk. Skin pale yellow, dotted with red, and covered with pale bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, slender, and inserted in a narrow cavity Flesh yellow, tender and melting, rich, sugary, and briskly flavoured, adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

A dessert and preserving plum. Ripe in the middle of September.

St. Cloud. See Goliath.

St. Etienne.—Fruit medium sized, roundish-oval, frequently somewhat heart-shaped. Skin thin, greenish-yellow, strewed with red dots and flakes, and sometimes with a red blush on the side next the sun. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a narrow cavity. Flesh yellow, tender, melting and juicy, rich and delicious, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A first-rate dessert plum. Ripe in the beginning and middle of August:

St. Martin. See Coe's Late Bed.

St. Martin Rouge. See Coe's Late Red.

St. Martin's Quetsche.—Fruit medium sized, ovate, or rather heart-shaped. Skin pale yellow, covered with white bloom. Flesh yellowish, sweet, and well-flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A very late plum. Ripe in the middle of October,

St. Maurin. See d'Agen.

Sans Noyau. See Stoneless.

Schuyler Gage. See Green Gage.

Semiana. See Italian Quetsche.

Shailer's White Damson. See White Damson.

Sharp's Emperor. See Victoria. Sheen. See Fotheringham. Shropshire Damson. See Prune Damson. Sir Charles "Worsley's. See Royale.

Smith's Orleans.—Fruit large, oval, or roundish-oval, widest towards the stalk, and marked with a deep suture. Skin reddish-purple, strewed with yellow dots, and covered with thick blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender, inserted in a deep cavity. Flesh deep yellow, firm, juicy, richly briskly flavoured, and perfumed, adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

An excellent plum.Ripe in. the end of August.

Standard of England.—Fruit above medium size, obovate, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin pale red, strewed with yellow dots, and covered with thin bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in. a small cavity. Skin rather firm, juicy, and briskly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A culinary plum. Ripe in the beginning of September.

Steer's Emperor. See Goliath.

Stoneless (Kirke's Stoneless; Sans Noyau).—Fruit small, oval. Skin dark purple, or rather black, covered with blue bloom. Stalk half an inch long. Flesh greenish-yellow, at first harsh and acid, but when highly ripened and when it begins to shrivel it is mellow and agreeable. The kernel is not surrounded by any bony deposit. Shoots downy. Ripe in the beginning of September.

Sucrin Vert. See Green Gage.

Suisse (Monsieur Tardive; Switzer's Plum).—Fruit medium sized, round, slightly depressed at the apex, and marked with a very shallow suture. Skin of a fine dark purple next the sun, but paler on the shaded side, strewed with yellow dots, and covered with blue bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a rather wide cavity. Flesh greenish-yellow, juicy and melting, with a rich, brisk flavour, and adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

A preserving plum. Ripe in the beginning of October.

Sweet Prune. See Quetsche. Switzer's Plum. See Suisse.