Reinette Blanche D'Espagne (Josephine; Belle Josephine; Reinette d'Espagne; De Rateau; Concombre Ancien; American Fall Pippin; Camuesar; White Spanish Reinette)

Fruit, very large, three inches and a half wide, and three inches and three-quarters high; oblato-oblong, angular on the sides, and uneven at the crown, where it is nearly as broad as at the base. Skin, smooth and unctuous to the feel, yellowish green in the shade, but orange tinged with brownish red next the sun, and strewed with dark dots. Eye, large and open, set in a deep, angular, and irregular basin. Stamens, marginal; tube, conical. Stalk, half an inch long, inserted in a narrow and even cavity. Flesh, yellowish white, tender, juicy, and sweet. Cells, open, obovate.

An apple of first-rate quality, suitable for the dessert, but particularly so for all culinary purposes; it is in use from December to April.

The tree is healthy and vigorous, and an excellent bearer. It requires a dry, warm, and loamy soil.

Reinette Carpentin

Fruit, small, two inches and a quarter wide, and two inches high; roundish, or rather oblato-oblong. Skin, yellowish green on the shaded side, but striped, and washed with dark glossy red, on the side next the sun, and so much covered with a thick cinnamon-coloured russet that the ground colours are sometimes only partially visible. Eye, set in a wide, saucer-like basin, which is considerably depressed. Stalk, an inch long, thin, and inserted in a round and deep cavity. Flesh, yellowish white, delicate, tender, and juicy, with a brisk, vinous, and peculiar aromatic flavour, slightly resembling anise.

A first-rate dessert apple; in use from December to April.

The tree is a free grower, with long slender shoots, and when a little aged is a very abundant bearer.

Reinette d'Allemagne. See Borsdörfer.

Reinette De Breda

Fruit, medium sized, two inches and three-quarters wide, and two and a quarter high; roundish and compressed. Skin, at first pale yellow, but changing as it ripens to fine deep golden yellow, and covered with numerous russety streaks and dots, and with a tinge of red and fine crimson dots on the side exposed to the sun. Eye, set in a wide and plaited basin. Stalk, half an inch long, inserted in a russety cavity. Flesh, yellowish white, firm, and crisp, but tender and juicy, with a rich vinous and aromatic flavour.

A dessert apple of first-rate quality; in use from December to March.

This is the Reinette d'Aizerna of the Horticultural Society's Catalogue, and may be the Nelguin of Knoop; but it is certainly not the Reinette d'Aizerna of Knoop.

Reinette De Canada (Portugal; St. Helena Russet; Canada Reinette)

Fruit, large, three inches and a half wide, and three inches deep; oblato-conical, with prominent ribs originating at the eye, and diminishing as they extend downwards towards the stalk. Skin, greenish yellow, with a tinge of brown on the side next the sun, covered with numerous brown russety dots, and reticulations of russet. Eye, large, open or closed, with short segments, and set in a rather deep and plaited basin. Stamens, basal; tube, conical. Stalk, about an inch long, slender, inserted in a deep, wide, and generally smooth cavity. Flesh, yellowish white, firm, juicy, brisk, and highly flavoured. Cells, obovate; axile, slit.

An apple of first-rate quality, either for culinary or dessert use; it is in season from November to April.

The tree is a strong and vigorous grower, and attains a large size; it is also an excellent bearer. The finest fruit are produced from dwarf trees.

Reinette de Canada Grise. See Royal Russet. Reinette de Canada Plat. See Royal Russet. Reinette de Caux. See Dutch Miynonne. Reinette d'Espagne. See Reinette Blanche d'Espagne. Reinette de Misnie. See Borsdörfer.