Washington {Bolmar; Bolmar's Washington; Franklin; Irving's Bolmar; Parker's Mammoth). — Fruit large, roundish-ovate, with a faint suture on one side. Skin of a fine deep yellow, marked with crimson dots, and covered with grey bloom. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a wide and shallow cavity. Flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet, and pleasantly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A handsome plum, suitable for the dessert, but better adapted for preserving. Ripe in the middle of September.

"Wentworth. See White Magnum Bonum.

White Bullace (Bullace).—Fruit small, round. Skin pale yellowish-white, mottled with red on the side next the sun. Flesh firm, juicy, sweet, and subacid, adhering to the stone. Shoots downy.

A culinary plum. Ripe in October.

White Damask (Damas Blanc; Damas Blanc Gros; Damas Blanc Hatif Gros).—Fruit rather below medium size, roundish, inclining to oval, and swollen on one side of the suture. Skin greenish-yellow, covered with white bloom. Stalk half an inch long, stout. Flesh sweet, pleasantly flavoured, and separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A culinary plum. Ripe in the beginning of September.

White Damson (Shailer's White Damson).— Fruit small, oval. Skin pale yellow, covered with thin white bloom. Stalk half an inch long, slender. Flesh yellow, sweet, and agreeably acid, adhering to the stone. Shoots downy.

A culinary plum. Ripe in the middle and end of September.

White Imperatice (Imperatrice Blanche). — Fruit medium sized, oval. Skin bright yellow, covered with very thin bloom. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a narrow cavity. Flesh firm and transparent, juicy, sweet, and separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A dessert plum, requiring a wall, and ripening in the beginning and middle of September.

White Magnum Bonum (Askew's Golden Egg; Bonum Magnum; Dame Aubert; Dame Aubert Blanche; Egg Plum; Grosse Luisante; Imperiale Blanche; White Mogul; Yellow Magnum Bonum).—Fruit of the largest size, oval, with a rather deep suture extending the whole length of one side. Skin deep yellow, covered with thin white bloom. Stalk an inch long, inserted without depression. Flesh yellow, firm, coarse-grained, with a brisk subacid flavour, and adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

A culinary plum, highly esteemed for preserving. Ripe in the beginning of September.

White Mirabelle. See Mirabelle Petite.

White Mogul. See White Magnum Bonum.

White Perdrigon {Brignole; Maitre Claude; Per-drigon Blanc).—Fruit medium sized, oval, narrowing towards the stalk, with a faint suture on one side. Skin pale yellow, strewed with white dots, and marked with a few red spots next the sun. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, slender, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh tender, juicy, rich, and slightly perfumed, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

An excellent plum for drying and preserving. Ripe in the end of August.

White Primordian (Primordian; Avant Prune Blanche; D'Avoine; De Catalogne; Catalonian; Cerisette Blanche; Early Yellow; Jaune de Catalogue, London Plum; Pickett's July; St. Barnabe).— Fruit small, oval, narrowing towards the stalk, marked with a shallow suture. Skin pale yellow, covered with thin white bloom. Stalk half an inch long, very slender, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh yellow, tender, sweet, and pleasantly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots downy.

A very early plum, but of little merit. Ripe in the end of July.

Wilmot's Early Orleans. See Early Orleans.

Wilmot's Green Gage. See Green Gage.

Wilmot's Late Orleans. See Goliath.

Wilmot's Orleans. See Early Orleans.

Winesour (Rotherham).—Fruit below medium size, oval. Skin dark purple, covered, with, darker purple specks. Stalk half an inch long. Flesh greenish-yellow, agreeably acid, and having red veins near the stone, to which it adheres. Shoots downy.

A very valuable preserving plum. Ripe in the middle of September.

Woolston Black Gage.—Fruit about medium size, round, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin deep purple, almost black, strewed with small dots, and covered with blue bloom. Flesh melting, juicy, sugary, and rich, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A dessert plum of excellent quality. Ripe in the beginning of September.

Yellow Apricot. See Apricot.

Yellow Gage {Gonne's Green Gage; Little Queen Claude; Reine Claude Petite; Petit Damas Vert; White Gage). — Fruit below medium size, round, and marked with a shallow suture. Skin greenish-yellow, thickly covered with white bloom. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a pretty deep cavity. Flesh yellowish-white, firm, rather coarse-grained, but sweet and pleasantly flavoured, separating from the stone. Shoots smooth.

A dessert plum of second-rate quality. Ripe in the beginning and middle of September.

Yellow Imperatrice (Altesse Blanche; Monsieur a Fruits Jaune).—Fruit large, roundish-oval, marked with a suture, which is deep at the apex and becomes shallow towards the stalk. Skin deep golden yellow, with a few streaks of red about the stalk, which is half an inch long. Flesh yellow, juicy and melting, sugary and richly flavoured, and adhering to the stone. Shoots smooth.

An excellent dessert plum. Ripe in the middle of August.

Yellow Magnum Bonum. See White Magnum Bonum.

Yellow Perdrigon. See Drap d'Or.

Zwetsche. See Quetsche.