Spice Apple

Fruit, medium sized, two inches and a half broad, and two and a quarter high; roundish, but narrowing towards the eye. Skin, deep yellow, marked with broad streaks of crimson on the side next the sun. Eye, open, with long, broad, reflexed, downy segments, set in a narrow, shallow, and plaited basin. Stalk, short, inserted in a round cavity, which is lined with russet. Flesh, yellow, firm, crisp, brisk, and perfumed.

A good second-rate dessert apple; in use from November to February.

It is not the Spice Apple of the Horticultural Society's Catalogue, but one which was cultivated by Kirke, of Brompton, under that name, and so described by Diel. - See Aromatic Russet.

Spitzemberg

Fruit, medium sized, two inches and a half broad, and two inches high; roundish, flattened at the base, and narrowing a little towards the eye. Skin, deep yellow, with an orange tinge on the side exposed to the sun, and strewed with large stelloid russety specks. Eye, partially open, with long, broad, and erect segments, set in a narrow and shallow basin. Stalk, short and stout, inserted in a small narrow cavity. Flesh, tender, juicy, sweet, and pleasantly flavoured.

An apple of second-rate quality; in use from November to Christmas.

This is the Spitzemberg of the German nurseries.

Spreading Norman

Fruit, small, an inch and three-quarters wide, and two inches high; conical, even and regular in its outline. Skin, smooth and shining, of a clear lemon-yellow on the shaded side, and with a bright red cheek on the side next the sun; the surface strewed with russet dots. Eye, closed, with erect convergent segments, set in a narrow round basin. Stamens, median; tube, funnel-shaped. Stalk, short, inserted in a shallow cavity, surrounded with brown russet, and with a fleshy swelling on one side of it. Flesh, soft, not very juicy, and with a bitter-sweet flavour. Cells, obovate; axile, quite closed.

A Herefordshire cider apple.

Spring Ribston. See D'Arcy Spice.

Springrove Codlin

Fruit, above medium size, three inches wide at the base, and two inches and three-quarters high; conical, and slightly angular on the sides. Skin, pale greenish yellow, tinged with orange on the side exposed to the sun. Eye, closed, with broad connivent segments, and set in a narrow plaited basin. Stamens, marginal; tube, conical or funnel-shaped. Stalk, short, inserted in a rather deep cavity. Flesh, greenish yellow, tender, juicy, sugary, brisk, and slightly perfumed. Cells, roundish obovate; abaxile.

A first-rate culinary apple. It may be used for tarts as soon as the fruit are the size of a walnut, and continues in use up to the beginning of October.

It was raised by T. A. Knight, and named after Springrove, the seat of Sir Joseph Banks, near Hounslow, Middlesex-

Squire's Pippin

Fruit, about medium size, two inches and a half wide, and two inches high; roundish and flattened, irregular in its outline, having sometimes very prominent, unequal, and obtuse angles on the sides, which terminate in undulations round the eye. Skin, of a fine clear grass-green colour, covered with dull brownish red where exposed to the sun, thinly strewed all over with minute dots. Eye, quite open, like that of Blenheim Pippin, placed in a saucer-like basin. Stamens, marginal; tube, funnel-shaped. Stalk, short and slender, inserted in a round, narrow, and deep cavity, which is lined with rough scaly russet. Flesh, yellowish white, firm and crisp, with a brisk, somewhat sugary flavour, and when kept till spring becomes rich and balsamic. Cells, obovate; axile.

A good culinary apple, and useful also for the dessert; it is in use from Christmas till April or May.

Raised on the property of Mrs. Squires, of Wigtoft, near Sleaford, and has much the appearance of a small Blenheim Pippin, Stagg's Nonpareil. See Early Nonpareil.