Early Red Calville (Calrille Rouge Precoce)

Fruit, below medium size, two inches and a half wide, and two inches and a quarter high; roundish, smooth, and even in outline. Skin, very highly coloured, being of a brilliant crimson all over, and sprinkled with large fawn-coloured russet dots. Eye, half open, with somewhat divergent segments, set in a shallow, narrow, and neat saucer-like basin. Stamens, marginal; tube, deep, funnel-shaped. Stalk, half an inch long, straight, inserted in a shallow cavity. Flesh, tender, pleasantly acid, but not highly flavoured. Cells, obovate; axile, closed.

A very ornamental apple, whose greatest recommendation is the brilliancy of its colour. It is in use in October and November.

Early Red Juneating. See Margaret.

Early Red Margaret. See Margaret.

Early Spice

Fruit, of medium size, two inches and three-quarters wide, and two inches and a quarter high; roundish, and somewhat angular. Skin, smooth, of an uniform pale yellow or straw colour, and thinly strewed with greenish dots. Eye, small and open, with long reflexed segments, and set in a small basin. Stalk, three-quarters of an inch long, deeply inserted in a rather angular cavity, which is thickly lined with russet. Flesh, white, tender, and very juicy, with a pleasant, refreshing, and sub-acid flavour.

An excellent early culinary apple, which is well suited for baking, and is also good as an eating apple. It is ripe in the first week of August, but soon becomes woolly after being gathered.

Early Striped Juneating. See Margaret, Early Summer Pippin. See Drap d' Or.

Early Wax

Fruit, below medium size, two inches wide, and two inches and a half high; oblong, and somewhat ribbed, particularly at the base. Skin, thick and membranous, of an uniform waxen yellow colour. Eye, partially open, with long reflexed segments, and set in a moderately deep basin. Stalk, long and slender, inserted in a deep and angular cavity, from which issue prominent ribs. Flesh, yellowish white, tender and soft, with a sweet and abundant juice.

A dessert apple of ordinary merit, valuable only for its earliness, as it ripens in the first week of August, but does not keep any time.

Easter Pippin. See Winter Greening.

Ecklinville

Fruit, large, three inches and a half wide, and two inches and a half high; roundish and flattened, even in its outline, and slightly angular round the eye. Skin, bright, rather deep lemon colour, with a tinge of green, strewed, but not thickly, with large russet dots, and with a crimson blush on the side exposed to the sun. Eye, large, with closed segments, deeply set in an angular basin. Stamens, median; tube, conical. Stalk, half an inch long, slender, not protruding beyond the flat base of the fruit. Flesh, white, tender, and fine grained, with a brisk acidulous flavour. Cells, ovate; abaxile.

This is a handsome and excellent culinary apple; in use from October to Christmas. The tree is a great bearer.

The tree was raised at Ecklinville, four miles from Portafcrry, and eighteen from Belfast, by a Scotch gardener of the name of Logan, about the beginning of this century, and it is now extensively grown in Ireland and the south of Scotland.